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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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Epirus
or Greek Epeiros geographical name region NW Greece bordering on Ionian Sea • Epirote noun
episcia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek episkios shaded, from epi- + skia shadow — more at shine Date: circa 1868 any of a genus (Episcia) of tropical American herbs of the ...
episcopacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1647 1. government of the church by bishops or by a hierarchy 2. episcopate
episcopal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin episcopalis, from episcopus bishop — more at bishop Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to a bishop 2. of, having, ...
Episcopal
noun Date: 1752 Episcopalian
Episcopalian
noun Date: 1690 1. an adherent of the episcopal form of church government 2. a member of an episcopal church (as the Protestant Episcopal Church) • Episcopalian ...
Episcopalianism
noun see Episcopalian
episcopally
adverb see episcopal
episcopate
noun Date: 1641 1. the rank or office of or term of as a bishop 2. diocese 3. the body of bishops (as in a country)
episcope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 a projector for images of opaque objects (as photographs)
episiotomy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary episio- vulva (from Greek epision pubic region) + -tomy Date: 1878 surgical incision of the perineum to enlarge the ...
episode
noun Etymology: Greek epeisodion, from neuter of epeisodios coming in besides, from epi- + eisodios coming in, from eis into (akin to Greek en in) + hodos road, journey — more ...
episodic
also episodical adjective Date: 1711 1. made up of separate especially loosely connected episodes 2. having the form of an episode 3. of or limited in duration or ...
episodical
adjective see episodic
episodically
adverb see episodic
episomal
adjective see episome
episomally
adverb see episome
episome
noun Date: circa 1931 a genetic determinant (as the DNA of some bacteriophages) that can replicate autonomously in bacterial cytoplasm or as an integral part of the ...
epistasis
noun (plural epistases) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, act of stopping, from ephistanai to stop, from epi- + histanai to cause to stand — more at stand Date: circa 1917 ...
epistatic
adjective see epistasis
epistaxis
noun (plural epistaxes) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from epistazein to drip on, to bleed at the nose again, from epi- + stazein to drip Date: 1793 nosebleed
epistemic
adjective Date: 1922 of or relating to knowledge or knowing ; cognitive • epistemically adverb
epistemically
adverb see epistemic
epistemological
adjective see epistemology
epistemologically
adverb see epistemology
epistemologist
noun see epistemology
epistemology
noun Etymology: Greek epistēmē knowledge, from epistanai to understand, know, from epi- + histanai to cause to stand — more at stand Date: circa 1856 the study or a ...
epistle
noun Etymology: Middle English, letter, Epistle, from Anglo-French, from Latin epistula, epistola letter, from Greek epistolē message, letter, from epistellein to send to, from ...
epistler
noun see epistle
epistolary
I. adjective Date: circa 1656 1. of, relating to, or suitable to a letter 2. contained in or carried on by letters 3. written in the form of a series of letters II. ...
epistoler
noun Date: 1530 the reader of the liturgical Epistle especially in Anglican churches
epistome
noun Etymology: New Latin epistoma Date: 1852 any of several structures or regions situated above or covering the mouth of various invertebrates
epistrophe
noun Etymology: Greek epistrophē, literally, turning about, from epi- + strophē turning — more at strophe Date: circa 1584 repetition of a word or expression at the end ...
epitaph
noun Etymology: Middle English epitaphe, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin epitaphium, from Latin, funeral oration, from Greek epitaphion, ...
epitaphial
adjective see epitaph
epitaphic
adjective see epitaph
epitasis
noun (plural epitases) Etymology: Greek, increased intensity, from epiteinein to stretch tighter, from epi- + teinein to stretch — more at thin Date: 1583 the part of a ...
epitaxial
adjective see epitaxy
epitaxially
adverb see epitaxy
epitaxy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1931 the growth on a crystalline substrate of a crystalline substance that mimics the orientation of the ...
epithalamic
adjective see epithalamium
epithalamion
noun see epithalamium
epithalamium
or epithalamion noun (plural -miums or epithalamia) Etymology: Latin & Greek; Latin epithalamium, from Greek epithalamion, from epi- + thalamos room, bridal chamber; perhaps ...
epithelial
adjective Date: 1845 of or relating to epithelium
epithelialization
or epithelization noun Date: circa 1934 the process of becoming covered with or converted to epithelium • epithelialize or epithelize transitive verb
epithelialize
transitive verb see epithelialization
epithelioid
adjective Date: 1878 resembling epithelium
epithelioma
noun (plural -mas; also -ma•ta) Date: 1872 a tumor derived from epithelial tissue • epitheliomatous adjective
epitheliomatous
adjective see epithelioma
epithelium
noun (plural epithelia) Etymology: New Latin, from epi- + Greek thēlē nipple — more at feminine Date: 1748 1. a membranous cellular tissue that covers a free surface or ...
epithelization
noun see epithelialization
epithelize
transitive verb see epithelialization
epithet
noun Etymology: Latin epitheton, from Greek, from neuter of epithetos added, from epitithenai to put on, add, from epi- + tithenai to put — more at do Date: 1579 1. a. a ...
epithetic
adjective see epithet
epithetical
adjective see epithet
epitome
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek epitomē, from epitemnein to cut short, from epi- + temnein to cut — more at tome Date: 1520 1. a. a summary of a written work b. a ...
epitomic
adjective see epitome
epitomical
adjective see epitome
epitomise
British variant of epitomize
epitomize
transitive verb (-mized; -mizing) Date: 1594 1. to make or give an epitome of 2. to serve as the typical or ideal example of
epitope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from epi- + Greek topos place Date: 1960 a molecular region on the surface of an antigen capable of eliciting an immune ...
epizoic
adjective Date: circa 1857 living upon the body of an animal • epizoite noun
epizoite
noun see epizoic
epizootic
noun Etymology: French épizootique, from épizootie such an outbreak, from épi- (as in épidemie epidemic) + Greek zōiotēs animal nature, from zōē life — more at quick ...
epizootiologic
adjective see epizootiology
epizootiological
adjective see epizootiology
epizootiology
noun Date: 1910 1. the sum of the factors controlling the occurrence of a disease or pathogen of animals 2. a science that deals with the character, ecology, and causes of ...
EPO
abbreviation erythropoietin
epoch
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin epocha, from Greek epochē cessation, fixed point, from epechein to pause, hold back, from epi- + echein to hold — more at scheme Date: 1614 ...
epochal
adjective Date: 1685 1. of or relating to an epoch 2. uniquely or highly significant ; momentous ; also unparalleled • epochally adverb
epochally
adverb see epochal
epode
noun Etymology: Latin epodos, from Greek epōidos, from epōidos sung or said after, from epi- + aidein to sing — more at ode Date: 1598 1. a lyric poem in which a long ...
eponym
noun Etymology: Greek epōnymos, from epōnymos eponymous, from epi- + onyma name — more at name Date: 1846 1. one for whom or which something is or is believed to be ...
eponymic
adjective see eponym
eponymous
adjective Date: 1846 of, relating to, or being an eponym
eponymy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1865 the explanation of a proper name (as of a town or tribe) by supposing a fictitious eponym
epopee
noun Etymology: French épopée, from Greek epopoiia, from epos + poiein to make — more at poet Date: 1697 epic; especially an epic poem
epos
noun Etymology: Greek, word, epic poem — more at voice Date: circa 1828 1. epic 1 2. a number of poems that treat an epic theme but are not formally united
epoxidation
noun Date: 1944 a conversion of a usually unsaturated compound into an epoxide
epoxide
noun Date: 1930 an epoxy compound
epoxidize
transitive verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1945 to convert into an epoxide
epoxy
I. adjective Etymology: epi- + oxy Date: 1916 1. containing oxygen attached to two different atoms already united in some other way; specifically containing a 3-membered ...
epoxy resin
noun Date: 1950 a flexible usually thermosetting resin made by copolymerization of an epoxide with another compound having two hydroxyl groups and used chiefly in coatings ...
Epping Forest
geographical name forested region SE England in Essex NE of London & S of town of Epping
eppur si muove
foreign term Etymology: Italian and yet it does move — attributed to Galileo after recanting his assertion of the earth's motion
EPR
abbreviation electron paramagnetic resonance
EPROM
noun Etymology: erasable programmable read-only memory Date: 1977 a read-only memory that can be erased (as by exposure to ultraviolet radiation) and usually reprogrammed
epsilon
noun Etymology: Greek e psilon, literally, simple e Date: 15th century 1. the 5th letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet table 2. an arbitrarily small positive ...
epsilonic
adjective see epsilon
Epsom salt
noun Date: 1770 Epsom salts
Epsom salts
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Epsom, England Date: 1828 a bitter colorless or white crystalline salt MgSO4•7H2O that is a hydrated magnesium ...
Epstein
biographical name Sir Jacob 1880-1959 British (American-born) sculptor
Epstein-Barr virus
noun Etymology: Michael Anthony Epstein b1921 and Yvonne M. Barr b1932 English pathologists Date: 1968 a herpesvirus (species Human herpesvirus 4 of the genus ...
eq
abbreviation 1. equal 2. equation
equability
noun see equable
equable
adjective Etymology: Latin aequabilis, from aequare to make level or equal, from aequus Date: 1677 1. marked by lack of variation or change ; uniform 2. marked by lack of ...
equableness
noun see equable
equably
adverb see equable
equal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin aequalis, from aequus level, equal Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) of the same measure, quantity, amount, or number as ...
equal opportunity employer
noun Date: 1963 an employer who agrees not to discriminate against any employee or job applicant because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, physical or mental ...
equal protection
noun Date: 1953 a guarantee under the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution that a state must treat an individual or class of individuals the same as it treats ...
equal sign
noun Date: circa 1909 a sign = indicating mathematical or logical equivalence — called also equality sign, equals sign
equal-area
adjective Date: 1901 of a map projection maintaining constant ratio of size between quadrilaterals formed by the meridians and parallels and the quadrilaterals of the globe ...
equalise
British variant of equalize
equaliser
British variant of equalizer
equalitarian
adjective or noun Date: 1799 egalitarian • equalitarianism noun
equalitarianism
noun see equalitarian
equality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being equal 2. equation 2a
equality sign
noun see equal sign
equalization
noun see equalize
equalize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1600 transitive verb 1. to make equal 2. a. to compensate for b. to make uniform; especially to distribute evenly or uniformly ...
equalizer
noun Date: 1792 one that equalizes: as a. a score that ties a game b. an electronic device (as in a sound-reproducing system) used to adjust response to different audio ...
equally
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in an equal or uniform manner ; evenly 2. to an equal degree
equals sign
noun see equal sign
equanimity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Latin aequanimitas, from aequo animo with even mind Date: circa 1616 1. evenness of mind especially under stress 2. right disposition ; ...
equate
verb (equated; equating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin aequatus, past participle of aequare Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to make equal ; equalize ...
equation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process of equating b. (1) an element affecting a process ; factor (2) a complex of variable factors c. a state of ...
equation of time
Date: 1667 the difference between apparent time and mean time usually expressed as a correction which is to be added to apparent time to give local mean time
equational
adjective Date: 1864 1. of, using, or involving equation or equations 2. dividing into two equal parts — used especially of the mitotic cell division usually following ...
equationally
adverb see equational
equator
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin aequator, literally, equalizer, from Latin aequare Date: 14th century 1. the great circle of the celestial sphere whose ...
equatorial
adjective Date: 1664 1. a. of, relating to, or located at the equator or an equator; also being in the plane of the equator b. of, originating in, or suggesting the ...
Equatorial Guinea
geographical name country W Africa on Bight of Biafra comprising former Spanish Guinea; an independent republic since 1968 capital Malabo area 10,825 square miles (28,037 ...
equatorial plane
noun Date: circa 1892 the plane perpendicular to the spindle of a dividing cell and midway between the poles
equatorial plate
noun Date: 1882 1. metaphase plate 2. equatorial plane
equatorward
adverb or adjective Date: 1875 toward or near the equator
equerry
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: modification of Middle French ecurie, escuyrie squires (collectively), duties of a squire, care of horses, stable, from escuier squire — more ...
equestrian
I. adjective Etymology: Latin equestr-, equester of a horseman, from eques horseman, from equus horse — more at equine Date: circa 1681 1. a. of, relating to, or ...
equestrienne
noun Etymology: 2equestrian + -enne (as in tragedienne) Date: 1823 a girl or woman who rides on horseback
equi-
combining form Etymology: Latin aequi-, from aequus equal equal ; equally
equiangular
adjective Date: 1660 having all or corresponding angles equal
equicaloric
adjective Date: 1940 capable of yielding equal amounts of energy in the body
equid
noun Etymology: New Latin Equidae, family name, from Equus, genus name, from Latin, horse Date: circa 1889 any of a family (Equidae) of perissodactyl mammals consisting of ...
equidistant
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin aequidistant-, aequidistans, from Latin aequi- + distant-, distans, present participle of ...
equidistantly
adverb see equidistant
equilateral
adjective Etymology: Late Latin aequilateralis, from Latin aequi- + later-, latus side — more at lateral Date: 1570 1. having all sides equal — see triangle ...
equilateral hyperbola
noun Date: 1880 a hyperbola with its asymptotes at right angles
equilibrant
noun Date: 1883 a force that will balance one or more unbalanced forces
equilibrate
verb (-brated; -brating) Date: 1635 transitive verb to bring into or keep in equilibrium ; balance intransitive verb to bring about, come to, or be in equilibrium • ...
equilibration
noun see equilibrate
equilibrator
noun see equilibrate
equilibratory
adjective see equilibrate
equilibrist
noun Date: 1760 one (as a rope dancer) who performs difficult feats of balancing • equilibristic adjective
equilibristic
adjective see equilibrist
equilibrium
noun (plural -riums or equilibria) Etymology: Latin aequilibrium, from aequilibris being in equilibrium, from aequi- + libra weight, balance Date: 1608 1. a. a state of ...
equilibrium constant
noun Date: 1929 a number that expresses the relationship between the amounts of products and reactants present at equilibrium in a reversible chemical reaction at a given ...
equimolar
adjective Date: 1881 1. of or relating to an equal number of moles 2. having equal molar concentration
equine
adjective Etymology: Latin equinus, from equus horse; akin to Old English eoh horse, Greek hippos, Sanskrit aśva Date: 1776 of, relating to, or resembling a horse or the ...
equine encephalitis
noun Date: 1946 any of three forms of encephalitis that attack chiefly equines and humans in various parts of North and South America and are caused by three related ...
equinely
adverb see equine
equinoctial
I. adjective Date: 1545 1. relating to an equinox or to a state or the time of equal day and night 2. relating to the regions or climate on or near the equator 3. relating ...
equinox
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French equinocce, from Medieval Latin equinoxium, alteration of Latin aequinoctium, from aequi- equi- ...
equip
I. transitive verb (equipped; equipping) Etymology: modification of Anglo-French eskiper, eschiper to load on board a ship, embark, outfit, man, of Germanic origin; akin to Old ...
equipage
noun Date: 1573 1. a. material or articles used in equipment ; outfit b. archaic (1) a set of small articles (as for table service) (2) etui c. trappings 2. ...
equipment
noun Date: 1651 1. a. the set of articles or physical resources serving to equip a person or thing: as (1) the implements used in an operation or activity ; apparatus ...
equipoise
I. noun Date: 1658 1. a state of equilibrium 2. counterbalance II. transitive verb Date: 1664 1. to serve as an equipoise to 2. to put or hold in equipoise
equipollence
noun Date: 15th century the quality of being equipollent
equipollent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin aequipollent-, aequipollens, from aequi- equi- + pollent-, pollens, present participle of pollēre to be able ...
equipollently
adverb see equipollent
equiponderant
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin aequiponderant-, aequiponderans, present participle of aequiponderare, from Latin aequi- + ponderare to weigh — more at ponder Date: 1630 ...
equipotential
adjective Date: circa 1865 having the same potential ; of uniform potential throughout
equiprobable
adjective Date: 1921 having the same degree of logical or mathematical probability
equisetum
noun (plural -setums or equiseta) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin equisaetum horsetail plant, from equus horse + saeta bristle Date: 1761 horsetail
equitability
noun see equitable
equitable
adjective Date: 1598 1. having or exhibiting equity ; dealing fairly and equally with all concerned 2. existing or valid in equity as distinguished from law Synonyms: ...
equitableness
noun see equitable
equitably
adverb see equitable
equitation
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin equitation-, equitatio, from equitare to ride on horseback, from equit-, eques horseman, from equus horse Date: 1562 the act or art ...
equity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English equite, from Anglo-French equité, from Latin aequitat-, aequitas, from aequus equal, fair Date: 14th century 1. a. justice ...
equity capital
noun Date: 1942 capital (as stock or surplus earnings) that is free of debt; especially capital received for an interest in the ownership of a business
equiv
abbreviation equivalency; equivalent
equivalence
noun Date: circa 1541 1. a. the state or property of being equivalent b. the relation holding between two statements if they are either both true or both false so that ...
equivalence class
noun Date: 1952 a set for which an equivalence relation holds between every pair of elements
equivalence relation
noun Date: circa 1949 a relation (as equality) between elements of a set (as the real numbers) that is symmetric, reflexive, and transitive and for any two elements either ...
equivalency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1535 1. equivalence 2. a level of achievement equivalent to completion of an educational or training program
equivalent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin aequivalent-, aequivalens, present participle of aequivalēre to have equal ...
equivalent weight
noun Date: circa 1855 the mass of a substance especially in grams that combines with or is chemically equivalent to eight grams of oxygen or one gram of hydrogen ; the atomic ...
equivalently
adverb see equivalent
equivocal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin aequivocus, from aequi- equi- + voc-, vox voice — more at voice Date: 1599 1. a. subject to two or more interpretations and usually used ...
equivocality
noun see equivocal
equivocally
adverb see equivocal
equivocalness
noun see equivocal
equivocate
intransitive verb (-cated; -cating) Date: 1590 1. to use equivocal language especially with intent to deceive 2. to avoid committing oneself in what one says Synonyms: see ...
equivocation
noun see equivocate
equivocator
noun see equivocate
equivoke
noun see equivoque
equivoque
also equivoke noun Etymology: French équivoque, from équivoque equivocal, from Late Latin aequivocus Date: 1599 1. an equivocal word or phrase; specifically pun 2. a. ...
er
interjection Date: 1862 — used to express hesitation
Er
symbol erbium
ER
abbreviation 1. earned run 2. emergency room
Er Rif
or Rif geographical name mountain range N Morocco on the Mediterranean
era
noun Etymology: Late Latin aera, from Latin, counters, plural of aer-, aes copper, money — more at ore Date: 1615 1. a. a fixed point in time from which a series of ...
ERA
abbreviation 1. earned run average 2. Equal Rights Amendment
eradicable
adjective see eradicate
eradicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin eradicatus, past participle of eradicare, from e- + radic-, radix root — more at root Date: 1532 1. to pull up by the ...
eradication
noun see eradicate
eradicator
noun see eradicate
erasability
noun see erase
erasable
adjective see erase
erase
verb (erased; erasing) Etymology: Latin erasus, past participle of eradere, from e- + radere to scratch, scrape — more at rodent Date: 1605 transitive verb 1. a. to ...
eraser
noun Date: 1790 one that erases; especially a device (as a piece of rubber, or a felt pad) used to erase marks (as of ink or chalk)
Erasmian
adjective see Erasmus
Erasmus
biographical name Desiderius 1466?-1536 Dutch scholar • Erasmian adjective
Erastian
adjective Etymology: Thomas Erastus died 1583 Swiss physician and Zwinglian theologian Date: 1773 of, characterized by, or advocating the doctrine of state supremacy in ...
Erastianism
noun see Erastian
erasure
noun Date: 1734 an act or instance of erasing
Erato
noun Etymology: Greek Eratō Date: 1557 the Greek Muse of lyric and love poetry
Eratosthenes
biographical name circa 276-circa 194 B.C. Greek astronomer
Erbīl
geographical name — see arbil
erbium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Ytterby, Sweden Date: 1843 a metallic element of the rare-earth group — see element table
Erciyas
geographical name mountain 12,848 feet (3916 meters) central Turkey; highest in Asia Minor
Erckmann-Chatrian
biographical name joint pseudonym of Émile Erckmann 1822-1899 & Alexandre Chatrian 1826-1890 French authors
Erdos
biographical name Paul 1913-1996 Hungarian mathematician
ere
I. preposition Etymology: Middle English er, from Old English ǣr, from ǣr, adverb, early, soon; akin to Old High German ēr earlier, Greek ēri early Date: before 12th ...
Erebus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Erebos Date: 1578 1. a personification of darkness in Greek mythology 2. a place of darkness in the underworld on the way to Hades
Erebus, Mount
geographical name volcano 12,450 feet (3795 meters) E Antarctica on Ross Island in SW Ross Sea
erect
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin erectus, past participle of erigere to erect, from e- + regere to lead straight, guide — more at right Date: 14th century ...
erectable
adjective see erect II
erectile
adjective Date: 1830 1. of, relating to, or capable of undergoing physiological erection 2. capable of being raised to an upright position • erectility noun
erectility
noun see erectile
erection
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the state marked by firm turgid form and erect position of a previously flaccid bodily part containing cavernous tissue when that tissue ...
erectly
adverb see erect I
erectness
noun see erect I
erector
noun Date: 1538 one that erects; especially a muscle that raises or keeps a part erect
Erector
trademark — used for a metal toy construction set
Eregli
geographical name 1. city S Turkey SSE of Ankara population 74,332 2. town & port NW Turkey in Asia on Black Sea population 63,776
erelong
adverb Date: 1553 archaic before long, soon
eremite
noun Etymology: Middle English — more at hermit Date: 13th century hermit; especially a religious recluse • eremitic or eremitical adjective • eremitism noun
eremitic
adjective see eremite
eremitical
adjective see eremite
eremitism
noun see eremite
eremurus
noun (plural eremuri) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek erēmos solitary + oura tail — more at ass Date: 1829 any of a genus (Eremurus) of perennial Asian herbs of the lily ...
erenow
adverb Date: 14th century archaic heretofore
erepsin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary er- (probably from Latin eripere to snatch away, from e- + rapere to seize) + pepsin — more at rapid Date: 1902 a ...
erethism
noun Etymology: French éréthisme, from Greek erethismos irritation, from erethizein to irritate; akin to Greek ornynai to rouse — more at orient Date: 1800 abnormal ...
erewhile
also erewhiles adverb Date: 13th century archaic a while before ; formerly
erewhiles
adverb see erewhile
Erfurt
geographical name city central Germany capital of Thuringia population 204,912
erg
noun Etymology: Greek ergon work — more at work Date: 1873 a centimeter-gram-second unit of work equal to the work done by a force of one dyne acting through a distance of ...
erg-
or ergo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from ergon work
ergastic
adjective Etymology: Greek ergastikos able to work, from ergazesthai to work, from ergon work Date: circa 1896 constituting the nonliving by-products of protoplasmic activity ...
ergastoplasm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1902 ribosome-studded endoplasmic reticulum • ergastoplasmic adjective
ergastoplasmic
adjective see ergastoplasm
ergative
adjective Etymology: Greek ergatēs worker, from ergon work Date: 1939 of, relating to, or being a language (as Inuit or Georgian) in which the objects of transitive verbs ...
ergo
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Old Latin, because of, from Old Latin *e rogo from the direction (of) Date: 14th century therefore, hence
ergo-
combining form Etymology: French, from ergot ergot
ergodic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary erg- + -ode Date: 1926 1. of or relating to a process in which every sequence or sizable sample is equally ...
ergodicity
noun see ergodic
ergogenic
adjective Date: 1941 enhancing physical performance
ergograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 an apparatus for measuring the work capacity of a muscle
ergometer
noun Date: circa 1879 an apparatus for measuring the work performed (as by a person exercising); also an exercise machine equipped with an ergometer • ergometric adjective
ergometric
adjective see ergometer
ergonomic
adjective see ergonomics
ergonomically
adverb see ergonomics
ergonomics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: erg- + -nomics (as in economics) Date: 1949 1. an applied science concerned with designing and arranging things ...
ergonomist
noun see ergonomics
ergonovine
noun Etymology: ergo- + Latin novus new — more at new Date: circa 1936 an alkaloid C19H23N3O2 derived from ergot and used especially in the form of its maleate as an ...
ergosterol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1906 a crystalline steroid alcohol C28H44O that occurs especially in yeast, molds, and ergot and is converted by ...
ergot
noun Etymology: French, literally, cock's spur Date: 1683 1. the black or dark purple sclerotium of fungi (genus Claviceps) that occurs as a club-shaped body replacing the ...
ergotamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1921 an alkaloid C33H35N5O5 derived from ergot that is used chiefly in the form of its tartrate especially in ...
ergotic
adjective see ergot
ergotism
noun Date: circa 1841 a toxic condition produced by eating grain, grain products (as rye bread), or grasses infected with ergot fungus or by chronic excessive use of an ergot ...
ergotized
adjective Date: 1860 infected with ergot ; also poisoned by ergot
Erhard
biographical name Ludwig 1897-1977 chancellor of West Germany (1963-66)
erica
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin erice heather, from Greek ereikē — more at briar Date: 1826 any of a large genus (Erica) of evergreen chiefly African plants of the ...

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