Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
gulper
noun see gulp
gum
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gome, from Old English gōma palate; akin to Old High German guomo palate, and perhaps to Greek chaos abyss Date: before 12th century the ...
gum arabic
noun Date: 14th century a water-soluble gum obtained from several acacias (especially Acacia senegal) and used especially in the manufacture of inks, adhesives, ...
gum boot
noun Date: 1850 a rubber boot
gum resin
noun Date: 1712 a product consisting essentially of a mixture of gum and resin usually obtained by making an incision in a plant and allowing the juice which exudes to ...
gum tragacanth
noun Date: 1573 tragacanth
gum tree
noun Date: 1676 gum III,3
gum turpentine
noun Date: 1884 turpentine 2a
gumbo
I. noun (plural gumbos) Etymology: American French gombo, of Bantu origin; akin to Umbundu ochinggômbo okra Date: 1805 1. a soup thickened with okra pods or filé and ...
gumbo-limbo
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1837 a tree (Bursera simaruba of the family Burseraceae) of southern Florida and the American tropics that has a smooth coppery bark and ...
gumboil
noun Date: 1753 an abscess in the gum
gumdrop
noun Date: 1860 a sugar-coated candy made usually from corn syrup with gelatin or gum arabic
gumma
noun (plural gummas; also gummata) Etymology: New Latin gummat-, gumma, from Late Latin, gum, alteration of Latin gummi gum Date: circa 1722 a tumor of gummy or rubbery ...
gummatous
adjective see gumma
gummer
noun see gum IV
gumminess
noun see gummy
gummite
noun Date: 1868 a yellow to reddish-brown mixture of hydrous oxides of uranium, thorium, and lead
gummosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1882 a pathological production of gummy exudate in a plant; also a plant disease marked by gummosis
gummous
adjective Date: 1669 resembling or composed of gum
gummy
adjective (gummier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. viscous, sticky 2. a. consisting of or containing gum b. covered with gum • gumminess noun
gumption
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1719 1. chiefly dialect common sense, horse sense 2. enterprise, initiative
gumshoe
I. noun Date: 1913 detective II. intransitive verb (gumshoed; gumshoeing) Date: 1930 to engage in detective work
Gumti
geographical name — see Gomati
gumwood
noun Date: 1709 gum III,4
gun
I. noun Etymology: Middle English gonne, gunne Date: 14th century 1. a. a piece of ordnance usually with high muzzle velocity and comparatively flat trajectory b. a ...
gun control
noun Date: 1969 regulation of the selling, owning, and use of guns
gun for
phrasal to aim at or go after with determination or effort
gun lap
noun Date: circa 1949 the final lap of a race in track signaled by the firing of a gun as the leader begins the lap
gun moll
noun Etymology: argot gun thief, rascal, by shortening & alteration from gonoph, ganef thief — more at ganef Date: circa 1908 slang moll 2b
gun room
noun Date: 1626 quarters on a British warship originally used by the gunner and his mates but now by midshipmen and junior officers
gun-shy
adjective Date: 1884 1. afraid of loud noise (as that of a gun) 2. markedly distrustful, afraid, or cautious
gunboat
noun Date: 1777 an armed ship of shallow draft
gunboat diplomacy
noun Date: 1927 diplomacy backed by the use or threat of military force
guncotton
noun Date: 1846 nitrocellulose; especially an explosive highly nitrated product used chiefly in smokeless powder
gundog
noun Date: 1744 a dog trained to work with hunters by locating and retrieving game
gunfight
noun Date: 1659 a hostile encounter in which antagonists with guns shoot at each other • gunfighter noun
gunfighter
noun see gunfight
gunfire
noun Date: 1801 the firing of guns
gunflint
noun Date: 1731 a small sharp flint fashioned to ignite the priming in a flintlock
gung ho
adjective Etymology: Gung ho!, motto (interpreted as meaning “work together”) adopted by certain United States marines, from Chinese (Beijing) gōnghé, short for Zhōngguó ...
gunite
noun Etymology: from Gunite, a trademark Date: 1914 a building material consisting of a mixture of cement, sand, and water that is sprayed onto a mold
gunk
noun Etymology: from Gunk, trademark for a cleaning solvent Date: 1943 filthy, sticky, or greasy matter • gunky adjective
gunky
adjective see gunk
gunman
noun Date: 1624 1. a man armed with a gun; especially a professional killer 2. a man noted for speed or skill in handling a gun
gunmetal
noun Date: 1541 1. a metal used for guns; specifically a bronze formerly much used as a material for cannon 2. an alloy or metal treated to imitate nearly black tarnished ...
Gunnar
noun Etymology: Old Norse Gunnarr Date: 1842 the king of the Nibelungs and husband of Brynhild in Norse mythology
Gunnarsson
biographical name Gunnar 1889-1975 Icelandic writer
gunned
adjective see gun I
gunnel
I. variant of gunwale II. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1740 a small slimy eellike bony fish (Pholis gunnellus) of the North Atlantic; broadly any fish of the ...
gunner
noun Date: 14th century 1. a soldier or airman who operates or aims a gun 2. one who hunts with a gun 3. a warrant officer who supervises ordnance and ordnance stores
gunnery
noun Date: 1605 the use of guns; especially the science of the flight of projectiles and of the effective use of guns
gunnery sergeant
noun Date: circa 1961 a noncommissioned officer in the marine corps ranking above a staff sergeant and below a master sergeant or first sergeant
Gunnison
geographical name river 150 miles (241 kilometers) W central Colorado flowing W & NW into Colorado River — see Black Canyon
gunnysack
noun Etymology: gunny coarse fabric, of Indo-Aryan origin; akin to Hindi gon sack, Punjabi gūṇī Date: 1799 a sack made of a coarse heavy fabric (as burlap)
gunplay
noun Date: 1881 the shooting of small arms with intent to scare or kill
gunpoint
noun Date: 1951 the muzzle of a gun
gunpowder
noun Date: 15th century an explosive mixture of potassium nitrate, charcoal, and sulfur used in gunnery and blasting; broadly any of various powders used in guns as ...
gunrunner
noun Date: 1899 one that traffics in contraband arms and ammunition • gunrunning noun
gunrunning
noun see gunrunner
Gunsan
geographical name — see Kunsan
gunsel
noun Etymology: argot gunsel catamite, perhaps modification of Yiddish gendzl gosling Date: 1929 slang gunman
gunship
noun Date: 1966 a helicopter or cargo aircraft armed with rockets and machine guns
gunshot
noun Date: 15th century 1. shot or a projectile fired from a gun 2. the range of a gun 3. the firing of a gun
gunslinger
noun Date: 1927 a person noted for speed and skill in handling and shooting a gun especially in the American West
gunslinging
noun Date: circa 1944 the shooting of a gun especially in a gunfight
gunsmith
noun Date: 1588 one who designs, makes, or repairs small firearms • gunsmithing noun
gunsmithing
noun see gunsmith
Gunter
biographical name Edmund 1581-1626 English mathematician
Gunter's chain
noun Etymology: Edmund Gunter Date: circa 1679 a chain 66 feet (20.1 meters) long that is the unit of length for surveys of United States public lands
Gunther
noun Etymology: German Date: 1907 a Burgundian king and husband of Brunhild in Germanic legend
Guntur
geographical name city E India in central Andhra Pradesh W of Machilipatnam population 471,051
gunwale
also gunnel noun Etymology: Middle English gonne-wale, from gonne gun + 1wale; from its former use as a support for guns Date: 15th century the upper edge of a ship's or ...
guppy
noun (plural guppies) Etymology: R.J.L. Guppy died 1916 Trinidadian naturalist Date: 1925 a small bony fish (Poecilia reticulata of the family Poeciliidae) especially of ...
gurgle
intransitive verb (gurgled; gurgling) Etymology: probably imitative Date: 1596 1. to flow in a broken irregular current 2. to make a sound like that of a gurgling liquid ...
Gurkha
noun Etymology: Ghurka, member of a Rajput clan who dominated Nepal in the 18th century Date: 1811 a soldier from Nepal in the British or Indian army
gurnard
noun (plural gurnard or gurnards) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French gurenard, irregular from Old French grognier to grunt, from Latin grunnire, of imitative origin ...
Gurnee
geographical name village NE corner of Illinois population 28,834
gurney
noun (plural gurneys) Etymology: probably ultimately from Gurney cab type of horse-drawn cab with a rear entrance, from J. Theodore Gurney, who patented such a cab in Boston in ...
gurry
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1850 fishing offal
guru
noun (plural gurus) Etymology: ultimately from Sanskrit guru, from guru, adjective, heavy, venerable — more at grieve Date: 1613 1. a personal religious teacher and ...
gush
I. verb Etymology: Middle English guschen Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to issue copiously or violently 2. to emit a sudden copious flow 3. to make an ...
gusher
noun Date: 1864 one that gushes; specifically an oil well with a copious natural flow
gushily
adverb see gushy
gushiness
noun see gushy
gushingly
adverb see gush I
gushy
adjective (gushier; -est) Date: 1845 marked by effusive sentimentality • gushily adverb • gushiness noun
Gusmão
biographical name Xanana 1946- originally José Alexandre Gusmão president of East Timor (2002- )
gusset
noun Etymology: Middle English, piece of armor covering the joints in a suit of armor, from Anglo-French goussete Date: circa 1570 1. a usually diamond-shaped or triangular ...
gussy up
transitive verb (gussied up; gussying up) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1952 dress up, embellish
gust
I. noun Etymology: Middle English guste, from Latin gustus; akin to Latin gustare to taste — more at choose Date: 15th century 1. obsolete a. the sensation of taste b. ...
gustation
noun Etymology: Latin gustation-, gustatio, from gustare Date: 1599 the act or sensation of tasting
gustatorily
adverb see gustatory
gustatory
adjective Date: 1684 relating to or associated with eating or the sense of taste • gustatorily adverb
Gustav
or Gustavus biographical name name of 6 kings of Sweden, the first 4 of the Vasa dynasty: I (Gustav Eriksson) 1496?-1560 (reigned 1523-60); II (Gustav Adolph) 1594-1632 ...
Gustavo A. Madero, Villa
geographical name city central Mexico in Distrito Federal N of Mexico City population 1,182,895
Gustavus
biographical name see Gustav
gustily
adverb see gust II
gustiness
noun see gust II
gusto
noun (plural gustoes) Etymology: Italian, from Latin gustus, past participle Date: 1620 1. a. an individual or special taste b. enthusiastic and vigorous enjoyment or ...
gusty
adjective see gust II
GUT
abbreviation grand unified theory; grand unification theory
gut
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English guttas, plural; probably akin to Old English gēotan to pour Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) bowels, entrails ...
gut check
noun Date: 1972 a test or assessment of courage, character, or determination
gut course
noun Date: 1948 a course (as in college) that is easily passed
gut it out
phrasal persevere
gut-wrenching
adjective Date: 1974 causing mental or emotional anguish
gutbucket
noun Date: 1929 1. barrelhouse 2 2. a homemade bass fiddle consisting of a stick attached to an inverted washtub and having a single string
guten Tag
foreign term Etymology: German good day
Gutenberg
biographical name Johannes circa 1390-1468 German inventor of printing from movable type
Guthrie
biographical name Woodrow Wilson 1912-1967 Woody American folksinger
gutless
adjective Date: 1900 1. lacking courage ; cowardly 2. lacking significance or vitality • gutlessness noun
gutlessness
noun see gutless
gutsily
adverb see gutsy
gutsiness
noun see gutsy
gutsy
adjective (gutsier; -est) Date: circa 1893 1. marked by courage, pluck, or determination 2. a. expressing or characterized by basic physical senses or passions b. ...
gutta
noun (plural guttae) Etymology: Latin, literally, drop Date: 1563 one of a series of ornaments in the Doric entablature that is usually in the form of a frustum of a cone
gutta-percha
noun Etymology: Malay gĕtah-pĕrcha, from gĕtah sap, latex + pĕrcha scrap, rag Date: 1845 a tough plastic substance from the latex of several Malaysian trees (genera ...
guttation
noun Etymology: Latin gutta drop Date: circa 1889 the exudation of liquid water from the uninjured surface of a plant leaf
gutter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English goter, from Anglo-French gutere, goter, from gute drop, from Latin gutta Date: 14th century 1. a. a trough along the eaves to catch and ...
gutter out
intransitive verb Date: 1875 1. to become gradually weaker and then go out 2. to end feebly or undramatically
guttering
noun Date: 1703 1. material for gutters 2. gutter 1a
guttersnipe
noun Date: circa 1869 1. a homeless vagabond and especially an outcast boy or girl in the streets of a city 2. a person of the lowest moral or economic station • ...
guttersnipish
adjective see guttersnipe
guttural
adjective Etymology: Middle French, probably from Medieval Latin gutturalis, from Latin guttur throat Date: 1594 1. articulated in the throat 2. velar 3. being or ...
gutturalism
noun see guttural
gutty
adjective (guttier; -est) Date: 1942 1. gutsy 1 2. having a vigorous challenging quality
Gutzkow
biographical name Karl Ferdinand 1811-1878 German journalist, novelist, & dramatist
guy
I. noun Etymology: probably from Dutch gei brail Date: 1623 a rope, chain, rod, or wire attached to something as a brace or guide — called also guyline II. transitive verb ...
Guy Fawkes Day
noun Date: 1825 November 5 observed in England in commemoration of the seizure of Guy Fawkes in 1605 for an attempt to blow up the houses of parliament
Guyana
or formerly British Guiana geographical name country N South America on Atlantic coast; a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations since 1970 capital Georgetown area 83,000 ...
Guyanese
adjective or noun see Guyana
Guyenne
geographical name see Guienne
guyline
noun see guy I
guyot
noun Etymology: Arnold H. Guyot died 1884 American geographer & geologist Date: 1946 a flat-topped seamount
Guzmán Blanco
biographical name Antonio 1829-1899 Venezuelan soldier & statesman; dictator of Venezuela (1870-89)
guzzle
verb (guzzled; guzzling) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1567 intransitive verb to drink especially liquor greedily, continually, or habitually transitive verb 1. to ...
guzzler
noun see guzzle
GVHD
abbreviation graft-versus-host disease
GW
abbreviation gross weight
Gwadar
or Gwadur geographical name town & port SW Pakistan on Arabian Sea; until 1958 belonged to Sultan of Oman population 17,000
Gwadur
geographical name see Gwadar
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve
geographical name reservation W Canada in W British Columbia in Queen Charlotte Islands
Gwalior
geographical name 1. former state N central India capital Lashkar; part of Madhya Pradesh since 1956 2. city N central India in NW Madhya Pradesh SSE of Agra population ...
Gwangju
geographical name — see Kwangju
Gwinnett
biographical name Button circa 1735-1777 American Revolutionary leader
Gwyn
or Gwynn or Gwynne biographical name Eleanor 1650-1687 Nell English actress mistress of Charles II
Gwynedd
geographical name administrative area of NW Wales area 984 square miles (2548 square kilometers)
Gwynn
biographical name see Gwyn
Gwynne
biographical name see Gwyn
Gy
abbreviation gray
Gy Sgt
abbreviation gunnery sergeant
Gyandzha
geographical name — see Ganca
gybe
variant of jibe
gym
noun Date: circa 1871 1. gymnasium 2. physical education 3. a usually metal frame supporting an assortment of outdoor play equipment (as a swing, seesaw, and rings)
gymkhana
noun Etymology: probably modification of Hindi gếdkhāna & Urdu gendkhāna, literally, ball court Date: 1877 a meet featuring sports contests or athletic skills: as a. ...
gymnasium
noun (plural -nasiums or gymnasia) Etymology: Latin, exercise ground, school, from Greek gymnasion, from gymnazein to exercise naked, from gymnos naked — more at naked Date: ...
gymnast
noun Etymology: Middle French gymnaste, from Greek gymnastēs trainer, from gymnazein Date: 1594 a person trained in gymnastics
gymnastic
I. adjective Date: 1574 of or relating to gymnastics ; athletic • gymnastically adverb II. noun Date: 1652 1. plural but singular in construction a. physical ...
gymnastically
adverb see gymnastic I
gymnosophist
noun Etymology: Latin gymnosophista, from Greek gymnosophistēs, from gymnos + sophistēs wise man, sophist Date: 15th century any of a sect of ascetics in ancient India ...
gymnosperm
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek gymnos + sperma seed — more at sperm Date: circa 1838 any of a group of vascular plants that produce naked seeds not enclosed in an ...
gymnospermous
adjective see gymnosperm
gymnospermy
noun see gymnosperm
gyn
or gynecol abbreviation gynecology
gyn-
or gyno- combining form Etymology: Greek gyn-, from gynē woman — more at queen female reproductive organ ; ovary
gynaec-
combining form see gynec-
gynaeco-
combining form see gynec-
gynaecology
chiefly British variant of gynecology
gynandromorph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek gynandros + -morph Date: circa 1890 an abnormal individual exhibiting characters of both sexes in various ...
gynandromorphic
adjective see gynandromorph
gynandromorphism
noun see gynandromorph
gynandromorphy
noun see gynandromorph
gynandrous
adjective Etymology: Greek gynandros of doubtful sex, from gynē woman + andr-, anēr man — more at andr- Date: 1807 having the androecium and gynoecium united in a column
gynec-
or gyneco-; also gynaec- or gynaeco- combining form Etymology: Greek gynaik-, gynaiko-, from gynaik-, gynē woman — more at queen woman
gyneco-
combining form see gynec-
gynecocracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Greek gynaikokratia, from gynaik- + -kratia -cracy Date: 1612 political supremacy of women • gynecocratic adjective
gynecocratic
adjective see gynecocracy
gynecoid
adjective Date: 1907 typical or characteristic of the human female
gynecol
abbreviation see gyn
gynecologic
adjective see gynecology
gynecological
adjective see gynecology
gynecologist
noun see gynecology
gynecology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1847 a branch of medicine that deals with the diseases and routine physical care of the reproductive system of ...
gynecomastia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from gynec- + Greek mastos breast + New Latin -ia Date: 1881 excessive development of the breast in the male
gyno-
combining form see gyn-
gynocentric
adjective Date: 1976 dominated by or emphasizing feminine interests or a feminine point of view
gynoecium
noun (plural gynoecia) Etymology: New Latin, alteration of Latin gynaeceum women's apartments, from Greek gynaikeion, from gynaik-, gynē Date: 1832 the aggregate of carpels ...
gynogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1925 development in which the embryo contains only maternal chromosomes due to activation of an egg by a sperm that degenerates without fusing ...
gynogenetic
adjective see gynogenesis
gynophore
noun Date: 1821 a prolongation of the receptacle (as in a caper flower) with the gynoecium at its apex
Gyor
geographical name city NW Hungary WNW of Budapest population 134,200
gyp
I. noun Etymology: probably short for gypsy Date: 1750 1. British a college servant 2. a. cheat, swindler b. fraud, swindle II. verb (gypped; gypping) Date: 1880 ...
gypseous
adjective Date: 1661 resembling, containing, or consisting of gypsum
gypsophila
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin gypsum + New Latin -phila -phil Date: 1771 any of a large genus (Gypsophila) of Old World herbs of the pink family having small delicate ...
gypsum
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek gypsos Date: 14th century 1. a widely distributed mineral consisting of hydrous calcium sulfate that is used especially as a soil amendment ...
gypsy
intransitive verb (gypsied; gypsying) Date: circa 1627 to live or roam like a Gypsy
Gypsy
noun (plural Gypsies) Etymology: by shortening & alteration from Egyptian Date: 1537 1. a member of a traditionally itinerant people who originated in northern India and now ...
gypsy cab
noun Date: 1964 a taxicab licensed only to answer calls; especially such a cab that cruises in search of passengers illegally
gypsy moth
noun Date: 1819 an Old World tussock moth (Lymantria dispar) that was introduced about 1869 into the United States and has a grayish-brown mottled hairy caterpillar which is ...
gyr-
or gyro- combining form Etymology: Greek gyros rounded 1. ring ; circle ; spiral 2. gyroscope
gyral
adjective see gyre I
gyrase
noun Etymology: gyr- + -ase Date: 1976 a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes the breaking and rejoining of bonds linking adjacent nucleotides in circular DNA to generate ...
gyrate
I. adjective Date: 1830 winding or coiled around ; convoluted II. intransitive verb (gyrated; gyrating) Date: 1830 1. to revolve around a point or axis 2. to oscillate ...
gyration
noun Date: 1615 1. an act or instance of gyrating 2. something (as a coil of a shell) that is gyrate • gyrational adjective
gyrational
adjective see gyration
gyrator
noun see gyrate II
gyratory
adjective see gyrate II
gyre
I. noun Etymology: Latin gyrus, from Greek gyros Date: 1566 a circular or spiral motion or form; especially a giant circular oceanic surface current • gyral ...
gyrene
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1894 slang a United States marine
gyrfalcon
noun Etymology: Middle English gerfaucun, from Anglo-French girfauc, girfaucon, probably from gir vulture (from Old High German gīr) + faucon falcon Date: 14th century an ...
Gyro
noun (plural Gyros) Etymology: Gyro International (association) Date: 1971 a member of a major international service club
gyro
I. noun (plural gyros) Date: 1910 1. gyrocompass 2. gyroscope II. noun (plural gyros) Etymology: New Greek gyros turn, from Greek; from the rotation of the meat on a spit ...
gyro horizon
noun Date: 1938 artificial horizon
gyro-
combining form see gyr-
gyrocompass
noun Date: 1910 a compass consisting of a continuously driven gyroscope whose spinning axis is confined to a horizontal plane so that the earth's rotation causes it to assume ...
gyrofrequency
noun Date: 1938 the frequency with which a charged particle (as an electron) executes spiral gyrations in moving obliquely across a magnetic field
gyromagnetic
adjective Date: 1922 of or relating to the magnetic properties of a rotating electrical particle
gyromagnetic ratio
noun Date: 1922 the ratio of the magnetic moment of a spinning charged particle to its angular momentum — called also g-factor
gyroplane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1907 an airplane balanced and supported by the aerodynamic forces acting on rapidly rotating horizontal or slightly ...
gyroscope
noun Etymology: French Date: 1856 a wheel or disk mounted to spin rapidly about an axis and also free to rotate about one or both of two axes perpendicular to each other and ...
gyroscopic
adjective see gyroscope
gyroscopically
adverb see gyroscope
gyrostabilizer
noun Date: 1921 a stabilizing device (as for a ship or airplane) that consists of a continuously driven gyro spinning about a vertical axis and pivoted so that its axis of ...
gyrostat
noun see gyrostabilizer
gyrus
noun (plural gyri) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, circle — more at gyre Date: circa 1842 a convoluted ridge between anatomical grooves; especially convolution 2
gyve
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 13th century fetter, shackle • gyve transitive verb
H
I. abbreviation 1. Hamiltonian 2. henry 3. heroin II. symbol hydrogen
h
I. noun (plural h's or hs) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 8th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
H hour
noun Etymology: H, abbreviation for hour Date: 1918 the hour set for launching a specific tactical operation
H Res
abbreviation House resolution
H-bomb
noun Date: 1950 hydrogen bomb
HA
abbreviation hour angle
ha
I. interjection or hah Etymology: Middle English, from Old English Date: before 12th century — used especially to express surprise, joy, or triumph II. abbreviation ...
ha'penny
noun Etymology: by contraction Date: 13th century halfpenny
Ha-erh-pin
geographical name — see Harbin
ha-ha
I. interjection Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ha ha Date: before 12th century — used to express amusement or derision II. noun Etymology: French haha Date: ...
Haakon VII
biographical name 1872-1957 king of Norway (1905-57)
Haarlem
geographical name city W Netherlands capital of North Holland population 149,788
Haavelmo
biographical name Trygve 1911- Norwegian economist
Hab
abbreviation Habacuc; Habakkuk
hab corp
abbreviation habeas corpus
Habacuc
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Hebrew Ḥăbhaqqūq Date: circa 1600 Habakkuk
Habakkuk
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ḥăbhaqqūq Date: 1621 1. a Hebrew prophet of seventh century B.C. Judah who prophesied an imminent Chaldean invasion 2. a prophetic book of ...
Habana, La
geographical name — see Havana • Habanero noun
habanera
noun Etymology: Spanish (danza) habanera, literally, Havanan dance Date: 1878 1. a Cuban dance in slow duple time 2. the music for the habanera
habanero
also habañero noun Etymology: American Spanish (chile) habanero, literally, Havanan chili Date: 1987 a very hot roundish chili pepper (Capsicum chinense) that is usually ...
Habanero
noun see Habana, La
habañero
noun see habanero
habdalah
variant of havdalah
habeas corpus
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, literally, you should have the body (the opening words of the writ) Date: 15th century 1. any of several common-law writs ...
habeas corpus ad subjiciendum
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, you should have the body for submitting Date: 1768 a writ for inquiring into the lawfulness of the restraint of a person who is ...
Haber
biographical name Fritz 1868-1934 German chemist
Haber process
noun Etymology: Fritz Haber died 1934 German chemist Date: 1916 a catalytic process for synthesizing ammonia from nitrogen and hydrogen
haberdasher
noun Etymology: Middle English haberdassher, from modification of Anglo-French hapertas kind of cloth Date: 14th century 1. British a dealer in notions 2. a dealer in men's ...
haberdashery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1547 1. goods sold by a haberdasher 2. a haberdasher's shop
habergeon
noun Etymology: Middle English haubergeoun, from Anglo-French haubergeon, diminutive of hauberc hauberk Date: 14th century 1. a medieval jacket of mail shorter than a ...
Habibie
biographical name B(acharuddin) J(usuf) 1936- president of Indonesia (1998-99)
habile
adjective Etymology: Middle English (Scots) habyll, from Middle French habile, from Latin habilis — more at able Date: 15th century having general skill ; able, skillful
habiliment
noun Etymology: Middle English abiliments, habilementes, from Middle French abillement, habillemens, from Old French abiller to prepare, equip, from bille trimmed wood, log — ...
habilitate
verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Late Latin habilitatus, past participle of habilitare, from Latin habilitas ability — more at ability Date: 1604 transitive verb 1. to ...
habilitation
noun see habilitate
habit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin habitus condition, character, from habēre to have, hold — more at give Date: 13th century 1. archaic ...
habit-forming
adjective Date: 1913 inducing the formation of an addiction
habitability
noun see habitable
habitable
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being lived in ; suitable for habitation • habitability noun • habitableness noun • habitably adverb

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.092 c;