Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389)

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force field
noun Date: 1920 1. field 6a 2. a special charm, aura, or spirit that can influence anyone in its presence 3. something resembling a force field especially in intensity ...
force majeure
noun Etymology: French, superior force Date: 1883 1. superior or irresistible force 2. an event or effect that cannot be reasonably anticipated or controlled — compare ...
force of habit
Date: 1796 behavior made involuntary or automatic by repeated practice
force of nature
Date: 1975 force 4b
force one's hand
phrasal to cause one to act precipitously ; force one to reveal one's purpose or intention
force play
noun Date: 1912 force-out
force pump
noun Date: 1659 a pump with a solid piston for drawing and forcing through valves a liquid (as water) to a considerable height above the pump or under a considerable pressure
force-feed
transitive verb (-fed; -feeding) Date: 1901 1. to feed (as an animal) by forcible administration of food 2. to force to take in — also used with a single object
force-out
noun Date: 1896 a play in baseball in which a runner is put out by being forced to advance to the next base but failing to do so safely
forced
adjective Date: circa 1537 1. compelled by force or necessity ; involuntary 2. done or produced with effort, exertion, or pressure • forcedly adverb
forcedly
adverb see forced
forceful
adjective Date: 1571 possessing or filled with force ; effective • forcefully adverb • forcefulness noun
forcefully
adverb see forceful
forcefulness
noun see forceful
forceless
adjective see force I
forcemeat
noun Etymology: force (alteration of 2farce) + meat Date: circa 1688 finely chopped and highly seasoned meat or fish that is either served alone or used as a stuffing — ...
forceps
noun (plural forceps) Etymology: Latin, tongs, perhaps from formus warm + capere to take — more at therm, heave Date: 1634 an instrument for grasping, holding firmly, or ...
forcepslike
adjective see forceps
forcer
noun see force II
forcible
adjective Date: 15th century 1. effected by force used against opposition or resistance 2. characterized by force, efficiency, or energy ; powerful • forcibleness noun ...
forcibleness
noun see forcible
forcibly
adverb see forcible
Ford
I. biographical name Ford Madox 1873-1939 originally Ford Hermann Hueffer English author II. biographical name Gerald R(udolph) 1913- American politician; 38th president of ...
ford
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old Norse fjǫrthr fjord, Latin portus port, Old English faran to go — more at fare Date: before 12th century a ...
fordable
adjective see ford II
fordo
also foredo transitive verb (fordid; fordone; fordoing) Etymology: Middle English fordon, from Old English fordōn, from for- + dōn to do Date: before 12th century 1. archaic ...
fore
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old English for Date: before 12th century 1. obsolete at an earlier time or period 2. in, toward, or near the ...
fore and aft
adverb Date: circa 1618 1. lengthwise of a ship ; from stem to stern 2. in, at, or toward both the bow and stern 3. in or at the front and back or the beginning and end
fore-
combining form Etymology: Middle English for-, fore-, from Old English fore-, from fore, adverb 1. a. earlier ; beforehand b. occurring earlier ; occurring beforehand ...
fore-and-aft
adjective Date: 1820 1. lying, running, or acting in the general line of the length of a construction (as a ship or a house) ; longitudinal 2. having no square sails
fore-and-aft rig
noun Date: 1879 a sailing-ship rig in which most or all of the sails are not attached to yards but are bent to gaffs or set on the masts or on stays in a fore-and-aft line
fore-and-after
noun Date: 1823 a ship with a fore-and-aft rig; especially schooner
fore-topmast
noun Date: 1626 a mast next above the foremast
forearm
I. transitive verb Date: 1584 to arm in advance ; prepare II. noun Date: 1741 the part of the human arm between the elbow and the wrist; also the corresponding part in ...
forebay
noun Date: 1770 a reservoir or canal from which water is taken to run equipment (as a waterwheel or turbine)
forebear
also forbear noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from fore- + -bear (from been to be) Date: 15th century ancestor, forefather; also precursor — usually used in plural
forebearer
noun Date: 1852 ancestor, forefather
forebode
also forbode verb Date: 1603 transitive verb 1. to have an inward conviction of (as coming ill or misfortune) 2. foretell, portend intransitive verb augur, predict ...
foreboder
noun see forebode
foreboding
I. noun Date: 14th century the act of one who forebodes; also an omen, prediction, or presentiment especially of coming evil ; portent II. adjective Date: 1630 indicative ...
forebodingly
adverb see foreboding II
forebodingness
noun see foreboding II
forebrain
noun Date: 1879 the anterior of the three primary divisions of the developing vertebrate brain or the corresponding part of the adult brain that includes especially the ...
forecaddie
noun Date: 1792 a golf caddie who is stationed in the fairway and who indicates the position of balls on the course
forecast
I. verb (forecast; also forecasted; forecasting) Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to calculate or predict (some future event or condition) usually as a result of ...
forecastable
adjective see forecast I
forecaster
noun see forecast I
forecastle
or fo'c'sle noun Date: 15th century 1. the forward part of the upper deck of a ship 2. the crew's quarters usually in a ship's bow
forecheck
intransitive verb Date: 1951 to check an opponent in ice hockey in the opponent's defensive zone • forechecker noun
forechecker
noun see forecheck
foreclose
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French forclos, past participle of forclore, forsclore, from fors outside (from Latin foris) + clore to close — more at forum Date: ...
foreclosure
noun Date: 1713 an act or instance of foreclosing; specifically a legal proceeding that bars or extinguishes a mortgagor's right of redeeming a mortgaged estate
forecourt
noun Date: 1535 1. an open court in front of a building 2. the area near the net in a court game
foredeck
noun Date: 1565 the forepart of a ship's main deck
foredo
variant of fordo
foredoom
transitive verb Date: 1559 doom 2
foreface
noun Date: 1545 the part of the head of a quadruped that is in front of the eyes
forefather
noun Date: 14th century 1. ancestor 1a 2. a person of an earlier period and common heritage
forefeel
transitive verb (forefelt; -feeling) Date: 1580 to have a presentiment of
forefend
variant of forfend
forefinger
noun Date: 15th century index finger
forefoot
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. one of the anterior feet especially of a quadruped b. the front part of the human foot; also the front part of a shoe 2. the forward ...
forefront
noun Date: 15th century the foremost part or place
foregather
variant of forgather
forego
I. transitive verb (forewent; foregone; foregoing) Date: before 12th century to go before ; precede • foregoer noun II. variant of forgo
foregoer
noun see forego I
foregoing
adjective Date: 15th century listed, mentioned, or occurring before Synonyms: see preceding
foregone
adjective Date: 1575 previous, past
foregone conclusion
noun Date: 1604 1. a conclusion that has preceded argument or examination 2. an inevitable result ; certainty
foreground
I. noun Date: 1695 1. the part of a scene or representation that is nearest to and in front of the spectator 2. a position of prominence ; forefront 3. a level of ...
foregut
noun Date: circa 1889 the anterior part of the alimentary canal of a vertebrate embryo that develops into the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and extreme anterior part of the ...
forehand
I. noun Date: 1557 1. archaic superior position ; advantage 2. the part of a horse that is before the rider 3. a forehand stroke (as in tennis or racquets); also the ...
forehanded
adjective Date: 1650 1. a. mindful of the future ; prudent b. well-to-do 2. forehand 2 • forehandedly adverb • forehandedness noun
forehandedly
adverb see forehanded
forehandedness
noun see forehanded
forehead
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the part of the face above the eyes 2. the front or forepart of something
forehoof
noun Date: 1726 the hoof of a forefoot
foreign
adjective Etymology: Middle English forein, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin foranus on the outside, from Latin foris outside — more at forum Date: 13th century 1. ...
foreign affairs
noun plural Date: 1611 matters having to do with international relations and with the interests of the home country in foreign countries
foreign aid
noun Date: 1947 assistance (as economic aid) provided by one nation to another
foreign bill
noun Date: 1682 a bill of exchange that is drawn in one jurisdiction (as a country or state) and payable within another
foreign correspondent
noun Date: 1801 a correspondent employed to send news or comment from a foreign country
foreign exchange
noun Date: 1691 1. a process of settling accounts or debts between persons residing in different countries 2. foreign currency or current short-term credit instruments ...
foreign minister
noun Date: 1678 a governmental minister for foreign affairs
foreign office
noun Date: 1820 a government office (as a ministry) that deals with foreign affairs
foreign policy
noun Date: 1804 the policy of a sovereign state in its interaction with other sovereign states
foreign service
noun Date: 1870 the field force of a foreign office comprising diplomatic and consular personnel
foreign-born
adjective Date: 1692 foreign by birth
foreigner
noun Date: 15th century 1. a person belonging to or owing allegiance to a foreign country 2. chiefly dialect one not native to a place or community ; stranger 1c
foreignism
noun Date: 1855 something peculiar to a foreign language or people; specifically a foreign idiom or custom
foreignness
noun see foreign
forejudge
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English forjuggen, from Anglo-French forjuger, forsjugger, from fors outside (from Latin foris) + juger to judge Date: 15th century to ...
foreknow
transitive verb (foreknew; foreknown; -knowing) Date: 14th century to have previous knowledge of ; know beforehand especially by paranormal means or by revelation Synonyms: ...
foreknowledge
noun see foreknow
forelady
noun Date: circa 1889 forewoman
foreland
noun Date: 14th century promontory, headland
foreleg
noun Date: 15th century a front leg
forelimb
noun Date: circa 1796 a limb (as an arm, wing, fin, or leg) that is situated anteriorly
forelock
noun Date: 1589 a lock of hair growing from the front of the head
foreman
noun Date: 15th century a first or chief person: as a. a member of a jury who acts as chairman and spokesman b. (1) a chief and often specially trained worker who ...
foremanship
noun see foreman
foremast
noun Date: 1582 the mast nearest the bow of a ship
foremost
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English formest, from Old English, superlative of forma first; akin to Old High German fruma advantage, Old English fore fore Date: before 12th ...
foremother
noun Date: 1582 a female ancestor
forename
noun Date: 1533 a name that precedes one's surname
forenamed
adjective Date: 13th century named previously ; aforesaid
forenoon
noun Date: 15th century the early part of the day ending with noon ; morning
forensic
I. adjective Etymology: Latin forensis public, forensic, from forum forum Date: 1659 1. belonging to, used in, or suitable to courts of judicature or to public discussion and ...
forensically
adverb see forensic I
foreordain
transitive verb Date: 15th century to dispose or appoint in advance ; predestine • foreordination noun
foreordination
noun see foreordain
forepart
noun Date: 14th century 1. the anterior part of something 2. the earlier part of a period of time
forepassed
or forepast adjective Date: 1557 bygone
forepast
adjective see forepassed
forepaw
noun Date: 1782 the paw of a foreleg
forepeak
noun Date: 1693 the extreme forward lower compartment or tank usually used for trimming or storage in a ship
foreplay
noun Date: 1929 1. erotic stimulation preceding sexual intercourse 2. action or behavior that precedes an event
forequarter
noun Date: 15th century the front half of a lateral half of the body or carcass of a quadruped
forereach
verb Date: 1644 intransitive verb of a ship to gain ground in tacking transitive verb to gain on or go ahead of (a ship) when close-hauled
forerun
transitive verb (foreran; -run; -running) Date: before 12th century 1. to run before 2. to come before as a token of something to follow 3. forestall, anticipate
forerunner
noun Date: 13th century 1. one that precedes and indicates the approach of another: as a. a premonitory sign or symptom b. a skier who runs the course before the start ...
foresaid
adjective Date: before 12th century archaic aforesaid
foresail
noun Date: 15th century 1. the lowest sail set on the foremast of a square-rigged ship or schooner — see sail illustration 2. the sole or principal headsail (as of a ...
foresee
transitive verb (foresaw; foreseen; -seeing) Date: before 12th century to see (as a development) beforehand • foreseer noun Synonyms: foresee, foreknow, divine, ...
foreseeability
noun see foreseeable
foreseeable
adjective Date: 1804 1. being such as may be reasonably anticipated 2. lying within the range for which forecasts are possible • foreseeability noun
foreseer
noun see foresee
foreshadow
transitive verb Date: 1577 to represent, indicate, or typify beforehand ; prefigure • foreshadower noun
foreshadower
noun see foreshadow
foreshank
noun Date: 1924 the upper part of the foreleg of cattle; also meat cut from this part
foresheet
noun Date: 1667 1. one of the sheets of a foresail 2. plural the forward part of an open boat
foreshock
noun Date: 1902 any of the usually minor tremors commonly preceding the principal shock of an earthquake
foreshore
noun Date: 1764 1. a strip of land margining a body of water 2. the part of a seashore between high-water and low-water marks
foreshorten
transitive verb Date: 1606 1. to shorten by proportionately contracting in the direction of depth so that an illusion of projection or extension in space is obtained 2. to ...
foreside
noun Date: 14th century the front side or part ; front
foresight
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or the power of foreseeing ; prescience 2. provident care ; prudence 3. an act of looking forward; also a view forward • ...
foresighted
adjective see foresight
foresightedly
adverb see foresight
foresightedness
noun see foresight
foresightful
adjective see foresight
foreskin
noun Date: 1530 a fold of skin that covers the glans of the penis — called also prepuce
forespeak
transitive verb (forespoke; forespoken; -speaking) Date: 14th century 1. archaic foretell, predict 2. archaic to arrange for in advance
forest
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin forestis (silva) unenclosed (woodland), from Latin foris outside — more at ...
forest floor
noun Date: 1849 the richly organic layer of soil and debris characteristic of forested land
forest green
noun Date: 1810 a dark yellowish or moderate olive green
forest ranger
noun Date: 1830 an officer charged with the patrolling and guarding of a forest; especially one in charge of the management and protection of a portion of a public forest
forest tent caterpillar
noun Date: 1854 a moth (Malacosoma disstria of the family Lasiocampidae) whose orange-marked larva is a tent caterpillar and a serious defoliator of deciduous trees
forestage
noun Date: 1923 apron 2e
forestal
adjective see forest I
forestall
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from forstall act of waylaying, from Old English foresteall, from fore- + steall position, stall Date: before 12th century 1. to ...
forestaller
noun see forestall
forestallment
noun see forestall
forestation
noun see forest II
forestay
noun Date: 13th century a stay from the foremast to the foredeck or bow of a ship
forestaysail
noun Date: 1742 the triangular aftermost headsail of a schooner, ketch, or yawl set on the forestay — see sail illustration
forested
adjective see forest I
forester
noun Etymology: Middle English forster, forester, from Anglo-French forester, from forest Date: 14th century 1. a person trained in forestry 2. an inhabitant of a forest ...
Forester
biographical name C(ecil) S(cott) 1899-1966 British writer
forestial
adjective see forest I
forestland
noun Date: 1649 land covered with forest or reserved for the growth of forests
forestry
noun Date: 1823 1. forestland 2. a. the science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests b. the management of growing timber
foreswear
variant of forswear
foresworn
variant of forsworn
foretaste
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. a small anticipatory sample 2. an advance indication or warning Synonyms: see prospect II. transitive verb Date: 15th century to taste ...
foretell
transitive verb (foretold; -telling) Date: 14th century to tell beforehand ; predict • foreteller noun Synonyms: foretell, predict, forecast, prophesy, prognosticate ...
foreteller
noun see foretell
forethought
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a thinking or planning out in advance ; premeditation 2. consideration for the future II. adjective Date: 15th century archaic ...
forethoughtful
adjective Date: circa 1810 full of or having forethought • forethoughtfully adverb • forethoughtfulness noun
forethoughtfully
adverb see forethoughtful
forethoughtfulness
noun see forethoughtful
foretime
noun Date: circa 1540 former or past time ; the time before the present
foretoken
I. noun Date: before 12th century a premonitory sign II. transitive verb (foretokened; foretokening) Date: 15th century to indicate or warn of in advance
foretop
noun Date: 1509 the platform at the head of a ship's foremast
foretopman
noun Date: 1816 a sailor on duty on the foremast and above
forever
I. adverb Date: circa 1500 1. for a limitless time 2. at all times ; continually II. noun Date: 1858 a seemingly interminable time ; excessively long
forevermore
adverb Date: 1641 forever 1
foreverness
noun Date: 1945 eternity
forewarn
transitive verb Date: 14th century to warn in advance
forewarning
noun Date: 1548 1. a warning given in advance 2. the state of being warned in advance
forewing
noun Date: circa 1889 either of the anterior wings of a 4-winged insect
forewoman
noun Date: 1620 a woman who is a foreman
foreword
noun Date: 1842 prefatory comments (as for a book) especially when written by someone other than the author
foreworn
archaic variant of forworn
Forfar
geographical name 1. (or Forfarshire) — see Angus 2. royal burgh E Scotland NNE of Dundee population 12,742
Forfarshire
I. geographical name see Forfar 1 II. geographical name see Angus II
forfeit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English forfait, from Anglo-French, from past participle of forfaire, forsfaire to commit a crime, forfeit, from fors outside (from Latin foris) + ...
forfeitable
adjective see forfeit II
forfeiter
noun see forfeit II
forfeiture
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of forfeiting ; the loss of property or money because of a breach of a legal obligation 2. something (as money or property) that is ...
forfend
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic forbid b. to ward off ; prevent 2. protect, preserve
forgather
or foregather intransitive verb Date: 1513 1. to come together ; assemble 2. to meet someone usually by chance
forge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin fabrica, from fabr-, faber smith Date: 13th century 1. a furnace or a shop with its furnace where metal is ...
forgeability
noun see forge II
forgeable
adjective see forge II
forger
noun Etymology: 2forge Date: 14th century 1. one that forges metals 2. a. a person who falsifies; especially a creator of false tales b. a person guilty of forgery
forgery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1583 1. archaic invention 2. something forged 3. an act of forging; especially the crime of falsely and fraudulently making or altering a ...
forget
verb (forgot; forgotten or -got; -getting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English forgietan, from for- + -gietan (akin to Old Norse geta to get) Date: before 12th century ...
forget oneself
phrasal to lose one's dignity, temper, or self-control
forget-me-not
noun Date: 1532 any of a genus (Myosotis) of small herbs of the borage family having usually bright blue or white flowers usually arranged in a curving spike
forgetful
adjective Date: 14th century 1. likely to forget 2. characterized by negligent failure to remember ; neglectful 3. inducing oblivion • forgetfully adverb • ...
forgetfully
adverb see forgetful
forgetfulness
noun see forgetful
forgetive
adjective Etymology: probably from 2forge + -tive (as in inventive) Date: 1597 archaic inventive, imaginative
forgettable
adjective Date: 1845 fit or likely to be forgotten
forgetter
noun see forget
forging
noun Date: 14th century 1. the art or process of forging 2. a piece of forged work 3. forgery 3
forgivable
adjective see forgive
forgivably
adverb see forgive
forgive
verb (forgave; forgiven; -giving) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English forgifan, from for- + gifan to give Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to ...
forgiveness
noun Date: before 12th century the act of forgiving
forgiver
noun see forgive
forgiving
adjective Date: 1623 1. willing or able to forgive 2. allowing room for error or weakness • forgivingly adverb • forgivingness noun
forgivingly
adverb see forgiving
forgivingness
noun see forgiving
forgo
also forego transitive verb (forwent; forgone; forgoing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English forgān to pass by, forgo, from for- + gān to go Date: before 12th ...
forgoer
noun see forgo
forgotten man
noun Date: 1925 a person or category of persons that receives less attention than is merited
Forillon National Park
geographical name reservation E Canada in Gaspé Peninsula
forint
noun (plural forints; also forint) Etymology: Hungarian Date: circa 1916 — see money table
fork
I. noun Etymology: Middle English forke, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English forca & Anglo-French furke, from Latin furca Date: before 12th century 1. an implement ...
fork-tender
adjective Date: 1973 tender enough to be easily pierced or cut with a fork
forkball
noun Date: 1936 a baseball pitch in which the ball is gripped between the forked index and middle fingers
forked
adjective Date: 13th century 1. resembling a fork especially in having one end divided into two or more branches or points 2. shaped like a fork or having a forked part
forked tongue
noun Date: 1833 intent to mislead or deceive — usually used in the phrase to speak with forked tongue
forker
noun see fork II
forkful
noun see fork I
forklift
noun Date: 1944 a self-propelled machine for hoisting and transporting heavy objects by means of steel fingers inserted under the load
forky
adjective (forkier; -est) Date: 1695 forked
Forlì
geographical name commune N Italy in Emilia-Romagna SE of Bologna population 109,228
forlorn
adjective Etymology: Middle English forloren, from Old English, past participle of forlēosan to lose, from for- + lēosan to lose — more at lose Date: before 12th century ...
forlorn hope
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from Dutch verloren hoop, literally, lost band Date: 1579 1. a body of men selected to perform a perilous service 2. a desperate or ...
forlornly
adverb see forlorn
forlornness
noun see forlorn
form
I. noun Etymology: Middle English forme, from Anglo-French furme, forme, from Latin forma form, beauty Date: 13th century 1. a. the shape and structure of something as ...
form class
noun Date: 1921 a class of linguistic forms that can be used in the same position in a construction and that have one or more morphological or syntactical features in common
form critic
noun see form criticism
form criticism
noun Date: 1928 a method of criticism for determining the sources and historicity of biblical writings through analysis of the writings in terms of ancient literary forms and ...
form genus
noun Date: 1873 an artificial taxonomic category established for organisms (as imperfect fungi) of obscure true relationships
form letter
noun Date: 1909 1. a letter on a subject of frequent recurrence that can be sent to different people without essential change except in the address 2. a letter for mass ...
form on
phrasal to take up a formation next to
form word
noun Date: 1875 function word
form-
or formo- combining form Etymology: formic formic acid
form-critical
adjective Date: 1933 based on or applying form criticism
formability
noun see form II
formable
adjective see form II
formal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin formalis, from forma Date: 14th century 1. a. belonging to or constituting the form or essence of a thing b. ...
formaldehyde
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary form- + aldehyde Date: 1872 a colorless pungent irritating gas CH2O used chiefly in aqueous solution as a disinfectant and ...
formalin
noun Etymology: Formalin, a trademark Date: 1893 a clear aqueous solution of formaldehyde containing a small amount of methanol used especially as a preservative
formalise
British variant of formalize
formalism
noun Date: 1839 1. the practice or the doctrine of strict adherence to prescribed or external forms (as in religion or art); also an instance of this 2. marked attention to ...
formalist
noun or adjective see formalism
formalistic
adjective see formalism
formality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1597 1. compliance with formal or conventional rules ; ceremony 2. the quality or state of being formal 3. an established form or procedure that ...
formalizable
adjective see formalize
formalization
noun see formalize
formalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1646 1. to give a certain or definite form to ; shape 2. a. to make formal b. to give formal status or approval to • ...
formalizer
noun see formalize
formally
adverb see formal I
formalness
noun see formal I
formamide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary form- + amide Date: 1852 a colorless hygroscopic liquid CHONH2 used chiefly as a solvent
formant
noun Date: 1901 a characteristic component of the quality of a speech sound; specifically any of several resonance bands held to determine the phonetic quality of a vowel
format
I. noun Etymology: French or German; French, from German, from Latin formatus, past participle of formare to form, from forma Date: 1840 1. the shape, size, and general ...
formate
noun Date: 1807 a salt or ester of formic acid
formation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of giving form or shape to something or of taking form ; development 2. something that is formed 3. the manner in which a thing is ...
formative
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. giving or capable of giving form ; constructive b. used in word formation or inflection 2. capable of alteration by growth and ...

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