Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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hippocras
noun Etymology: Middle English ypocras, from Anglo-French ipocras, from Ipocras Hippocrates, to whom its invention was ascribed Date: 14th century a mulled wine popular in ...
Hippocrates
biographical name circa 460-circa 377 B.C. father of medicine Greek physician
Hippocratic
adjective Date: circa 1620 of or relating to Hippocrates or to the school of medicine that took his name
Hippocratic oath
noun Date: 1747 an oath embodying a code of medical ethics usually taken by those about to begin medical practice
Hippocrene
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hippokrēnē Date: 1605 a fountain on Mount Helicon sacred to the Muses and believed to be a source of poetic inspiration
hippodrome
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin hippodromos, from Greek, from hippos + dromos racecourse — more at dromedary Date: 1585 1. an oval stadium for horse and chariot ...
hippogriff
noun Etymology: French hippogriffe, from Italian ippogrifo, from ippo- (from Greek hippos horse) + grifo griffin, from Latin gryphus Date: circa 1656 a legendary animal ...
Hippolyta
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hippolytē Date: 1701 a queen of the Amazons given in marriage to Theseus by Hercules
Hippolytus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hippolytos Date: 1567 a son of Theseus falsely accused of amorous advances by his stepmother and killed by his father through the agency ...
Hippomenes
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hippomenēs Date: 1567 the successful suitor of Atalanta in Greek mythology
hippopotamus
noun (plural -muses or hippopotami) Etymology: Latin, from Greek hippopotamos, alteration of hippos potamios, literally, riverine horse Date: 1563 a very large herbivorous ...
hippy
adjective Date: 1919 having large hips
hipster
noun Etymology: 4hip Date: 1940 a person who is unusually aware of and interested in new and unconventional patterns (as in jazz or fashion)
hipsterism
noun Date: 1958 1. hipness 2. the way of life characteristic of hipsters
hiragana
noun Etymology: Japanese, from hira- ordinary + kana syllabary Date: 1859 the cursive script that is one of two sets of symbols of Japanese syllabic writing — compare ...
Hirakata
geographical name city Japan in S Honshu population 390,790
hire
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hȳr; akin to Old Saxon hūria hire Date: before 12th century 1. a. payment for the temporary use of something b. ...
hire purchase
noun Date: 1895 chiefly British purchase on the installment plan
hired gun
noun Date: 1971 an expert hired to do a specific and often ethically dubious job
hireling
noun Date: before 12th century a person who serves for hire especially for purely mercenary motives
hirer
noun see hire II
hiring hall
noun Date: 1934 a union-operated placement office where registered applicants are referred in rotation to jobs
Hirohito
biographical name 1901-1989 emperor of Japan (1926-89)
Hiroshige
biographical name Ando 1797-1858 Japanese painter
Hiroshima
geographical name city & port Japan in SW Honshu on Inland Sea population 1,096,919
hirsute
adjective Etymology: Latin hirsutus; akin to Latin horrēre to bristle — more at horror Date: 1621 1. hairy 1 2. covered with coarse stiff hairs • hirsuteness noun
hirsuteness
noun see hirsute
hirsutism
noun Date: 1927 excessive growth of hair of normal or abnormal distribution
hirudin
noun Etymology: from Hirudin, a trademark Date: 1905 an anticoagulant extracted from the buccal glands of the medicinal leech
his
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, genitive of hē he Date: before 12th century of or relating to him or himself especially as possessor, agent, or ...
his/her
adjective Date: 1952 his or her — used as an adjective of common gender
Hispania
geographical name Iberian Peninsula
Hispanic
adjective Etymology: Latin hispanicus, from Hispania Iberian Peninsula, Spain Date: circa 1889 of, relating to, or being a person of Latin American descent living in the ...
Hispanicism
noun see Hispanic
Hispanicist
noun see Hispanic
Hispanicize
transitive verb see Hispanic
hispanidad
noun Date: 1941 hispanism 1
Hispaniola
or Spanish Española or formerly Haiti or Santo Domingo geographical name island West Indies in the Greater Antilles; divided between Haiti (on W) & Dominican Republic (on E) ...
hispanism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1940 1. a movement to reassert the cultural unity of Spain and Latin America 2. a characteristic feature of Spanish occurring in another ...
Hispanist
noun Date: 1786 a scholar specially informed in Spanish or Portuguese language, literature, linguistics, or civilization
Hispano
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: American Spanish hispano, probably short for hispanoamericano, literally, Spanish-American Date: 1946 a native or resident of the southwestern ...
hispid
adjective Etymology: Latin hispidus; akin to Latin horrēre Date: 1646 rough or covered with bristles, stiff hairs, or minute spines
hiss
verb Etymology: Middle English, of imitative origin Date: 14th century intransitive verb to make a sharp sibilant sound transitive verb 1. to express disapproval of ...
Hissarlik
geographical name site of ancient Troy NW Turkey in Asia 4 miles (6.4 kilometers) SE of mouth of the Dardanelles
hisself
pronoun Date: 12th century chiefly dialect himself 1
hisser
noun see hiss
hissy
noun Etymology: perhaps by shortening & alteration from hysterical Date: circa 1934 chiefly Southern & southern Midland tantrum
hissy fit
noun Date: circa 1970 tantrum
hist
I. interjection Date: 1592 — used to attract attention II. dialect variant of hoist III. abbreviation historian; historical; history
hist-
or histo- combining form Etymology: French, from Greek histos mast, loom beam, web, from histanai to cause to stand — more at stand tissue
histaminase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1930 a widely occurring flavoprotein enzyme that oxidizes histamine and various diamines
histamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hist- + amine Date: circa 1913 a compound C5H9N3 especially of mammalian tissues that causes dilation of capillaries, ...
histaminergic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1936 of autonomic nerve fibers liberating or activated by histamine
histidine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hist- + -idine Date: 1896 a crystalline essential amino acid C6H9N3O2 formed by the hydrolysis of most proteins
histiocyte
noun Etymology: Greek histion web (diminutive of histos) + International Scientific Vocabulary -cyte Date: 1924 a nonmotile macrophage of extravascular tissues and especially ...
histiocytic
adjective see histiocyte
histo-
combining form see hist-
histochemical
adjective see histochemistry
histochemically
adverb see histochemistry
histochemistry
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1860 a science that combines the techniques of biochemistry and histology in the study of the chemical ...
histocompatibility
noun Date: 1948 a state of mutual tolerance that allows some tissues to be grafted effectively to others — compare major histocompatibility complex
histogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1854 the formation and differentiation of tissues • histogenetic adjective
histogenetic
adjective see histogenesis
histogram
noun Etymology: Greek histos mast, web + English -gram Date: 1891 a representation of a frequency distribution by means of rectangles whose widths represent class intervals ...
histologic
adjective see histology
histological
adjective see histology
histologically
adverb see histology
histologist
noun see histology
histology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: French histologie, from hist- + -logie -logy Date: circa 1847 1. a branch of anatomy that deals with the minute structure of animal and plant ...
histolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1857 the breakdown of bodily tissues
histone
noun Etymology: German Histon Date: 1885 any of various simple water-soluble proteins that are rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and are complexed with DNA in ...
histopathologic
adjective see histopathology
histopathological
adjective see histopathology
histopathologically
adverb see histopathology
histopathologist
noun see histopathology
histopathology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 1. a branch of pathology concerned with the tissue changes characteristic of disease 2. the tissue changes ...
histophysiologic
adjective see histophysiology
histophysiological
adjective see histophysiology
histophysiology
noun Date: circa 1886 1. a branch of physiology concerned with the function and activities of tissues 2. structural and functional tissue organization • ...
histoplasmosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Histoplasma, genus of fungi Date: 1907 a respiratory disease with symptoms like those of influenza that is caused by a fungus (Histoplasma ...
historian
noun Date: 15th century 1. a student or writer of history; especially one who produces a scholarly synthesis 2. a writer or compiler of a chronicle
historic
adjective Date: 1594 historical: as a. famous or important in history b. having great and lasting importance c. known or established in the past d. dating ...
historical
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. of, relating to, or having the character of history b. based on history c. used in the past and reproduced in historical ...
historical materialism
noun Date: 1925 the Marxist theory of history and society that holds that ideas and social institutions develop only as the superstructure of a material economic base — ...
historical present
noun Date: 1867 the present tense used in relating past events
historically
adverb Date: 1550 1. in accordance with or with respect to history 2. in the past
historicalness
noun see historical
historicism
noun Date: 1895 a theory, doctrine, or style that emphasizes the importance of history: as a. a theory in which history is seen as a standard of value or as a determinant ...
historicist
adjective or noun see historicism
historicity
noun Date: 1880 historical actuality
historicize
verb (-cized; -cizing) Date: 1846 transitive verb to make historical intransitive verb to use historical material
historiographer
noun Etymology: Middle French historiographeur, from Late Latin historiographus, from Greek historiographos, from historia + graphein to write — more at carve Date: 15th ...
historiographic
adjective see historiography
historiographical
adjective see historiography
historiographically
adverb see historiography
historiography
noun Date: 1569 1. a. the writing of history; especially the writing of history based on the critical examination of sources, the selection of particulars from the ...
history
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English histoire, historie, from Anglo-French estoire, histoire, from Latin historia, from Greek, inquiry, history, from histōr, istōr ...
histrionic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin histrionicus, from Latin histrion-, histrio actor Date: 1648 1. deliberately affected ; theatrical 2. of or relating to actors, acting, or ...
Huszár
biographical name Károly 1882-1941 Hungarian journalist & politician
hut
I. noun Etymology: French hutte, from Old French hute, from Old High German hutta hut; probably akin to Old English hȳd skin, hide Date: 1655 1. an often small and ...
hutch
noun Etymology: Middle English huche, from Anglo-French Date: 13th century 1. a. a chest or compartment for storage b. a cupboard usually surmounted by open shelves 2. ...
Hutchins
biographical name Robert Maynard 1899-1977 American educator
Hutchinson
I. biographical name Anne 1591-1643 née Marbury American (English-born) religious dissident II. biographical name Thomas 1711-1780 American colonial administrator III. ...
hutment
noun Date: 1889 1. a collection of huts ; encampment 2. hut
Hutten
biographical name Ulrich von 1488-1523 German humanist & supporter of Luther
Hutterian
adjective see Hutterite
Hutterite
noun Etymology: Jakob Hutter died 1536 Moravian Anabaptist Date: 1910 a member of an Anabaptist sect of northwestern United States and Canada living communally and holding ...
Hutu
noun (plural Hutu or Hutus) Etymology: Kinyarwanda & Kirundi (Bantu languages of East Africa) Date: 1952 a member of a Bantu-speaking people of Rwanda and Burundi
hutzpa
I. noun see chutzpah II. see hutzpah
hutzpah
or hutzpa variant of chutzpah
Huxleian
adjective see Huxley I
Huxley
I. biographical name Aldous Leonard 1894-1963 brother of J.S. English novelist & critic • Huxleian or Huxleyan adjective II. biographical name Sir Julian Sorell ...
Huxleyan
adjective see Huxley I
Huy
geographical name commune E Belgium SW of Liège population 18,197
Huygens
biographical name Christian 1629-1695 Dutch mathematician, physicist, & astronomer
Huysmans
I. biographical name Camille 1871-1968 Belgian politician II. biographical name Joris-Karl 1848-1907 originally Georges-Charles French novelist
Huyton with Roby
geographical name town NW England in Lancashire E of Liverpool population 57,671
huzza
noun see huzzah
huzzah
or huzza noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1573 an expression or shout of acclaim — often used interjectionally to express joy or approbation
hv
abbreviation have
HV
abbreviation 1. high velocity 2. high voltage
HVAC
abbreviation heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning
hvy
abbreviation heavy
HW
abbreviation 1. high water 2. highway 3. hot water
Hwaining
geographical name — see Anqing
Hwang
geographical name see Huang
HWM
abbreviation high-water mark
hwy
abbreviation highway
hyacinth
noun Etymology: Latin hyacinthus, a precious stone, a flowering plant, from Greek hyakinthos Date: 1553 1. a. a precious stone of the ancients sometimes held to be the ...
hyacinthine
adjective see hyacinth
Hyacinthus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hyakinthos Date: 1565 a youth loved and accidentally killed by Apollo who memorializes him with a hyacinth growing from the youth's blood
Hyades
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 14th century a V-shaped cluster of stars in the head of the constellation Taurus held by the ancients to indicate rainy ...
hyal-
or hyalo- combining form Etymology: Late Latin, glass, from Greek, from hyalos glass ; glassy ; hyaline
hyalin
noun see hyaline II, 2
hyaline
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin hyalinus, from Greek hyalinos, from hyalos Date: circa 1661 transparent or nearly so and usually homogeneous II. noun Date: 1667 1. ...
hyaline cartilage
noun Date: 1855 translucent bluish-white cartilage with the cells embedded in an apparently homogeneous matrix present in joints and respiratory passages and forming most of ...
hyalite
noun Etymology: German Hyalit, from Greek hyalos Date: 1794 a colorless opal that is clear as glass or sometimes translucent or whitish
hyalo-
combining form see hyal-
hyaloid
adjective Etymology: Greek hyaloeidēs, from hyalos Date: circa 1836 glassy, transparent
hyaloplasm
noun Etymology: probably from German Hyaloplasma, from hyal- + -plasma -plasm Date: 1886 cytosol
hyaluronic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1934 a viscous glycosaminoglycan chiefly of the matrix of tissues that occurs especially in the vitreous humor, ...
hyaluronidase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from hyaluronic (acid) + -idase (as in glucosidase) Date: 1940 a mucolytic enzyme that facilitates the spread of fluids ...
Hyatt
biographical name Alpheus 1838-1902 American naturalist
Hybla
geographical name ancient town in Sicily on S slope of Mt. Etna
hybrid
noun Etymology: Latin hybrida Date: 1601 1. an offspring of two animals or plants of different races, breeds, varieties, species, or genera 2. a person whose background is ...
hybrid computer
noun Date: 1968 a computer system consisting of a combination of analog and digital computer systems
hybrid tea
noun see hybrid tea rose
hybrid tea rose
noun Date: 1888 any of numerous moderately hardy cultivated hybrid bush roses grown especially for their strongly recurrent bloom of large usually scentless flowers — called ...
hybrid vigor
noun Date: 1918 heterosis
hybridism
noun see hybrid
hybridity
noun see hybrid
hybridization
noun see hybridize
hybridize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1845 transitive verb to cause to produce hybrids ; interbreed intransitive verb to produce hybrids • hybridization noun • hybridizer noun
hybridizer
noun see hybridize
hybridoma
noun Date: 1978 a hybrid cell produced by the fusion of an antibody-producing lymphocyte with a tumor cell and used to culture continuously a specific monoclonal antibody
hyd
abbreviation 1. hydraulics 2. hydrostatics
Hydaspes
geographical name — see Jhelum
hydathode
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek hydat-, hydōr water + hodos road Date: 1895 a specialized pore on the leaves of higher plants that functions ...
hydatid
noun Etymology: Greek hydatid-, hydatis watery cyst, from hydat-, hydōr Date: 1683 the larval cyst of a tapeworm (genus Echinococcus) occurring as a fluid-filled sac ...
Hyde
I. biographical name Douglas 1860-1949 pseudonym An Craoibhín Aoibhinn Irish author; president of Republic of Ireland (1938-45) II. biographical name Edward 1609-1674 1st ...
Hyder Ali
or Haidar Ali biographical name 1722-1782 Indian ruler & soldier
Hyderabad
geographical name 1. former state S central India in the Deccan capital Hyderabad 2. (or Haidarabad) city S central India capital of Andhra Pradesh population 3,145,939 3. ...
hydr-
or hydro- combining form Etymology: Latin hydr-, hydro-, from Greek, from hydōr — more at water 1. a. water b. liquid 2. hydrogen ; containing or combined with ...
Hydra
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Ydra, from Latin Hydra, from Greek Date: 15th century 1. a many-headed serpent or monster in Greek mythology that was slain by Hercules and ...
hydra-headed
adjective Date: 1599 having many centers or branches
hydralazine
noun Etymology: hydr- + phthalic (acid) + azine Date: 1952 a vasodilator C8H8N4 used in the form of its hydrochloride to treat hypertension
hydrangea
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hydr- + Greek angeion vessel — more at angi- Date: circa 1753 any of a genus (Hydrangea) of mostly shrubs having opposite leaves and showy ...
hydrant
noun Date: 1806 1. a discharge pipe with a valve and spout at which water may be drawn from a water main (as for fighting fires) — called also fireplug 2. faucet
hydranth
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hydr- + Greek anthos flower — more at anthology Date: 1874 one of the feeding zooids of a hydroid colony
Hydraotes
geographical name — see Ravi
hydrase
noun Date: 1943 an enzyme that promotes the addition or removal of water to or from its substrate
hydrate
I. noun Date: 1802 a compound formed by the union of water with some other substance II. verb (hydrated; hydrating) Date: 1846 transitive verb 1. to cause to take up or ...
hydration
noun see hydrate II
hydrator
noun see hydrate II
hydraulic
adjective Etymology: Latin hydraulicus, from Greek hydraulikos, from hydraulis hydraulic organ, from hydr- + aulos reed instrument — more at alveolus Date: 1661 1. ...
hydraulically
adverb see hydraulic
hydraulics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1671 a branch of science that deals with practical applications (as the transmission of energy or the effects of flow) of liquid ...
hydrazide
noun Date: 1888 any of a class of compounds resulting from the replacement of hydrogen by an acid group in hydrazine or in one of its derivatives
hydrazine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 a colorless fuming corrosive strongly reducing liquid base N2H4 used especially in fuels for rocket and jet ...
hydrazoic acid
noun Etymology: hydr- + azo- + 1-ic Date: 1894 a colorless volatile poisonous explosive liquid HN3 that has a foul odor and yields explosive salts of heavy metals
hydric
adjective Date: 1926 characterized by, relating to, or requiring an abundance of moisture — compare mesic, xeric
hydride
noun Date: 1869 a compound of hydrogen with a more electropositive element or group
hydrilla
noun Etymology: New Latin, probably from Latin Hydra Hydra Date: 1969 a freshwater aquatic Asian plant (Hydrilla verticillata of the Hydrocharitaceae family) that has small ...
hydriodic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hydr- + iodic acid Date: 1816 an aqueous solution of hydrogen iodide HI that is a strong acid and a strong reducing agent
Hydriot
noun see Hydra II
Hydriote
noun see Hydra II
hydro
I. noun (plural hydros) Etymology: short for hydropathic establishment Date: 1882 British an establishment offering hydropathic treatment (as for weight loss) ; health ...
hydro-
combining form see hydr-
hydrobiological
adjective see hydrobiology
hydrobiologist
noun see hydrobiology
hydrobiology
noun Date: 1926 the biology of bodies or units of water; especially limnology • hydrobiological adjective • hydrobiologist noun
hydrobromic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1830 an aqueous solution of hydrogen bromide HBr that is a strong acid and a weak reducing agent and that is used ...
hydrocarbon
noun Date: 1826 an organic compound (as acetylene or butane) containing only carbon and hydrogen and often occurring in petroleum, natural gas, coal, and bitumens
hydrocele
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek hydrokēlē, from hydr- + kēlē tumor — more at -cele Date: 1597 an accumulation of serous fluid in a saclike cavity (as the scrotum)
hydrocephalic
adjective Date: 1815 relating to, characterized by, or affected with hydrocephalus • hydrocephalic noun
hydrocephalus
also hydrocephaly noun Etymology: New Latin hydrocephalus, from Late Latin, hydrocephalic, adjective, from Greek hydrokephalos, from hydr- + kephalē head — more at cephalic ...
hydrocephaly
noun see hydrocephalus
hydrochloric acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1819 an aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride HCl that is a strong corrosive irritating acid, is normally present in ...
hydrochloride
noun Date: 1826 a chemical complex composed of an organic base (as an alkaloid) in association with hydrogen chloride
hydrochlorofluorocarbon
noun Date: 1977 any of several simple gaseous compounds that contain carbon, chlorine, fluorine, and hydrogen
hydrochlorothiazide
noun Etymology: hydr- + chlor- + thiazine + -ide Date: 1958 a diuretic and antihypertensive drug C7H8ClN3O4S2
hydrocolloid
noun Date: 1916 a substance that yields a gel with water • hydrocolloidal adjective
hydrocolloidal
adjective see hydrocolloid
hydrocortisone
noun Date: 1951 cortisol; especially cortisol used pharmaceutically
hydrocrack
transitive verb see hydrocracking
hydrocracker
noun see hydrocracking
hydrocracking
noun Date: 1940 the cracking of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen • hydrocrack transitive verb • hydrocracker noun
hydrocyanic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1816 an aqueous solution of hydrogen cyanide HCN that is a poisonous weak acid and is used chiefly in fumigating and ...
hydrodynamic
also hydrodynamical adjective Etymology: New Latin hydrodynamicus, from hydr- + dynamicus dynamic Date: circa 1828 of, relating to, or involving principles of hydrodynamics ...
hydrodynamical
adjective see hydrodynamic
hydrodynamically
adverb see hydrodynamic
hydrodynamicist
noun see hydrodynamics
hydrodynamics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1779 a branch of physics that deals with the motion of fluids and the forces acting on solid bodies immersed in fluids and in ...
hydroelectric
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 of or relating to production of electricity by waterpower • hydroelectrically adverb • ...
hydroelectrically
adverb see hydroelectric
hydroelectricity
noun see hydroelectric
hydrofluoric acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1830 an aqueous solution of hydrogen fluoride HF that is a weak poisonous acid, that attacks silica and silicates, ...
hydrofluorocarbon
noun Date: 1986 any of several simple gaseous compounds that contain carbon, fluorine, and hydrogen
hydrofoil
noun Date: 1919 1. a body similar to an airfoil but designed for action in or on water 2. a motorboat that has metal plates or fins attached by struts fore and aft for ...
hydrogel
noun Date: 1864 a gel composed usually of one or more polymers suspended in water
hydrogen
noun Etymology: French hydrogène, from hydr- + -gène -gen; from the fact that water is generated by its combustion Date: 1788 a nonmetallic element that is the simplest and ...
hydrogen bomb
noun Date: 1947 a bomb whose violent explosive power is due to the sudden release of atomic energy resulting from the fusion of light nuclei (as of hydrogen atoms) at very ...
hydrogen bond
noun Date: 1923 an electrostatic attraction between a hydrogen atom in one polar molecule (as of water) and a small electronegative atom (as of oxygen, nitrogen, or fluorine) ...
hydrogen bonding
noun see hydrogen bond
hydrogen bromide
noun Date: 1869 a colorless irritating gas HBr that fumes in moist air and yields hydrobromic acid when dissolved in water
hydrogen chloride
noun Date: 1869 a colorless pungent poisonous gas HCl that fumes in moist air and yields hydrochloric acid when dissolved in water
hydrogen cyanide
noun Date: 1869 1. a poisonous usually gaseous compound HCN that has the odor of bitter almonds 2. hydrocyanic acid
hydrogen fluoride
noun Date: 1869 a colorless corrosive fuming usually gaseous compound HF that yields hydrofluoric acid when dissolved in water
hydrogen iodide
noun Date: 1869 an acrid colorless gas HI that fumes in moist air and yields hydriodic acid when dissolved in water
hydrogen ion
noun Date: 1896 1. the cation H+ of acids consisting of a hydrogen atom whose electron has been transferred to the anion of the acid 2. hydronium
hydrogen peroxide
noun Date: 1872 an unstable compound H2O2 used especially as an oxidizing and bleaching agent, an antiseptic, and a propellant
hydrogen sulfide
noun Date: 1869 a flammable poisonous gas H2S that has an odor suggestive of rotten eggs and is found especially in many mineral waters and in putrefying matter
hydrogenase
noun Date: 1900 an enzyme of various microorganisms that promotes the formation and utilization of gaseous hydrogen
hydrogenate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1809 to combine or treat with or expose to hydrogen; especially to add hydrogen to the molecule of (an unsaturated organic compound) ...
hydrogenation
noun see hydrogenate
hydrogenous
adjective see hydrogen
hydrogeologist
noun see hydrogeology
hydrogeology
noun Date: 1824 a branch of geology concerned with the occurrence, use, and functions of surface water and groundwater; also the phenomena dealt with in hydrogeology • ...
hydrographer
noun see hydrographic
hydrographic
adjective Etymology: French hydrographique, from Middle French, from hydr- + -graphique -graphic Date: 1665 1. of or relating to the characteristic features (as flow or ...
hydrography
noun see hydrographic
hydroid
I. adjective Etymology: ultimately from New Latin Hydra Date: circa 1864 of or relating to a hydrozoan; especially resembling a typical hydra II. noun Date: 1865 ...
hydrokinetic
adjective Date: 1876 of or relating to the motions of fluids or the forces which produce or affect such motions — compare hydrostatic
hydrolase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin hydrolysis + International Scientific Vocabulary -ase Date: 1910 a hydrolytic enzyme
hydrologic
adjective see hydrology
hydrologic cycle
noun Date: 1936 the sequence of conditions through which water passes from vapor in the atmosphere through precipitation upon land or water surfaces and ultimately back into ...
hydrological
adjective see hydrology
hydrological cycle
noun see hydrologic cycle
hydrologically
adverb see hydrology
hydrologist
noun see hydrology
hydrology
noun Etymology: New Latin hydrologia, from Latin hydr- + -logia -logy Date: 1762 a science dealing with the properties, distribution, and circulation of water on and below ...
hydrolysate
also hydrolyzate noun Date: 1915 a product of hydrolysis
hydrolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1880 a chemical process of decomposition involving the splitting of a bond and the addition of the hydrogen cation and the hydroxide anion of ...
hydrolytic
adjective see hydrolysis
hydrolytically
adverb see hydrolysis
hydrolyzable
adjective see hydrolyze
hydrolyzate
noun see hydrolysate
hydrolyze
verb (-lyzed; -lyzing) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin hydrolysis Date: 1880 transitive verb to subject to hydrolysis intransitive verb ...
hydromagnetic
adjective Date: 1943 magnetohydrodynamic
hydromancy
noun Etymology: Middle English ydromancie, from Middle French hydromancie, from Latin hydromantia, from hydr- + -mantia -mancy Date: 14th century divination by the appearance ...
hydromechanical
adjective Date: 1825 relating to a branch of mechanics that deals with the equilibrium and motion of fluids and of solid bodies immersed in them • hydromechanics noun ...
hydromechanics
noun plural but singular in construction see hydromechanical
hydromedusa
noun (plural hydromedusae) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1889 a jellyfish (as of the orders Anthomedusae and Leptomedusae) produced as a bud from a hydroid
hydrometallurgical
adjective see hydrometallurgy
hydrometallurgist
noun see hydrometallurgy

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