Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву flüg-gulp (6389)

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furcula
noun (plural furculae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, forked prop, diminutive of furca Date: 1859 a forked process or part: as a. wishbone b. the forked leaping ...
furfural
noun Etymology: Latin furfur bran + International Scientific Vocabulary 3-al Date: 1879 a liquid aldehyde C5H4O2 of penetrating odor that is usually made from plant materials ...
furioso
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, literally, furious Date: circa 1823 with great force or vigor — used as a direction in music
furious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French furieus, from Latin furiosus, from furia madness, fury Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) ...
furiously
adverb see furious
furl
I. verb Etymology: Anglo-French ferlier to fasten, from fer, ferm tight (from Latin firmus firm) + lier to tie, from Latin ligare — more at ligature Date: 1556 transitive ...
furless
adjective see fur II
furlong
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English furlang, from furh furrow + lang long Date: 14th century a unit of distance equal to 220 yards (about 201 meters)
furlough
I. noun Etymology: Dutch verlof, literally, permission, from Middle Dutch, from ver- for- + lof permission; akin to Middle High German loube permission — more at for-, leave ...
furmity
variant of frumenty
furnace
noun Etymology: Middle English furnas, from Anglo-French forneise, from Latin fornac-, fornax; akin to Latin formus warm — more at therm Date: 13th century an enclosed ...
Furneaux
geographical name islands Australia off NE Tasmania
Furness
I. biographical name Horace Howard: father 1833-1912 & son 1865-1930 American Shakespeare scholars II. geographical name district N England comprising peninsula in Irish Sea ...
furnish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English furnisshen, from Anglo-French furniss-, stem of furnir, fournir to complete, equip, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German frummen ...
furnisher
noun see furnish
furnishing
noun Date: 1594 1. an article or accessory of dress — usually used in plural 2. an object that tends to increase comfort or utility; especially an article of furniture ...
furniture
noun Etymology: Middle French fourniture, from fournir Date: 1542 equipment that is necessary, useful, or desirable: as a. archaic the trappings of a horse b. movable ...
furniture beetle
noun Date: 1915 a widespread beetle (Anobium punctatum of the family Anobiidae) that bores in and damages furniture and seasoned wood
Furnivall
biographical name Frederick James 1825-1910 English philologist
furor
noun Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French, from Latin, from furere to rage Date: 15th century 1. an angry or maniacal fit ; rage 2. fury 4 3. a fashionable ...
furor loquendi
foreign term Etymology: Latin rage for speaking
furor poeticus
foreign term Etymology: Latin poetic frenzy
furor scribendi
foreign term Etymology: Latin rage for writing
furore
noun Etymology: Italian, from Latin furor Date: 1790 1. furor 3 2. furor 4b
furosemide
noun Etymology: furfural + -o- + sulf- + -emide, probably alteration of amide Date: 1965 a powerful diuretic C12H11ClN2O5S used especially to treat edema and hypertension
furred
adjective Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. lined, trimmed, or faced with fur 2. coated as if with fur; specifically having a coating consisting chiefly of ...
furrier
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English furrer, from Anglo-French furrere, from furrer to fur — more at fur Date: 14th century 1. a fur dealer 2. a. one that ...
furriery
noun Date: circa 1864 1. the fur business 2. fur craftsmanship
furriner
noun Etymology: by alteration Date: 1838 foreigner 2 — used to represent a dialect pronunc.
furring
noun Date: 14th century 1. a fur trimming or lining 2. a. the application of thin wood, brick, or metal to joists, studs, or walls to form a level surface (as for ...
furrow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English furgh, forow, from Old English furh; akin to Old High German furuh furrow, Latin porca Date: before 12th century 1. a. a trench in the ...
furry
adjective (furrier; -est) Date: circa 1674 1. consisting of or resembling fur 2. covered with fur 3. thick in quality
Fürth
geographical name city S central Germany NW of Nuremberg population 105,297
further
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English furthor (akin to Old High German furthar further), comparative, from the base of Old English forth forth Date: before 12th ...
further education
noun Date: 1937 British adult education
furtherance
noun Date: 15th century the act of furthering ; advancement
furtherer
noun see further II
furthermore
adverb Date: 13th century in addition to what precedes ; besides
furthermost
adjective Date: 15th century most distant ; farthest
furthest
adverb or adjective Date: 14th century farthest
furtive
adjective Etymology: French or Latin; French furtif, from Latin furtivus, from furtum theft, from fur thief, from or akin to Greek phōr thief; akin to Greek pherein to carry ...
furtively
adverb see furtive
furtiveness
noun see furtive
Furtwängler
biographical name (Gustav Heinrich Ernst Martin) Wilhelm 1886-1954 German conductor
furuncle
noun Etymology: Latin furunculus petty thief, boil, diminutive of furon-, furo ferret, thief, from fur Date: 1676 boil II
furunculosis
noun (plural furunculoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1886 1. the condition of having or tending to develop multiple furuncles 2. a highly infectious disease of various ...
fury
noun (plural furies) Etymology: Middle English furie, from Latin furia, from furere to rage Date: 14th century 1. intense, disordered, and often destructive rage 2. a. ...
furze
noun Etymology: Middle English firse, from Old English fyrs; akin to Russian pyreĭ quack grass, Greek pyros wheat Date: before 12th century gorse • furzy adjective
furzy
adjective see furze
fusarium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin fusus spindle Date: 1907 any of a genus (Fusarium) of ascomycetous fungi having curved septate conidia which includes forms that are ...
fuscous
adjective Etymology: Latin fuscus — more at dusk Date: 1662 of any of several colors averaging a brownish gray
fuse
I. verb (fused; fusing) Etymology: Latin fusus, past participle of fundere to pour, melt — more at found Date: 1592 transitive verb 1. to reduce to a liquid or plastic ...
fused quartz
noun Date: 1925 quartz glass — called also fused silica
fused silica
noun see fused quartz
fusee
noun Etymology: French fusée, literally, spindleful of yarn, from Old French, from fus spindle, from Latin fusus Date: 1622 1. a conical spirally grooved pulley in a ...
fusel oil
noun Etymology: German Fusel bad liquor Date: 1850 an acrid oily liquid occurring in insufficiently distilled alcoholic liquors, consisting chiefly of amyl alcohol, and used ...
fuselage
noun Etymology: French, from fuselé spindle-shaped, from Middle French, from fusel, diminutive of fus Date: 1909 the central body portion of an aircraft designed to ...
Fushun
geographical name city NE China in NE Liaoning E of Shenyang population 1,202,388
fusibility
noun see fusible
fusible
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being fused and especially liquefied by heat • fusibility noun
fusiform
adjective Etymology: Latin fusus spindle Date: 1746 tapering toward each end
fusil
I. adjective or fusile Etymology: Middle English, from Latin fusilis, from fundere Date: 14th century 1. archaic a. made by melting and pouring into forms ; cast b. ...
fusile
adjective see fusil I
fusileer
noun see fusilier
fusilier
or fusileer noun Etymology: French fusilier, from fusil Date: 1680 1. a soldier armed with a fusil 2. a member of a British regiment formerly armed with fusils
fusillade
noun Etymology: French, from fusiller to shoot, from fusil Date: 1801 1. a. a number of shots fired simultaneously or in rapid succession b. something that gives the ...
fusilli
noun Etymology: Italian, plural of fusillo, from Italian dialect (southern Italy), diminutive of fuso spindle, from Latin fusus Date: 1948 spiral-shaped pasta
Fusin
geographical name see Fuxin
fusion
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin fusion-, fusio, from fundere Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of liquefying or rendering plastic by heat 2. a union ...
fusion cuisine
noun see fusion
fusionist
noun Date: 1851 a person involved in a political fusion or in musical fusion
fuss
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1701 1. a. needless bustle or excitement b. a show of flattering attention 2. a. a state of agitation especially over a ...
fussbudget
noun Date: circa 1904 one who fusses or is fussy especially about trifles • fussbudgety adjective
fussbudgety
adjective see fussbudget
fusser
noun see fuss II
fussily
adverb see fussy
fussiness
noun see fussy
fusspot
noun Date: 1921 fussbudget
fussy
adjective (fussier; -est) Date: 1831 1. easily upset ; irritable 2. overly decorative 3. a. requiring or giving close attention to details b. revealing a ...
fustian
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French fustian, fustayn, from Medieval Latin fustaneum, probably from fustis tree trunk, from Latin, stick, cudgel Date: 13th ...
fustic
noun Etymology: Middle English fustyk smoke tree, from Middle French fustoc, from Arabic fustuq, from Greek pistakē pistachio tree — more at pistachio Date: 15th century ...
fustigate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Late Latin fustigatus, past participle of fustigare, from Latin fustis + -igare (as in fumigare to fumigate) Date: circa 1661 1. ...
fustily
adverb see fusty
fustiness
noun see fusty
fusty
adjective (fustier; -est) Etymology: probably alteration of Middle English foisted, foist musty, from foist wine cask, from Anglo-French fust, fuist wood, tree trunk, cask, ...
fusulinid
noun Etymology: New Latin Fusulinidae, from Fusulina, a genus, from Latin fusus spindle + -ulus -ule + New Latin -ina, diminutive suffix Date: 1941 any of a family ...
fut
abbreviation future
futhark
also futhorc or futhork noun Etymology: from the first six letters, f, u, Þ (th), o (or a), r, c (=k) Date: 1851 the runic alphabet — see rune illustration
futhorc
noun see futhark
futhork
noun see futhark
futile
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin futilis brittle, pointless, probably from fu- (akin to fundere to pour) — more at found Date: circa ...
futilely
adverb see futile
futileness
noun see futile
futilitarian
noun Etymology: blend of futile and utilitarian Date: 1827 one who believes that human striving is futile • futilitarian adjective • futilitarianism noun
futilitarianism
noun see futilitarian
futility
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1623 1. the quality or state of being futile ; uselessness 2. a useless act or gesture
futon
noun (plural futons; also futon) Etymology: Japanese Date: 1876 a usually cotton-filled mattress used on the floor or in a frame as a bed, couch, or chair
futtock
noun Etymology: Middle English votek, futtek, perhaps modification of Middle Dutch voetkijn, diminutive of voet foot Date: 13th century one of the curved timbers scarfed ...
futtock shroud
noun Date: 1817 a short iron rod connecting the topmast rigging with the lower mast
Futuna
geographical name 1. island SW Pacific in Futuna Islands 2. island SW Pacific in SE Vanuatu
Futuna Islands
or Hoorn Islands geographical name islands SW Pacific NE of Fiji; formerly a French protectorate, since 1959 part of Wallis & Futuna Islands territory population 4732
future
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin futurus about to be — more at be Date: 14th century 1. that is to be; ...
future perfect
adjective Date: circa 1898 of, relating to, or constituting a verb tense that is traditionally formed in English with will have and shall have and that expresses completion ...
future shock
noun Date: 1965 the physical and psychological distress suffered by one who is unable to cope with the rapidity of social and technological changes
futureless
adjective Date: 1863 having no future • futurelessness noun
futurelessness
noun see futureless
futurism
noun Date: 1909 1. a movement in art, music, and literature begun in Italy about 1909 and marked especially by an effort to give formal expression to the dynamic energy and ...
futurist
noun Date: circa 1846 1. one who studies and predicts the future especially on the basis of current trends 2. one who advocates or practices futurism • futurist adjective
futuristic
adjective Date: 1915 of, relating to, or characteristic of the future, futurism, or futurology; also very modern • futuristically adverb
futuristically
adverb see futuristic
futuristics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1969 futurology
futurity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1604 1. time to come ; future 2. the quality or state of being future 3. plural future events or prospects 4. a. a horse race usually for ...
futurological
adjective see futurology
futurologist
noun see futurology
futurology
noun Date: 1946 a study that deals with future possibilities based on current trends • futurological adjective • futurologist noun
futz
intransitive verb Etymology: perhaps part modification, part translation of Yiddish arumfartsn zikh, literally, to fart around Date: circa 1930 slang fool around 1 — often ...
Fuxin
or Fusin geographical name city NE China in central Liaoning
fuze
variant of fuse
Fuzhou
or Foochow or Fu-chou or formerly Minhow geographical name city & port SE China capital of Fujian on Min River population 874,809
fuzz
I. noun Etymology: probably back-formation from fuzzy Date: 1674 1. fine light particles or fibers (as of down or fluff) 2. a blurred effect II. verb Date: circa 1702 ...
fuzzily
adverb see fuzzy
fuzziness
noun see fuzzy
fuzzy
adjective (fuzzier; -est) Etymology: perhaps from Low German fussig loose, spongy Date: 1713 1. marked by or giving a suggestion of fuzz 2. lacking in clarity or ...
fuzzy logic
noun Date: 1969 a system of logic in which a statement can be true, false, or any of a continuum of values in between
fuzzy set
noun Date: 1964 a mathematical set with the property that an object can be a member of the set, not a member of the set, or any of a continuum of states of being a partial ...
Fu‘ād I
biographical name 1868-1936 sultan (1917-22) & king (1922-36) of Egypt
FV
abbreviation Etymology: Latin folio verso the page being turned on the back of the page
fwd
abbreviation 1. foreword 2. forward
FWD
abbreviation front-wheel drive
FX
abbreviation foreign exchange
FY
abbreviation fiscal year
fyce
variant of feist
FYI
abbreviation for your information
fyke
noun Etymology: Dutch fuik Date: 1832 a long bag net kept open by hoops
fylfot
noun Etymology: Middle English, device used to fill the lower part of a painted glass window (from a conjectural manuscript reading) Date: 1842 swastika
Fyn
geographical name island Denmark in the Baltic between Sjælland & Jutland; chief city Odense area 1149 square miles (2987 square kilometers), population 458,111
fynbos
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from fyn fine, delicate + bos bush Date: 1936 a biome of southern coastal South Africa characterized by a diverse richness of endemic plant species ...
G
I. abbreviation 1. German 2. giga- 3. guanine 4. Gulf II. certification mark — used to certify that a motion picture is of such a nature that persons of all ages may ...
g
I. noun (plural g's or gs) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 7th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
G clef
noun Date: 1596 treble clef
G protein
noun Etymology: guanosine triphosphate-binding protein Date: 1967 any of a class of cell membrane proteins that are coupled to cell surface receptors and upon stimulation of ...
G suit
noun Etymology: gravity suit Date: 1944 a suit designed to counteract the physiological effects of acceleration on an aviator or astronaut
g-factor
noun Date: 1942 gyromagnetic ratio
g-force
noun Date: 1903 the force of gravity or acceleration on a body
G-man
noun Etymology: probably from government man Date: 1928 a special agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
G-rated
adjective Date: 1975 1. having a rating of G; broadly relating to or characterized by a lack of violence, obscenity, or sexual explicitness 2. innocent, clean
G-spot
noun Etymology: Grafenberg spot, from Ernst Grafenberg died 1957 American (German-born) gynecologist Date: 1982 a mass of tissue that is held to exist on the anterior ...
G-string
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1878 a strip of cloth passed between the legs and supported by a waist cord that is worn especially by striptease dancers
G1 phase
noun Etymology: growth Date: 1966 the period in the cell cycle from the end of cell division to the beginning of DNA replication — compare G2 phase, M phase, S phase
G2 phase
noun Etymology: growth Date: 1968 the period in the cell cycle from the completion of DNA replication to the beginning of cell division — compare G1 phase, M phase, S phase
ga
abbreviation gauge
GA
abbreviation 1. Gamblers Anonymous 2. general agent 3. general assembly 4. general average 5. general of the army 6. Georgia
Ga
I. abbreviation Georgia II. symbol gallium
GAAP
abbreviation generally accepted accounting principles
gab
I. intransitive verb (gabbed; gabbing) Etymology: probably short for gabble Date: 1786 to talk in a rapid or thoughtless manner ; chatter • gabber noun II. noun Date: ...
GABA
abbreviation gamma-aminobutyric acid
gabardine
noun Etymology: Middle French gaverdine Date: 1520 1. gaberdine 1 2. a. a firm hard-finish durable fabric (as of wool or rayon) twilled with diagonal ribs on the right ...
gabber
noun see gab I
gabble
verb (gabbled; gabbling) Etymology: probably of imitative origin Date: 1577 intransitive verb 1. to talk fast or foolishly ; jabber 2. to utter inarticulate or animal ...
gabbler
noun see gabble
gabbro
noun (plural gabbros) Etymology: Italian, probably modification of Latin glaber smooth — more at glad Date: circa 1828 a granular igneous rock composed essentially of ...
gabbroic
adjective see gabbro
gabby
adjective (gabbier; -est) Date: 1719 talkative, garrulous
gabelle
noun Etymology: Middle English gabell, from gabelle, from Old Italian gabella tax, from Arabic qabāla Date: 15th century a tax on salt levied in France prior to 1790
gaberdine
noun Etymology: Middle French gaverdine Date: 1520 1. a long loose outer garment worn in medieval times and associated especially with Jews since the 16th century 2. ...
Gaberones
geographical name see Gaborone
Gabès
geographical name city & port SE Tunisia on Gulf of Gabès (or ancient Syrtis Minor) (arm of the Mediterranean) population 83,610
gabfest
noun Date: 1897 1. an informal gathering for general talk 2. an extended conversation
gabion
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old Italian gabbione, literally, large cage, augmentative of gabbia cage, from Latin cavea — more at cage Date: 1573 a basket or cage ...
gable
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, probably from Medieval Latin gabulum gibbet, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish gabul forked stick Date: 14th century 1. ...
Gable
biographical name (William) Clark 1901-1960 American actor
gable roof
noun Date: 1850 a double-sloping roof that forms a gable at each end
gabled
adjective see gable
Gabo
biographical name Naum 1890-1977 originally Naum Pevsner American (Russian-born) sculptor
Gabon
geographical name 1. (or Gaboon) (or Gabun) river NW Gabon flowing into the Atlantic through long wide estuary 2. country W Africa on the Atlantic; formerly a territory of ...
Gabonese
adjective or noun see Gabon
gaboon
noun Etymology: alteration of 1gob + -oon (as in spittoon) Date: 1929 dialect spittoon
Gaboon
geographical name see Gabon 1
Gabor
biographical name Dennis 1900-1979 British (Hungarian-born) physicist
Gaboriau
biographical name Émile 1832?-1873 French writer
Gaborone
or formerly Gaberones geographical name town SE Botswana, its capital population 133,468
Gabriel
noun Etymology: Hebrew Gabhrī'ēl Date: before 12th century one of the four archangels named in Hebrew tradition
Gabrieli
biographical name Giovanni circa 1556-1612 Italian composer
Gabun
geographical name see Gabon 1
gaby
noun (plural gabies) Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1796 dialect chiefly England simpleton
Gad
noun Etymology: Hebrew Gādh Date: before 12th century a son of Jacob and the traditional eponymous ancestor of one of the tribes of Israel • Gadite noun
gad
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, spike, from Old Norse gaddr; akin to Old English geard rod — more at yard Date: 1671 1. a chisel or pointed iron or steel bar for ...
gadabout
noun Date: 1837 a person who flits about in social activity • gadabout adjective
Gadara
geographical name town of ancient Palestine SE of Sea of Galilee • Gadarene adjective or noun
gadarene
adjective Usage: often capitalized Etymology: from the demon-possessed Gadarene swine in Matthew 8:28 that rushed into the sea Date: 1922 headlong, precipitate
Gadarene
adjective or noun see Gadara
Gades
or Gadir geographical name — see cadiz • Gaditan adjective or noun
gadfly
noun Etymology: 1gad Date: 1593 1. any of various flies (as a horsefly, botfly, or warble fly) that bite or annoy livestock 2. a person who stimulates or annoys especially ...
gadget
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1886 an often small mechanical or electronic device with a practical use but often thought of as a novelty • gadgeteer noun • ...
gadgeteer
noun see gadget
gadgetry
noun see gadget
gadgety
adjective see gadget
Gadhafi
biographical name Mu‘ammar Muḥammad al- 1942- Libyan leader (1969- )
Gadir
I. geographical name see Cádiz 2 II. geographical name see Gades
Gaditan
adjective or noun see Gades
Gadite
noun see Gad
gadoid
adjective Etymology: New Latin Gadus, genus of fishes, from Greek gados, a fish Date: circa 1842 resembling or related to the cods • gadoid noun
gadolinite
noun Etymology: German Gadolinit, from Johann Gadolin died 1852 Finnish chemist Date: 1802 a black or brown mineral that is a source of rare earths and consists of a silicate ...
gadolinium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from J. Gadolin Date: 1886 a magnetic metallic element of the rare-earth group occurring in combination in gadolinite and several other minerals ...
gadroon
noun Etymology: French godron round plait, gadroon Date: circa 1724 1. the ornamental notching or carving of a rounded molding 2. a short often oval fluting or reeding used ...
gadrooning
noun see gadroon
Gadsden
I. biographical name James 1788-1858 American army officer & diplomat II. geographical name city NE Alabama on the Coosa population 38,978
Gadsden Purchase
geographical name tract of land S of Gila River in present Arizona & New Mexico purchased 1853 by the United States from Mexico area 29,640 square miles (77,064 square ...
gadwall
noun (plural gadwalls or gadwall) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1666 a grayish-brown medium-sized dabbling duck (Anas strepera)
gadzookery
noun Date: 1955 British the use of archaisms (as in a historical novel)
gadzooks
interjection Usage: often capitalized Etymology: perhaps from God's hooks, the nails of the Crucifixion Date: 1694 archaic — used as a mild oath
Gaea
noun Etymology: Greek Gaia Date: 1833 the Greek earth goddess and mother of the Titans
Gael
noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic Gàidheal & Irish Gaedheal Date: 1753 1. a Scottish Highlander 2. a Celtic especially Gaelic-speaking inhabitant of Ireland, Scotland, or ...
Gaeldom
noun see Gael
Gaelic
adjective Etymology: Scottish Gaelic Gàidhlig the Scottish Gaelic language, from Gàidheal Gaelic Date: 1741 1. of or relating to the Gaels and especially the Celtic ...
Gaeltacht
noun Etymology: Irish, from Gaelic, spelling variant of Gaedheal Irishman, Gaelic Date: 1929 any of the Irish-speaking regions remaining in Ireland
Gaeta
geographical name city & port central Italy in Lazio on Gulf of Gaeta (inlet of Tyrrhenian Sea N of Bay of Naples) population 22,393
gaff
I. noun Etymology: French gaffe, from Occitan gaf Date: circa 1656 1. a. a spear or spearhead for taking fish or turtles b. a handled hook for holding or lifting heavy ...
gaff-topsail
noun Date: 1794 a usually triangular topsail with its foot extended upon the gaff — see sail illustration
gaffe
noun Etymology: French, gaff, gaffe Date: 1909 1. a social or diplomatic blunder 2. a noticeable mistake
gaffer
noun Etymology: alteration of godfather Date: 1589 1. an old man — compare gammer 2. British a. foreman, overseer b. employer 3. a head glassblower 4. a ...
Gafsa
or ancient Capsa geographical name oasis W central Tunisia
gag
I. verb (gagged; gagging) Etymology: Middle English gaggen to strangle, of imitative origin Date: 1509 transitive verb 1. a. to restrict use of the mouth of by ...
gag order
noun Date: 1952 a judicial ruling barring public disclosure or discussion (as by the press) of information related to a case; broadly a similar nonjudicial prohibition ...
gaga
adjective Etymology: French, from gaga fool, of imitative origin Date: 1917 1. crazy, foolish 2. marked by wild enthusiasm ; infatuated, doting
gagaku
noun Etymology: Japanese, from ga elegance + gaku music Date: 1929 the ancient court music of Japan
Gagarin
biographical name Yury Alekseyevich 1934-1968 Russian astronaut
Gage
biographical name Thomas 1721-1787 British general & colonial governor in America
gage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, pledge, reward, from Anglo-French — more at wage Date: 14th century 1. a token of defiance; specifically a glove or cap cast on the ...
gagger
noun see gag I
gaggle
noun Etymology: Middle English gagyll, from gagelen to cackle Date: 15th century 1. flock; especially a flock of geese when not in flight — compare skein 2. a group, ...
gagman
noun Date: 1928 1. a gag writer 2. comedian 2
gagster
noun Date: 1935 gagman; also one who plays practical jokes
Gahanna
geographical name city central Ohio NE of Columbus population 32,636
gahnite
noun Etymology: German Gahnit, from J. G. Gahn died 1818 Swedish chemist Date: circa 1808 a usually dark green mineral consisting of an oxide of zinc and aluminum
Gaia
noun Etymology: Greek, Gaea Date: 1975 the hypothesis that the living and nonliving components of earth function as a single system in such a way that the living component ...
gaiety
also gayety noun (plural -eties) Etymology: French gaieté Date: 1634 1. merrymaking; also festive activity — often used in plural 2. high spirits ; merriment 3. ...
gaijin
noun (plural gaijin) Etymology: Japanese, from gai- outer, foreign + -jin person Date: 1964 a foreigner in Japan
Gaillard
biographical name David DuBose 1859-1913 American army officer & engineer
gaillardia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Gaillard de Marentonneau, 18th century French botanist Date: 1879 any of a genus (Gaillardia) of American composite herbs with showy flower ...
gaily
also gayly adverb Date: 14th century in a gay manner ; marked by gaiety
gain
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gayne, from Anglo-French gaigne, gain, from gaaigner to till, earn, gain, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German weidanōn to hunt for ...
gain ground
phrasal to make progress
gainer
noun see gain II
Gaines
biographical name Edmund Pendleton 1777-1849 American general
Gainesville
geographical name 1. city N central Florida population 95,447 2. city N Georgia NE of Atlanta population 25,578
gainful
adjective Date: 1553 productive of gain ; profitable • gainfully adverb • gainfulness noun
gainfully
adverb see gainful
gainfulness
noun see gainful
gaingiving
noun Etymology: gain- (against) + giving Date: 1602 archaic misgiving
gainsay
transitive verb (gainsaid; gainsaying; gainsays) Etymology: Middle English gainsayen, from gain- against (from Old English gēan-) + sayen to say — more at again Date: 14th ...
gainsayer
noun see gainsay
Gainsborough
biographical name Thomas 1727-1788 English painter
Gairdner, Lake
geographical name salt lake Australia in South Australia W of Lake Torrens area 1840 square miles (4784 square kilometers)
Gaiseric
biographical name see Genseric
gait
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gait, gate gate, way Date: 1509 1. a manner of walking or moving on foot 2. a sequence of foot movements (as a walk, trot, pace, or ...
gaited
adjective Date: 1588 having a particular gait or so many gaits
gaiter
noun Etymology: French guêtre Date: 1775 1. a cloth or leather leg covering reaching from the instep to above the ankle or to mid-calf or knee 2. a. an overshoe with ...
Gaithersburg
geographical name town W Maryland NW of Washington, D.C. population 52,613
Gaitskell
biographical name Hugh Todd Naylor 1906-1963 English politician
Gaius
biographical name flourished A.D. 130-180 Roman jurist
Gal
abbreviation Galatians
gal
I. noun Etymology: by alteration Date: 1795 girl, woman II. noun Etymology: Galileo Galilei Date: 1914 a unit of acceleration equivalent to one centimeter per second per ...
gal Friday
noun Date: 1958 girl Friday

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