Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389)

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gastroenteritis
noun Date: circa 1829 inflammation of the lining membrane of the stomach and the intestines characterized especially by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and cramps
gastroenterological
adjective see gastroenterology
gastroenterologist
noun see gastroenterology
gastroenterology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1904 a branch of medicine concerned with the structure, functions, diseases, and pathology of the stomach and ...
gastroesophageal
adjective Date: circa 1889 of, relating to, or involving the stomach and esophagus
gastroesophageal reflux
noun Date: 1966 backward flow of the contents of the stomach into the esophagus that is due to improper functioning of a sphincter at the lower end of the esophagus and ...
gastrointestinal
adjective Date: 1831 of, relating to, affecting, or including both stomach and intestine
gastrolith
noun Date: 1854 a stone or pebble ingested by an animal and functioning to grind food in gastric digestion
gastronome
noun Etymology: French, back-formation from gastronomie Date: 1823 a lover of good food; especially one with a serious interest in gastronomy Synonyms: see epicure
gastronomic
adjective see gastronomy
gastronomical
adjective see gastronomy
gastronomically
adverb Date: 1844 1. from the standpoint of gastronomy 2. toward gastronomy
gastronomist
noun Date: 1825 gastronome
gastronomy
noun Etymology: French gastronomie, from Greek Gastronomia, title of a 4th century B.C. poem, from gastro- gastr- + -nomia -nomy Date: 1814 1. the art or science of good ...
gastropod
noun Etymology: New Latin Gastropoda, class name Date: 1826 any of a large class (Gastropoda) of mollusks (as snails and slugs) usually with a univalve shell or none and a ...
gastroscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1888 an endoscope for viewing the interior of the stomach • gastroscopic adjective • gastroscopist noun • ...
gastroscopic
adjective see gastroscope
gastroscopist
noun see gastroscope
gastroscopy
noun see gastroscope
gastrotrich
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek gastr- + trich-, thrix hair — more at trich- Date: 1940 any of a phylum (Gastrotricha) of minute aquatic pseudocoelomate animals that ...
gastrovascular
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1876 functioning in both digestion and circulation
gastrula
noun (plural -las or gastrulae) Etymology: New Latin, from gastr- Date: 1876 an early metazoan embryo in which the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm are established either by ...
gastrular
adjective see gastrula
gastrulate
intransitive verb see gastrulation
gastrulation
noun Date: 1879 the process of becoming or of forming a gastrula • gastrulate intransitive verb
gasworks
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1819 a plant for manufacturing gas and especially illuminating gas
gat
I. archaic past of get II. noun Etymology: probably from Dutch, literally, hole; akin to Old English geat gate Date: 1723 a natural or artificial channel or passage III. ...
gate
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English geat; akin to Old Norse gat opening Date: before 12th century 1. an opening in a wall or fence 2. a city or castle ...
gate-crash
verb see gate-crasher
gate-crasher
noun Date: 1921 a person who enters, attends, or participates without ticket or invitation • gate-crash verb
gâteau
or gateau noun (plural gâteaux or gateaux; also gateaus) Etymology: French, from Old French gastel, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old English wist sustenance, food ...
gateau
noun see gâteau
gated
adjective Date: 1581 1. having or controlled by a gate 2. designed to restrict entrance usually by means of physical barriers, a private security force, and a controlled ...
gatefold
noun Date: 1946 foldout; especially one with a single fold that opens out like a gate
gatehouse
noun Date: 14th century a building or house connected or associated with a gate
gatekeeper
noun Date: 1572 1. one that tends or guards a gate 2. a person who controls access • gatekeeping noun
gatekeeping
noun see gatekeeper
gateleg table
noun Date: 1926 a table with drop leaves supported by movable paired legs
gatepost
noun Date: 1522 the post to which a gate is hung or the one against which it closes
Gates
I. biographical name Henry Louis, Jr. 1950- American educator II. biographical name Horatio circa 1728-1806 American general in Revolution III. biographical name William ...
Gates of the Arctic National Park
geographical name wilderness area N central Alaska in Brooks Range N of the Arctic Circle
Gateshead
geographical name town N England in Tyne and Wear county on the Tyne opposite Newcastle population 196,500
gateway
noun Date: 1707 1. an opening for a gate 2. gate 4a
gateway drug
noun Date: 1982 a drug (as alcohol or marijuana) whose use is thought to lead to the use of and dependence on a harder drug (as cocaine or heroin)
Gath
geographical name city of ancient Philistia ENE of Gaza
gather
I. verb (gathered; gathering) Etymology: Middle English gaderen, from Old English gaderian; akin to Middle High German gadern to unite — more at good Date: before 12th ...
gatherer
noun see gather I
gathering
noun Date: before 12th century 1. assembly, meeting 2. a suppurating swelling ; abscess 3. the collecting of food or raw materials from the wild 4. collection, ...
Gatineau
geographical name 1. river 240 miles (386 kilometers) Canada in SW Quebec flowing S into Ottawa River at Hull 2. town Canada in SW Quebec population 102,898
Gatling gun
noun Etymology: Richard J. Gatling died 1903 American inventor Date: 1867 a machine gun with a revolving cluster of barrels fired once each per revolution
gator
noun Date: 1844 alligator
Gatsbyesque
adjective Date: 1977 resembling or characteristic of the title character or the world of the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
GATT
abbreviation General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade
Gatun Lake
geographical name lake central Panama formed by the Gatun Dam in the Chagres; formerly in Canal Zone
gauche
adjective (sometimes gaucher; sometimes gauchest) Etymology: French, literally, left Date: 1751 1. a. lacking social experience or grace; also not tactful ; crude b. ...
gauchely
adverb see gauche
gaucheness
noun see gauche
Gaucher's disease
noun Etymology: Philippe C. E. Gaucher died 1918 French physician Date: 1902 a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism caused by an enzyme deficiency and characterized ...
gaucherie
noun Etymology: French Date: 1810 a tactless or awkward act
gaucho
noun (plural gauchos) Etymology: American Spanish Date: 1824 a cowboy of the South American pampas
gaud
noun Etymology: Middle English gaude Date: 15th century ornament, trinket
gaudeamus igitur
foreign term Etymology: Latin let us then be merry
gaudery
noun Date: circa 1598 showy ornamentation; especially personal finery
gaudily
adverb see gaudy I
gaudiness
noun see gaudy I
gaudy
I. adjective (gaudier; -est) Date: 1582 1. ostentatiously or tastelessly ornamented 2. marked by extravagance or sometimes tasteless showiness ; outlandish ; also ...
gauffer
variant of goffer
gauge
I. noun also gage Etymology: Middle English gauge, from Anglo-French Date: 15th century 1. a. a measurement (as of linear dimension) according to some standard or system: ...
gauge theory
noun Date: 1973 any of several theories in physics that explain the transmission of a fundamental force between two interacting particles by the exchange of an elementary ...
gauged
adjective Date: 1823 of masonry dressed to size
gauger
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that gauges 2. chiefly British an exciseman who inspects dutiable bulk goods
Gauguin
biographical name (Eugène-Henri-) Paul 1848-1903 French painter • Gauguinesque adjective
Gauguinesque
adjective see Gauguin
Gaul
I. noun Date: 1625 1. a Celt of ancient Gaul 2. Frenchman II. geographical name or Latin Gallia ancient country W Europe comprising the region now occupied by France & ...
gauleiter
noun Etymology: German, from Gau party district in Nazi Germany + Leiter leader Date: 1936 1. a. a district leader in Nazi Germany who served as a provincial governor b. ...
Gaulish
I. adjective Date: 1659 of or relating to the Gauls or their language or land II. noun Date: 1668 the Celtic language of the ancient Gauls — see Indo-European languages ...
Gaulle, de
biographical name Charles (-André-Marie-Joseph) 1890-1970 French general & politician; president of Fifth Republic (1958-69)
Gaullism
noun Etymology: Charles de Gaulle Date: 1943 1. a French political movement during World War II led by Charles de Gaulle in opposition to the Vichy regime 2. a postwar ...
Gaullist
adjective or noun see Gaullism
gault
noun Etymology: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse gald hard-packed snow Date: 1575 chiefly British a heavy thick clay soil
gaum
transitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1656 dialect smudge, smear
gaunt
adjective Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century 1. excessively thin and angular 2. barren, desolate Synonyms: see lean • gauntly adverb • gauntness noun
gauntlet
I. noun also gantlet Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French gantelet, diminutive of gant glove, from Old French, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch want glove, Old ...
gauntleted
adjective see gauntlet I
gauntly
adverb see gaunt
gauntness
noun see gaunt
gaur
noun Etymology: Hindi, from Sanskrit gaura; akin to Sanskrit go bull, cow — more at cow Date: 1806 a large wild ox (Bos gaurus) of India and southeast Asia with a broad ...
gauss
noun (plural gauss; also gausses) Etymology: Karl F. Gauss Date: 1882 the centimeter-gram-second unit of magnetic flux density that is equal to 1 × 10-4 tesla
Gauss
biographical name Carl Friedrich 1777-1855 German mathematician & astronomer
Gaussian
adjective Etymology: Karl F. Gauss Date: 1905 being or having the shape of a normal curve or a normal distribution
Gaussian curve
noun Date: 1905 normal curve
Gaussian distribution
noun Date: 1905 normal distribution
Gautama Buddha
biographical name — see siddhartha gautama
Gauteng
or formerly Pretoria-Witwatersrand-Vereeniging geographical name province central NE Republic of South Africa area 7262 square miles (18,810 square kilometers), population ...
Gautier
biographical name Théophile 1811-1872 French author
gauze
noun Etymology: Middle French gaze Date: 1561 1. a. a thin often transparent fabric used chiefly for clothing or draperies b. a loosely woven cotton surgical dressing ...
gauzelike
adjective see gauze
gauzily
adverb see gauze
gauzy
adjective (gauzier; -est) Date: 1760 1. made of or resembling gauze 2. marked by vagueness, elusiveness, or fuzziness 3. tending to be or make romantic
gavage
noun Etymology: French, from gaver to stuff, force-feed, from Middle French dialect (Picardy) gave gullet, crop Date: 1889 introduction of material into the stomach by a tube
Gavarnie
geographical name waterfall 1385 feet (422 meters) SW France S of Lourdes in the Cirque de Gavarnie (natural amphitheater at head of Gave de Pau) — see Pau 1
gave
past of give
Gave de Pau
geographical name — see Pau 1
gavel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gafol; akin to Old English giefan to give Date: before 12th century rent or tribute in medieval England II. noun ...
gavel-to-gavel
adjective Date: 1968 extending from the beginning to the end of a meeting or session
gavelkind
noun Etymology: Middle English gavelkynde, from 1gavel + kinde kind Date: 14th century a tenure of land existing chiefly in Kent from Anglo-Saxon times until 1925 and ...
gavial
noun Etymology: French, modification of Bengali ghãṛiyal or Hindi ghaṛyal — more at gharial Date: circa 1825 gharial
Gavins Point Dam
geographical name dam SE South Dakota & NE Nebraska in Missouri River — see Lewis and Clark Lake
Gävle
geographical name city & port E Sweden on Gulf of Bothnia NNW of Stockholm population 89,194
gavotte
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Old Occitan gavato, from gavot Alpine dweller Date: 1696 1. a dance of French peasant origin marked by the raising rather ...
Gawain
noun Date: 14th century a knight of the Round Table and nephew of King Arthur
gawk
I. noun Etymology: probably from English dialect gawk left-handed Date: 1757 a clumsy stupid person ; lout II. intransitive verb Etymology: perhaps alteration of obsolete ...
gawker
noun see gawk II
gawkily
adverb see gawky
gawkiness
noun see gawky
gawkish
adjective Date: 1840 gawky • gawkishly adverb • gawkishness noun
gawkishly
adverb see gawkish
gawkishness
noun see gawkish
gawky
adjective (gawkier; -est) Date: 1759 awkward, clumsy • gawkily adverb • gawkiness noun • gawky noun
gawp
intransitive verb Etymology: English dialect gawp to yawn, gape, from obsolete galp, from Middle English Date: 1855 chiefly British gawk • gawper noun
gawper
noun see gawp
Gay
biographical name John 1685-1732 English poet & dramatist
gay
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French gai, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German gāhi quick, sudden Date: 14th century 1. a. happily excited ; ...
Gay-Lussac
biographical name Joseph-Louis 1778-1850 French chemist & physicist
Gaya
geographical name city NE India in central Bihar population 291,220
gaydar
noun Etymology: blend of gay and radar Date: 1982 slang the ability to recognize homosexuals through observation or intuition
gayety
variant of gaiety
gayly
variant of gaily
gayness
noun see gay I
gaz
abbreviation gazette
Gaza
or Arabic Ghazze geographical name Palestinian-administered city near the Mediterranean; with surrounding coastal district ( Gaza Strip, adjoining Sinai Peninsula), ...
Gazan
noun or adjective see Gaza
gazania
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Theodorus Gaza died 1478 Greek scholar Date: 1813 any of a genus (Gazania) of South African composite herbs often cultivated for their ...
gazar
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1967 a silk organza
gaze
I. intransitive verb (gazed; gazing) Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century to fix the eyes in a steady intent look often with eagerness or studious attention • ...
gazebo
noun (plural -bos) Etymology: perhaps from 1gaze + Latin -ebo (as in videbo I shall see) Date: 1752 1. belvedere 2. a freestanding roofed structure usually open on the sides
gazehound
noun Date: 1610 sighthound
gazelle
noun (plural gazelles; also gazelle) Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Arabic ghazāl Date: 1600 any of numerous small to medium graceful and swift African and ...
gazer
noun see gaze I
gazette
I. noun Etymology: French, from Italian gazetta Date: circa 1598 1. newspaper 2. an official journal 3. British an announcement in an official gazette II. transitive ...
gazetteer
noun Date: 1611 1. archaic journalist, publicist 2. [The Gazetteer's: or, Newsman's Interpreter, a geographical index edited by Laurence Echard] a geographical dictionary; ...
Gaziantep
or formerly Aintab geographical name city S Turkey N of Aleppo, Syria population 603,434
gazillion
noun Etymology: alteration of zillion Date: 1978 zillion • gazillion adjective • gazillionth adjective
gazillionaire
noun Date: 1980 zillionaire
gazillionth
adjective see gazillion
gazogene
variant of gasogene
gazoo
noun (plural gazoos) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1965 slang wazoo
gazpacho
noun (plural -chos) Etymology: Spanish Date: 1775 a spicy soup that is usually made from chopped raw vegetables (as tomato, onion, pepper, and cucumber) and that is served ...
GB
I. noun Etymology: code name Date: 1961 sarin II. abbreviation 1. gigabyte 2. Great Britain
GC
abbreviation gas chromatograph; gas chromatography
GCA
abbreviation ground-controlled approach
GCB
abbreviation Knight Grand Cross of the Bath
GCD
abbreviation greatest common divisor
GCF
abbreviation greatest common factor
gd
abbreviation good
Gd
symbol gadolinium
Gdańsk
or German Danzig geographical name city & port N Poland on Gulf of Gdańsk population 464,649
Gdańsk, Gulf of
or Gulf of Danzig geographical name inlet of S Baltic Sea in N Poland & W Russia
GDP
abbreviation gross domestic product
GDR
abbreviation German Democratic Republic
Gdynia
geographical name city & port N Poland on Gulf of Gdańsk NNW of Gdańsk population 250,936
ge
abbreviation gilt edges
Ge
symbol germanium
gear
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gere, from Old Norse gervi, gǫrvi; akin to Old English gearwe equipment, clothing, gearu ready — more at yare Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
gear up
intransitive verb Date: 1943 to get ready
gearbox
noun Date: 1887 1. gearing 2 2. transmission 3
gearchange
noun Date: 1927 British gearshift
gearhead
noun Date: 1974 a person who pursues mechanical or technological interests (as in automobiles or computers)
gearing
noun Date: 1833 1. the act or process of providing or fitting with gears 2. the parts by which motion is transmitted from one portion of machinery to another; especially a ...
gearless
adjective see gear I
gearshift
noun Date: circa 1924 a mechanism by which the transmission gears in a power-transmission system are engaged and disengaged; also a lever for controlling such a mechanism
gearwheel
noun Date: circa 1874 gear 6a(2)
Geat
noun Etymology: Old English Gēat Date: before 12th century a member of a Scandinavian people of southern Sweden to which the legendary hero Beowulf belonged • Geatish ...
Geatish
adjective see Geat
Gebel Katherina
geographical name — see katherina (Gebel)
Gebel Musa
geographical name — see musa (Gebel)
Geber
biographical name — see jābir ibn ḥayyan
gecko
noun (plural geckos or geckoes) Etymology: perhaps from Malay dialect geʔkok Date: 1774 any of numerous small chiefly tropical and nocturnal insectivorous lizards (family ...
GED
abbreviation 1. General Educational Development (tests) 2. general equivalency diploma
gedankenexperiment
noun Etymology: German, from Gedanke thought + Experiment experiment Date: 1941 an experiment carried out in thought only
Geddes
biographical name Norman Bel 1893-1958 American designer
Gediz
or Sarabat geographical name river 217 miles (349 kilometers) W Turkey in Asia flowing W into Gulf of Izmir
gee
I. verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1628 verb imperative — used as a direction to turn to the right or move ahead; compare haw V intransitive verb geed geeing to ...
gee whiz
interjection Date: 1876 gee II
gee-whiz
adjective Date: 1934 1. designed to arouse wonder or excitement or to amplify the merits or significance of something especially by the use of clever or sensational language ...
geegaw
variant of gewgaw
geek
noun Etymology: probably from English dialect geek, geck fool, from Low German geck, from Middle Low German Date: 1914 1. a carnival performer often billed as a wild man ...
geekdom
noun see geek
geeked
adjective Date: 1984 slang filled with excitement or enthusiasm
geekiness
noun see geek
geeky
adjective see geek
Geelong
geographical name city & port SE Australia in S Victoria on Port Phillip Bay SW of Melbourne population 13,036
Geelvink Bay
geographical name — see Sarera Bay
geese
plural of goose
geez
variant of jeez
Geez
noun Etymology: Geez gə‘əz Date: 1790 a Semitic language formerly spoken in northern highland Ethiopia and still used as the liturgical language of the Christian church ...
geezer
noun Etymology: probably alteration of Scots guiser one in disguise Date: 1885 a queer, odd, or eccentric person — used especially of elderly men • geezerhood noun
geezerhood
noun see geezer
gefilte fish
noun Etymology: Yiddish, literally, stuffed fish Date: 1892 balls or cakes of seasoned minced fish usually simmered in a fish stock or baked in a tomato sauce
gegenschein
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: German, from gegen against, counter- + Schein shine Date: 1877 a faint light about 20° across on the celestial sphere opposite the ...
Gehenna
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek Geenna, from Hebrew Gē' Hinnōm, literally, valley of Hinnom Date: circa 1534 1. a place or state of misery 2. hell 1a(2)
Gehrig
biographical name Lou 1903-1941 Henry Louis Gehrig American baseball player
Gehry
biographical name Frank Owen 1929- American (Canadian-born) architect
Geiger counter
noun Etymology: Hans Geiger died 1945 German physicist Date: 1924 an instrument for detecting the presence and intensity of radiations (as cosmic rays or particles from a ...
Geiger-Müller counter
noun Etymology: W. Müller, 20th century German physicist Date: 1932 Geiger counter
Geikie
biographical name Sir Archibald 1835-1924 Scottish geologist
Geisel
biographical name Theodor Seuss 1904-1991 pseudonym Dr. Seuss American writer & illustrator
geisha
noun (plural geisha or geishas) Etymology: Japanese, from gei art + -sha person Date: 1881 a Japanese girl or woman who is trained to provide entertaining and lighthearted ...
gel
I. noun Etymology: gelatin Date: 1899 1. a colloid in a more solid form than a sol; broadly jelly 2 2. a thin colored transparent sheet used over a stage light to color ...
gel electrophoresis
noun Date: 1955 electrophoresis in which molecules (as proteins and nucleic acids) migrate through a gel and especially a polyacrylamide gel and separate into bands according ...
gel permeation chromatography
noun Date: 1966 chromatography in which macromolecules (as polymers) in a solution are separated by size on a column packed with a gel (as of polystyrene)
gelable
adjective see gel II
gelada
noun see gelada baboon
gelada baboon
noun Etymology: Amharic č'ällada Date: 1871 a large long-haired chiefly herbivorous primate (Theropithecus gelada) of Ethiopia related to the baboon — called also gelada
geländesprung
noun Etymology: German, from Gelände open fields + Sprung jump Date: 1931 a jump usually over an obstacle in skiing that is made from a low crouch with the aid of both ski ...
gelate
intransitive verb (gelated; gelating) Date: 1915 gel
gelatin
also gelatine noun Etymology: French gélatine edible jelly, gelatin, from Italian gelatina, from gelato, past participle of gelare to freeze, from Latin — more at cold Date: ...
gelatine
noun see gelatin
gelatinization
noun Date: 1843 the process of converting into a gelatinous form or into a jelly • gelatinize verb
gelatinize
verb see gelatinization
gelatinous
adjective Date: 1712 1. resembling gelatin or jelly ; viscous 2. of, relating to, or containing gelatin • gelatinously adverb • gelatinousness noun
gelatinously
adverb see gelatinous
gelatinousness
noun see gelatinous
gelation
I. noun Etymology: Latin gelation-, gelatio, from gelare Date: 1854 the action or process of freezing II. noun Etymology: 1gel + -ation Date: 1915 the formation of a gel ...
gelato
noun (plural gelati; also -tos) Etymology: Italian, literally, frozen Date: 1929 a soft rich ice cream containing little or no air
gelcap
noun Date: 1986 a capsule-shaped tablet coated with gelatin for easy swallowing
geld
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse gelda; akin to Old English gelde sterile Date: 14th century 1. castrate 2. to deprive of a natural or ...
Gelderland
geographical name province E Netherlands bordering on IJsselmeer capital Arnhem area 1981 square miles (5131 square kilometers), population 1,839,883
gelding
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse geldingr, from gelda Date: 14th century 1. a castrated animal; specifically a castrated male horse 2. archaic eunuch
gelée
noun Etymology: French, jelly, from Middle French — more at jelly Date: 1966 a cosmetic gel
Gelibolu
geographical name — see Gallipoli
gelid
adjective Etymology: Latin gelidus, from gelu frost, cold — more at cold Date: 1599 extremely cold ; icy • gelidity noun • gelidly adverb
gelidity
noun see gelid
gelidly
adverb see gelid
gelignite
noun Etymology: gelatin + Latin ignis fire + English -ite — more at igneous Date: 1889 a dynamite in which the adsorbent base is largely potassium nitrate or a similar ...
Gell-Mann
biographical name Murray 1929- American physicist
gellant
noun Date: 1956 a substance used to produce gelling
Gellée
biographical name Claude — see Claude Lorrain
Gelsenkirchen
geographical name city W Germany in the Ruhr W of Dortmund population 293,839
gelt
noun Etymology: Dutch & German geld & Yiddish gelt; all akin to Old English geld 2geld Date: circa 1529 money
GEM
abbreviation ground-effect machine
gem
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gemme, from Anglo-French, from Latin gemma bud, gem Date: 14th century 1. a. jewel b. a precious or sometimes semiprecious stone cut ...
Gemara
noun Etymology: Aramaic gĕmārā completion Date: 1613 a commentary on the Mishnah forming the second part of the Talmud • Gemaric adjective • Gemarist noun
Gemaric
adjective see Gemara
Gemarist
noun see Gemara
gemeinschaft
noun Etymology: German, community, from gemein common, general (from Old High German gimeini) + -schaft -ship — more at mean Date: 1937 a spontaneously arising organic ...
gemfibrozil
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1976 a drug C15H22O3 that regulates blood serum lipids and is used especially to lower the levels of triglycerides and increase the ...
geminal
adjective Etymology: Latin geminus twin Date: 1967 relating to or characterized by two usually similar substituents on the same atom • geminally adverb
geminally
adverb see geminal
geminate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin geminatus, past participle of geminare to double, from geminus twin Date: 15th century 1. arranged in pairs ; duplicate 2. being a sequence of ...
gemination
noun see geminate II
Gemini
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: Latin (genitive Geminorum), literally, the twins (Castor and Pollux) Date: 14th century 1. the third zodiacal ...
gemma
noun (plural gemmae) Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1741 bud; broadly an asexual reproductive body that becomes detached from a parent plant
gemmation
noun Date: circa 1839 reproduction by gemmae
gemmologist
noun see gemologist
gemmology
noun see gemology
gemmule
noun Etymology: French, from Latin gemmula, diminutive of gemma Date: circa 1828 a small bud: a. a theoretical particle proposed in the theory of pangenesis that is shed ...
gemmy
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having the characteristics desired in a gemstone 2. bright, glittering
gemological
adjective see gemology
gemologist
also gemmologist noun Date: 1931 a specialist in gems; specifically one who appraises gems
gemology
or gemmology noun Etymology: Latin gemma gem Date: 1811 the science of gems • gemological adjective
gemot
or gemote noun Etymology: Old English gemōt, from ge-, perfective prefix + mōt assembly — more at co-, moot Date: before 12th century a judicial or legislative assembly ...
gemote
noun see gemot
gemsbok
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from German Gemsbock male chamois, from Gems chamois + Bock male goat Date: 1777 a large and strikingly marked oryx (Oryx gazella) formerly ...
gemstone
noun Date: before 12th century a mineral or petrified material that when cut and polished can be used in jewelry

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