Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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entry-level
adjective Date: 1970 of or being at the lowest level of a hierarchy
entryway
noun Date: 1746 a passage for entrance
entwine
verb Date: 1590 transitive verb to twine together or around intransitive verb to become twisted or twined
entwist
transitive verb Date: 1590 entwine
enucleate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin enucleatus, past participle of enucleare, literally, to remove the kernel from, from e- + nucleus kernel — more at nucleus ...
enucleation
noun see enucleate
enumerability
noun see enumerable
enumerable
adjective Date: circa 1889 countable • enumerability noun
enumerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin enumeratus, past participle of enumerare, from e- + numerare to count, from numerus number Date: 1616 1. to ascertain the ...
enumeration
noun see enumerate
enumerative
adjective see enumerate
enumerator
noun Date: 1835 one that enumerates; especially a census taker
enunciable
adjective see enunciate
enunciate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin enuntiatus, past participle of enuntiare to report, declare, from e- + nuntiare to report — more at announce Date: 1623 transitive ...
enunciation
noun see enunciate
enunciator
noun see enunciate
enure
variant of inure
enuresis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek enourein to urinate in, wet the bed, from en- + ourein to urinate — more at urine Date: circa 1800 the involuntary discharge of ...
enuretic
adjective or noun see enuresis
env
abbreviation envelope
envelop
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English envolupen, from Anglo-French envoluper, envoleper, from en- + voluper to wrap Date: 14th century 1. to enclose or enfold completely ...
envelope
noun Date: circa 1714 1. a flat usually paper container (as for a letter) 2. something that envelops ; wrapper 3. a. the outer covering of an aerostat b. the bag ...
envelopment
noun see envelop
envenom
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English envenimen, from Anglo-French envenimer, from en- + venim venom Date: 13th century 1. to make poisonous 2. embitter
envenomate
transitive verb see envenomation
envenomation
noun Date: 1923 an act or instance of poisoning by venom (as of a snake or spider) • envenomate transitive verb
envenomization
noun Date: 1960 envenomation
Enver Paşa
biographical name 1881-1922 Turkish soldier & politician
enviable
adjective Date: 1602 highly desirable • enviableness noun • enviably adverb
enviableness
noun see enviable
enviably
adverb see enviable
envier
noun Date: 15th century one that envies
envious
adjective Date: 13th century 1. feeling or showing envy
enviously
adverb see envious
enviousness
noun see envious
enviro
noun (plural -ros) Date: 1987 environmentalist
environ
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English envirounen, from Anglo-French enviruner, from envirun around, from en in (from Latin in) + virun circle, from virer to turn — more at ...
environment
noun Date: 1827 1. the circumstances, objects, or conditions by which one is surrounded 2. a. the complex of physical, chemical, and biotic factors (as climate, soil, and ...
environmental
adjective see environment
environmentalism
noun Date: circa 1922 1. a theory that views environment rather than heredity as the important factor in the development and especially the cultural and intellectual ...
environmentalist
noun Date: 1916 1. an advocate of environmentalism 2. one concerned about environmental quality especially of the human environment with respect to the control of pollution
environmentally
adverb see environment
environs
noun plural Date: 1665 1. the districts around a city 2. a. environing things ; surroundings b. an adjoining region or space ; vicinity
envisage
transitive verb (-aged; -aging) Etymology: French envisager, from en- + visage face Date: 1660 1. to view or regard in a certain way 2. to have a mental picture of ...
envision
transitive verb Date: 1855 to picture to oneself Synonyms: see think
envoi
or envoy noun Etymology: Middle English envoye, from Middle French envoi, literally, message, from Old French envei, from enveier to send on one's way, from Vulgar Latin ...
envoy
noun Etymology: French envoyé, from past participle of envoyer to send, from Old French enveier Date: 1635 1. a. a minister plenipotentiary accredited to a foreign ...
envoy extraordinary
noun see envoy
envy
I. noun (plural envies) Etymology: Middle English envie, from Anglo-French, from Latin invidia, from invidus envious, from invidēre to look askance at, envy, from in- + vidēre ...
envyingly
adverb see envy II
enwheel
transitive verb Date: 1604 obsolete encircle
enwind
transitive verb (enwound; enwinding) Date: 1631 to wind in or about ; enfold
enwomb
transitive verb Date: 1590 to shut up as if in a womb
enwrap
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to wrap in a covering ; enfold 2. a. envelop b. to preoccupy or absorb mentally ; engross
enwreathe
transitive verb Date: 15th century to encircle with or as if with a wreath ; envelop
enzootic
adjective Etymology: en- + epizootic Date: 1882 of animal diseases peculiar to or constantly present in a locality • enzootic noun
enzymatic
also enzymic adjective Date: 1900 of, relating to, or produced by an enzyme • enzymatically also enzymically adverb
enzymatically
adverb see enzymatic
enzyme
noun Etymology: German Enzym, from Middle Greek enzymos leavened, from Greek en- + zymē leaven — more at juice Date: 1881 any of numerous complex proteins that are ...
enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay
noun Date: 1976 an in vitro method for quantifying an antigen or antibody concentration in which the test material is immobilized on a surface and exposed either to a complex ...
enzymic
adjective see enzymatic
enzymically
adverb see enzymatic
enzymologist
noun see enzymology
enzymology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 a branch of biochemistry that deals with the properties, activity, and significance of enzymes • ...
EO
abbreviation executive order
eo ipso
foreign term Etymology: Latin by that itself ; by that fact alone
eo nomine
Etymology: Latin Date: 1627 by or under that name
eo-
combining form Etymology: Greek ēō- dawn, from ēōs — more at east earliest ; oldest
Eocene
adjective Date: 1831 of, relating to, or being an epoch of the Tertiary between the Paleocene and the Oligocene or the corresponding series of rocks — see geologic time ...
EOE
abbreviation equal opportunity employer
eohippus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from eo- + Greek hippos horse — more at equine Date: circa 1879 any of a genus (Hyracotherium syn. Eohippus) of very small primitive horses from ...
eolian
also aeolian adjective Etymology: Latin Aeolus, Aeolus Date: 1622 borne, deposited, produced, or eroded by the wind
eolith
noun Date: 1895 a very crudely chipped flint
Eolithic
adjective Date: 1890 of or relating to the early period of the Stone Age marked by the use of eoliths
EOM
abbreviation end of month
eon
variant of aeon
Eos
noun Etymology: Greek Ēōs Date: 1574 the Greek goddess of dawn — compare aurora
eosin
also eosine noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek ēōs dawn Date: 1866 1. a red fluorescent dye C20H8Br4O5 obtained by the action of bromine on ...
eosine
noun see eosin
eosinophil
I. adjective Date: circa 1882 eosinophilic 1 II. noun Date: circa 1900 a granulocyte readily stained by eosin that is present at sites of allergic reactions and parasitic ...
eosinophilia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1900 abnormal increase in the number of eosinophils in the blood that is characteristic of allergic states and various parasitic infections
eosinophilic
adjective Date: circa 1900 1. staining readily with eosin 2. of, relating to, or characterized by eosinophilia
EP
abbreviation 1. estimated position 2. European plan 3. extended play
ep-
prefix see epi-
EPA
abbreviation Environmental Protection Agency
epact
noun Etymology: Middle French epacte, from Late Latin epacta, from Greek epaktē, from epagein to bring in, intercalate, from epi- + agein to drive — more at agent Date: ...
Epaminondas
biographical name circa 410-362 B.C. Theban general & statesman
eparchy
noun (plural -chies) Etymology: Greek eparchia province, from eparchos prefect, from epi- + archos ruler — more at arch- Date: 1796 a diocese of an Eastern church
épater le bourgeois
or épater les bourgeois foreign term Etymology: French to shock the middle classes
épater les bourgeois
foreign term see épater le bourgeois
epaulet
also epaulette noun Etymology: French épaulette, diminutive of épaule shoulder, from Old French espalle, from Late Latin spatula shoulder blade, spoon, diminutive of Latin ...
epaulette
noun see epaulet
epauletted
adjective see epaulet
epazote
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl epazōtl Date: 1946 wormseed b; also the fresh or dried pungent-smelling leaves of wormseed used especially in Mexican cooking
épée
noun Etymology: French, from Old French espee, Latin spatha Date: 1889 1. a fencing or dueling sword having a bowl-shaped guard and a rigid blade of triangular section with ...
épéeist
noun Date: 1910 one who fences with an épée
epeirogenic
adjective see epeirogeny
epeirogenically
adverb see epeirogeny
epeirogeny
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Greek ēpeiros mainland, continent + English -geny Date: 1890 the deformation of the earth's crust by which the broader features of relief are ...
Epeiros
geographical name see Epirus
epenthesis
noun (plural epentheses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from epentithenai to insert a letter, from epi- + entithenai to put in, from en- + tithenai to put — more at do ...
epenthetic
adjective see epenthesis
epergne
noun Etymology: probably from French épargne saving Date: 1761 an often ornate tiered centerpiece consisting typically of a frame of wrought metal (as silver or gold) ...
epexegesis
noun (plural epexegeses) Etymology: Greek epexēgēsis, from epi- + exēgēsis exegesis Date: circa 1577 additional explanation or explanatory matter • epexegetical or ...
epexegetic
adjective see epexegesis
epexegetical
adjective see epexegesis
epexegetically
adverb see epexegesis
Eph
or Ephes abbreviation Ephesians
ephah
noun Etymology: Middle English ephi, from Late Latin, from Hebrew ēphāh, from Egyptian 'pt Date: 1611 an ancient Hebrew unit of dry measure equal to 1/10 homer or a little ...
ephebe
noun Etymology: Latin ephebus Date: 1880 ephebus; also a young man ; youth
ephebic
adjective Date: 1865 of, relating to, or characteristic of an ephebe or ephebus
ephebus
noun (plural ephebi) Etymology: Latin, from Greek ephēbos, from epi- + hēbē youth, puberty Date: 1627 a youth of ancient Greece; especially an Athenian 18 or 19 years old ...
ephedra
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, equisetum, from Greek, from ephedros sitting upon, from epi- + hedra seat — more at sit Date: circa 1889 1. any of a ...
ephedrine
noun Etymology: New Latin Ephedra Date: 1889 a crystalline sympathomimetic alkaloid C10H15NO extracted from Chinese ephedras or synthesized and usually used in the form of a ...
ephemera
noun (plural ephemera; also ephemerae or ephemeras) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek ephēmera, neuter plural of ephēmeros Date: 1650 1. something of no lasting significance ...
ephemeral
I. adjective Etymology: Greek ephēmeros lasting a day, daily, from epi- + hēmera day Date: 1576 1. lasting one day only 2. lasting a very short time Synonyms: see ...
ephemerality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1822 1. plural ephemeral things 2. the quality or state of being ephemeral
ephemerally
adverb see ephemeral I
ephemerid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek ephēmeron Date: 1872 mayfly
ephemeris
noun (plural ephemerides) Etymology: Latin, diary, ephemeris, from Greek ephēmeris, from ephēmeros Date: 1508 a tabular statement of the assigned places of a celestial ...
ephemeris time
noun Date: 1950 a uniform measure of time defined by the orbital motions of the planets
Ephes
abbreviation see Eph
Ephesian
adjective or noun see Ephesus
Ephesians
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: short for Epistle to the Ephesians Date: 1549 a letter addressed to early Christians and included as a book in the New ...
Ephesus
geographical name ancient city W Asia Minor in Ionia near Aegean coast; site SSE of Izmir • Ephesian adjective or noun
ephod
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Hebrew ēphōdh Date: 14th century 1. a linen apron worn in ancient Hebrew rites; especially a vestment for the high ...
ephor
noun Etymology: Latin ephorus, from Greek ephoros, from ephoran to oversee, from epi- + horan to see — more at wary Date: 1579 1. one of five ancient Spartan magistrates ...
ephorate
noun see ephor
Ephraim
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew Ephrayim Date: before 12th century a son of Joseph and the traditional eponymous ancestor of one of the tribes of Israel II. geographical name 1. ...
Ephraimite
noun Date: 1568 1. a member of the Hebrew tribe of Ephraim 2. a native or inhabitant of the biblical northern kingdom of Israel
epi-
or ep- prefix Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from epi on, at, besides, after; akin to Old English eofot crime 1. upon ; besides ; attached to ; over ; outer ; after 2. ...
epiblast
noun Date: 1875 the outer layer of the blastoderm ; ectoderm • epiblastic adjective
epiblastic
adjective see epiblast
epibolic
adjective see epiboly
epiboly
noun (plural -lies) Etymology: Greek epibolē addition, from epiballein to throw on, from epi- + ballein to throw — more at devil Date: 1875 the growing of one part about ...
epic
I. adjective Etymology: Latin epicus, from Greek epikos, from epos word, speech, poem — more at voice Date: 1589 1. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an ...
epic simile
noun Date: 1931 an extended simile that is used typically in epic poetry to intensify the heroic stature of the subject
epical
adjective see epic I
epically
adverb see epic I
epicalyx
noun Date: 1870 an involucre resembling the calyx but consisting of a whorl of bracts that is exterior to the calyx or results from the union of the sepal appendages
epicanthic fold
noun Etymology: New Latin epicanthus epicanthic fold, from epi- + canthus canthus Date: 1913 a prolongation of a fold of the skin of the upper eyelid over the inner angle or ...
epicardial
adjective see epicardium
epicardium
noun (plural epicardia) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1865 the inner layer of the pericardium that closely envelops the heart • epicardial adjective
epicarp
noun Etymology: French épicarpe, from épi- epi- + -carpe -carp Date: 1835 exocarp
epicene
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin epicoenus, from Greek epikoinos, from epi- + koinos common — more at co- Date: 15th century 1. of a noun having but one form ...
epicenism
noun see epicene
epicenter
noun Etymology: New Latin epicentrum, from epi- + Latin centrum center Date: 1887 1. the part of the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake — compare ...
epicentral
adjective see epicenter
epichlorohydrin
noun Date: circa 1891 a volatile liquid toxic epoxide C3H5ClO having a chloroform odor and used especially in making epoxy resins and rubbers
epicontinental
adjective Date: 1900 lying upon a continent or a continental shelf
epicotyl
noun Etymology: epi- + cotyledon Date: 1880 the portion of the axis of a plant embryo or seedling above the cotyledonary node
epicritic
adjective Etymology: Greek epikritikos determinative, from epikrinein to decide, from epi- + krinein to judge — more at certain Date: 1905 of, relating to, being, or ...
Epictetian
adjective see Epictetus
Epictetus
biographical name circa A.D. 55-circa 135 Greek Stoic philosopher in Rome • Epictetian adjective
epicure
noun Etymology: Epicurus Date: 1565 1. archaic one devoted to sensual pleasure ; sybarite 2. one with sensitive and discriminating tastes especially in food or wine ...
epicurean
adjective Date: 1586 1. capitalized of or relating to Epicurus or Epicureanism 2. of, relating to, or suited to an epicure
Epicurean
noun Date: 14th century 1. a follower of Epicurus 2. often not capitalized epicure 2
epicureanism
noun Date: circa 1751 1. capitalized a. the philosophy of Epicurus who subscribed to a hedonistic ethics that considered an imperturbable emotional calm the highest good ...
epicurism
noun Date: 1586 the practices or tastes of an epicure or an epicurean
Epicurus
biographical name 341-270 B.C. Greek philosopher
epicuticle
noun Date: 1929 the outermost waxy layer of the arthropod exoskeleton • epicuticular adjective
epicuticular
adjective see epicuticle
epicycle
noun Etymology: Middle English epicicle, from Late Latin epicyclus, from Greek epikyklos, from epi- + kyklos circle — more at wheel Date: 14th century 1. in Ptolemaic ...
epicyclic
adjective see epicycle
epicyclic train
noun Date: 1869 a train (as of gear wheels) designed to have one or more parts travel around the circumference of another fixed or revolving part
epicycloid
noun Date: circa 1755 a curve traced by a point on a circle that rolls on the outside of a fixed circle • epicycloidal adjective
epicycloidal
adjective see epicycloid
Epidamnus
geographical name — see Durres
Epidaurus
geographical name ancient town S Greece in Argolis on Saronic Gulf
epidemic
I. adjective Etymology: French épidémique, from Middle French, from epidemie, noun, epidemic, from Late Latin epidemia, from Greek epidēmia visit, epidemic, from epidēmos ...
epidemical
adjective see epidemic I
epidemically
adverb see epidemic I
epidemicity
noun see epidemic I
epidemiologic
adjective see epidemiology
epidemiological
adjective see epidemiology
epidemiologically
adverb see epidemiology
epidemiologist
noun see epidemiology
epidemiology
noun Etymology: Late Latin epidemia + International Scientific Vocabulary -logy Date: circa 1860 1. a branch of medical science that deals with the incidence, distribution, ...
epidendrum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek epi- + dendron tree — more at dendr- Date: 1791 any of a large genus (Epidendrum) of chiefly epiphytic orchids found especially in ...
epidermal
also epidermic adjective Date: 1816 of, relating to, or arising from the epidermis
epidermal growth factor
noun Date: 1966 a polypeptide hormone that stimulates cell proliferation
epidermic
adjective see epidermal
epidermis
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from epi- + derma skin — more at derm- Date: 1626 1. a. the outer epithelial layer of the external integument of the animal body ...
epidermoid
adjective Date: 1836 resembling epidermis or epidermal cells ; made up of elements like those of epidermis
epidiascope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 1. a projector for images of both opaque objects and transparencies 2. episcope
epididymal
adjective see epididymis
epididymis
noun (plural epididymides) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from epi- + didymos testicle, twin, from dyo two — more at two Date: 1610 a system of ductules emerging ...
epididymitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1852 inflammation of the epididymis
epidote
noun Etymology: French épidote, from Greek epididonai to give in addition, from epi- + didonai to give — more at date Date: 1808 a yellowish-green mineral ...
epidural
I. adjective Date: 1882 situated upon or administered or placed outside the dura mater II. noun Date: 1970 an injection of a local anesthetic into the space outside the ...
epifauna
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1914 benthic fauna living on the substrate (as a hard sea floor) or on other organisms — compare infauna • epifaunal adjective
epifaunal
adjective see epifauna
epigastric
adjective Date: circa 1678 1. lying upon or over the stomach 2. a. of, relating to, supplying, or draining the anterior walls of the abdomen b. of or relating to the ...
epigeal
also epigean or epigeous or epigeic adjective Etymology: Greek epigaios upon the earth, from epi- + gaia earth Date: 1861 1. of a cotyledon forced above ground by elongation ...
epigean
adjective see epigeal
epigeic
adjective see epigeal
epigenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1798 1. development of a plant or animal from an egg or spore through a series of processes in which unorganized cell masses differentiate ...
epigenetic
adjective Date: 1883 1. a. of, relating to, or produced by the chain of developmental processes in epigenesis that lead from genotype to phenotype after the initial action ...
epigenetically
adverb see epigenetic
epigeous
adjective see epigeal
epiglottal
also epiglottic adjective Date: 1926 of, relating to, or produced with the aid of the epiglottis
epiglottic
adjective see epiglottal
epiglottis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek epiglōttis, from epi- + glōttis glottis Date: 15th century a thin plate of flexible cartilage in front of the glottis that folds back ...
epigone
noun Etymology: German, from Latin epigonus successor, from Greek epigonos, from epigignesthai to be born after, from epi- + gignesthai to be born — more at kin Date: 1865 ...
epigonic
adjective see epigone
epigonism
noun see epigone
epigonous
adjective see epigone
epigonus
noun (plural epigoni) Etymology: Latin Date: 1922 epigone — usually used in plural
epigram
noun Etymology: Middle English epigrame, from Latin epigrammat-, epigramma, from Greek, from epigraphein to write on, inscribe, from epi- + graphein to write — more at carve ...
epigrammatic
adjective Date: 1694 1. of, relating to, or resembling an epigram 2. marked by or given to the use of epigrams • epigrammatically adverb
epigrammatically
adverb see epigrammatic
epigrammatism
noun see epigram
epigrammatist
noun see epigram
epigrammatize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1691 transitive verb 1. to express in the form of an epigram 2. to make an epigram about intransitive verb to make an epigram • ...
epigrammatizer
noun see epigrammatize
epigraph
noun Etymology: Greek epigraphē, from epigraphein Date: 1624 1. an engraved inscription 2. a quotation set at the beginning of a literary work or one of its divisions to ...
epigrapher
noun Date: 1887 epigraphist
epigraphic
also epigraphical adjective Date: 1858 of or relating to epigraphs or epigraphy • epigraphically adverb
epigraphical
adjective see epigraphic
epigraphically
adverb see epigraphic
epigraphist
noun Date: circa 1864 a specialist in epigraphy
epigraphy
noun Date: 1851 1. epigraphs, inscriptions 2. the study of inscriptions; especially the deciphering of ancient inscriptions
epigynous
adjective Date: 1830 1. of a floral organ adnate to the surface of the ovary and appearing to grow from the top of it 2. having epigynous floral organs • epigyny noun
epigyny
noun see epigynous
epilation
noun Etymology: French épilation, from épiler to remove hair, from é- e- + Latin pilus hair — more at pile Date: 1878 the loss or removal of hair
epilepsy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Middle English epilencie, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French epelempsie, modification of Late Latin epilepsia, from Greek epilēpsia, from ...
epilept-
or epilepti- or epilepto- combining form Etymology: Greek epilēpt-, from epilēptos seized by epilepsy, from epilambanein epilepsy
epilepti-
combining form see epilept-
epileptic
adjective Date: 1605 relating to, affected with, or having the characteristics of epilepsy • epileptic noun • epileptically adverb
epileptically
adverb see epileptic
epileptiform
adjective Date: circa 1859 resembling that of epilepsy
epilepto-
combining form see epilept-
epileptogenic
adjective Date: circa 1882 inducing or tending to induce epilepsy
epileptoid
adjective Date: circa 1860 1. epileptiform 2. exhibiting symptoms resembling those of epilepsy
epilimnion
noun Etymology: New Latin, from epi- + Greek limnion, diminutive of limnē marshy lake — more at limnetic Date: circa 1910 the water layer overlying the thermocline of a ...
epilog
noun see epilogue
epilogue
also epilog noun Etymology: Middle English epiloge, from Middle French epilogue, from Latin epilogus, from Greek epilogos, from epilegein to say in addition, from epi- + legein ...
epimer
noun Etymology: epi- + isomer Date: circa 1911 either of two stereoisomers that differ in the arrangement of groups on a single asymmetric carbon atom (as the first chiral ...
epimerase
noun Date: 1960 any of various isomerases that catalyze the inversion of asymmetric groups in a substrate with several centers of asymmetry
epimeric
adjective see epimer
epimysium
noun (plural epimysia) Etymology: New Latin, irregular from epi- + Greek mys mouse, muscle — more at mouse Date: 1900 the external connective-tissue sheath of a muscle
Épinal
geographical name commune NE France on the Moselle population 39,480
epinasty
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary epi- + Greek nastos close-pressed (from nassein to press) + International Scientific Vocabulary 2-y Date: 1880 a nastic ...
epinephrin
noun see epinephrine
epinephrine
also epinephrin noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary epi- + Greek nephros kidney — more at nephritis Date: 1899 a colorless crystalline feebly basic ...
epineurium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1882 the external connective-tissue sheath of a nerve trunk
epipelagic
adjective Date: 1940 of, relating to, or constituting the part of the oceanic zone into which enough light penetrates for photosynthesis
epiphanic
adjective Date: 1951 of or having the character of an epiphany
epiphanous
adjective Date: 1965 epiphanic
epiphany
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English epiphanie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin epiphania, from Late Greek, plural, probably alteration of Greek epiphaneia ...
epiphenomenal
adjective Date: 1899 of or relating to an epiphenomenon ; derivative • epiphenomenally adverb
epiphenomenalism
noun Date: 1899 a doctrine that mental processes are epiphenomena of brain processes
epiphenomenally
adverb see epiphenomenal
epiphenomenon
noun (plural epiphenomena) Date: circa 1706 a secondary phenomenon accompanying another and caused by it; specifically a secondary mental phenomenon that is caused by and ...
epiphragm
noun Etymology: Greek epiphragma covering Date: circa 1854 a closing membrane or septum (as of a snail shell or a moss capsule)
epiphyseal
also epiphysial adjective Date: 1842 of or relating to an epiphysis
epiphysial
adjective see epiphyseal
epiphysis
noun (plural epiphyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, growth, from epiphyesthai to grow on, from epi- + phyesthai to grow, middle voice of phyein to bring forth — more at ...
epiphyte
noun Date: circa 1847 a plant that derives its moisture and nutrients from the air and rain and grows usually on another plant
epiphytic
adjective Date: 1830 1. of, relating to, or being an epiphyte 2. living on the surface of plants • epiphytically adverb • epiphytism noun
epiphytically
adverb see epiphytic
epiphytism
noun see epiphytic
epiphytotic
adjective Etymology: epi- + -phyte + -otic (as in epizootic) Date: circa 1899 of, relating to, or being a plant disease that tends to recur sporadically and to affect large ...
EPIRB
abbreviation emergency position-indicating radio beacon
Epirote
noun see Epirus

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