Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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eubacterium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1913 any of the bacteria excluding those included in the archaebacteria or the archaea • eubacterial adjective
Euboea
or Evvoia geographical name island 90 miles (145 kilometers) long E Greece in the Aegean NE of Attica & Boeotia area 1411 square miles (3654 square kilometers) • Euboean ...
Euboean
adjective or noun see Euboea
eucalypt
noun Date: 1877 eucalyptus
eucalyptol
also eucalyptole noun Date: 1879 a liquid C10H18O with an odor of camphor that occurs in many essential oils (as of eucalyptus) and is used especially as an expectorant and ...
eucalyptole
noun see eucalyptol
eucalyptus
noun (plural eucalypti or -tuses) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from eu- + Greek kalyptos covered, from kalyptein to conceal; from the conical covering of the buds — more ...
eucaryote
variant of eukaryote
Eucharist
noun Etymology: Middle English eukarist, from Anglo-French eukariste, from Late Latin eucharistia, from Greek, Eucharist, gratitude, from eucharistos grateful, from eu- + ...
eucharistic
adjective see Eucharist
euchre
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1841 a card game in which each player is dealt five cards and the player making trump must take three tricks to win a hand II. ...
euchromatic
adjective see euchromatin
euchromatin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1932 the part of chromatin that is genetically active and is largely composed of genes • euchromatic adjective
euclase
noun Etymology: French, from eu- (from Latin) + Greek klasis breaking, from klan to break Date: 1804 a mineral that consists of a brittle silicate of beryllium and aluminum ...
Euclid
I. biographical name flourished circa 300 B.C. Greek geometer II. geographical name city NE Ohio NE of Cleveland population 52,717
Euclid's algorithm
noun see Euclidean algorithm
euclidean
also euclidian adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1660 of, relating to, or based on the geometry of Euclid or a geometry with similar axioms
Euclidean algorithm
noun Date: circa 1955 a method of finding the greatest common divisor of two numbers by dividing the larger by the smaller, the smaller by the remainder, the first remainder ...
euclidean geometry
noun Usage: often capitalized E Date: circa 1865 1. geometry based on Euclid's axioms 2. the geometry of a euclidean space
euclidean space
noun Usage: often capitalized E Date: 1883 a space in which Euclid's axioms and definitions (as of straight and parallel lines and angles of plane triangles) apply
euclidian
adjective see euclidean
eucrite
noun Etymology: German Eukrit, from Greek eukritos easily discerned, from eu- + kritos separated, from krinein to separate — more at certain Date: 1881 1. a stony ...
eucritic
adjective see eucrite
eudaemonism
or eudaimonism noun Etymology: Greek eudaimonia happiness, from eudaimōn having a good attendant spirit, happy, from eu- + daimōn spirit — more at demon Date: 1827 a ...
eudaemonist
noun see eudaemonism
eudaemonistic
adjective see eudaemonism
eudaimonism
noun see eudaemonism
eudiometer
noun Etymology: modification of Italian eudiometro, from Greek eudia fair weather (from eu- + -dia weather—akin to Latin dies day) + Italian -metro -meter, from Greek metron ...
eudiometric
adjective see eudiometer
eudiometrically
adverb see eudiometer
Euganean Hills
geographical name hills NE Italy in SW Veneto between Padua & the Adige
Eugene
I. biographical name 1663-1736 François-Eugène de Savoie-Carignan prince of Savoy & Austrian general II. geographical name city W Oregon on the Willamette population ...
eugenic
adjective Etymology: Greek eugenēs wellborn, from eu- + -genēs born — more at -gen Date: 1883 1. relating to or fitted for the production of good offspring 2. of or ...
eugenically
adverb see eugenic
eugenicist
noun Date: circa 1909 a student or advocate of eugenics
eugenics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1883 a science that deals with the improvement (as by control of human mating) of hereditary qualities of a race or breed
Eugénie
biographical name 1826-1920 Eugénia Maria de Montijo de Guzmán; wife of Napoleon III empress of the French (1853-71)
eugenist
noun Date: 1908 eugenicist
eugenol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary eugen-, from New Latin Eugenia, genus of tropical trees Date: 1886 a colorless aromatic liquid phenol C10H12O2 found ...
eugeosynclinal
adjective see eugeosyncline
eugeosyncline
noun Date: 1942 a narrow rapidly subsiding geosyncline usually with volcanic materials mingled with clastic sediments • eugeosynclinal adjective
euglena
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from eu- + Greek glēnē eyeball, socket of a joint Date: circa 1889 any of a genus (Euglena) of green freshwater flagellates often ...
euglenoid
noun Date: 1885 any of a taxon (Euglenoidina or Euglenophyta) of varied flagellates (as a euglena) that are typically green or colorless stigma-bearing solitary organisms ...
euglenoid movement
noun Date: 1940 writhing usually nonprogressive protoplasmic movement of plastic-bodied euglenoid flagellates
euglobulin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 a simple protein that does not dissolve in pure water
euhemerism
noun Etymology: Euhemerus, 4th century B.C. Greek mythographer Date: 1846 interpretation of myths as traditional accounts of historical persons and events • euhemerist ...
euhemerist
noun see euhemerism
euhemeristic
adjective see euhemerism
eukaryote
also eucaryote noun Etymology: New Latin Eukaryotes, proposed subdivision of protists, from eu- + kary- + -otes, plural noun suffix, from Greek -ōtos — more at -otic Date: ...
eukaryotic
adjective see eukaryote
eulachon
noun (plural eulachon or eulachons) Etymology: Chinook Jargon ulâkân, probably from Lower Chinook u-λ̄alχwə́n Date: 1807 candlefish
Euler
biographical name Leonhard 1707-1783 Swiss mathematician & physicist
Euler-Chelpin
biographical name Hans (Karl August Simon) von 1873-1964 Swedish (German-born) chemist
Euless
geographical name city NE Texas NE of Fort Worth population 46,005
eulogise
British variant of eulogize
eulogist
noun Date: 1808 one who eulogizes
eulogistic
adjective see eulogy
eulogistically
adverb see eulogy
eulogium
noun (plural eulogia or -giums) Etymology: Medieval Latin Date: 1621 eulogy
eulogize
transitive verb (-gized; -gizing) Date: 1810 to speak or write in high praise of ; extol • eulogizer noun
eulogizer
noun see eulogize
eulogy
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle English euloge, from Medieval Latin eulogium, from Greek eulogia praise, from eu- + -logia -logy Date: 15th century 1. a commendatory ...
Eumenides
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from Greek, literally, the gracious ones Date: 1536 the Furies in Greek mythology
eunuch
noun Etymology: Middle English eunuk, from Latin eunuchus, from Greek eunouchos, from eunē bed + echein to have, have charge of — more at scheme Date: 15th century 1. a ...
eunuchism
noun see eunuch
eunuchoid
noun Date: 1906 a sexually deficient individual; especially one lacking in sexual differentiation and tending toward the intersexual state • eunuchoid adjective
euonymus
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin euonymos spindle tree, from Greek euōnymos, from euōnymos having an auspicious name, from eu- + onyma name — more at name ...
eupatrid
noun (plural eupatridae) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Greek eupatridēs, from eu- + patr-, patēr father — more at father Date: 1836 one of the hereditary ...
Eupen
geographical name commune E Belgium E of Liège; formerly in Germany; transferred (with Malmédy) to Belgium 1919 population 17,161
eupeptic
adjective Date: 1699 1. of, relating to, or having good digestion 2. cheerful, optimistic
euphausiid
noun Etymology: New Latin Euphausia, genus of crustaceans Date: 1885 any of an order (Euphausiacea) of small usually luminescent malacostracan crustaceans that resemble ...
euphemise
British variant of euphemize
euphemism
noun Etymology: Greek euphēmismos, from euphēmos auspicious, sounding good, from eu- + phēmē speech, from phanai to speak — more at ban Date: circa 1681 the ...
euphemist
noun see euphemism
euphemistic
adjective see euphemism
euphemistically
adverb see euphemism
euphemize
transitive verb (-mized; -mizing) Date: 1857 to express or describe euphemistically • euphemizer noun
euphemizer
noun see euphemize
euphenic
adjective see euphenics
euphenics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: eu- + phen- (from phenotype) + -ics; after English genotype : eugenics Date: 1963 the therapeutic techniques and ...
euphonic
adjective see euphony
euphonically
adverb see euphony
euphonious
adjective Date: 1774 pleasing to the ear • euphoniously adverb • euphoniousness noun
euphoniously
adverb see euphonious
euphoniousness
noun see euphonious
euphonium
noun Etymology: Greek euphōnos + English -ium (as in harmonium) Date: 1865 a brass instrument smaller than but resembling a tuba and having a range from B flat below the ...
euphony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: French euphonie, from Late Latin euphonia, from Greek euphōnia, from euphōnos sweet-voiced, musical, from eu- + phōnē voice — more at ban ...
euphorbia
noun Etymology: New Latin, alteration of Latin euphorbea, from Euphorbus, 1st century A.D. Greek physician Date: 14th century any of a large genus (Euphorbia) of herbs, ...
euphoria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from euphoros healthy, from eu- + pherein to bear — more at bear Date: circa 1751 a feeling of well-being or elation • euphoric ...
euphoriant
noun Date: 1947 a drug that tends to induce euphoria • euphoriant adjective
euphoric
adjective see euphoria
euphorically
adverb see euphoria
euphotic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1909 of, relating to, or constituting the upper layers of a body of water into which sufficient light ...
Euphratean
adjective see Euphrates
Euphrates
geographical name river 1700 miles (2736 kilometers) SW Asia flowing from E Turkey SE through Syria & Iraq to unite with the Tigris forming the Shatt al Arab — see Kara Su ...
Euphrosyne
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Euphrosynē Date: 1579 one of the three Graces
euphuism
noun Etymology: Euphues, character in prose romances by John Lyly Date: 1592 1. an elegant Elizabethan literary style marked by excessive use of balance, antithesis, and ...
euphuist
noun see euphuism
euphuistic
adjective see euphuism
euphuistically
adverb see euphuism
euploid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1926 having a chromosome number that is an exact multiple of the monoploid number — compare aneuploid • ...
euploidy
noun see euploid
eupnea
also eupnoea noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek eupnoia, from eupnous breathing freely, from eu- + pnein to breathe — more at sneeze Date: circa 1706 normal respiration ...
eupneic
adjective see eupnea
eupnoea
noun see eupnea
Eur
abbreviation Europe; European
Eur-
or Euro- combining form Etymology: Europe European and ; European ; western European ; of the European Union
Euramerican
adjective see Euro-American I
Eurasia
geographical name landmass of Asia & Europe — chiefly used to refer to the two continents as one continent
Eurasian
adjective Date: 1844 1. of a mixed European and Asian origin 2. of or relating to Europe and Asia • Eurasian noun
Eure
geographical name river 140 miles (225 kilometers) NW France flowing N into the Seine
Eureka
geographical name city & port NW California population 26,128
eureka
I. interjection Etymology: Greek heurēka I have found, from heuriskein to find; from the exclamation attributed to Archimedes on discovering a method for determining the purity ...
eurhythmic
adjective see eurythmic
eurhythmics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see eurythmics
eurhythmy
noun see eurythmy
Euripidean
adjective see Euripides
Euripides
biographical name circa 484-406 B.C. Greek dramatist • Euripidean adjective
Euro
adjective Date: 1963 European • Euro noun
euro
I. noun (plural euros) Etymology: Adnyamathanha (Australian aboriginal language of South Australia) yuru Date: 1855 wallaroo II. noun (plural euros; also euro) Etymology: ...
Euro-
combining form see Eur-
Euro-American
I. adjective or Euramerican Date: 1941 1. western 2a, b 2. western 3 II. noun Date: 1949 1. a person of both European and American ancestry 2. a. Anglo-American b. ...
Eurobond
noun Date: 1966 a bond of a United States corporation that is sold outside the United States and that is denominated and paid for in dollars and yields interest in dollars
Eurocentric
adjective Date: 1963 centered on Europe or the Europeans; especially reflecting a tendency to interpret the world in terms of western and especially European or ...
Eurocentrism
noun see Eurocentric
Eurocentrist
noun see Eurocentric
Eurocommunism
noun Date: 1976 the communism especially of western European Communist parties that was marked by a willingness to reach power through coalitions and by independence from ...
Eurocommunist
noun or adjective see Eurocommunism
Eurocracy
noun see Eurocrat
Eurocrat
noun Date: 1961 a staff member of the administrative commission of the European Union • Eurocracy noun
Eurocurrency
noun Date: 1963 moneys (as of the United States and Japan) held outside their countries of origin and used in the money markets of Europe
Eurodollar
noun Date: 1960 a United States dollar held as Eurocurrency
Europa
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Eurōpē Date: 14th century a Phoenician princess carried off by Zeus in the form of a white bull and by him mother of Minos, Rhadamanthus, ...
Europe
geographical name 1. continent of the eastern hemisphere between Asia & the Atlantic area 3,997,929 square miles (10,354,636 square kilometers), population 498,000,000 2. the ...
European
I. adjective Date: 1603 of, relating to, or characteristic of the continent of Europe or its people • Europeanness noun II. noun Date: 1623 1. a native or inhabitant of ...
European American
noun Date: 1881 Euro-American
European bison
noun Date: 1860 wisent
European chafer
noun Date: 1947 an Old World beetle (Rhizotragus majalis syn. Amphimallon majalis) established in parts of eastern North America where its larva is a destructive pest on the ...
European Communities
geographical name see European Union
European Community
geographical name see European Union
European corn borer
noun Date: 1920 an Old World moth (Ostrinia nubilalis) widespread in eastern and central North America where its larva is a major pest in the stems, crowns, and fruits of ...
European Economic Community
or Common Market geographical name economic organization subsumed within the European Union
European flat
noun Date: 1981 a flat-shelled European oyster (Ostrea edulis)
European plan
noun Date: 1834 a hotel plan whereby the daily rates cover only the cost of the room — compare American plan
European red mite
noun Date: 1940 a small bright red or brownish-red oval Old World mite (Panonychus ulmi) that is a destructive orchard pest
European Union
or formerly European Communities or European Community geographical name economic, scientific, and political organization consisting of Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, ...
Europeanism
noun Date: 1828 1. attachment or allegiance to the traditions, interests, or ideals of Europeans 2. the ideal or advocacy of the political and economic integration of Europe
Europeanist
noun Date: 1948 1. a specialist in European culture or history 2. an advocate for Europeanism
Europeanization
noun see Europeanize
Europeanize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1844 to cause to acquire or conform to European characteristics • Europeanization noun
Europeanness
noun see European I
europium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Europa Europe Date: 1901 a divalent and trivalent metallic element of the rare-earth group found especially in monazite sand — see element ...
Europocentric
adjective Date: 1926 Eurocentric • Europocentrism noun
Europocentrism
noun see Europocentric
eury-
combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from eurys; akin to Sanskrit uru broad, wide broad ; wide
eurybathic
adjective Etymology: eury- + Greek bathos depth Date: 1902 capable of living on the bottom in both deep and shallow water
Eurydice
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Eurydikē Date: 15th century the wife of Orpheus whom he attempts to bring back from Hades
euryhaline
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary eury- + Greek halinos of salt, from hals salt — more at salt Date: 1888 able to live in waters of a wide range of ...
eurypterid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek eury- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1871 any of an order (Eurypterida) of usually large aquatic Paleozoic arthropods ...
eurythermal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1881 tolerating a wide range of temperature
eurythermic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 eurythermal
eurythermous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1940 eurythermal
eurythmic
or eurhythmic adjective Date: 1855 1. harmonious 2. of or relating to eurythmy or eurythmics
eurythmics
or eurhythmics noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1912 the art of harmonious bodily movement especially through expressive timed movements in response ...
eurythmy
or eurhythmy noun Etymology: German Eurhythmie, from Latin eurythmia rhythmical movement, from Greek, from eurythmos rhythmical, from eu- + rhythmos rhythm Date: 1949 a ...
eurytopic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary eury- + Greek topos place Date: 1937 tolerant of wide variation in one or more environmental factors
Eusden
biographical name Laurence 1688-1730 English poet; poet laureate (1718-30)
Eusebius of Caesarea
biographical name circa 260-circa 339 theologian & church historian
eusocial
adjective Date: 1966 living in a cooperative group in which usually one female and several males are reproductively active and the nonbreeding individuals care for the young ...
eusociality
noun see eusocial
eustachian tube
noun Usage: often capitalized E Etymology: Bartolommeo Eustachio Date: 1741 a bony and cartilaginous tube connecting the middle ear with the nasopharynx and equalizing air ...
Eustachio
biographical name Bartolomeo 1520-1574 L. Eustachius Italian anatomist
eustatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1906 relating to or characterized by worldwide change of sea level
eustele
noun Date: 1902 a stele typical of dicotyledonous plants that consists of vascular bundles of xylem and phloem strands with parenchymal cells between the bundles
eutectic
adjective Etymology: Greek eutēktos easily melted, from eu- + tēktos melted, from tēkein to melt — more at thaw Date: 1884 1. of an alloy or solution having the lowest ...
eutectoid
adjective or noun see eutectic
Euterpe
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Euterpē Date: 15th century the Greek Muse of music
euthanasia
noun Etymology: Greek, easy death, from euthanatos, from eu- + thanatos death — more at Thanatos Date: 1869 the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of ...
euthanasic
adjective see euthanasia
euthanatize
transitive verb see euthanize
euthanize
also euthanatize transitive verb (-nized; also -tized; -nizing; also -tizing) Etymology: Greek euthanatos Date: 1873 to subject to euthanasia
euthenics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Greek euthenein to thrive Date: 1905 a science that deals with development of human well-being by improvement ...
euthenist
noun see euthenics
eutherian
adjective Etymology: ultimately from New Latin eu- + Greek thērion beast — more at treacle Date: 1880 of or relating to a major division (Eutheria) of mammals comprising ...
euthyroid
adjective Date: 1924 characterized by normal thyroid function
eutrophic
adjective Etymology: probably from German Eutroph eutrophic, from Greek eutrophos well-nourished, nourishing, from eu- + trephein to nourish Date: 1928 of a body of water ...
eutrophication
noun Date: 1946 the process by which a body of water becomes enriched in dissolved nutrients (as phosphates) that stimulate the growth of aquatic plant life usually resulting ...
eutrophy
noun see eutrophic
eV
abbreviation electron volt
EV
abbreviation electric vehicle
EVA
abbreviation extravehicular activity
evacuate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, to draw off morbid humors, from Latin evacuatus, past participle of evacuare to empty, from e- + vacuus empty Date: 15th ...
evacuation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of evacuating 2. something evacuated or discharged
evacuative
adjective see evacuate
evacuee
noun Date: 1918 an evacuated person
evadable
adjective see evade
evade
verb (evaded; evading) Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French evader, from Latin evadere, from e- + vadere to go, walk — more at wade Date: 1513 intransitive verb ...
evader
noun see evade
evagination
noun Etymology: Late Latin evagination-, evaginatio, act of unsheathing, from Latin evaginare to unsheathe, from e- + vagina sheath Date: circa 1676 1. an act or instance of ...
eval
abbreviation evaluation
evaluate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: back-formation from evaluation, from French évaluation, from Middle French evaluacion, from esvaluer to evaluate, from e- + value ...
evaluation
noun see evaluate
evaluative
adjective see evaluate
evaluator
noun see evaluate
evanesce
intransitive verb (-nesced; -nescing) Etymology: Latin evanescere — more at vanish Date: 1822 to dissipate like vapor
evanescence
noun Date: 1751 1. the process or fact of evanescing 2. evanescent quality
evanescent
adjective Etymology: Latin evanescent-, evanescens, present participle of evanescere Date: 1717 tending to vanish like vapor Synonyms: see transient
evangel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English evangile, from Anglo-French evangeile, from Late Latin evangelium, from Greek euangelion good news, gospel, from euangelos bringing good news, ...
evangelic
adjective see evangelical I
evangelical
I. adjective also evangelic Date: 1531 1. of, relating to, or being in agreement with the Christian gospel especially as it is presented in the four Gospels 2. protestant ...
Evangelicalism
noun see evangelical I
evangelically
adverb see evangelical I
evangelism
noun Date: circa 1626 1. the winning or revival of personal commitments to Christ 2. militant or crusading zeal • evangelistic adjective • evangelistically adverb
evangelist
noun Date: 13th century 1. often capitalized a writer of any of the four Gospels 2. a person who evangelizes; specifically a Protestant minister or layman who preaches at ...
evangelistic
adjective see evangelism
evangelistically
adverb see evangelism
evangelization
noun see evangelize
evangelize
verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to preach the gospel to 2. to convert to Christianity intransitive verb to preach the gospel • ...
Evans
I. biographical name Sir Arthur John 1851-1941 English archaeologist II. biographical name Donald Louis 1946- United States secretary of commerce (2001- ) III. biographical ...
Evans, Mount
geographical name mountain 14,264 feet (4348 meters) N central Colorado in Front Range WSW of Denver
Evanston
geographical name city NE Illinois N of Chicago population 74,239
Evansville
geographical name city SW Indiana on Ohio River population 121,582
evap
abbreviation evaporate
evaporate
verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin evaporatus, past participle of evaporare, from e- + vapor steam, vapor Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. ...
evaporated milk
noun Date: 1870 unsweetened milk concentrated by partial evaporation
evaporation
noun see evaporate
evaporative
adjective see evaporate
evaporator
noun see evaporate
evaporite
noun Etymology: evaporation + 1-ite Date: 1924 a sedimentary rock (as gypsum) that originates by evaporation of seawater in an enclosed basin • evaporitic adjective
evaporitic
adjective see evaporite
evapotranspiration
noun Etymology: evaporation + transpiration Date: 1938 loss of water from the soil both by evaporation and by transpiration from the plants growing thereon
Evarts
biographical name William Maxwell 1818-1901 American lawyer & statesman
evasion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin evasion-, evasio, from Latin evadere to evade Date: 15th century 1. a means of ...
evasive
adjective Date: 1637 tending or intended to evade ; equivocal • evasively adverb • evasiveness noun
evasively
adverb see evasive
evasiveness
noun see evasive
Evatt
biographical name Herbert Vere 1894-1965 Australian jurist & statesman
eve
noun Etymology: Middle English eve, even Date: 13th century 1. evening 2. the evening or the day before a special day 3. the period immediately preceding
Eve
noun Etymology: Old English Ēfe, from Late Latin Eva, from Hebrew Ḥawwāh Date: before 12th century the first woman, the wife of Adam, and the mother of Cain and Abel
Evelyn
biographical name John 1620-1706 English diarist
even
I. noun Etymology: Middle English even, eve, from Old English ǣfen Date: before 12th century archaic evening II. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ...
even money
noun Date: 1880 a situation in wagering in which the odds are even
even permutation
noun Date: circa 1932 a permutation that is produced by the successive application of an even number of interchanges of pairs of elements
even so
adverb Date: 1930 in spite of that ; nevertheless
even-keeled
adjective Date: 1945 characterized by stability or consistency
evener
noun see even IV
evenfall
noun Date: 1814 the beginning of evening ; dusk
evenhanded
adjective Date: 1605 fair, impartial • evenhandedly adverb • evenhandedness noun
evenhandedly
adverb see evenhanded
evenhandedness
noun see evenhanded
evening
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ǣfnung, from ǣfnian to grow toward evening, from ǣfen evening; akin to Old High German āband ...
evening grosbeak
noun Date: 1828 a North American grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus) having conspicuous white wing patches with the male being chiefly yellowish with some black
evening prayer
noun Usage: often capitalized E&P Date: 1571 the daily evening office of the Anglican liturgy
evening primrose
noun Date: 1804 any of several dicotyledonous plants of a family (Onagraceae, the evening-primrose family) and especially of the type genus (Oenothera); especially a coarse ...
evening star
noun Date: 1535 1. a bright planet (as Venus) seen especially in the western sky at or after sunset 2. a planet that rises before midnight
evenings
adverb Date: 1652 in the evening repeatedly ; on any evening
evenly
adverb see even II
evenness
noun see even II
evensong
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ǣfensang, from ǣfen evening + sang song Date: before 12th century 1. vespers 1 2. evening prayer
event
noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin eventus, from evenire to happen, from e- + venire to come — more at come Date: 1549 1. a. archaic ...
eventful
adjective Date: 1600 1. full of or rich in events 2. momentous • eventfully adverb • eventfulness noun
eventfully
adverb see eventful
eventfulness
noun see eventful
eventide
noun Date: before 12th century the time of evening ; evening

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