Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389)

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Gomel
geographical name — see Homyel'
Gómez
biographical name Juan Vicente 1864-1935 Venezuelan general & politician; dictator (1908-35)
Gomorrah
I. noun Etymology: from Gomorrah, ancient city destroyed by God for its wickedness in Genesis 19 Date: 1907 a place notorious for vice and corruption II. geographical name ...
Gompers
biographical name Samuel 1850-1924 American (British-born) labor leader
Gomułka
biographical name Władysław 1905-1982 Polish politician
gon-
or gono- combining form Etymology: Greek, from gonos procreation, seed, from gignesthai to be born — more at kin sexual ; generative ; semen ; seed
gonad
noun Etymology: New Latin gonad-, gonas, from Greek gonos Date: 1880 a reproductive gland (as an ovary or testis) that produces gametes • gonadal adjective
gonadal
adjective see gonad
gonadectomized
adjective see gonadectomy
gonadectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1915 surgical removal of an ovary or testis • gonadectomized adjective
gonadotrophic
adjective see gonadotropic
gonadotrophin
noun see gonadotropin
gonadotropic
also gonadotrophic adjective Date: circa 1923 acting on or stimulating the gonads
gonadotropin
also gonadotrophin noun Date: 1931 a gonadotropic hormone (as follicle-stimulating hormone)
gonadotropin-releasing hormone
noun Date: 1974 a hormone secreted by the hypothalamus that stimulates the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland to release gonadotropins (as luteinizing hormone and ...
Gonâve, Gulf of
geographical name arm of Caribbean Sea on W coast of Haiti
Gonçalves Dias
biographical name Antônio 1823-1864 Brazilian poet
Goncharova
biographical name Nathalie 1883-1962 Russian artist
Goncourt
biographical name Edmond (-Louis-Antoine Huot) de 1822-1896 & his brother Jules (-Alfred Huot) de 1830-1870 French novelist & collaborators
Gond
noun Date: 1801 a member of a Dravidian or pre-Dravidian people of central India
Gondar
geographical name see Gonder
Gonder
or Gondar geographical name city NW Ethiopia N of Lake Tana capital of Amhara & former capital of Ethiopia population 98,352
Gondi
noun Date: 1848 the Dravidian language of the Gonds
gondola
noun Etymology: Italian dialect (Venetian), probably from Middle Greek kontoura small vessel Date: 1549 1. a long narrow flat-bottomed boat with a high prow and stern used on ...
gondolier
noun Date: 1603 one who propels a Venetian gondola
Gondomar
biographical name Conde de 1567-1626 Diego Sarmiento de Acuña Spanish diplomat
Gondwana
geographical name see Gondwanaland
Gondwanaland
or Gondwana geographical name hypothetical land area believed to have once connected the Indian subcontinent & the landmasses of the southern hemisphere
gone
adjective Etymology: from past participle of go Date: 1598 1. a. lost, ruined b. dead c. characterized by sinking or dropping 2. a. involved, absorbed ...
goner
noun Date: 1850 one whose case is hopeless
gonfalon
noun Etymology: Italian gonfalone Date: 1595 1. the ensign of certain princes or states (as the medieval republics of Italy) 2. a flag that hangs from a crosspiece or frame
gong
noun Etymology: Malay & Javanese, of imitative origin Date: circa 1590 1. a disk-shaped percussion instrument that produces a resounding tone when struck with a usually ...
Gongga Shan
or Minya Konka geographical name mountain 24,790 feet (7556 meters) W China in SW central Sichuan; highest in China
Gongorism
noun Etymology: Spanish gongorismo, from Luis de Góngora y Argote died 1627 Spanish poet Date: 1813 a literary style characterized by studied obscurity and by the use of ...
gongoristic
adjective see Gongorism
gonidium
noun (plural gonidia) Etymology: New Latin, from gon- + -idium Date: 1882 an asexual reproductive cell or group of cells especially in algae (as volvox)
gonif
variant of ganef
goniff
variant of ganef
goniometer
noun Etymology: Greek gōnia angle Date: 1766 1. an instrument for measuring angles 2. direction finder • goniometric adjective • goniometry noun
goniometric
adjective see goniometer
goniometry
noun see goniometer
gono-
combining form see gon-
gonococcal
adjective see gonococcus
gonococcus
noun (plural gonococci) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1889 a pus-producing bacterium (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) that causes gonorrhea • gonococcal adjective
gonophore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1859 an attached reproductive zooid of a hydroid colony
gonopore
noun Date: 1897 a genital pore in some invertebrates and especially some insects
gonorrhea
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, morbid loss of semen, from Greek gonorrhoia, from gon- + -rrhoia -rrhea Date: circa 1526 a contagious inflammation of the genital ...
gonorrheal
adjective see gonorrhea
Gonzaga
biographical name Saint Aloysius 1568-1591 Italian Jesuit
González
biographical name Manuel 1833-1893 Mexican general; president of Mexico (1880-84)
Gonzalo de Córdoba
biographical name — see fernandez de cordoba
gonzo
adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1971 1. idiosyncratically subjective but engagé 2. bizarre 3. freewheeling or unconventional especially to the point of ...
goo
noun Etymology: perhaps short for burgoo Date: 1900 1. a viscid or sticky substance 2. sentimental tripe • gooey adjective • gooeyness noun
goo-goo
I. adjective Etymology: perhaps alteration of 2goggle Date: 1900 loving, enticing — used chiefly in the phrase goo-goo eyes II. noun (plural goo-goos) Etymology: from good ...
goober
noun Etymology: of Bantu origin; akin to Kimbundu ŋguba peanut Date: 1834 Southern & Midland peanut
good
I. adjective (better; best) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gōd; akin to Old High German guot good, Middle High German gatern to unite, Sanskrit gadhya what one ...
good and
phrasal very, entirely
good book
noun Usage: often capitalized G&B Date: 1651 bible
good cholesterol
noun Date: 1980 HDL
good deal
noun Date: before 12th century a considerable quantity or extent ; lot
good faith
noun Date: 1755 honesty or lawfulness of purpose
good fellow
noun Date: 13th century an affable companionable person • good-fellowship noun
Good Friday
noun Etymology: from its special sanctity Date: 13th century the Friday before Easter observed in churches as the anniversary of the crucifixion of Christ and in some states ...
Good Hope, Cape of
geographical name cape S Republic of South Africa in SW Western Cape province W of False Bay, at 34°21′ S — see Cape of Good Hope 2
good life
noun Date: 1942 a life marked by a high standard of living
good offices
noun plural Date: 1681 services as a mediator
good ol' boy
noun see good old boy
good old boy
or good ol' boy or good ole boy noun Date: circa 1967 a usually white Southerner who conforms to the values, culture, or behavior of his peers
good ole boy
noun see good old boy
Good Samaritan
noun Date: 1679 Samaritan 2
good word
phrasal 1. a favorable statement 2. good news
good-by
noun see good-bye
good-bye
or good-by noun Etymology: alteration of God be with you Date: circa 1580 1. a concluding remark or gesture at parting — often used interjectionally 2. a taking of leave ...
good-fellowship
noun see good fellow
good-for-nothing
adjective Date: 1533 of no use or value • good-for-nothing noun
good-hearted
adjective Date: 1552 having a kindly generous disposition • good-heartedly adverb • good-heartedness noun
good-heartedly
adverb see good-hearted
good-heartedness
noun see good-hearted
good-humored
adjective Date: 1662 good-natured, cheerful • good-humoredly adverb • good-humoredness noun
good-humoredly
adverb see good-humored
good-humoredness
noun see good-humored
good-looker
noun see good-looking
good-looking
adjective Date: 1762 having a pleasing or attractive appearance • good-looker noun
good-natured
adjective Date: 1577 of a pleasant and cooperative disposition Synonyms: see amiable • good-naturedly adverb • good-naturedness noun
good-naturedly
adverb see good-natured
good-naturedness
noun see good-natured
good-neighbor
adjective Date: 1936 marked by principles of friendship, cooperation, and noninterference in the internal affairs of another country
good-tempered
adjective Date: 1768 not easily angered or upset • good-temperedly adverb • good-temperedness noun
good-temperedly
adverb see good-tempered
good-temperedness
noun see good-tempered
Goodall
biographical name Jane 1934- British ethologist
Goodhue
biographical name Bertram Grosvenor 1869-1924 American architect
goodie
noun see goody II
goodish
adjective see good I
goodly
adjective (goodlier; -est) Date: before 12th century 1. pleasantly attractive 2. significantly large ; considerable
goodman
noun Date: 13th century 1. archaic the master of a household 2. archaic Mr.
Goodman
biographical name Benjamin David 1909-1986 Benny Goodman American musician & bandleader
goodness
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the quality or state of being good 2. — used interjectionally or in phrases especially to express mild surprise or shock 3. the ...
goodness of fit
Date: 1895 the conformity between an experimental result and theoretical expectation or between data and an approximating curve
Goodrich
biographical name Samuel Griswold 1793-1860 pseudonym Peter Parley American writer
goodwife
noun Date: 13th century 1. archaic the mistress of a household 2. archaic Mrs.
goodwill
noun Date: before 12th century 1. a. a kindly feeling of approval and support ; benevolent interest or concern b. (1) the favor or advantage that a business has ...
goodwilled
adjective see goodwill
Goodwin Sands
geographical name shoals SE England in Strait of Dover off E coast of Kent — see Downs 2
goody
I. noun Etymology: alteration of goodwife Date: 1559 archaic a usually married woman of lowly station — used as a title preceding a surname II. noun or goodie (plural ...
Goody Two-shoes
noun Usage: often capitalized S Etymology: from Goody Two-Shoes, heroine of a children's story perhaps by Oliver Goldsmith Date: 1934 a person who is goody-goody; also a ...
goody-goody
adjective Date: 1871 affectedly or ingratiatingly good or proper • goody-goody noun
goody-two-shoes
adjective see Goody Two-shoes
Goodyear
biographical name Charles 1800-1860 American inventor
gooey
adjective see goo
gooeyness
noun see goo
goof
I. noun Etymology: probably alteration of English dialect goff simpleton Date: 1915 1. a silly or stupid person 2. blunder II. verb Date: 1932 intransitive verb 1. ...
goof on
phrasal slang to make fun of ; kid, put on
goof-off
noun Date: 1953 one who evades work or responsibility
goofball
noun Date: 1950 1. slang a barbiturate sleeping pill 2. a goofy person
goofily
adverb see goofy
goofiness
noun see goofy
goofy
adjective (goofier; -est) Date: 1921 being crazy, ridiculous, or mildly ludicrous ; silly • goofily adverb • goofiness noun
googly-eyed
adjective Etymology: by alteration Date: 1926 goggle-eyed
googol
noun Etymology: coined by Milton Sirotta b ab 1929 nephew of Edward Kasner died 1955 American mathematician Date: 1938 the figure 1 followed by 100 zeros equal to 10100
googolplex
noun Date: 1938 the figure 1 followed by a googol of zeros equal to 10googol
gook
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1920 usually offensive a nonwhite or non-American person; specifically Asian II. variant of guck
goombah
noun Etymology: Italian dialect (Campania) cumbà, vocative form of cumbare respected older man, literally, godfather, from Medieval Latin compater — more at compeer Date: ...
goon
noun Etymology: probably short for English dialect gooney simpleton Date: 1921 1. a stupid person 2. a. a man hired to terrorize or eliminate opponents b. enforcer ...
gooney
or goony noun (plural gooneys or goonies) Etymology: probably from English dialect gooney simpleton Date: 1895 black-footed albatross; broadly albatross
goony
noun see gooney
goop
noun Etymology: probably alteration of goo Date: circa 1918 goo, gunk • goopy adjective
goopy
adjective see goop
goosander
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1766 the common merganser (Mergus merganser) of the northern hemisphere
goose
I. noun (plural geese) Etymology: Middle English gos, from Old English gōs; akin to Old High German gans goose, Latin anser, Greek chēn Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
goose bumps
noun plural Date: 1933 a roughness of the skin produced by erection of its papillae especially from cold, fear, or a sudden feeling of excitement
Goose Creek
geographical name city SE South Carolina population 29,208
goose egg
noun Date: 1866 zero, nothing; especially a score of zero in a game or contest
goose pimples
noun plural Date: circa 1889 goose bumps
goose step
noun Date: 1806 a straight-legged stiff-kneed step used by troops of some armies when passing in review
goose-step
intransitive verb Date: 1879 1. to march in a goose step 2. to practice an unthinking conformity
gooseberry
noun Date: 1573 1. a. the acid usually prickly fruit of any of several shrubs (genus Ribes, especially R. hirtellum of the United States and R. uva-crispa of Europe) ...
goosefish
noun Date: 1807 any of a family (Lophiidae) of pediculate fishes with a large flattened head, a fringe of flaps along each side of the lower jaw, head, and body, and a long ...
gooseflesh
noun Date: circa 1810 goose bumps
goosefoot
noun (plural goosefoots) Date: 1548 any of a genus (Chenopodium) or family (Chenopodiaceae, the goosefoot family) of glabrous herbs with fruit that is a utricle
goosegrass
noun Date: 1530 1. cleavers 2. yard grass
gooseneck
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1688 1. something (as a flexible jointed metal pipe) curved like the neck of a goose or U-shaped 2. a truck trailer (as for ...
goosenecked
adjective see gooseneck
goosey
adjective (goosier; -est) Date: 1811 1. resembling a goose 2. a. affected with goose bumps ; scared b. very nervous c. reacting strongly when goosed or startled
GOP
abbreviation Grand Old Party (Republican)
GOPer
noun Date: 1951 a member of the GOP
gopher
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1791 1. a burrowing land tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) of the southern United States; broadly any of several related land tortoises ...
gopher ball
noun Date: circa 1949 a pitched baseball hit for a home run
gopher snake
noun Date: 1837 1. indigo snake 2. bull snake
gopher tortoise
noun see gopher I
gopik
noun (plural gopik) Etymology: Azerbaijani gəpik kopeck, from Russian kopeĭka Date: 1992 — see manat at money table
Gorakhpur
geographical name city NE India in E Uttar Pradesh N of Varanasi population 505,566
Gorbachev
biographical name Mikhail Sergeyevich 1931- Soviet politician; 1st secretary of Communist party (1985-91); president of U.S.S.R. (1990-91)
Gorchakov
biographical name Prince Aleksandr Mikhaylovich 1798-1883 Russian statesman & diplomat
Gordian knot
noun Date: 1579 1. an intricate problem; especially a problem insoluble in its own terms — often used in the phrase cut the Gordian knot 2. a knot tied by Gordius, king ...
Gordimer
biographical name Nadine 1923- South African writer
Gordin
biographical name Jacob 1853-1909 American (Russian-born) Yiddish dramatist
gordita
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish, diminutive of gorda thick tortilla, from Spanish, feminine of gordo fat, thick, from Late Latin gurdus dull, blunt Date: 1945 a deep-fried ...
Gordon
I. biographical name Charles George 1833-1885 Chinese Gordon, Gordon Pasha British soldier II. biographical name Charles William 1860-1937 pseudonym Ralph Connor Canadian ...
Gordon setter
noun Etymology: Alexander, 4th Duke of Gordon died 1827 Scottish sportsman Date: 1865 any of a breed of large bird dogs of Scottish origin that have a long flat ...
Gore
biographical name Albert, Jr. 1948- American politician; vice president of the United States (1993-2001)
gore
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gāra; akin to Old English gār spear, and perhaps to Greek chaion shepherd's staff Date: before 12th century 1. a small ...
Goremykin
biographical name Ivan Logginovich 1839-1917 Russian statesman; prime minister (1906; 1914-16)
Gorey
biographical name Edward St. John 1925-2000 American illustrator & writer
Gorgas
biographical name William Crawford 1854-1920 American army surgeon & sanitation expert
gorge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin gurga, alteration of gurges, from Latin, whirlpool — more at voracious Date: 14th century 1. throat ...
gorgeous
adjective Etymology: Middle English gorgeouse, from Middle French gorgias elegant, perhaps from gorgias wimple, from gorge throat Date: 15th century splendidly or showily ...
gorgeously
adverb see gorgeous
gorgeousness
noun see gorgeous
gorger
noun see gorge II
gorget
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from gorge Date: 15th century 1. a piece of armor protecting the throat — see armor illustration 2. a. an ...
gorgon
noun Etymology: Latin Gorgon-, Gorgo, from Greek Gorgōn Date: 14th century 1. capitalized any of three snake-haired sisters in Greek mythology whose appearance turns the ...
gorgonian
noun Etymology: New Latin Gorgonia, a coral genus, from Latin, coral, from Gorgon-, Gorgo Date: 1835 any of an order (Gorgonacea) of colonial anthozoans with a usually horny ...
Gorgonian
adjective see gorgon
gorgonize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1609 to have a paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on ; stupefy, petrify
Gorgonzola
noun Etymology: Italian, from Gorgonzola, Italy Date: 1878 a pungent blue cheese of Italian origin
gorilla
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek Gorillai, plural, a tribe of hairy women mentioned in an account of a voyage around Africa Date: 1847 1. a very large typically ...
Göring
biographical name Hermann 1893-1946 German Nazi politician
Gorizia
geographical name commune NE Italy in Venetia population 37,999
Gorki
geographical name — see Nizhniy Novgorod
Gorky
I. biographical name Arshile 1905-1948 American (Armenian-born) artist II. biographical name Maksim 1868-1936 pseudonym of Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov Russian writer
Görlitz
geographical name city E Germany on Neisse River population 70,448
Gorlovka
or Horlivka geographical name city E Ukraine in the Donets Basin N of Donetsk population 337,000
gormandise
chiefly British variant of gormandize
gormandize
verb (-dized; -dizing) Etymology: gormand, alteration of gourmand Date: 1548 intransitive verb to eat gluttonously or ravenously transitive verb to eat greedily ; ...
gormandizer
noun see gormandize
gormless
adjective Etymology: alteration of English dialect gaumless, from gaum attention, understanding (from Middle English gome, from Old Norse gaum, gaumr) + -less Date: 1883 ...
gormlessness
noun see gormless
Gorno-Altai
geographical name see Gorno-Altay
Gorno-Altay
or Gorno-Altai or Altai or Altay or formerly Oyrot geographical name autonomous region S Russia in Asia in SE Altai Territory in Altai Mountains capital Gorno-Altaysk area ...
Gorno-Badakhshan
geographical name autonomous region SE Tajikistan in the Pamirs capital Khorog area 24,595 square miles (63,701 square kilometers), population 167,100
gorp
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1968 a snack consisting of high-energy food (as raisins and nuts)
gorse
noun Etymology: Middle English gorst, from Old English; akin to Old High German gersta barley, Latin hordeum Date: before 12th century a spiny yellow-flowered European shrub ...
gorsy
adjective see gorse
Gort
biographical name Viscount — see Vereker
gory
adjective (gorier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. covered with gore ; bloodstained 2. bloodcurdling, sensational Synonyms: see bloody
Gorzow Wielkopolski
geographical name city W Poland population 123,350
gosh
interjection Etymology: euphemism for God Date: 1757 — used as a mild oath or to express surprise
goshawk
noun Etymology: Middle English goshawke, from Old English gōshafoc, from gōs goose + hafoc hawk Date: before 12th century any of several long-tailed hawks with short ...
Goshen
geographical name 1. city N Indiana population 29,383 2. district of ancient Egypt E of the Nile Delta
gosling
noun Etymology: Middle English, from gos goose Date: 14th century 1. a young goose 2. a foolish or callow person
gospel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gōdspel (translation of Late Latin evangelium), from gōd good + spell tale — more at spell Date: before 12th century 1. ...
gospel side
noun Usage: often capitalized G Etymology: from the custom of reading the Gospel from this side Date: 1891 the left side of an altar or chancel as one faces it
gospeler
or gospeller noun Date: 1506 1. a person who reads or sings the liturgical Gospel 2. a person who preaches or propounds a gospel
gospeller
noun see gospeler
gospelly
adjective see gospel I
Gosport
geographical name town S England in Hampshire on Portsmouth harbor population 72,800
gossamer
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gossomer, from gos goose + somer summer Date: 14th century 1. a film of cobwebs floating in air in calm clear weather 2. something light, ...
gossamery
adjective see gossamer I
gossan
noun Etymology: Cornish gossen, from gōs blood Date: 1776 decomposed rock or vein material of reddish or rusty color that results from oxidized pyrites
Gosse
biographical name Sir Edmund William 1849-1928 English poet & critic
gossip
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib Date: before 12th century 1. a. dialect ...
gossiper
noun see gossip II
gossipmonger
noun Date: 1836 a person who starts or spreads gossip
gossipry
noun see gossip I
gossipy
adjective Date: 1818 characterized by, full of, or given to gossip
gossypol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, ultimately from Latin gossypion cotton Date: 1899 a toxic phenolic pigment C30H30O8 in cottonseed
got
past and past participle of get
gotcha
noun Etymology: alteration of got you Date: 1974 an unexpected usually disconcerting challenge, revelation, or catch; also an attempt to embarrass, expose, or disgrace ...
Göteborg
or Gothenburg geographical name city & port SW Sweden on the Kattegat population 433,811
Goth
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Gothes, Gotes (plural), partly from Old English Gotan (plural); partly from Late Latin Gothi (plural) Date: 14th century 1. a member of a ...
Gotha
geographical name city central Germany W of Erfurt population 53,372
Gotham
geographical name new york city — an informal name • Gothamite noun
Gothamite
noun see Gotham
Gothenburg
geographical name see Göteborg
Gothic
I. adjective Date: 1591 1. a. of, relating to, or resembling the Goths, their civilization, or their language b. Teutonic, Germanic c. medieval 1 d. uncouth, ...
Gothic arch
noun Date: 1739 a pointed arch; especially one with a joint instead of a keystone at its apex
Gothic Revival
noun Date: 1869 an artistic style or movement of the 18th and 19th centuries inspired by and imitative of the Gothic style especially in architecture
gothically
adverb see Gothic I
Gothicism
noun Date: 1710 1. barbarous lack of taste or elegance 2. conformity to or practice of Gothic style • Gothicist noun
Gothicist
noun see Gothicism
gothicize
transitive verb (-cized; -cizing) Usage: often capitalized Date: 1712 to make Gothic
Gothick
chiefly British variant of Gothic
Gothicness
noun see Gothic I
Gotland
geographical name island Sweden in the Baltic off SE coast; chief town Visby area 1225 square miles (3173 square kilometers), population 56,840
gotten
past participle of get
Götterdämmerung
noun Etymology: German, literally, twilight of the gods, from Götter (plural of Gott god) + Dämmerung twilight Date: 1909 a collapse (as of a society or regime) marked by ...
Göttingen
geographical name city central Germany SSW of Brunswick population 124,331
Gottschalk
biographical name Louis Moreau 1829-1869 American composer
gouache
noun Etymology: French, from Italian guazzo, literally, puddle, probably from Latin aquatio watering place, from aquari to fetch water, from aqua water — more at island ...
Gouda
I. noun Etymology: Gouda, Netherlands Date: 1885 a mild cheese of Dutch origin that is similar to Edam but contains more fat II. geographical name commune SW Netherlands ...
Goudy
biographical name Frederic William 1865-1947 American type designer
gouge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gowge, from Middle French gouge, from Late Latin gulbia Date: 14th century 1. a chisel with a concavo-convex cross section 2. a. the ...
gouger
noun see gouge II
Gough
biographical name Hugh 1779-1869 1st Viscount Gough English field marshal
goulash
noun Etymology: Hungarian gulyás, short for gulyáshús, literally, herdsman's meat Date: 1866 1. a stew made with meat (as beef), assorted vegetables, and paprika 2. a ...
Gould
I. biographical name Glenn (Herbert) 1932-1982 Canadian pianist II. biographical name Jay 1836-1892 originally Jason Gould American financier III. biographical name ...
Gounod
biographical name Charles-François 1818-1893 French composer
gourami
noun (plural -mi or -mis; also -mies) Etymology: Malay dialect (Java), from Javanese graméh Date: 1878 any of numerous African and Asian tropical freshwater bony fishes ...
gourd
noun Etymology: Middle English gourde, from Anglo-French gurde, gourde, from Latin cucurbita Date: 14th century 1. any of a family (Cucurbitaceae, the gourd family) of ...
gourde
noun Etymology: American French Date: circa 1858 — see money table
gourmand
noun Etymology: Middle English gourmaunt, from Middle French gourmant Date: 15th century 1. one who is excessively fond of eating and drinking 2. one who is heartily ...
gourmandise
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from gourmant Date: 15th century appreciation of or interest in good food and drink ; gourmandism
gourmandism
noun see gourmand
gourmandize
intransitive verb see gourmand
gourmet
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, alteration of gromet boy servant, vintner's assistant, probably ultimately from Middle English grom groom Date: 1820 a connoisseur ...
Gourmont
biographical name Remy de 1858-1915 French writer
gout
noun Etymology: Middle English goute, from Anglo-French gute drop, gout, from Latin gutta drop Date: 13th century 1. a metabolic disease marked by a painful inflammation of ...
goût de terroir
foreign term Etymology: French taste of the earth
gouty
adjective see gout
gov
abbreviation 1. government; governor 2. governmental institution — usually preceded by a period; used in World Wide Web addresses
Gove
biographical name Philip Babcock 1902-1972 American lexicographer
govern
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French governer, from Latin gubernare to steer, govern, from Greek kybernan Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to ...
governable
adjective see govern
governance
noun Date: 14th century government

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