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Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389)

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Ghanian
adjective or noun see Ghana
Gharapuri
geographical name — see Elephanta
Ghardaïa
geographical name commune N central Algeria population 89,415
gharial
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu ghaṛyāl, ghaṛiyāl, ultimately from Sanskrit ghaṇṭika crocodilian Date: circa 1809 a large long-snouted crocodilian (Gavialis gangeticus ...
gharry
noun (plural gharries) Etymology: Hindi & Urdu gāṛī Date: 1810 a horse-drawn cab used especially in India and Egypt
ghast
adjective Date: 1622 archaic ghastly
ghastful
adjective Date: 14th century archaic frightful • ghastfully adverb, archaic
ghastfully
adverb see ghastful
ghastliness
noun see ghastly
ghastly
adjective (ghastlier; -est) Etymology: Middle English gastly, from gasten to terrify — more at gast Date: 14th century 1. a. terrifyingly horrible to the senses ; ...
ghat
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu ghāṭ, from Sanskrit ghaṭṭa Date: 1783 a broad flight of steps that is situated on an Indian riverbank and that provides access to the ...
Ghats
geographical name — see Eastern Ghats, Western Ghats
Ghazālī, al-
biographical name 1058-1111 Abu Ḥāmid Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad aṭ-Ṭūsī al-Ghazālī Islamic jurist, theologian, & mystic
Ghazni
geographical name city E central Afghanistan; once capital of a Muslim kingdom extending from the Tigris to the Ganges population 35,900
Ghazze
geographical name — see Gaza
GHB
noun Date: 1964 a metabolite C4H8O3 of gamma-aminobutyric acid that is a depressant of the central nervous system and is used illicitly in the form of its synthetic sodium ...
ghee
or ghi noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu ghī, from Sanskrit ghṛta Date: 1665 a semifluid clarified butter made especially in India
Ghent
or Flemish Gent or French Gand geographical name city NW central Belgium capital of East Flanders population 230,246
gherkin
noun Etymology: Dutch gurken, plural of gurk cucumber, ultimately from Middle Greek agouros Date: 1661 1. a. a small prickly fruit used for pickling; also a pickle made ...
ghetto
I. noun (plural ghettos; also ghettoes) Etymology: Italian, from Venetian dialect ghèto island where Jews were forced to live, literally, foundry (located on the island), from ...
ghetto blaster
noun Date: 1981 boom box
ghettoization
noun see ghettoize
ghettoize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1939 to isolate in or as if in a ghetto • ghettoization noun
ghi
noun see ghee
Ghibelline
noun Etymology: Italian Ghibellino Date: 1573 a member of an aristocratic political party in medieval Italy supporting the authority of the German emperors — compare Guelf
Ghiberti
biographical name Lorenzo circa 1378-1455 Florentine goldsmith, painter, & sculptor
ghillie
variant of gillie
Ghirlandaio
biographical name see Ghirlandajo
Ghirlandajo
or Ghirlandaio biographical name Domenico 1449-1494 originally Domenico di Tommaso Bigordi Florentine painter
Ghose
biographical name Sri Aurobindo — see Aurobindo
ghost
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gost, gast, from Old English gāst; akin to Old High German geist spirit, Sanskrit heḍa anger Date: before 12th century 1. the seat of ...
Ghost Dance
noun Date: 1890 a group dance of a late 19th century American Indian messianic cult believed to promote the return of the dead and the restoration of traditional ways of life
ghost story
noun Date: 1819 1. a story about ghosts 2. a tale based on imagination rather than fact
ghost town
noun Date: 1931 a once-flourishing town wholly or nearly deserted usually as a result of the exhaustion of some natural resource
ghost word
noun Date: 1886 a word form never in established usage
ghosting
noun Date: circa 1957 a faint double image on a television screen; also the formation of such images
ghostlike
adjective see ghost I
ghostliness
noun see ghostly
ghostly
adjective (ghostlier; -est) Date: before 12th century 1. of or relating to the soul ; spiritual 2. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a ghost ; spectral • ...
ghostwrite
verb (ghostwrote; ghostwritten) Etymology: back-formation from ghostwriter Date: 1927 intransitive verb to write for and in the name of another transitive verb to write ...
ghostwriter
noun see ghostwrite
ghosty
adjective see ghost I
ghoul
noun Etymology: Arabic ghūl Date: 1786 1. a legendary evil being that robs graves and feeds on corpses 2. one suggestive of a ghoul; especially one who shows morbid ...
ghoulie
noun Date: 1928 ghoul 1
ghoulish
adjective see ghoul
ghoulishly
adverb see ghoul
ghoulishness
noun see ghoul
GHQ
abbreviation general headquarters
Ghudamis
geographical name see Ghadames
GHz
abbreviation gigahertz
gi
abbreviation gill
GI
I. adjective Etymology: galvanized iron; from abbreviation used in listing such articles as garbage cans, but taken as abbreviation for government issue Date: circa 1935 1. ...
Giacconi
biographical name Ricardo 1931- American (Italian-born) astrophysicist
Giacometti
biographical name Alberto 1901-1966 Swiss artist
giant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English giaunt, from Anglo-French geant, from Latin gigant-, gigas, from Greek Date: 14th century 1. a legendary humanlike being of great stature ...
giant anteater
noun Date: 1940 a large bushy-tailed anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) of Central and South America
giant cactus
noun Date: circa 1884 saguaro
giant clam
noun Date: circa 1889 a very large clam (Tridacna gigas) found on the coral reefs of the Indian and Pacific oceans that sometimes weighs more than 500 pounds (227 kilograms)
giant panda
noun Date: 1920 panda 2
giant reed
noun Date: 1851 a tall perennial grass (Arundo donax) native to Mediterranean regions that has woody stems used especially in making baskets, shelters, and reeds for ...
giant schnauzer
noun Date: circa 1934 any of a breed of powerful heavyset schnauzers that attain a height of 23 1/2 to 27 1/2 inches (60 to 70 centimeters)
giant sequoia
noun Date: circa 1931 an evergreen tree (Sequoiadendron giganteum) of the bald cypress family that grows on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountain range and ...
giant slalom
noun Date: 1952 a slalom race for skiers on a longer and steeper course than that used for the regular slalom
giant squid
noun Date: circa 1890 any of a genus (Architeuthis) of extremely large squids that may attain a length of 60 feet (18 meters) and include the largest mollusks known
giant star
noun Date: 1912 a star of great luminosity and of large mass
giant tortoise
noun Date: circa 1909 any of various large long-lived herbivorous land tortoises (genus Geochelone) formerly common on the islands of the western Indian Ocean and on the ...
giant water bug
noun Date: 1901 any of a family (Belostomatidae and especially genus Lethocerus) of very large predatory aquatic bugs capable of inflicting a painful bite
Giant's Causeway
geographical name formation of prismatic basaltic columns Northern Ireland on N coast of Moyle
giantess
noun Date: 14th century a female giant
giantism
noun Date: 1639 1. the quality or state of being a giant 2. gigantism 2
giantlike
adjective see giant I
giaour
noun Etymology: French, from Italian dialect (Venetian) giaur, from Turkish gâvur, from Persian gawr, gabr Date: 1564 one outside the Islamic faith ; infidel 2a
giardia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Alfred M. Giard died 1908 French biologist Date: 1918 any of a genus (Giardia) of flagellate protozoans inhabiting the intestines of various ...
giardiasis
noun (plural giardiases) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1919 infestation with or disease caused by a giardia
Giauque
biographical name William Francis 1895-1982 American chemist
Gib
or Gibr abbreviation Gibraltar
gib
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Gib, nickname for Gilbert Date: 1561 a male cat; specifically a castrated male cat II. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1795 ...
gibber
intransitive verb (gibbered; gibbering) Etymology: imitative Date: 1604 to speak rapidly, inarticulately, and often foolishly • gibber noun
gibberellic acid
noun Date: 1954 a crystalline acid C19H22O6 that is a gibberellin used especially in the malting of barley
gibberellin
noun Etymology: New Latin Gibberella fujikoroi, fungus from which it was first isolated Date: 1939 any of several growth-regulating plant hormones that promote cell ...
gibberish
noun Etymology: probably from gibber Date: circa 1554 unintelligible or meaningless language: a. a technical or esoteric language b. pretentious or needlessly obscure ...
gibbet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gibet, from Anglo-French Date: 13th century 1. gallows 1a 2. an upright post with a projecting arm for hanging the bodies of executed ...
gibbon
noun Etymology: French Date: 1774 any of a genus (Hylobates of the family Hylobatidae) of agile brachiating tailless apes of southeastern Asia that are the smallest and most ...
Gibbon
biographical name Edward 1737-1794 English historian • Gibbonesque or Gibbonian adjective
Gibbonesque
adjective see Gibbon
Gibbonian
adjective see Gibbon
Gibbons
I. biographical name James 1834-1921 American cardinal II. biographical name Orlando 1538-1625 English organist & composer
gibbosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century protuberance, swelling
gibbous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin gibbosus humpbacked, from Latin gibbus hump Date: 14th century 1. a. marked by convexity or swelling b. of the moon ...
Gibbs
I. biographical name James 1682-1754 British architect II. biographical name J(osiah) Willard 1839-1903 American mathematician & physicist
gibe
or jibe verb (gibed or jibed; gibing or jibing) Etymology: perhaps from Middle French giber to shake, handle roughly Date: 1567 intransitive verb to utter taunting words ...
Gibeon
geographical name city of ancient Palestine NW of Jerusalem • Gibeonite noun
Gibeonite
noun see Gibeon
giber
noun see gibe
giblets
noun plural Etymology: Middle English gibelet giblets piece, nonessential bit, from Anglo-French gibelot, from Old French (Picard) giblé stew of wildfowl Date: 15th century ...
Gibr
abbreviation see Gib
Gibraltar
I. noun Etymology: Gibraltar, fortress in the British colony of Gibraltar Date: 1776 an impregnable stronghold II. geographical name town & port on Rock of Gibraltar; a ...
Gibraltar, Rock of
or ancient Calpe geographical name headland on S coast of Spain at E end of Strait of Gibraltar; highest point 1396 feet (426 meters) — see Pillars of Hercules
Gibraltar, Strait of
geographical name channel between Spain & Africa connecting the Atlantic & Mediterranean about 8 miles (12.8 kilometers) wide at narrowest point
Gibraltarian
noun see Gibraltar II
Gibran
or Jibran biographical name Kahlil 1883-1931 Jubrān Khalīl Jubrān Lebanese novelist, poet, & artist in U.S.
Gibson
I. noun Etymology: from the name Gibson Date: 1948 a martini garnished with a cocktail onion II. biographical name Charles Dana 1867-1944 American illustrator III. ...
Gibson girl
adjective Etymology: Charles D. Gibson Date: 1936 of or relating to a style especially in women's clothing characterized by high necks, full sleeves, and wasp waists
gid
noun Etymology: back-formation from giddy Date: 1601 a disease especially of sheep caused by the larva of a tapeworm (Multiceps multiceps) in the brain
giddap
verb imperative see giddyap
giddily
adverb see giddy I
giddiness
noun see giddy I
giddy
I. adjective (giddier; -est) Etymology: Middle English gidy mad, foolish, from Old English gydig possessed, mad; akin to Old English god god Date: 14th century 1. a. dizzy ...
giddyap
or giddyup; also giddap verb imperative Etymology: alteration of get up Date: circa 1897 — a command (as to a horse) to go ahead or go faster
giddyup
verb imperative see giddyap
Gide
biographical name André 1869-1951 French novelist, critic, & essayist
Gideon
noun Etymology: Hebrew Gidh‘ōn Date: 1535 1. an early Hebrew hero noted for his defeat of the Midianites 2. a member of an interdenominational organization whose ...
gie
chiefly Scottish variant of give
Gielgud
biographical name Sir (Arthur) John 1904-2000 English actor
Giemsa
noun see Giemsa stain
Giemsa stain
noun Etymology: Gustav Giemsa died 1948 German chemotherapist Date: circa 1909 a stain consisting of eosin and a blue dye and used chiefly in the differential staining of ...
Giemsa's stain
noun see Giemsa stain
Giemsa-stained
adjective see Giemsa stain
Gierek
biographical name Edward 1913-2001 1st secretary of Polish Communist party (1970-80)
Gieseking
biographical name Walter Wilhelm 1895-1956 German (French-born) pianist
Giessen
geographical name city W central Germany N of Frankfurt am Main population 73,763
GIF
noun Etymology: graphic interchange format Date: 1987 a computer file format for the compression and storage of digital video images; also such an image itself
GIFT
abbreviation gamete intrafallopian transfer; gamete intrafallopian tube transfer
gift
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse, something given, talent; akin to Old English giefan to give Date: 12th century 1. a notable capacity, talent, or ...
gift certificate
noun Date: 1942 a certificate entitling the recipient to receive goods or services of a specified value from the issuer
gift of gab
Date: 1839 the ability to talk glibly and persuasively
gift of tongues
Etymology: from the gifts of the Spirit in 1 Corinthians 12:1-13 Date: 1560 a charisma identified by ecstatic usually unintelligible speech
gift wrap
transitive verb Date: 1936 to wrap (merchandise intended as a gift) decoratively
gifted
adjective Date: 1644 1. having great natural ability ; talented 2. revealing a special gift • giftedly adverb • giftedness noun
giftedly
adverb see gifted
giftedness
noun see gifted
giftee
noun see gift II
giftware
noun Date: 1904 wares or goods suitable for gifts
Gifu
geographical name city Japan in central Honshu population 410,318
gig
I. noun Etymology: Middle English -gyge (in whyrlegyge whirligig), of unknown origin Date: 1570 1. something that whirls or is whirled: as a. obsolete top, whirligig b. ...
giga-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek gigas giant billion (109)
gigabit
noun Date: 1970 one billion bits
gigabyte
noun Date: 1975 1024 megabytes or 1,073,741,824 bytes; also one billion bytes
gigaflop
noun Etymology: floating-point operation Date: 1976 a unit of measure for the calculating speed of a computer equal to one billion floating-point operations per second
gigahertz
noun Date: 1964 a unit of frequency equal to one billion hertz
gigantesque
adjective Date: 1821 of enormous or grotesquely large proportions
gigantic
adjective Etymology: Greek gigantikos, from gigant-, gigas giant Date: 1630 exceeding the usual or expected (as in size, force, or prominence) Synonyms: see enormous ...
gigantically
adverb see gigantic
gigantism
noun Date: circa 1885 1. giantism 1 2. development to abnormally large size 3. excessive vegetative growth often accompanied by the inhibiting of reproduction
gigawatt
noun Date: circa 1962 a unit of power equal to one billion watts
giggle
I. verb (giggled; giggling) Etymology: imitative Date: 1509 intransitive verb to laugh with repeated short catches of the breath transitive verb to utter with a giggle ...
giggler
noun see giggle I
gigglingly
adverb see giggle I
giggly
adjective see giggle I
GIGO
abbreviation garbage in, garbage out
gigolo
noun (plural -los) Etymology: French Date: 1922 1. a man supported by a woman usually in return for his attentions 2. a professional dancing partner or male escort
gigot
noun (plural gigots) Etymology: Middle French, diminutive of gigue fiddle; from its shape — more at jig Date: 1526 1. a leg of meat (as lamb) especially when cooked 2. a ...
gigue
noun Etymology: French, from English jig Date: 1685 a lively dance movement (as of a suite) having compound triple rhythm and composed in fugal style
Gijón
geographical name city & port NW Spain in Asturias province on Bay of Biscay population 259,067
Gila
geographical name river 630 miles (1014 kilometers) New Mexico & Arizona flowing W into Colorado River
Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument
geographical name reservation SW New Mexico including cliff-dweller ruins
Gila monster
noun Etymology: Gila River, Ariz. Date: 1877 a large orange and black venomous lizard (Heloderma suspectum) of the southwestern United States; also a related lizard (H. ...
gilbert
noun Etymology: William Gilbert Date: 1893 the centimeter-gram-second unit of magnetomotive force equivalent to 10÷4π ampere-turn
Gilbert
I. biographical name Cass 1859-1934 American architect II. biographical name Sir Humphrey circa 1539-1583 English navigator III. biographical name Walter 1932- American ...
Gilbert and Ellice
geographical name island group W Pacific; until 1976 a British colony; now divided into the independent countries of Kiribati and Tuvalu
Gilbert Islands
geographical name islands Kiribati in W Pacific • Gilbertese noun or adjective
Gilbertese
noun or adjective see Gilbert Islands
Gilbertian
adjective see Gilbert V
Gilboa, Mount
geographical name mountain 1631 feet (497 meters) N Israel W of Jordan River & S of Plain of Esdraelon
gild
I. transitive verb (gilded or gilt; gilding) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gyldan; akin to Old English gold gold Date: 14th century 1. to overlay with or as if ...
gild the lily
phrasal to add unnecessary ornamentation to something beautiful in its own right
gilder
noun see gild I
Gilead
geographical name mountainous region of ancient Palestine E of Jordan River; now in Jordan • Gileadite noun
Gileadite
noun see Gilead
Gilgamesh
Date: 1894 a legendary Sumerian king and hero of the Gilgamesh Epic
Gilgit
geographical name 1. region NW Kashmir; under Pakistani control 2. town NW Kashmir on Gilgit River (tributary of the Indus) population 4671
gill
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gille, from Medieval Latin gillus, from Late Latin gillo, gello water pot Date: 14th century — see weight table II. noun Etymology: ...
gill arch
noun Date: 1879 1. any of the bony or cartilaginous arches or curved bars extending dorsoventrally and placed one behind the other on each side of the pharynx and supporting ...
gill cleft
noun Date: circa 1889 1. gill slit 1 2. gill slit 2
gill cover
noun Date: 1776 operculum 1b
gill net
noun Date: 1796 a flat net suspended vertically in the water with meshes that allow the head of a fish to pass but entangle the gills upon withdrawal
gill raker
noun Date: 1880 any of the bony processes on a gill arch that divert solid substances away from the gills
gill slit
noun Date: 1854 1. any of the openings or clefts between the gill arches in vertebrates that breathe by gills through which water taken in at the mouth passes to the exterior ...
gilled
adjective see gill II
giller
noun see gill III
Gillespie
biographical name John Birks 1917-1993 Dizzy American jazz musician
Gillette
I. biographical name King Camp 1855-1932 American inventor & manufacturer II. biographical name William Hooker 1855-1937 American actor
gillie
or ghillie noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic gille & Irish giolla youth, gillie Date: 1705 1. a male attendant on a Scottish Highland chief; broadly attendant 2. chiefly ...
Gillingham
geographical name town SE England in Kent population 93,300
gillnet
transitive verb Date: 1949 to catch (fish) with a gill net
gillnetter
noun Date: circa 1889 a boat equipped for or engaged in fishing with gill nets; also a person who fishes with a gill net
gillyflower
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from Middle English gilofre clove, from Anglo-French, alteration of Old French girofle, from Latin caryophyllum, from Greek karyophyllon, from ...
Gilman
I. biographical name Alfred Goodman 1941- American pharmacologist II. biographical name Daniel Coit 1831-1908 American educator; president Johns Hopkins U. (1875-1901)
Gilmer
biographical name Elizabeth 1870-1951 née Meriwether pseudonym Dorothy Dix American journalist
Gilpin
biographical name Charles Sidney 1878-1930 American actor
Gilroy
geographical name city W California SE of San Jose population 41,464
Gilsonite
trademark — used for asphalt
gilt
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from past participle of gilden to gild Date: 14th century covered with gold or gilt ; of the color of gold II. noun Date: 15th ...
gilt-edge
adjective see gilt-edged
gilt-edged
or gilt-edge adjective Date: 1818 1. having a gilt edge 2. of the best quality or rating
gimbal
I. noun Etymology: alteration of obsolete gemel double ring, from Middle English, from Anglo-French gemel, jomel, from Latin gemellus, diminutive of geminus Date: circa 1780 ...
gimbal ring
noun see gimbal I
gimcrack
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1676 a showy object of little use or value ; gewgaw • gimcrackery noun II. adjective Date: 1715 cheap, shoddy
gimcrackery
noun see gimcrack I
gimel
noun Etymology: Hebrew gīmel Date: circa 1567 the 3d letter of the Hebrew alphabet — see alphabet table
gimlet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French guimbelet, from Middle French (Picard), modification of Middle Dutch wimmelkijn, from wimmel wimble Date: 14th century a ...
gimlet-eyed
adjective Date: 1752 sharp-sighted
gimmal
noun Etymology: alteration of obsolete gemel double ring — more at gimbal Date: 1598 1. plural joined work (as in a clock) whose parts move within each other 2. a finger ...
gimme
noun (plural gimmes) Etymology: from gimme, contraction of give me Date: 1929 1. a short putt in golf conceded to an opponent in casual or match play 2. something easily ...
gimme cap
noun Date: 1978 an adjustable visored cap that often features a corporate logo or slogan
gimmick
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1922 1. a. a mechanical device for secretly and dishonestly controlling gambling apparatus b. an ingenious or novel mechanical ...
gimmickry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1948 an array or profusion of gimmicks; also use of gimmicks
gimmicky
adjective see gimmick I
gimp
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from Dutch Date: 1664 an ornamental flat braid or round cord used as a trimming II. noun Etymology: perhaps from gimp fish line strengthened with ...
gimpy
adjective see gimp III
gin
I. verb (gan; ginning) Etymology: Middle English ginnen, short for beginnen Date: 13th century archaic begin II. noun Etymology: Middle English gin, from Anglo-French, ...
gin mill
noun Date: 1865 bar, saloon
gin rummy
noun Etymology: 5gin Date: 1941 a rummy game for two players in which each player is dealt 10 cards and in which a player may win a hand by matching all the cards in it or ...
Ginastera
biographical name Alberto Evaristo 1916-1983 Argentine composer
ginger
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of Old English gingifer, from Medieval Latin gingiber, alteration of Latin zingiber, from Greek zingiberi, of Indo-Aryan origin; ...
ginger ale
noun Date: circa 1864 a sweetened carbonated nonalcoholic beverage flavored mainly with ginger extract
ginger beer
noun Date: 1809 a sweetened carbonated nonalcoholic beverage heavily flavored with ginger or capsicum or both
ginger group
noun Date: 1925 chiefly British a group that serves as an energizing force within a larger body (as a political party)
ginger nut
noun Date: 1842 British gingersnap
gingerbread
noun Date: 15th century 1. a cake whose ingredients include molasses and ginger 2. [from the fancy shapes and gilding formerly often applied to gingerbread] lavish or ...
gingerbreaded
adjective see gingerbread
gingerbready
adjective see gingerbread
gingerliness
noun see gingerly
gingerly
adjective Etymology: perhaps from 1ginger Date: 1604 very cautious or careful • gingerliness noun • gingerly adverb
gingerroot
noun Date: 1831 ginger 1a(1)
gingersnap
noun Date: 1805 a thin brittle cookie sweetened with molasses and flavored with ginger
gingery
adjective see ginger I
gingham
noun Etymology: modification of Malay genggang striped cloth Date: 1615 a clothing fabric usually of yarn-dyed cotton in plain weave
gingiva
noun (plural gingivae) Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1889 gum I • gingival adjective
gingival
adjective see gingiva
gingivectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1927 surgical removal of a portion of the gingiva
gingivitis
noun Date: 1874 inflammation of the gums
gingko
noun see ginkgo
Gingrich
biographical name Newton Leroy 1943- American politician
gink
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1906 slang person, guy
ginkgo
also gingko noun (plural ginkgoes or ginkgos; also gingkos or gingkoes) Etymology: New Latin Ginkgo, from Japanese ginkyō Date: 1773 a gymnospermous dioecious tree (Ginkgo ...
ginkgo biloba
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, bilobed ginkgo Date: 1980 an extract of the leaves of ginkgo that is held to enhance mental functioning by increasing blood circulation ...
ginner
noun see gin III
ginny
adjective see gin V
Ginsberg
biographical name Allen 1926-1997 American poet
Ginsburg
biographical name Ruth Bader 1933- American jurist
ginseng
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) rénshēn Date: 1654 1. a. a Chinese perennial herb (Panax ginseng syn. P. schinseng of the family Araliaceae, the ginseng family) having ...
Ginza
geographical name shopping street & entertainment district in downtown Tokyo, Japan
Giorgione
biographical name circa 1477-1511 Giorgione da Castelfranco Venetian painter
Giotto
biographical name 1266/67(or 1276)-1337 Giotto di Bondone Florentine painter, architect, & sculptor
Gipsy
chiefly British variant of gypsy
giraffe
noun (plural giraffes) Etymology: Italian giraffa, from Arabic zirāfa Date: circa 1600 1. or plural giraffe a large fleet African ruminant mammal (Giraffa camelopardalis) ...
giraffish
adjective see giraffe
girandole
noun Etymology: French & Italian; French, from Italian girandola, from girare to turn, from Late Latin gyrare, from Latin gyrus gyre Date: 1749 1. a radiating and showy ...
Girard
I. biographical name Jean-Baptiste 1765-1850 Swiss Franciscan & educator II. biographical name Stephen 1750-1831 American (French-born) financier
girasol
noun see girasole
girasole
also girasol noun Etymology: Italian girasole sunflower, from girare + sole sun, from Latin sol — more at solar Date: circa 1586 1. Jerusalem artichoke 2. (usually ...
Giraud
biographical name Henri-Honoré 1879-1949 French general
Giraudoux
biographical name (Hyppolyte-) Jean 1882-1944 French writer
gird
I. verb (girded or girt; girding) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gyrdan; akin to Old English geard yard — more at yard Date: before 12th century transitive ...
gird one's loins
phrasal to prepare for action ; muster up one's resources
girder
noun Etymology: 1gird Date: 1611 a horizontal main structural member (as in a building or bridge) that supports vertical loads and that consists of a single piece or of more ...
girdle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English girdel, from Old English gyrdel; akin to Old High German gurtil girdle, Old English gyrdan to gird Date: before 12th century 1. something ...
Giresun
or Kerasun geographical name city & port NE Turkey on Black Sea W of Trabzon population 67,536
Girgenti
geographical name — see Agrigento
girl
noun Etymology: Middle English gurle, girle young person of either sex Date: 14th century 1. a. a female child from birth to adulthood b. daughter c. a young ...
girl Friday
noun Etymology: girl + Friday (as in man Friday) Date: 1940 a female assistant (as in an office) entrusted with a wide variety of tasks
Girl Guide
noun Date: 1909 a member of a worldwide scouting movement for girls 7 to 18 years of age that is equivalent to the Girl Scouts in the United States
Girl Scout
noun Date: 1909 a member of any of the scouting programs of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America for girls ages 5 through 17
girlfriend
noun Date: 1859 1. a female friend 2. a frequent or regular female companion in a romantic or sexual relationship

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