Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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ericaceous
adjective Date: circa 1859 of, relating to, or being a heath or the heath family
ericoid
adjective Date: 1848 resembling heath
Ericsson
biographical name John 1803-1889 American (Swedish-born) engineer & inventor
Erie
I. noun Etymology: American French Erie, Erié, modification of Huron Eriehronon the Erie people Date: circa 1909 1. a member of an American Indian people living south of ...
Erie Canal
geographical name canal 363 miles (584 kilometers) long N New York from Hudson River at Albany to Lake Erie at Buffalo; built 1817-25; superseded by New York State Barge Canal ...
Erie, Lake
geographical name lake E central North America on boundary between the United States & Canada; one of the Great Lakes area 9910 square miles (25,667 square kilometers)
Erigena
biographical name John Scotus circa 810-circa 877 Scottish (Irish-born) philosopher & theologian
erigeron
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, groundsel, from Greek ērigerōn, from ēri early + gerōn old man; from the hoary down of some species — more at ere, geront- Date: ...
Erik
biographical name the Red 10th century Norwegian navigator & explorer
Eriksson
biographical name Leif — see Leif Eriksson
Erin
geographical name Ireland — a poetic name
Erin go bragh
foreign term Etymology: Irish go brách or go bráth, literally, till doomsday Ireland forever
Erinys
noun (plural Erinyes) Etymology: Greek Date: 1567 fury 2a
eriophyid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek erion wool + phyē growth; akin to Greek physis growth — more at physics Date: 1942 any of a large family (Eriophyidae) of minute ...
ERISA
abbreviation Employee Retirement Income Security Act
eristic
I. adjective also eristical Etymology: Greek eristikos fond of wrangling, from erizein to wrangle, from eris strife Date: 1637 characterized by disputatious and often ...
eristical
adjective see eristic I
eristically
adverb see eristic I
Eritrea
geographical name country NE Africa bordering on Red Sea capital Asmara; incorporated (1962) into Ethiopia; voted (1993) in favor of independence area 45,405 square miles ...
Eritrean
adjective or noun see Eritrea
Erlander
biographical name Tage Frithiof 1901-1985 Swedish politician
Erlangen
geographical name city S Germany in Bavaria NNW of Nuremberg population 102,433
Erlanger
biographical name Joseph 1874-1965 American physiologist
Erlenmeyer
biographical name Richard August Carl Emil 1825-1909 German chemist
Erlenmeyer flask
noun Etymology: Emil Erlenmeyer Date: 1886 a flat-bottomed conical laboratory flask
ermine
noun (plural ermines) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French hermin, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German harmo weasel Date: 12th century 1. or plural ermine ...
ermined
adjective Date: 15th century clothed or adorned with ermine
Ermoúpolis
or Hermoúpolis or Syros geographical name town & port Greece on Syros; chief town of the Cyclades population 12,987
erne
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English earn; akin to Old High German arn eagle, Greek ornis bird Date: before 12th century eagle; especially a long-winged sea ...
Ernst
I. biographical name Max 1891-1976 German painter II. biographical name Richard Robert 1933- Swiss chemist
erodable
adjective see erode
erode
verb (eroded; eroding) Etymology: Latin erodere to eat away, from e- + rodere to gnaw — more at rodent Date: 1612 transitive verb 1. to diminish or destroy by degrees: ...
erodibility
noun see erode
erodible
adjective see erode
erogenous
adjective Etymology: Greek erōs + English -genous, -genic Date: circa 1889 1. producing sexual excitement or libidinal gratification when stimulated ; sexually sensitive 2. ...
Eros
noun Etymology: Greek Erōs, from erōs sexual love; akin to Greek erasthai to love, desire Date: 14th century 1. the Greek god of erotic love — compare Cupid 2. the sum ...
erose
adjective Etymology: Latin erosus, past participle of erodere Date: 1793 irregular, uneven; specifically having the margin irregularly notched as if gnawed
erosion
noun Date: 1541 1. a. the action or process of eroding b. the state of being eroded 2. an instance or product of erosive action • erosional adjective • ...
erosional
adjective see erosion
erosionally
adverb see erosion
erosive
adjective Date: 1830 tending to erode or to induce or permit erosion; also caused or marked by erosion • erosiveness noun • erosivity noun
erosiveness
noun see erosive
erosivity
noun see erosive
erotic
also erotical adjective Etymology: Greek erōtikos, from erōt-, erōs Date: 1651 1. of, devoted to, or tending to arouse sexual love or desire 2. strongly marked or ...
erotica
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: New Latin, from Greek erōtika, neuter plural of erōtikos Date: 1819 1. literary or artistic works having an ...
erotical
adjective see erotic
erotically
adverb see erotic
eroticism
noun Date: 1881 1. an erotic theme or quality 2. a state of sexual arousal 3. insistent sexual impulse or desire • eroticist noun
eroticist
noun see eroticism
eroticization
noun see eroticize
eroticize
transitive verb (-cized; -cizing) Date: circa 1914 to make erotic • eroticization noun
erotism
noun Date: 1849 eroticism
erotization
noun see erotize
erotize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1936 to invest with erotic significance or sexual feeling • erotization noun
eroto-
combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek erōto-, from erot-, eros sexual desire
erotogenic
adjective Date: circa 1909 erogenous
erotomania
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1877 1. excessive sexual desire 2. a psychological disorder marked by the delusional belief that one is the object of another person's love ...
erotomaniac
noun see erotomania
err
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French errer, from Latin errare to wander, err; akin to Old English ierre wandering, perverse, Gothic airzeis deceived ...
errancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1621 the state or an instance of erring
errand
noun Etymology: Middle English erend message, business, from Old English ǣrend; akin to Old High German ārunti message Date: before 12th century 1. archaic a. an oral ...
errant
adjective Etymology: Middle English erraunt, from Anglo-French errant, present participle of errer to err & errer to travel, from Late Latin iterare, from Latin iter road, ...
errantly
adverb see errant
errantry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1620 the quality, condition, or fact of wandering; especially a roving in search of chivalrous adventure
errare humanum est
foreign term Etymology: Latin to err is human
errata
noun Etymology: Latin, plural of erratum Date: 1573 a list of corrigenda; also a page bearing such a list
erratic
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin erraticus, from erratus, past participle of errare Date: 14th century 1. a. having no fixed course ; wandering b. ...
erratical
adjective see erratic I
erratically
adverb see erratic I
erraticism
noun see erratic I
erratum
noun (plural errata) Etymology: Latin, from neuter of erratus Date: 1589 error; especially corrigendum
erroneous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin erroneus, from erron-, erro wanderer, from errare Date: 15th century 1. containing or characterized by error ; mistaken ...
erroneously
adverb see erroneous
erroneousness
noun see erroneous
error
noun Etymology: Middle English errour, from Anglo-French, from Latin error, from errare Date: 13th century 1. a. an act or condition of ignorant or imprudent deviation ...
error bar
noun Date: 1968 the estimated uncertainty in experimental data
errorless
adjective see error
ersatz
adjective Etymology: German ersatz-, from Ersatz, noun, substitute Date: 1875 being a usually artificial and inferior substitute or imitation • ersatz noun
Erse
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots) Erisch, adjective, Irish, alteration of Irish Date: 15th century 1. Scottish Gaelic 2. Irish Gaelic • Erse adjective
Erskine
biographical name John 1879-1951 American educator & writer
Erskine of Carnock
biographical name John 1695-1768 Scottish jurist
erst
adverb Etymology: Middle English erest earliest, formerly, from Old English ǣrest, superlative of ǣr early — more at ere Date: 12th century archaic erstwhile
erstwhile
I. adverb Date: 1569 in the past ; formerly II. adjective Date: 1903 former, previous
ERT
abbreviation estrogen replacement therapy
erucic acid
noun Etymology: New Latin Eruca, genus of herbs, from Latin, colewort Date: 1869 a crystalline fatty acid C22H42O2 found in the form of glycerides especially in rapeseed oil
eruct
verb Etymology: Latin eructare, frequentative of erugere to belch, disgorge; akin to Old English rocettan to belch, Greek ereugesthai Date: 1596 belch
eructation
noun Date: 15th century an act or instance of belching
erudite
adjective Etymology: Middle English erudit, from Latin eruditus, from past participle of erudire to instruct, from e- + rudis rude, ignorant Date: 15th century possessing or ...
eruditely
adverb see erudite
erudition
noun Date: 15th century extensive knowledge acquired chiefly from books ; profound, recondite, or bookish learning Synonyms: see knowledge
erupt
verb Etymology: Latin eruptus, past participle of erumpere to burst forth, from e- + rumpere to break — more at reave Date: 1657 intransitive verb 1. a. (1) to ...
eruptible
adjective see erupt
eruption
noun Date: 1555 1. a. an act, process, or instance of erupting b. the breaking out of a rash on the skin or mucous membrane 2. a product of erupting (as a skin rash)
eruptive
adjective see erupt
eruptively
adverb see erupt
Ervine
biographical name Saint John Greer 1883-1971 Irish dramatist & novelist
eryngo
noun (plural -goes or -gos) Etymology: modification of Latin eryngion sea holly, from Greek ēryngion Date: 1543 1. any of various plants (genus Eryngium) of the carrot ...
erysipelas
noun Etymology: Middle English erisipila, from Latin erysipelas, from Greek, from erysi- (probably akin to Greek erythros red) + -pelas (probably akin to Latin pellis skin) — ...
erythema
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek erythēma, from erythainein to redden, from erythros Date: circa 1783 abnormal redness of the skin due to capillary congestion • ...
erythema chronicum migrans
noun see erythema migrans
erythema migrans
or erythema chronicum migrans noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, (chronic) migrating erythema Date: 1979 a red spreading annular skin lesion that is an early symptom of ...
erythematous
adjective see erythema
erythorbate
noun Date: 1963 a salt of erythorbic acid that is used in foods as an antioxidant
erythorbic acid
noun Etymology: erythr- + ascorbic acid Date: 1963 a diastereoisomer of ascorbic acid with optical activity
erythr-
or erythro- combining form Etymology: Greek, from erythros — more at red 1. red 2. erythrocyte
erythremia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1908 polycythemia vera
erythrism
noun Date: 1864 a condition marked by exceptional prevalence of red pigmentation (as in hair or feathers) • erythristic also erythrismal adjective
erythrismal
adjective see erythrism
erythristic
adjective see erythrism
erythrite
noun Date: 1844 a usually rose-colored mineral consisting of a hydrous cobalt arsenate occurring especially in monoclinic crystals
erythro-
combining form see erythr-
erythroblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 a polychromatic nucleated cell of red bone marrow that synthesizes hemoglobin and that is an intermediate ...
erythroblastic
adjective see erythroblast
erythroblastosis
noun (plural erythroblastoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1923 abnormal presence of erythroblasts in the circulating blood; especially erythroblastosis fetalis
erythroblastosis fetalis
noun Etymology: New Latin, fetal erythroblastosis Date: circa 1934 a hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn that occurs when the system of an Rh-negative mother produces ...
erythrocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1894 red blood cell • erythrocytic adjective
erythrocytic
adjective see erythrocyte
erythroid
adjective Date: 1927 relating to erythrocytes or their precursors
erythromycin
noun Date: 1952 a broad-spectrum antibiotic C37H67NO13 produced by an actinomycete (Streptomyces erythreus) and administered orally or topically
erythropoiesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1918 the production of red blood cells (as from the bone marrow) • erythropoietic adjective
erythropoietic
adjective see erythropoiesis
erythropoietin
noun Date: 1948 a glycoprotein hormone formed especially in the kidney and stimulating red blood cell formation
erythrosin
also erythrosine noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary erythr- + eosin Date: circa 1882 any of several dyes made from fluorescein that yield reddish shades
erythrosine
noun see erythrosin
Erzberger
biographical name Matthias 1875-1921 German statesman
Erzgebirge
geographical name mountain range Germany & NW Czech Republic on boundary between Saxony & Bohemia; highest Klinovec (in Czech Republic) 4080 feet (1244 meters)
Erzincan
geographical name city E central Turkey on the Euphrates population 90,799
Erzurum
geographical name city NE Turkey in mountainous area population 242,391
Es
symbol einsteinium
Esau
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Ēsau, from Hebrew ‘Ēsāw Date: before 12th century the elder son of Isaac and Rebekah who sold his birthright to his twin brother Jacob
ESB
abbreviation electrical stimulation of the brain
Esbjerg
geographical name city & port SW Denmark in SW Jutland Peninsula on North Sea population 81,843
escadrille
noun Etymology: French, flotilla, escadrille, from Spanish escuadrilla, diminutive of escuadra squadron, squad — more at squad Date: 1912 a unit of a European air command ...
escalade
noun Etymology: French, from Italian scalata, from scalare to scale, from scala ladder, from Late Latin — more at scale Date: 1598 an act of scaling especially the walls ...
escalader
noun see escalade
escalate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: back-formation from escalator Date: 1944 intransitive verb to increase in extent, volume, number, amount, intensity, or scope ...
escalation
noun see escalate
escalator
I. noun Etymology: from Escalator, a trademark Date: 1900 1. a. a power-driven set of stairs arranged like an endless belt that ascend or descend continuously b. an ...
escalatory
adjective see escalate
escalope
noun Etymology: French — more at scallop Date: 1828 scallop 5
escapade
noun Etymology: French, action of escaping, from Spanish escapada, from escapar to escape, from Vulgar Latin *excappare Date: 1667 a usually adventurous action that runs ...
escape
I. verb (escaped; escaping) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French escaper, eschaper, from Vulgar Latin *excappare, from Latin ex- + Late Latin cappa head covering, cloak ...
escape artist
noun Date: 1943 one (as a performer or criminal) unusually adept at escaping from confinement
escape hatch
noun Date: 1925 1. a hatch providing an emergency exit from an enclosed space 2. a means of evading a difficulty, dilemma, or responsibility
escape mechanism
noun Date: 1927 a mode of behavior or thinking adopted to evade unpleasant facts or responsibilities
escape velocity
noun Date: 1934 the minimum velocity that a moving body (as a rocket) must have to escape from the gravitational field of a celestial body (as the earth) and move outward ...
escapee
noun Date: circa 1866 one that has escaped; especially an escaped prisoner
escapement
noun Date: 1779 1. a. a device in a timepiece which controls the motion of the train of wheelwork and through which the energy of the power source is delivered to the ...
escaper
noun see escape I
escapism
noun Date: 1933 habitual diversion of the mind to purely imaginative activity or entertainment as an escape from reality or routine • escapist adjective or noun
escapist
adjective or noun see escapism
escapologist
noun see escapology
escapology
noun Date: 1939 the art or practice of escaping • escapologist noun
escargot
noun (plural escargots) Etymology: French, snail, from Middle French, from Old Occitan escaragol Date: circa 1892 a snail prepared for use as food
escarole
noun Etymology: French escarole, scarole, from Old French escariole, from Late Latin escariola, from Latin escarius of food, from esca food, from edere to eat — more at eat ...
escarpment
noun Etymology: French escarpement, from escarper to scarp, from Middle French, from escarpe scarp, from Old Italian scarpa — more at scarp Date: circa 1802 1. a steep ...
Escaut
geographical name — see Schelde
eschar
noun Etymology: Middle English escare — more at scar Date: 1543 a scab formed especially after a burn
escharotic
adjective Etymology: French or Late Latin; French escharotique, from Late Latin escharoticus, from Greek escharōtikos, from escharoun to form an eschar, from eschara eschar ...
eschatological
adjective Date: 1854 1. of or relating to eschatology or an eschatology 2. of or relating to the end of the world or the events associated with it in eschatology • ...
eschatologically
adverb see eschatological
eschatology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Greek eschatos last, farthest Date: 1844 1. a branch of theology concerned with the final events in the history of the world or of mankind 2. ...
escheat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English eschete, from Anglo-French, reversion of property, from escheir to fall, devolve, from Vulgar Latin *excadēre, from Latin ex- + Vulgar Latin ...
escheatable
adjective see escheat II
Escher
biographical name M(aurits) C(ornelis) 1898-1972 Dutch graphic artist
eschew
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French eschiver (3d present eschiu) of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German sciuhen to frighten off — more at shy ...
eschewal
noun see eschew
escolar
noun (plural escolar or escolars) Etymology: Spanish, literally, scholar, from Medieval Latin scholaris — more at scholar Date: circa 1890 a large widely distributed ...
Escondido
geographical name city SW California N of San Diego population 133,559
escort
I. noun Etymology: Middle French escorte, from Italian scorta, from scorgere to guide, from Vulgar Latin *excorrigere, from Latin ex- + corrigere to make straight, correct — ...
escot
transitive verb Etymology: Anglo-French escoter, from escot contribution, of Germanic origin; akin to Old Norse skot contribution, shot — more at shot Date: 1602 obsolete ...
escritoire
noun Etymology: obsolete French, writing desk, scriptorium, from Medieval Latin scriptorium Date: 1664 a writing table or desk; specifically secretary 4b
escrow
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French escroue scroll — more at scroll Date: 1594 1. a deed, a bond, money, or a piece of property held in trust by a third party to be turned ...
escudo
noun (plural -dos) Etymology: Spanish & Portuguese, literally, shield, from Latin scutum Date: circa 1821 1. any of various former gold or silver coins of Hispanic countries ...
esculent
adjective Etymology: Latin esculentus, from esca food, from edere to eat — more at eat Date: 1626 edible • esculent noun
escutcheon
noun Etymology: Middle English escochon, from Anglo-French escuchoun, from Vulgar Latin *scution-, scutio, from Latin scutum shield — more at esquire Date: 15th century 1. ...
Esd
abbreviation Esdras
Esdraelon, Plain of
geographical name plain N Israel NE of Mt. Carmel in valley of the upper Qishon
Esdras
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from Hebrew ‘Ezrā Date: 14th century 1. either of two books of the Roman Catholic canon of the Old Testament: a. Ezra 2 b. ...
ESE
abbreviation east-southeast
esemplastic
adjective Etymology: Greek es hen into one + English plastic Date: 1817 shaping or having the power to shape disparate things into a unified whole
eserine
noun Etymology: French ésérine Date: 1879 physostigmine
Esfahān
or Isfahan or formerly Ispahan geographical name city W central Iran; former capital of Persia population 986,753
Esher
geographical name town S England in N Surrey population 61,446
Eshkol
biographical name Levi 1895-1969 prime minister of Israel (1963-69)
Esk
abbreviation Eskimo
esker
noun Etymology: Irish eiscir ridge Date: 1848 a long narrow ridge or mound of sand, gravel, and boulders deposited by a stream flowing on, within, or beneath a stagnant ...
Eskilstuna
geographical name city SE Sweden population 89,584
Eskimo
noun Etymology: obsolete Esquimawe, probably from Spanish esquimao, from Montagnais (Algonquian language of eastern Canada) aiachkime8 Micmac, Eskimo; probably akin to modern ...
Eskimo curlew
noun Date: 1813 an extremely rare New World curlew (Numenius borealis) that breeds in northern North America and winters in South America
Eskimo dog
noun Date: 1774 a sled dog of American origin
Eskimo-Aleut
noun Date: 1921 a language family including Eskimo and Aleut languages
Eskimoan
adjective see Eskimo
Eskisehir
or Eskishehr geographical name city W central Turkey on tributary of the Sakarya population 413,082
Eskishehr
geographical name see Eskisehir
ESL
abbreviation English as a second language
ESOP
noun Etymology: employee stock ownership plan Date: 1975 a program by which a corporation's employees acquire its stock
esophageal
adjective see esophagus
esophagitis
noun (plural esophagitides) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 inflammation of the esophagus
esophagus
noun (plural esophagi) Etymology: Middle English ysophagus, from Medieval Latin ysofugus, from Greek oisophagos, from oisein to be going to carry + phagein to eat — more at ...
esoteric
adjective Etymology: Late Latin esotericus, from Greek esōterikos, from esōterō, comparative of eisō, esō within, from eis into; akin to Greek en in — more at in Date: ...
esoterica
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Greek esōterika, neuter plural of esōterikos Date: circa 1929 esoteric items
esoterically
adverb see esoteric
esotericism
noun Date: 1846 1. esoteric doctrines or practices 2. the quality or state of being esoteric
esp
abbreviation especially
ESP
noun Etymology: extrasensory perception Date: 1934 extrasensory perception
espadrille
noun Etymology: French, alteration of espardille, ultimately from Latin spartum Date: 1892 a sandal usually having a fabric upper and a flexible sole
espalier
I. noun Etymology: French, ultimately from Italian spalla shoulder, from Late Latin spatula shoulder blade — more at epaulet Date: 1662 1. a plant (as a fruit tree) trained ...
España
geographical name — see Spain
Española
geographical name — see Hispaniola
Espartero
biographical name Baldomero 1793-1879 Conde de Luchana Spanish general & statesman
esparto
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: Spanish, from Latin spartum, from Greek sparton — more at spire Date: 1845 1. either of two Spanish and Algerian grasses (Stipa tenacissima ...
esparto grass
noun see esparto
especial
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French — more at special Date: 14th century being distinctive: as a. directed toward a particular individual, group, or ...
especially
adverb Date: 15th century 1. specially 1 2. a. in particular ; particularly b. for a particular purpose 3. — used as an intensive
esperance
noun Etymology: Middle English esperaunce, from Middle French esperance Date: 15th century obsolete hope, expectation
Esperantist
noun or adjective see Esperanto
Esperanto
noun Etymology: Dr. Esperanto, pseudonym of L. L. Zamenhof died 1917 Polish oculist, its inventor Date: 1892 an artificial international language based as far as possible on ...
espial
noun Date: 14th century 1. observation 2. an act of noticing ; discovery
espiègle
adjective Etymology: French, after Ulespiegle (Till Eulenspiegel), peasant prankster Date: 1816 frolicsome, roguish
espièglerie
noun Etymology: French, from espiègle Date: 1815 the quality or state of being roguish or frolicsome
espionage
noun Etymology: French espionnage, from Middle French, from espionner to spy, from espion spy, from Old Italian spione, from spia, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German ...
Espírito Santo
geographical name state E Brazil bordering on the Atlantic capital Vitória area 17,658 square miles (45,734 square kilometers), population 2,598,231
Espíritu Santo
geographical name island SW Pacific in NW Vanuatu; largest in the group area 1420 square miles (3678 square kilometers), population 22,663
esplanade
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Italian spianata, from spianare to level, from Latin explanare — more at explain Date: 1591 a level open stretch of paved or grassy ...
ESPN
abbreviation Entertainment and Sports Programming Network
Espoo
geographical name town S Finland W of Helsinki population 175,806
espousal
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. betrothal b. wedding c. marriage 2. a taking up or adopting of a cause or belief
espouse
transitive verb (espoused; espousing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French espuser, from Late Latin sponsare to betroth, from Latin sponsus betrothed — more at spouse ...
espouser
noun see espouse
espresso
also expresso noun (plural -sos) Etymology: Italian (caffè) espresso, probably literally, coffee made on the spot at the customer's request Date: 1945 1. coffee brewed by ...
esprit
noun Etymology: French, from Old French espirit, Latin spiritus spirit Date: 1573 1. vivacious cleverness or wit 2. esprit de corps
esprit d'escalier
foreign term see esprit de l'escalier
esprit de corps
noun Etymology: French Date: 1780 the common spirit existing in the members of a group and inspiring enthusiasm, devotion, and strong regard for the honor of the group
esprit de l'escalier
or esprit d'escalier foreign term Etymology: French wit of the staircase ; repartee thought of only too late, on the way home
espy
transitive verb (espied; espying) Etymology: Middle English espien, from Anglo-French espier — more at spy Date: 14th century to catch sight of
Esq
also Esqr abbreviation esquire
Esqr
abbreviation see Esq
Esquiline
geographical name hill in Rome, Italy, one of seven on which the ancient city was built — see Aventine
Esquimau
noun (plural Esquimau or Esquimaux) Etymology: French, from Montagnais (Algonquian language) Date: 1744 Eskimo
esquire
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French esquier squire, from Late Latin scutarius, from Latin scutum shield; akin to Old Irish sciath shield Date: 15th century 1. ...
Esquivel
biographical name Adolfo Pérez 1931- Argentine sculptor & dissident
ess
noun Date: 1540 1. the letter s 2. something resembling the letter S in shape; especially an S-shaped curve in a road
Essaouira
or formerly Mogador geographical name city & port W Morocco on the Atlantic W of Marrakech population 30,061
essay
I. transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to put to a test 2. to make an often tentative or experimental effort to perform ; try Synonyms: see attempt • essayer noun II. ...
essay question
noun Date: 1947 an examination question that requires an answer in a sentence, paragraph, or short composition
essayer
noun see essay I
essayist
noun Date: 1601 a writer of essays
essayistic
adjective Date: 1862 1. of or relating to an essay or an essayist 2. resembling an essay in quality or character
esse quam videri
foreign term Etymology: Latin to be rather than to seem — motto of North Carolina
Essen
I. biographical name Count Hans Henrik von 1755-1824 Swedish field marshal & statesman II. geographical name city W Germany in the Ruhr population 626,989
essence
noun Etymology: Middle English essencia, from Latin essentia, from esse to be — more at is Date: 14th century 1. a. the permanent as contrasted with the accidental ...
Essene
noun Etymology: Greek Essēnos Date: 1553 a member of a monastic brotherhood of Jews in Palestine from the second century B.C. to the second century A.D. • Essenian or ...
Essenian
adjective see Essene
Essenic
adjective see Essene
Essenism
noun see Essene
essential
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or constituting essence ; inherent 2. a. of the utmost importance ; basic, indispensable, necessary b. being a ...
essential oil
noun Date: 1674 any of a class of volatile oils that give plants their characteristic odors and are used especially in perfumes and flavorings, and for aromatherapy — ...
essentialism
noun Date: 1927 1. an educational theory that ideas and skills basic to a culture should be taught to all alike by time-tested methods — compare progressivism 2. a ...
essentialist
adjective or noun see essentialism
essentiality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1616 1. a. essential nature ; essence b. an essential quality, property, or aspect 2. the quality or state of being essential
essentialize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1893 to express or formulate in essential form ; reduce to essentials
essentially
adverb see essential I
essentialness
noun see essential I
Essequibo
geographical name river 630 miles (1014 kilometers) Guyana flowing N into the Atlantic through a wide estuary

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