Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389)

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girlhood
noun see girl
girlie
or girly adjective Date: 1886 1. girlish 2. (usually girlie) featuring scantily clothed women
girlish
adjective Date: 1565 of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a girl or girlhood • girlishly adverb • girlishness noun
girlishly
adverb see girlish
girlishness
noun see girlish
girly
adjective see girlie
girn
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, alteration of grinnen to grin, snarl Date: 12th century chiefly Scottish snarl • girn noun, chiefly Scottish
giro
noun Etymology: German, circulation (of currency), from Italian, from Latin gyrus gyre Date: 1890 a service of many European banks that permits authorized direct transfer of ...
girolle
noun Etymology: French Date: 1949 chanterelle
Girona
geographical name see Gerona 2
Gironde
geographical name estuary 45 miles (72 kilometers) W France formed by junction of the Garonne & the Dordogne & flowing NW into Bay of Biscay
Girondin
noun Etymology: French, from girondin of Gironde Date: 1837 Girondist
Girondist
noun Etymology: French girondiste, from Gironde, a political party, from Gironde, department of France represented by its leaders Date: 1795 a member of the moderate ...
girt
verb Etymology: Middle English girten, alteration of girden Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. gird 2. to fasten by means of a girth intransitive verb to measure ...
girth
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse gjǫrth; akin to Old English gyrdan to gird Date: 13th century 1. a band or strap that encircles the body of an animal to ...
Girtin
biographical name Thomas 1775-1802 English painter
gisarme
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French Date: 13th century a medieval weapon consisting of a blade mounted on a long staff and carried by foot soldiers
Gisborne
geographical name port New Zealand on E North Island population 31,400
Giscard d'Estaing
biographical name Valéry 1926- president of France (1974-81)
Gish
biographical name Lillian Diana 1893-1993 American actress
gismo
noun see gizmo
Gissing
biographical name George Robert 1857-1903 English novelist
gist
noun Etymology: Anglo-French, it lies, from gisir to lie, ultimately from Latin jacēre — more at adjacent Date: circa 1711 1. the ground of a legal action 2. the main ...
git
I. noun Etymology: variant of get, term of abuse, from 2get Date: 1929 British a foolish or worthless person II. dialect variant of get
git-go
variant of get-go
gittern
noun Etymology: Middle English giterne, from Middle French guiterne, modification of Old Spanish guitarra guitar Date: 14th century a medieval guitar
Giulio Romano
biographical name circa 1499-1546 Giulio di Pietro di Filippo de' Gianuzzi Italian painter & architect
give
I. verb (gave; given; giving) Etymology: Middle English, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish giva to give; akin to Old English giefan, gifan to give, and perhaps to ...
give a good account of
phrasal to acquit (oneself) well
give a hang
or care a hang phrasal to be the least bit concerned or worried
give away
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to make a present of 2. to deliver (a bride) ceremonially to the bridegroom at a wedding 3. a. betray b. disclose, reveal 4. ...
give back
verb Date: 1548 intransitive verb retire, retreat transitive verb to send in return or reply ; restore, return
give birth
phrasal to have a baby
give birth to
phrasal 1. to produce as offspring 2. to be the source of
give chase
phrasal to set off in pursuit
give ground
phrasal to withdraw before superior force ; retreat
give in
verb Date: 1602 transitive verb deliver, submit intransitive verb to yield under insistence or entreaty ; surrender
give of
phrasal to make available ; provide generously
give off
verb Date: 1831 transitive verb 1. to send out as a branch 2. emit intransitive verb to branch off
give or take
phrasal as an estimate accurate within (an amount to be added or subtracted)
give out
verb Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. declare, publish b. to read aloud the words of (a hymn or psalm) for congregational singing 2. emit 3. issue ...
give over
verb Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. cease 2. entrust 3. a. to yield without restraint or control ; abandon b. to set apart for a particular purpose or ...
give place to
phrasal to be replaced or succeeded by
give rise to
phrasal to be the cause or source of ; produce
give the gun
phrasal to open the throttle of ; speed up
give the lie to
phrasal 1. to accuse of falsehood 2. to show to be false, inaccurate, or invalid
give tongue
phrasal of hounds to begin barking on the scent
give up
verb Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to yield control or possession of ; surrender 2. to desist from ; abandon 3. to declare incurable or insoluble 4. ...
give up the ghost
phrasal to cease to live or function ; die
give way
phrasal 1. a. retreat b. to yield the right of way 2. to yield oneself without restraint or control 3. a. to yield to or as if to physical stress b. to yield to ...
give-and-go
noun Date: 1965 a play (as in basketball or hockey) in which a player passes to a teammate and immediately cuts toward the net or goal to receive a return pass
give-and-take
noun Date: 1679 1. the practice of making mutual concessions ; compromise 2. a usually good-natured exchange (as of ideas or comments)
giveaway
noun Date: 1882 1. an unintentional revelation or betrayal 2. a. something given away free; specifically premium 1d b. the act of giving something away free 3. a ...
giveback
noun Date: 1978 a previous gain (as an increase in wages or benefits) given back to management by workers (as in a labor contract)
given
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. prone, disposed 2. presented as a gift ; bestowed without compensation 3. a. particular, specified b. assumed as actual or ...
given name
noun Date: 1717 a name that precedes one's surname; especially first name
giver
noun Date: 14th century one that gives ; donor
Giza
or El Giza or Al Jizah geographical name city N Egypt on W bank of the Nile near Cairo population 2,096,000
gizmo
also gismo noun (plural gizmos; also gismos) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1943 gadget
gizzard
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English giser gizzard, liver, from Anglo-French gesir, giser, from Latin gigeria (plural) giblets Date: 1565 1. a. the muscular ...
Gjuhezes, Cape
or formerly Cape Linguetta or Cape Glossa geographical name cape SW Albania projecting into Strait of Otranto
glabella
noun (plural glabellae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, feminine of glabellus hairless, diminutive of glaber Date: circa 1823 the smooth prominence between the eyebrows ...
glabellar
adjective see glabella
glabrous
adjective Etymology: Latin glabr-, glaber smooth, bald — more at glad Date: 1640 smooth; especially having a surface without hairs or projections
glacé
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of glacer to freeze, ice, glaze, from Latin glaciare, from glacies Date: 1845 1. made or finished so as to have a smooth ...
glacéed
adjective see glacé 2
glacial
adjective Etymology: Latin glacialis, from glacies Date: 1656 1. suggestive of ice: as a. extremely cold ; frigid b. devoid of warmth and cordiality c. coldly ...
glacially
adverb see glacial
glaciate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: circa 1623 1. freeze 2. a. to subject to glacial action; also to produce glacial effects in or on b. to cover with a glacier ...
glaciation
noun see glaciate
glacier
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French dialect (Franco-Provençal), from glace ice, from Latin glacies; akin to Latin gelu frost — more at cold Date: 1744 a large body ...
Glacier Bay
geographical name inlet SE Alaska at S end of St. Elias Range in Glacier Bay National Park
Glacier National Park
geographical name 1. — see Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park 2. reservation W Canada in SE British Columbia in Selkirk Mountains W of Yoho National Park
glaciological
adjective see glaciology
glaciologist
noun see glaciology
glaciology
noun Etymology: Latin glacies + International Scientific Vocabulary -logy Date: 1889 any of the branches of science dealing with snow or ice accumulation, glaciation, or ...
glacis
noun (plural glacis) Etymology: French, from glacer to freeze, slide Date: 1672 1. a. a gentle slope ; incline b. a slope that runs downward from a fortification 2. ...
glad
I. adjective (gladder; gladdest) Etymology: Middle English, shining, glad, from Old English glæd; akin to Old High German glat shining, smooth, Latin glaber smooth, bald Date: ...
glad hand
noun Date: circa 1895 a warm welcome or greeting often prompted by ulterior reasons
glad rags
noun plural Date: 1896 dressy clothes
glad-hand
verb Date: 1903 transitive verb to extend a glad hand to intransitive verb to extend a glad hand • glad-hander noun
glad-hander
noun see glad-hand
Gladbeck
geographical name city W Germany in the Ruhr population 80,127
gladden
verb (gladdened; gladdening) Date: 13th century intransitive verb archaic to be glad transitive verb to make glad
glade
noun Etymology: perhaps from 1glad Date: 1529 an open space surrounded by woods • glady adjective
Glades
geographical name Everglades
gladiator
noun Etymology: Latin, from gladius sword, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh cleddyf sword Date: 15th century 1. a person engaged in a fight to the death as public ...
gladiatorial
adjective see gladiator
gladiola
noun Etymology: back-formation from gladiolus, taken as a plural Date: 1926 gladiolus 1
gladiolus
noun (plural gladioli) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, gladiolus, from diminutive of gladius Date: 15th century 1. or plural gladiolus also gladioluses any of a genus ...
gladly
adverb see glad I
gladness
noun see glad I
Gladsakse
geographical name city Denmark, a suburb of Copenhagen population 61,198
gladsome
adjective Date: 14th century giving or showing joy ; cheerful • gladsomely adverb • gladsomeness noun
gladsomely
adverb see gladsome
gladsomeness
noun see gladsome
gladstone
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: W. E. Gladstone Date: 1887 a suitcase with flexible sides on a rigid frame that opens flat into two equal compartments — called ...
Gladstone
I. biographical name William Ewart 1809-1898 British statesman; prime minister (1868-74; 1880-85; 1886; 1892-94) • Gladstonian adjective II. geographical name city W ...
gladstone bag
noun see gladstone
Gladstonian
adjective see Gladstone I
glady
adjective see glade
glaiket
adjective see glaikit
glaikit
or glaiket adjective Etymology: Middle English (Scots) glaikit Date: 15th century chiefly Scottish foolish, giddy
glair
or glaire noun Etymology: Middle English gleyre egg white, from Anglo-French gleire, from Vulgar Latin *claria, from Latin clarus clear — more at clear Date: 13th century 1. ...
glaire
noun see glair
glairy
adjective (glairier; -est) Date: 1662 having the characteristics of or overlaid with glair
glaive
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, sword, lance, from Latin gladius sword Date: 15th century archaic sword; especially broadsword
glam
noun Date: 1963 1. extravagantly showy glamour 2. glitter rock • glam adjective
glamor
noun see glamour
Glamorgan
or Glamorganshire geographical name former county SE Wales capital Cardiff; divided 1974 into Mid Glamorgan, South Glamorgan, and West Glamorgan
Glamorganshire
geographical name see Glamorgan
glamorise
British variant of glamorize
glamorization
noun see glamorize
glamorize
also glamourize transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1936 1. to look upon or depict as glamorous ; romanticize 2. to make glamorous • glamorization noun • ...
glamorizer
noun see glamorize
glamorous
also glamourous adjective Date: 1861 full of glamour ; excitingly attractive • glamorously adverb • glamorousness noun
glamorously
adverb see glamorous
glamorousness
noun see glamorous
glamour
also glamor noun Etymology: Scots glamour, alteration of English grammar; from the popular association of erudition with occult practices Date: 1715 1. a magic spell 2. ...
glamour-puss
noun Date: 1941 a glamorously attractive person
glamourize
transitive verb see glamorize
glamourless
adjective see glamour
glamourous
adjective see glamorous
glance
I. verb (glanced; glancing) Etymology: Middle English glencen, glenchen Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to strike a surface obliquely so as to go off at an angle ...
glancer
noun see glance I
glancing
adjective Date: circa 1541 1. hitting so as to glance off 2. incidental, indirect • glancingly adverb
glancingly
adverb see glancing
gland
I. noun Etymology: French glande, from Old French, glandular swelling on the neck, gland, ultimately from Latin gland-, glans acorn; akin to Greek balanos acorn Date: 1692 1. ...
glandered
adjective Date: 1667 affected with glanders
glanders
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Middle French glandre glandular swelling on the neck, from Latin glandulae, from plural of glandula, diminutive of ...
glandless
adjective see gland I
glandular
adjective Date: circa 1740 1. a. of, relating to, or involving glands, gland cells, or their products b. having the characteristics or function of a gland 2. a. ...
glandular fever
noun Date: 1902 infectious mononucleosis
glandularly
adverb see glandular
glans
noun (plural glandes) Etymology: Latin gland-, glans, literally, acorn Date: 1650 1. a conical vascular body forming the extremity of the penis — called also glans penis ...
glans clitoridis
noun see glans
glans penis
noun see glans
glare
I. verb (glared; glaring) Etymology: Middle English glaren; akin to Old English glæs glass Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. a. to shine with a harsh ...
glaring
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having a fixed look of hostility, fierceness, or anger 2. a. shining with or reflecting an uncomfortably bright light b. (1) ...
glaringly
adverb see glaring
glaringness
noun see glaring
Glaris
geographical name see Glarus
Glarus
or French Glaris geographical name 1. canton E central Switzerland area 264 square miles (684 square kilometers), population 37,686 2. commune, its capital population 5623
glary
adjective (glarier; -est) Date: 1578 having a dazzling brightness ; glaring
Glaser
biographical name Donald Arthur 1926- American physicist
Glasgow
I. biographical name Ellen (Anderson Gholson) 1873-1945 American novelist II. geographical name city & port S central Scotland constituting an administrative area on the ...
Glashow
biographical name Sheldon Lee 1932- American physicist
glasnost
noun Etymology: Russian glasnost', literally, publicity, from glasnyĭ public, from glas voice, from Old Church Slavic glasŭ — more at call Date: 1986 a Soviet policy ...
Glaspell
biographical name Susan 1882-1948 American novelist & dramatist
Glass
I. biographical name Carter 1858-1946 American statesman II. biographical name Philip 1937- American composer
glass
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English glas, from Old English glæs; akin to Old English geolu yellow — more at yellow Date: before 12th century 1. any ...
glass ceiling
noun Date: 1984 an intangible barrier within the hierarchy of a company that prevents women or minorities from obtaining upper-level positions
glass eye
noun Date: 1651 1. an artificial eye made of glass 2. an eye having a pale, whitish, or colorless iris • glass-eyed adjective
glass fiber
noun Date: 1882 fiberglass
glass harmonica
noun Date: circa 1909 a musical instrument consisting of a series of rotating glass bowls of differing sizes played by touching the dampened edges with a finger
glass jaw
noun Date: 1940 vulnerability (as of a boxer) to knockout punches
glass snake
noun Date: 1709 any of a genus (Ophisaurus) of limbless snakelike lizards of the southern U.S., Eurasia, and Africa with a fragile tail that readily breaks off from the body ...
glass sponge
noun Date: 1875 any of a class (Hexactinellida syn. Hyalospongiae) of chiefly deep-water siliceous marine sponges with 6-rayed spicules and a skeleton often resembling glass ...
glass wool
noun Date: 1879 glass fibers in a mass resembling wool and being used especially for thermal insulation and air filters
glass-eyed
adjective see glass eye
glassblower
noun see glassblowing
glassblowing
noun Date: circa 1829 the art of shaping a mass of glass that has been softened by heat by blowing air into it through a tube • glassblower noun
glassful
noun see glass I
glasshouse
noun Date: 14th century 1. a place where glass is made 2. chiefly British greenhouse 3. British a military prison
glassie
or glassy noun (plural glassies) Date: 1887 a playing marble made of glass
glassily
adverb see glassy
glassine
noun Date: 1916 a thin dense transparent or semitransparent paper highly resistant to the passage of air and grease
glassiness
noun see glassy
glassless
adjective see glass I
glassmaker
noun Date: 1576 one that makes glass • glassmaking noun
glassmaking
noun see glassmaker
glassware
noun Date: 1722 articles made of glass
glasswork
noun Date: 1611 1. a. the manufacture of glass or glassware; also glaziers' work b. plural glasshouse 1 2. glassware • glassworker noun
glassworker
noun see glasswork
glasswort
noun Etymology: from its former use in the manufacture of glass Date: 1597 any of a genus (Salicornia) of woody jointed succulent herbs of the goosefoot family with leaves ...
glassy
adjective (glassier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. resembling or made of glass 2. having little animation ; dull, lifeless • glassily adverb • glassiness noun
glassy-eyed
adjective Date: 1847 marked by or having glassy eyes
Glastonbury
geographical name 1. town central Connecticut SE of Hartford population 31,876 2. town SW England in Somerset population 6773
Glaswegian
noun or adjective see Glasgow II
Glauber salt
noun see Glauber's salt
Glauber's salt
noun Etymology: Johann R. Glauber died 1668 German chemist Date: 1736 a colorless crystalline sulfate of sodium Na2SO4•10H2O used especially in dyeing, as a cathartic, and ...
glaucoma
noun Etymology: Latin, cataract, from Greek glaukōma, from glaukoun to have a cataract, from glaukos Date: 1885 a disease of the eye marked by increased pressure within the ...
glauconite
noun Etymology: German Glaukonit, irregular from Greek glaukos Date: 1836 a mineral consisting of a dull green earthy iron potassium silicate occurring in greensand • ...
glauconitic
adjective see glauconite
glaucous
adjective Etymology: Latin glaucus, from Greek glaukos gleaming, gray Date: 1671 1. a. of a pale yellow-green color b. of a light bluish-gray or bluish-white color 2. ...
glaucousness
noun see glaucous
glaze
I. verb (glazed; glazing) Etymology: Middle English glasen, from glas glass Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to furnish or fit with glass 2. a. to coat with or ...
glazed
adjective Date: 15th century 1. covered with or as if with a glassy film 2. marked by lack of expression
glazer
noun see glaze I
glazier
noun Date: 14th century one who sets glass • glaziery noun
glaziery
noun see glazier
glazing
noun Date: 15th century 1. the action, process, or trade of fitting windows with glass 2. a. glasswork b. glaze 3. transparent material (as glass) used for windows
Glazunov
biographical name Aleksandr Konstantinovich 1865-1936 Russian composer
gleam
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gleem, from Old English glǣm; akin to Old English geolu yellow — more at yellow Date: 15th century 1. a. a transient appearance of ...
gleamy
adjective see gleam I
glean
verb Etymology: Middle English glenen, from Anglo-French glener, from Late Latin glennare, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish doglenn he selects Date: 14th century ...
gleanable
adjective see glean
gleaner
noun see glean
gleanings
noun plural Date: 15th century things acquired by gleaning
glebe
noun Etymology: Latin gleba clod, land Date: 14th century 1. archaic land; specifically a plot of cultivated land 2. land belonging or yielding revenue to a parish church ...
glee
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English glēo entertainment, music; akin to Old Norse glȳ joy, and perhaps to Greek chleuē joke Date: before 12th century 1. ...
glee club
noun Date: 1814 a chorus organized for singing usually short pieces
gleed
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English glēd; akin to Old English glōwan to glow Date: before 12th century archaic a glowing coal
gleeful
adjective Date: 1586 full of glee ; merry • gleefully adverb • gleefulness noun
gleefully
adverb see gleeful
gleefulness
noun see gleeful
gleek
intransitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1590 archaic gibe, joke
gleeman
noun Etymology: Middle English gleman, from Old English glēoman, from glēo + man man Date: before 12th century jongleur
gleesome
adjective Date: 1590 archaic gleeful
gleet
noun Etymology: Middle English glet slimy or mucous matter, from Anglo-French glette, from Latin glittus viscous; akin to Latin gluten glue — more at clay Date: 14th ...
gleg
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse glǫggr clear-sighted Date: 14th century Scottish marked by quickness of perception or movement
Gleiwitz
geographical name see Gliwice
gleization
noun Date: 1938 development of or conversion into gley
glen
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), valley, from Scottish Gaelic & Irish gleann, from Old Irish glenn Date: 15th century a secluded narrow valley
Glen Canyon Dam
geographical name dam N Arizona in Glen Canyon of Colorado River forming Lake Powell (chiefly in SE Utah)
glen check
noun see glen plaid
Glen Cove
geographical name city SE New York on NW Long Island population 26,622
Glen Ellyn
geographical name village NE Illinois W of Chicago population 26,999
Glen More
geographical name valley about 50 miles (80 kilometers) long N Scotland running SW to NE & connecting Loche Linnhe & Moray Firth — see Caledonian Canal
glen plaid
noun Etymology: short for glenurquhart plaid, from Glen Urquhart, valley in Inverness-shire, Scotland Date: 1926 a twill pattern of broken checks; also a fabric woven in ...
Glencoe
geographical name valley W Scotland SE of Loch Leven
Glendale
geographical name 1. city central Arizona NW of Phoenix population 218,812 2. city SW California just N of Los Angeles population 194,973
Glendale Heights
geographical name city NE Illinois population 31,765
Glendora
geographical name city SW California population 49,415
Glendower
biographical name Owen circa 1359-circa 1416 Welsh rebel
glengarry
noun (plural -ries) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Glengarry, valley in Scotland Date: 1841 a woolen cap of Scottish origin — called also glengarry bonnet
glengarry bonnet
noun see glengarry
Glenn
biographical name John Herschel 1921- American astronaut & politician
Glenview
geographical name village NE Illinois NNW of Chicago population 41,847
gley
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Ukrainian gleĭ clayey earth; akin to Old English clǣg clay — more at clay Date: 1927 a sticky clay soil or soil layer formed ...
gleyed
adjective see gley
gleying
noun Date: 1949 gleization
glia
noun (plural glia) Etymology: New Latin, from Middle Greek, glue — more at clay Date: 1891 supporting tissue intermingled with the essential elements of nervous tissue ...
gliadin
noun Etymology: Italian gliadina, from Middle Greek glia Date: circa 1828 prolamin; especially one obtained by alcoholic extraction of gluten from wheat and rye
glial
adjective Date: 1888 of, relating to, or constituting glia
glib
adjective (glibber; glibbest) Etymology: probably modification of Low German glibberig slippery Date: 1584 1. a. marked by ease and informality ; nonchalant b. showing ...
glibly
adverb see glib
glibness
noun see glib
glide
I. verb (glided; gliding) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English glīdan; akin to Old High German glītan to glide Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to ...
glide path
noun Date: 1936 glide slope
glide slope
noun Date: circa 1949 1. the proper path of descent for an aircraft preparing to land; especially such a path indicated by a radio beam 2. the radio beam that marks a glide ...
glider
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that glides: as a. an aircraft similar to an airplane but without an engine b. a porch seat suspended from an upright framework 2. ...
glim
noun Etymology: perhaps short for 2glimmer Date: circa 1700 something that furnishes light (as a lantern or candle); also illumination given off by such a source
glimmer
I. intransitive verb (glimmered; glimmering) Etymology: Middle English glimeren; akin to Old English glǣm gleam Date: 15th century 1. a. to shine faintly or unsteadily ...
glimmering
noun Date: 15th century glimmer
glimpse
I. verb (glimpsed; glimpsing) Etymology: Middle English glimsen; akin to Middle High German glimsen to glimmer, Old English glǣm gleam Date: 14th century intransitive verb ...
glimpser
noun see glimpse I
Glinka
biographical name Mikhail Ivanovich 1804-1857 Russian composer
glint
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, to dart obliquely, glint, alteration of glenten, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish dialect glänta to clear up; akin to Old High German ...
glioblastoma
noun (plural -mas; also glioblastomata) Etymology: New Latin, from glia glia + blast- + -oma Date: circa 1923 a malignant rapidly growing astrocytoma of the central nervous ...
glioblastoma multiforme
noun see glioblastoma
glioma
noun (plural -mas; also gliomata) Etymology: New Latin, from glia Date: 1870 a tumor arising from glial cells
glissade
I. intransitive verb (glissaded; glissading) Etymology: French, noun, slide, glissade, from glisser to slide, from Old French glicier, alteration of glier, of Germanic origin; ...
glissader
noun see glissade I
glissando
noun (plural glissandi or -dos) Etymology: probably modification of French glissade Date: circa 1854 a rapid sliding up or down the musical scale
glisten
I. intransitive verb (glistened; glistening) Etymology: Middle English glistnen, from Old English glisnian; akin to Old English glisian to glitter, geolu yellow — more at ...
glister
intransitive verb (glistered; glistering) Etymology: Middle English glistren; akin to Old English glisian Date: 14th century glitter • glister noun
glitch
noun Etymology: perhaps from Yiddish glitsh slippery place, from glitshn (zikh) to slide, glide; akin to Old High German glītan to glide — more at glide Date: 1962 1. a. ...
glitchy
adjective see glitch
glitter
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English gliteren, perhaps from Old Norse glitra; akin to Old English geolu yellow Date: 14th century 1. a. to shine by reflection ...
glitter rock
noun Date: 1972 rock music characterized by performers wearing glittering costumes and bizarre often grotesque makeup
glitterati
noun plural Etymology: blend of 2glitter and literati Date: 1940 celebrities, beautiful people
glitteringly
adverb see glitter I
Glittertind
geographical name mountain 8110 feet (2472 meters) S central Norway in Jotunheim Mountains; highest in Scandinavia
glittery
adjective see glitter II

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