Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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engrossingly
adverb see engrossing
engrossment
noun Date: 1526 1. the act of engrossing 2. the state of being absorbed or occupied ; preoccupation
engulf
transitive verb Date: 1555 1. to flow over and enclose ; overwhelm 2. to take in (food) by or as if by flowing over and enclosing • engulfment noun
engulfment
noun see engulf
enhalo
transitive verb Date: 1842 to surround with or as if with a halo
enhance
transitive verb (enhanced; enhancing) Etymology: Middle English enhauncen, from Anglo-French enhaucer, enhauncer, from Vulgar Latin *inaltiare, from Latin in + altus high — ...
enhanced recovery
noun Date: 1970 the extraction of oil from a nearly exhausted well by methods more costly and complex than waterflooding alone
enhancement
noun see enhance
enhancer
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that enhances 2. a nucleotide sequence that increases the rate of genetic transcription by preferentially increasing the activity of the ...
enharmonic
adjective Etymology: French enharmonique, from Middle French, of a scale employing quarter tones, from Greek enarmonios, from en in + harmonia harmony, scale Date: 1794 of, ...
enharmonically
adverb see enharmonic
Enid
geographical name city N Oklahoma population 47,045
enigma
noun Etymology: Latin aenigma, from Greek ainigmat-, ainigma, from ainissesthai to speak in riddles, from ainos fable Date: 1539 1. an obscure speech or writing 2. ...
enigmatic
also enigmatical adjective Date: 1609 of, relating to, or resembling an enigma ; mysterious Synonyms: see obscure • enigmatically adverb
enigmatical
adjective see enigmatic
enigmatically
adverb see enigmatic
enisle
transitive verb Date: 1612 1. to place apart ; isolate 2. to make an island of
Eniwetok
geographical name island (atoll) W Pacific in the NW Marshalls
enjambement
noun see enjambment
enjambment
also enjambement noun Etymology: French enjambement, from Middle French, encroachment, from enjamber to straddle, encroach on, from en- + jambe leg — more at jamb Date: ...
enjoin
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enjoindre, from Latin injungere, from in- + jungere to join — more at yoke Date: 13th century 1. to direct or ...
enjoy
verb Etymology: Middle English enjoien, from Anglo-French enjoir, enjoier to gladden, enjoy, from en- + joie joy Date: 15th century intransitive verb to have a good time ...
enjoy oneself
phrasal to have a good time
enjoyable
adjective see enjoy
enjoyableness
noun see enjoy
enjoyably
adverb see enjoy
enjoyer
noun see enjoy
enjoyment
noun Date: 1553 1. a. the action or state of enjoying b. possession and use 2. something that gives keen satisfaction
enkephalin
noun Etymology: enkephal- (alteration of encephal-) + -in Date: 1975 either of two pentapeptides with opiate and analgesic activity that occur naturally especially in the ...
enkindle
verb Date: 1542 transitive verb 1. to set (as fuel) on fire 2. to make bright and glowing intransitive verb to take fire ; flame
enl
abbreviation 1. enlarged 2. enlisted
enlace
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enlacer to ensnare, from en- + lace lace Date: 14th century 1. encircle, enfold 2. entwine, interlace
enlacement
noun Date: 1830 1. the process or result of interlacing 2. a pattern of interlacing elements
enlarge
verb (enlarged; enlarging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enlarger, enlargir, from en- + large broad, large Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to make ...
enlargeable
adjective see enlarge
enlargement
noun Date: 1540 1. an act or instance of enlarging ; the state of being enlarged 2. a photographic print larger than the negative that is made by projecting the negative ...
enlarger
noun see enlarge
enlighten
transitive verb (enlightened; enlightening) Date: 1587 1. archaic illuminate 2. a. to furnish knowledge to ; instruct b. to give spiritual insight to
enlightened
adjective Date: 1652 1. freed from ignorance and misinformation 2. based on full comprehension of the problems involved
enlightenment
noun Date: 1654 1. the act or means of enlightening ; the state of being enlightened 2. capitalized a philosophic movement of the 18th century marked by a rejection of ...
enlist
verb Date: 1599 transitive verb 1. a. to secure the support and aid of ; employ in advancing an interest b. to win over ; attract 2. to engage (a person) for ...
enlisted
adjective Date: 1724 of, relating to, or constituting the part of a military or naval force below commissioned or warrant officers
enlisted man
noun Date: 1724 a man or woman in the armed forces ranking below a commissioned or warrant officer; specifically one ranking below a noncommissioned officer or petty officer
enlistee
noun see enlist
enlistment
noun see enlist
enliven
transitive verb Date: 1604 to give life, action, or spirit to ; animate Synonyms: see quicken
enmesh
also immesh transitive verb Date: 1604 to catch or entangle in or as if in meshes • enmeshment noun
enmeshment
noun see enmesh
enmity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English enmite, from Anglo-French enemité, enemisté, from enemi enemy Date: 13th century positive, active, and typically mutual hatred ...
Enna
geographical name commune Italy in central Sicily population 28,296
ennead
noun Etymology: Greek ennead-, enneas, from ennea nine — more at nine Date: 1550 a group of nine
Ennis
geographical name town W Ireland capital of County Clare population 13,746
Enniskillen
or Inniskilling geographical name town SW Northern Ireland in central Fermanagh district
ennoble
transitive verb (ennobled; ennobling) Etymology: Middle English ennobelen, from Middle French ennoblir, from Old French, from en- + noble noble Date: 15th century 1. to make ...
ennoblement
noun see ennoble
Enns
geographical name river 160 miles (257 kilometers) central Austria flowing E & N from Styria into the Danube
ennui
noun Etymology: French, from Old French enui annoyance, from enuier to vex, from Late Latin inodiare to make loathsome — more at annoy Date: 1732 a feeling of weariness ...
Enoch
noun Etymology: Greek Enōch, from Hebrew Ḥănōkh Date: before 12th century an Old Testament patriarch and father of Methuselah
enoki
noun see enoki mushroom
enoki mushroom
noun Etymology: Japanese enoki Date: 1979 a whitish cultivated agaric mushroom (Flammulina velutipes syn. Collybia velutipes) with a long thin stem and a small cap — ...
enokidake
noun Etymology: Japanese enokitake, from enoki Chinese hackberry (Celtis sinensis) + take mushroom Date: circa 1977 enoki mushroom
enol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary en- (from -ene) + -ol Date: 1904 an organic compound that contains a hydroxyl group bonded to a carbon atom having a ...
enolase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary enol + -ase Date: 1937 a crystalline enzyme that is found especially in muscle and yeast and is important in the ...
enolic
adjective see enol
enological
adjective see enology
enologist
noun see enology
enology
also oenology noun Etymology: Greek oinos wine + English -logy — more at wine Date: 1814 a science that deals with wine and wine making • enological also oenological ...
enormity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. an outrageous, improper, vicious, or immoral act 2. the quality or state of being immoderate, monstrous, or outrageous; ...
enormous
adjective Etymology: Latin enormis, from e, ex out of + norma rule Date: 1531 1. a. archaic abnormal, inordinate b. exceedingly wicked ; shocking 2. marked by ...
enormously
adverb see enormous
enormousness
noun see enormous
enosis
noun Etymology: Modern Greek enōsis, from Greek henõsis union, from henoun to unite, from hen-, heis one — more at same Date: 1928 a movement to secure the political ...
enough
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English ynough, from Old English genōg (akin to Old High German ginuog enough), from ge- (perfective prefix) + -nōg; akin to Latin nancisci to ...
enounce
transitive verb (enounced; enouncing) Etymology: French énoncer, from Latin enuntiare to report — more at enunciate Date: 1788 1. to set forth or state (as a proposition) ...
enow
adverb or adjective Etymology: Middle English inow, from Old English genōg Date: before 12th century archaic enough
enplane
also emplane intransitive verb Date: 1941 to board an airplane
enquire
chiefly British variant of inquire
enquiry
chiefly British variant of inquiry
enrage
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French enrager to become mad, from Old French enragier, from en- + rage rage Date: 1575 to fill with rage ; anger
enrapt
adjective Date: 1606 wholly absorbed with rapture
enrapture
transitive verb (enraptured; enrapturing) Date: 1740 to fill with delight
enregister
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French enregistrer, from Old French, from en- + registre register Date: 1523 to put on record ; register
enrich
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enrichir, enricher, from en- + riche rich Date: 14th century to make rich or richer especially by the addition or ...
enricher
noun see enrich
enrichment
noun see enrich
enrobe
transitive verb Date: 1593 1. to cover with or as if with a robe 2. coat 2
enrol
verb see enroll
enroll
also enrol verb (enrolled; enrolling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enrouler, from en- + rolle roll, register Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to ...
enrollee
noun see enroll
enrollment
noun see enroll
enrolment
noun see enroll
enroot
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century establish, implant
ENS
abbreviation ensign
ensample
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ensample, essample, example Date: 13th century archaic example, instance
ensanguine
transitive verb (-guined; -guining) Date: 1667 1. to make bloody 2. crimson
Enschede
geographical name commune E Netherlands in Overijssel near German frontier population 147,199
ensconce
transitive verb (ensconced; ensconcing) Etymology: en- + 2sconce Date: 1594 1. shelter, conceal 2. establish, settle
ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem
foreign term Etymology: Latin with the sword she seeks calm repose under liberty ; by the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty — motto of Massachusetts
ensemble
I. noun Etymology: French, from ensemble together, from Old French, from Latin insimul at the same time, from in- + simul at the same time — more at same Date: 1750 a group ...
Ensenada
geographical name city & port NW Mexico in Baja California on the Pacific SE of Tijuana population 260,905
enserf
transitive verb Date: 1882 to make a serf of ; deprive of liberty and personal rights • enserfment noun
enserfment
noun see enserf
ensheathe
transitive verb Date: 1593 to cover with or as if with a sheath
enshrine
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. to enclose in or as if in a shrine 2. to preserve or cherish as sacred • enshrinement noun
enshrinee
noun Date: 1968 a person inducted into a Hall of Fame
enshrinement
noun see enshrine
enshroud
transitive verb Date: 1583 to cover or enclose with or as if with a shroud
ensiform
adjective Etymology: French ensiforme, from Latin ensis sword + French -forme -form; akin to Sanskrit asi sword Date: 1541 having sharp edges and tapering to a slender point ...
ensign
noun Etymology: Middle English ensigne, sign, token, banner, from Anglo-French enseigne, from Latin insignia insignia, flags Date: 15th century 1. a flag that is flown (as ...
ensilage
noun Etymology: French, from ensiler to ensile, from en- + silo silo, from Spanish Date: 1876 1. the process of preserving fodder by ensiling 2. silage
ensile
transitive verb (ensiled; ensiling) Date: 1883 to prepare and store (fodder) so as to induce conversion to silage
ensky
transitive verb Date: 1603 exalt
enslave
transitive verb Date: 1628 to reduce to or as if to slavery ; subjugate • enslavement noun • enslaver noun
enslavement
noun see enslave
enslaver
noun see enslave
ensnare
transitive verb Date: 1576 to take in or as if in a snare Synonyms: see catch
ensnarl
transitive verb Date: 15th century to involve in a snarl
ensorcel
transitive verb see ensorcell
ensorcell
or ensorcel transitive verb (-celled or -celed; -celling or -celing) Etymology: Middle French ensorceler, alteration of Old French ensorcerer, from en- + -sorcerer, from ...
ensorcellment
noun see ensorcell
ensoul
transitive verb Date: 1605 to endow or imbue with a soul • ensoulment noun
ensoulment
noun see ensoul
ensphere
transitive verb Date: 1612 to enclose in or as if in a sphere
ensue
verb (ensued; ensuing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ensivre (3d singular ensiut), from en- + sivre to follow — more at sue Date: 14th century transitive ...
ensure
transitive verb (ensured; ensuring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ensurer, alteration of assurer — more at assure Date: 1660 to make sure, certain, or safe ; ...
enswathe
transitive verb Date: 1597 to enfold or enclose with or as if with a covering ; swathe
ENT
abbreviation ear, nose, and throat
ent-
or ento- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek entos within; akin to Latin intus within, Greek en in — more at in inner ; within
entablature
noun Etymology: obsolete French, modification of Italian intavolatura, from intavolare to put on a board or table, from in- (from Latin) + tavola board, table, from Latin ...
entail
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English entailen, entaillen, from 1en- + taile, taille limitation — more at tail Date: 14th century 1. to restrict (property) by ...
entailer
noun see entail I
entailment
noun see entail I
entamoeba
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1914 any of a genus (Entamoeba) of amoebas parasitic in vertebrates and including one (E. histolytica) that causes amebic dysentery in humans
entangle
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French entangler — more at tangle Date: 15th century 1. a. to wrap or twist together ; interweave b. ensnare 2. ...
entanglement
noun Date: 1535 1. a. the action of entangling ; the state of being entangled b. something that entangles, confuses, or ensnares 2. the condition of being deeply ...
entangler
noun see entangle
entasis
noun (plural entases) Etymology: Greek, literally, distension, stretching, from enteinen to stretch tight, from en- 2en- + teinein to stretch — more at thin Date: 1664 a ...
Entebbe
geographical name town S Uganda on N shore of Lake Victoria; former capital of Uganda population 41,638
entelechy
noun (plural -chies) Etymology: Late Latin entelechia, from Greek entelecheia, from entelēs complete (from en- 2en- + telos end) + echein to have — more at telos, scheme ...
entente
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, intent, understanding — more at intent Date: 1854 1. an international understanding providing for a common course of action 2. ...
entente cordiale
noun Etymology: French, literally, cordial understanding Date: 1844 1. entente 1 2. a friendly agreement or working relationship
enter
verb (entered; entering) Etymology: Middle English entren, from Anglo-French entrer, from Latin intrare, from intra within; akin to Latin inter between — more at inter- Date: ...
enter into
phrasal 1. to make oneself a party to or in 2. to form or be part of
enter the lists
phrasal to engage in a fight or struggle
enter-
or entero- combining form Etymology: Greek, from enteron — more at inter- intestine
enterable
adjective see enter
enteral
adjective Date: 1903 enteric • enterally adverb
enterally
adverb see enteral
enteric
adjective Date: 1833 1. of, relating to, or affecting the intestines; broadly alimentary 2. being a coating (as of an aspirin tablet) designed to pass through the stomach ...
enteric fever
noun Date: 1862 typhoid fever; also paratyphoid
enteritis
noun (plural enteritides; also enteritises) Date: 1808 1. inflammation of the intestines and especially of the human ileum 2. a disease of domestic animals (as panleukopenia ...
entero-
combining form see enter-
enterobacterial
adjective see enterobacterium
enterobacterium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1951 any of a family (Enterobacteriaceae) of gram-negative straight rod bacteria (as a salmonella, a shigella, or E. coli) that ferment ...
enterobiasis
noun (plural enterobiases) Etymology: New Latin, from Enterobius, genus name (from Greek enter- + bios mode of life) + -iasis Date: circa 1927 infestation with or disease ...
enterochromaffin
adjective Date: circa 1941 of or relating to epithelial cells of the intestinal mucosa that stain especially with chromium salts and usually contain serotonin
enterococcal
adjective see enterococcus
enterococcus
noun (plural enterococci) Etymology: New Latin, genus name Date: 1908 any of a genus (Enterococcus) of gram-positive bacteria that resemble streptococci and were formerly ...
enterocoel
noun see enterocoele
enterocoele
or enterocoel noun Date: 1877 a coelom originating by outgrowth from the archenteron • enterocoelous adjective • enterocoelic adjective
enterocoelic
adjective see enterocoele
enterocoelous
adjective see enterocoele
enterocolitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1857 enteritis affecting both the large and small intestine
enterogastrone
noun Etymology: enter- + gastr- + -one (as in hormone) Date: circa 1930 a hormone that is produced by the duodenal mucosa and has an inhibitory action on gastric motility and ...
enterokinase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1902 an enzyme especially of the duodenal mucosa that activates trypsinogen by converting it to trypsin
enteron
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, intestine — more at inter- Date: circa 1842 the alimentary canal or system — used especially of the embryo
enteropathogenic
adjective Date: 1961 tending to produce disease in the intestinal tract
enteropathy
noun Date: circa 1889 a disease of the intestinal tract
enterostomal
adjective see enterostomy
enterostomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1878 a surgical formation of an opening into the intestine through the abdominal wall • ...
enterotoxigenic
adjective Date: 1946 producing enterotoxin
enterotoxin
noun Date: circa 1928 a toxin that is produced by microorganisms (as some staphylococci) and causes gastrointestinal symptoms (as in some forms of food poisoning or cholera)
enteroviral
adjective see enterovirus
enterovirus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1957 any of a genus (Enterovirus) of picornaviruses (as the poliomyelitis virus) that typically occur in the gastrointestinal tract but may be ...
enterprise
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from entreprendre to undertake, from entre- inter- + prendre to take — more at prize Date: 15th century 1. a project or ...
enterprise zone
noun Date: 1978 an economically depressed area in which business growth is encouraged by the government through tax relief and financial concessions
enterpriser
noun Date: 1523 entrepreneur
enterprising
adjective Date: 1611 marked by an independent energetic spirit and by readiness to act
entertain
verb Etymology: Middle English entertinen, from Middle French entretenir, from entre- inter- + tenir to hold — more at tenable Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
entertainer
noun see entertain
entertaining
adjective Date: 1676 providing entertainment ; diverting • entertainingly adverb
entertainingly
adverb see entertaining
entertainment
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of entertaining 2. a. archaic maintenance, provision b. obsolete employment 3. a. amusement or diversion provided especially by ...
enthalpy
noun Etymology: en- + Greek thalpein to heat Date: circa 1924 the sum of the internal energy of a body or system and the product of its volume multiplied by the pressure
enthral
transitive verb see enthrall
enthrall
or enthral transitive verb (enthralled; enthralling) Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century 1. to hold in or reduce to slavery 2. to hold spellbound ; charm • ...
enthrallment
noun see enthrall
enthrone
transitive verb Date: circa 1593 1. a. to seat in a place associated with a position of authority or influence b. to seat ceremonially on a throne 2. to assign ...
enthronement
noun see enthrone
enthuse
verb (enthused; enthusing) Etymology: back-formation from enthusiasm Date: 1827 transitive verb 1. to make enthusiastic 2. to express with enthusiasm intransitive ...
enthusiasm
noun Etymology: Greek enthousiasmos, from enthousiazein to be inspired, irregular from entheos inspired, from en- + theos god Date: 1603 1. a. belief in special ...
enthusiast
noun Date: 1570 a person filled with enthusiasm: as a. one who is ardently attached to a cause, object, or pursuit b. one who tends to become ardently absorbed in an ...
enthusiastic
adjective Date: 1603 filled with or marked by enthusiasm • enthusiastically adverb
enthusiastically
adverb see enthusiastic
enthymeme
noun Etymology: Latin enthymema, from Greek enthymēma, from enthymeisthai to keep in mind, from en- + thymos mind, soul Date: 1552 a syllogism in which one of the premises ...
entice
transitive verb (enticed; enticing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enticer, from Vulgar Latin *intitiare, from Latin in- + titio firebrand Date: 14th century to ...
enticement
noun see entice
enticingly
adverb see entice
entire
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English enter, entier, entire, from Anglo-French enter, entier, from Latin integer, literally, untouched, from in- + tangere to touch — more at ...
entirely
adverb Date: 14th century 1. to the full or entire extent ; completely 2. to the exclusion of others ; solely
entireness
noun see entire I
entirety
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1548 1. the state of being entire or complete 2. sum total, whole
entitle
transitive verb (entitled; entitling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French entitler, from Late Latin intitulare, from Latin in- + titulus title Date: 14th century 1. ...
entitlement
noun Date: 1942 1. a. the state or condition of being entitled ; right b. a right to benefits specified especially by law or contract 2. a government program providing ...
entity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Medieval Latin entitas, from Latin ent-, ens existing thing, from coined present participle of esse to be — more at is Date: 1596 1. a. ...
ento-
— see ent-
entoderm
noun Date: 1879 endoderm • entodermal adjective
entodermal
adjective see entoderm
entoil
transitive verb Date: 1581 entrap, enmesh
entom
or entomol abbreviation entomological; entomology
entom-
or entomo- combining form Etymology: French, from Greek entomon insect
entomb
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English entoumben, from Middle French entomber, from en- + tombe tomb Date: 1565 1. to deposit in or as if in a tomb ; bury 2. to serve ...
entombment
noun see entomb
entomo-
combining form see entom-
entomofauna
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1951 a fauna of insects ; the insects of an environment or region
entomol
abbreviation see entom
entomological
adjective see entomology
entomologically
adverb see entomology
entomologist
noun see entomology
entomology
noun Etymology: French entomologie, from Greek entomon insect (from neuter of entomos cut up, from en- + temnein to cut) + French -logie -logy — more at tome Date: 1766 a ...
entomophagous
adjective Date: circa 1847 feeding on insects
entomophagy
noun Date: 1975 the practice of eating insects
entomophilous
adjective Date: 1880 normally pollinated by insects — compare zoophilic • entomophily noun
entomophily
noun see entomophilous
entoproct
noun Etymology: ultimately from ent- + Greek prōktos anus Date: 1940 any of a phylum (Entoprocta) of chiefly marine animals that are very similar to bryozoans but lack a ...
entorhinal
adjective Etymology: ent- + -rhinal; from the rhinal sulcus, the furrow within which the entorhinal cortex is located Date: 1968 of, relating to, or being the part of the ...
entourage
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from entourer to surround, from entour around, from en in (from Latin in) + tour circuit — more at turn Date: circa 1834 1. ...
entr'acte
noun Etymology: French, from entre- inter- + acte act Date: circa 1842 1. a dance, piece of music, or interlude performed between two acts of a play 2. the interval between ...
entrails
noun plural Etymology: Middle English entrailles, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin intralia, alteration of Latin interanea, plural of interaneum intestine, from neuter of ...
entrain
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle French entrainer, from en- + trainer to draw, drag — more at train Date: 1568 1. to draw along with or after oneself 2. to draw in ...
entrainer
noun see entrain I
entrainment
noun see entrain I
entrance
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. power or permission to enter ; admission 2. the act of entering 3. the means or place of entry 4. the point at which a voice or instrument ...
entrancement
noun see entrance II
entranceway
noun Date: 1849 entryway
entrant
noun Date: 1635 one that enters; especially one that enters a contest
entrap
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French entraper, from en- + trape trap Date: 1534 1. to catch in or as if in a trap 2. to lure into a compromising statement or act ...
entrapment
noun Date: 1597 1. a. the action or process of entrapping b. the condition of being entrapped 2. the action of luring an individual into committing a crime in order to ...
entreat
verb Etymology: Middle English entreten, from Anglo-French entreter, from en- + treter to treat Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. obsolete a. negotiate b. ...
entreatingly
adverb see entreat
entreatment
noun see entreat
entreaty
noun (plural -treaties) Date: 15th century an act of entreating ; plea
entrechat
noun Etymology: French, modification of Italian (capriola) intrecciata, literally, intertwined caper Date: 1775 a leap in which a ballet dancer repeatedly crosses the legs ...
entrecôte
also entrecote noun Etymology: French entrecôte, from entre- inter- + côte rib, from Latin costa — more at inter-, coast Date: 1841 a steak cut from between the ribs
entrecote
noun see entrecôte
entrée
or entree noun Etymology: French entrée, from Old French — more at entry Date: 1725 1. a. the act or manner of entering ; entrance b. freedom of entry or access 2. ...
entree
noun see entrée
entremets
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: French, from Old French entremes, from entre between + mes food, dish Date: 15th century dishes served in ...
entrench
also intrench verb Date: 1548 transitive verb 1. a. to place within or surround with a trench especially for defense b. to place (oneself) in a strong defensive ...
entrenchment
noun see entrench
entrepôt
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French entrepost, from entreposer to put between, from entre- inter- + poser to pose, put Date: 1758 an intermediary center of trade and ...
entrepreneur
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, from entreprendre to undertake — more at enterprise Date: 1852 one who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or ...
entrepreneurial
adjective see entrepreneur
entrepreneurialism
noun see entrepreneur
entrepreneurially
adverb see entrepreneur
entrepreneurship
noun see entrepreneur
entresol
noun Etymology: French, from Spanish entresuelo, from entre between + suelo ground, floor Date: 1711 mezzanine
entropic
adjective see entropy
entropically
adverb see entropy
entropion
noun Etymology: New Latin, from en- 2en- + ectropion turning out of the eyelid, from Greek ektropion, from ektrepein to turn out, from ex- out + trepein to turn Date: circa ...
entropy
noun (plural -pies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 2en- + Greek tropē change, literally, turn, from trepein to turn Date: 1875 1. a measure of the ...
entrust
also intrust transitive verb Date: 1593 1. to confer a trust on; especially to deliver something in trust to 2. to commit to another with confidence Synonyms: see commit ...
entrustment
noun see entrust
entry
noun (plural entries) Etymology: Middle English entre, from Anglo-French entree, from feminine of entré, past participle of entrer to enter Date: 13th century 1. the right ...
entry word
noun Date: circa 1908 headword

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