Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>
hydrometallurgy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 the treatment of ores by wet processes (as leaching) • hydrometallurgical adjective • ...
hydrometeor
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1857 a product (as fog, rain, or hail) formed by the condensation of atmospheric water vapor
hydrometeorological
adjective see hydrometeorology
hydrometeorologist
noun see hydrometeorology
hydrometeorology
noun Date: circa 1859 a branch of meteorology that deals with water in the atmosphere especially as precipitation • hydrometeorological adjective • hydrometeorologist ...
hydrometer
noun Date: 1675 an instrument for determining the specific gravity of a liquid (as battery acid or an alcohol solution) and hence its strength • hydrometric adjective
hydrometric
adjective see hydrometer
hydromorphic
adjective Date: 1938 of a soil developed in the presence of an excess of moisture which tends to suppress aerobic factors in soil-building
hydronic
adjective Etymology: hydr- + -onic (as in electronic) Date: 1946 of, relating to, or being a system of heating or cooling that involves transfer of heat by a circulating ...
hydronically
adverb see hydronic
hydronium
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hydr- + -onium Date: 1908 a hydrated hydrogen ion H3O+
hydropathic
adjective see hydropathy
hydropathy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1843 a method of treating disease by copious and frequent use of water both externally and internally — compare ...
hydroperoxide
noun Date: 1900 a compound containing an O2H group
hydrophane
noun Date: 1784 a semitranslucent opal that becomes translucent or transparent on immersion in water
hydrophilic
adjective Etymology: New Latin hydrophilus, from Greek hydr- + -philos -philous Date: 1901 of, relating to, or having a strong affinity for water • hydrophilicity noun
hydrophilicity
noun see hydrophilic
hydrophobia
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from hydr- + -phobia -phobia Date: 1547 1. rabies 2. a morbid dread of water
hydrophobic
adjective Date: 1807 1. of, relating to, or suffering from hydrophobia 2. lacking affinity for water • hydrophobicity noun
hydrophobicity
noun see hydrophobic
hydrophone
noun Date: 1860 an instrument for listening to sound transmitted through water
hydrophyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1832 1. a plant that grows either partly or totally submerged in water; also a plant growing in waterlogged ...
hydrophytic
adjective see hydrophyte
hydroplane
I. noun Date: 1904 1. a powerboat designed for racing that skims the surface of the water 2. seaplane II. intransitive verb Date: 1962 to skim on water; especially of a ...
hydroponic
adjective see hydroponics
hydroponically
adverb see hydroponics
hydroponics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: hydr- + -ponics (as in geoponics agriculture) Date: 1937 the growing of plants in nutrient solutions with or without an ...
hydropower
noun Date: 1933 hydroelectric power
hydroquinone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1872 a white crystalline strongly reducing phenol C6H6O2 used especially as a photographic developer, as an ...
hydrosere
noun Date: 1920 an ecological sere originating in an aquatic habitat
hydrosol
noun Etymology: hydr- + -sol (from solution) Date: 1864 a sol in which the liquid is water • hydrosolic adjective
hydrosolic
adjective see hydrosol
hydrospace
noun Date: 1963 the regions beneath the surface of the ocean
hydrosphere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 the aqueous vapor of the atmosphere; broadly the aqueous envelope of the earth including bodies of water and ...
hydrospheric
adjective see hydrosphere
hydrostatic
adjective Etymology: probably from New Latin hydrostaticus, from hydr- + staticus static Date: 1666 of or relating to fluids at rest or to the pressures they exert or ...
hydrostatically
adverb see hydrostatic
hydrostatics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1660 a branch of physics that deals with the characteristics of fluids at rest and especially with the pressure in a fluid or ...
hydrotherapy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1876 the therapeutic use of water (as in a whirlpool bath) — compare hydropathy
hydrothermal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1849 of or relating to hot water — used especially of the formation of minerals by hot solutions rising from ...
hydrothermal vent
noun Date: 1975 a fissure in the ocean floor especially at or near a mid-ocean ridge from which mineral-rich superheated water issues
hydrothermally
adverb see hydrothermal
hydrothorax
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1793 an excess of serous fluid in the pleural cavity; especially an effusion resulting from failing circulation (as in heart disease or from ...
hydrotropic
adjective see hydrotropism
hydrotropism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1882 a tropism (as in plant roots) in which water or water vapor is the orienting factor • hydrotropic ...
hydrous
adjective Date: 1826 containing water usually in chemical association (as in hydrates)
hydroxide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1851 1. the monovalent anion OH- consisting of one atom of hydrogen and one of oxygen — called also hydroxide ion ...
hydroxide ion
noun see hydroxide
hydroxy
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from hydroxyl Date: 1812 being or containing hydroxyl; especially containing hydroxyl especially in place of ...
hydroxyapatite
or hydroxylapatite noun Date: 1912 a complex phosphate of calcium Ca5(PO4)3OH that occurs as a mineral and is the chief structural element of vertebrate bone
hydroxybutyric acid
noun Date: 1879 a hydroxy derivative C4H8O3 of butyric acid that is excreted in increased quantities in the urine in diabetes
hydroxyl
noun Etymology: hydr- + ox- + -yl Date: 1869 1. the chemical group, ion, or radical OH that consists of one atom of hydrogen and one of oxygen and is neutral or negatively ...
hydroxylamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 a colorless odorless nitrogenous base NH3O that resembles ammonia in its reactions but is less basic and that ...
hydroxylapatite
noun see hydroxyapatite
hydroxylase
noun Date: 1953 any of a group of enzymes that catalyze oxidation reactions in which one of the two atoms of molecular oxygen is incorporated into the substrate and the other ...
hydroxylate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: circa 1909 to introduce hydroxyl into • hydroxylation noun
hydroxylation
noun see hydroxylate
hydroxylic
adjective see hydroxyl
hydroxyproline
noun Date: 1905 an amino acid C5H9NO3 that occurs naturally as a constituent of collagen
hydroxytryptamine
noun Date: 1949 serotonin — usually preceded by the numeral 5
hydroxyurea
noun Date: 1949 a drug CH4N2O2 used to treat some forms of leukemia, melanoma, and malignant tumors
hydroxyzine
noun Etymology: hydroxy- + piperazine Date: 1956 a compound C21H27ClN2O2 used as an antihistamine and tranquilizer
hydrozoan
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek hydr- + zōion animal — more at zo- Date: 1877 any of a class (Hydrozoa) of coelenterates that includes solitary and colonial polyps ...
hyena
noun (plural hyenas; also hyena) Etymology: Middle English hyene, from Latin hyaena, from Greek hyaina, from hys hog — more at sow Date: 14th century any of several large ...
hyenic
adjective see hyena
Hyères
geographical name commune SE France on Côte d'Azur E of Toulon population 50,122
Hyères Islands
or French Îles d'Hyères geographical name islands in the Mediterranean off SE coast of France
Hygeia
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hygieia Date: 1615 the goddess of health in Greek mythology
hygiene
noun Etymology: French hygiène & New Latin hygieina, from Greek, neuter plural of hygieinos healthful, from hygiēs healthy; akin to Sanskrit su well and to Latin vivus living ...
hygienic
adjective Date: 1833 1. a. of or relating to hygiene b. having or showing good hygiene 2. a. antiseptic 3c b. antiseptic 4 • hygienically adverb
hygienically
adverb see hygienic
hygienics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1855 hygiene 1
hygienist
noun see hygiene
hygr-
also hygro- combining form Etymology: Greek, from hygros wet — more at humor humidity ; moisture
hygro-
combining form see hygr-
hygrograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1864 an instrument for recording automatically variations in atmospheric humidity
hygrometer
noun Etymology: probably from French hygromètre, from hygr- + -mètre -meter Date: 1670 any of several instruments for measuring the humidity of the atmosphere • ...
hygrometric
adjective see hygrometer
hygrophilous
adjective Date: 1863 living or growing in moist places
hygroscopic
adjective Etymology: hygroscope, an instrument showing changes in humidity + 1-ic; from the use of such materials in the hygroscope Date: 1790 1. readily taking up and ...
hygroscopicity
noun see hygroscopic
hying
present part of hie
Hyksos
adjective Etymology: Greek Hyksōs, dynasty ruling Egyptian, perhaps from Egyptian ḥq? ruler + h̬?št foreign land Date: 1602 of or relating to a Semite dynasty that ruled ...
hylozoism
noun Etymology: Greek hylē matter, literally, wood + zōos alive, living; akin to Greek zōē life — more at quick Date: 1678 a doctrine held especially by early Greek ...
hylozoist
noun see hylozoism
hylozoistic
adjective see hylozoism
Hymans
biographical name Paul 1865-1941 Belgian statesman
hymen
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek hymēn membrane Date: 1543 a fold of mucous membrane partly closing the orifice of the vagina • hymenal adjective
Hymen
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hymēn Date: 1567 the Greek god of marriage
hymenal
adjective see hymen
hymeneal
I. adjective Etymology: Latin hymenaeus wedding song, wedding, from Greek hymenaios, from Hymēn Date: 1602 nuptial • hymeneally adverb II. noun Date: 1655 1. plural, ...
hymeneally
adverb see hymeneal I
hymenium
noun (plural hymenia or -niums) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hymēn Date: 1830 a spore-bearing layer in fungi
hymenopteran
noun Etymology: New Latin Hymenoptera, from Greek, neuter plural of hymenopteros membrane-winged, from hymēn + pteron wing — more at feather Date: circa 1842 any of an ...
hymenopteron
noun (plural hymenoptera; also -terons) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, neuter of hymenopteros Date: 1877 hymenopteran
hymenopterous
adjective see hymenopteran
Hymettian
adjective see Hymettus
Hymettus
geographical name mountain ridge about 3370 feet (1027 meters) central Greece E & SE of Athens • Hymettian adjective
hymn
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ymne, from Old English ymen, from Latin hymnus song of praise, from Greek hymnos Date: before 12th century 1. a. a song of praise to God ...
hymnal
noun Etymology: Middle English hymnale, from Medieval Latin, from Latin hymnus Date: 15th century a collection of church hymns
hymnary
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1888 hymnal
hymnbook
noun Date: before 12th century hymnal
hymnlike
adjective see hymn I
hymnody
noun Etymology: Late Latin hymnodia, from Greek hymnōidia, from hymnos + aeidein to sing — more at ode Date: 1711 1. hymn singing 2. hymn writing 3. the hymns of a ...
hymnology
noun Etymology: Greek hymnologia singing of hymns, from hymnos + -logia -logy Date: circa 1638 1. hymnody 2. the study of hymns
hyoid
adjective Etymology: New Latin hyoides hyoid bone Date: 1842 of or relating to the hyoid bone
hyoid bone
noun Etymology: New Latin hyoides, from Greek hyoeidēs shaped like the letter upsilon (Υ, υ), being the hyoid bone, from y, hy upsilon Date: circa 1811 a U-shaped bone ...
hyoscine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hyoscyamine + -ine Date: 1872 scopolamine; especially the levorotatory form of scopolamine
hyoscyamine
noun Etymology: German Hyoscyamin, from New Latin Hyoscyamus, genus of herbs, from Latin, henbane, from Greek hyoskyamos, literally, swine's bean, from hyos (genitive of hys ...
hyp
abbreviation hypothesis; hypothetical
hyp-
— see hypo-
hypabyssal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1895 of or relating to a fine-grained igneous rock usually formed at a moderate distance below the surface • ...
hypabyssally
adverb see hypabyssal
hypaethral
adjective Etymology: Latin hypaethrus exposed to the open air, from Greek hypaithros, from hypo- + aithēr ether, air — more at ether Date: 1794 1. having a roofless ...
hypallage
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek hypallagē, literally, interchange, from hypallassein to interchange, from hypo- + allassein to change, from allos other — more at else ...
hypanthium
noun (plural hypanthia) Etymology: New Latin, from hypo- + anth- + -ium Date: circa 1855 an enlargement of the floral receptacle bearing on its rim the stamens, petals, and ...
hype
I. noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration from hypodermic Date: 1924 1. slang a narcotics addict 2. slang hypodermic II. transitive verb (hyped; hyping) Date: 1938 1. ...
hyped-up
adjective see hype II
hyper
adjective Etymology: short for hyperactive Date: circa 1942 1. high-strung, excitable; also highly excited 2. extremely active
hyper-
prefix Etymology: Latin hyper-, from Greek, from hyper — more at over 1. above ; beyond ; super- 2. a. excessively b. excessive 3. that is or exists in a ...
hyperacid
adjective see hyperacidity
hyperacidity
noun Date: circa 1890 the condition of containing more than the normal amount of acid • hyperacid adjective
hyperactive
adjective Date: 1867 1. affected with or exhibiting hyperactivity; broadly more active than is usual or desirable 2. intricately or elaborately designed or detailed • ...
hyperactivity
noun Date: 1888 the state or condition of being excessively or pathologically active; especially attention deficit disorder
hyperaesthesia
variant of hyperesthesia
hyperalimentation
noun Date: 1962 the administration of nutrients by intravenous feeding especially to patients who cannot ingest food through the alimentary tract
hyperbaric
adjective Etymology: hyper- + bar- + 1-ic Date: 1962 of, relating to, or utilizing greater than normal pressure especially of oxygen • hyperbarically adverb
hyperbarically
adverb see hyperbaric
hyperbola
noun (plural -las or hyperbolae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hyperbolē Date: 1668 a plane curve generated by a point so moving that the difference of the distances from ...
hyperbole
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek hyperbolē excess, hyperbole, hyperbola, from hyperballein to exceed, from hyper- + ballein to throw — more at devil Date: 15th century ...
hyperbolic
I. adjective also hyperbolical Date: 15th century of, relating to, or marked by hyperbole • hyperbolically adverb II. adjective Date: 1676 1. of, relating to, or being ...
hyperbolic function
noun Date: circa 1890 any of a set of six functions analogous to the trigonometric functions but related to the hyperbola in a way similar to that in which the trigonometric ...
hyperbolic paraboloid
noun Date: 1842 a saddle-shaped quadric surface whose sections by planes parallel to one coordinate plane are hyperbolas while those sections by planes parallel to the other ...
hyperbolical
adjective see hyperbolic I
hyperbolically
adverb see hyperbolic I
hyperbolist
noun see hyperbole
hyperbolize
verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1599 intransitive verb to indulge in hyperbole transitive verb to exaggerate to a hyperbolic degree
hyperboloid
noun Date: 1743 a quadric surface whose sections by planes parallel to one coordinate plane are ellipses while those sections by planes parallel to the other two are ...
hyperboloidal
adjective see hyperboloid
hyperborean
I. noun Etymology: Latin Hyperborei (plural), from Greek Hyperboreoi, from hyper- + Boreas Date: 15th century 1. often capitalized a member of a people held by the ancient ...
hypercalcemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1925 an excess of calcium in the blood • hypercalcemic adjective
hypercalcemic
adjective see hypercalcemia
hypercapnia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hyper- + Greek kapnos smoke; probably akin to Lithuanian kvapas breath Date: 1908 the presence of excessive amounts of carbon dioxide in the ...
hypercapnic
adjective see hypercapnia
hypercatalectic
adjective see hypercatalexis
hypercatalexis
noun (plural hypercatalexes) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1890 the occurrence of an additional syllable after the final complete foot or dipody in a line of verse • ...
hypercharge
noun Etymology: short for hyperonic charge, from hyperon Date: 1956 a quantum characteristic of a group of subatomic particles governed by the strong force that is related ...
hypercholesterolemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1916 the presence of excess cholesterol in the blood • hypercholesterolemic adjective
hypercholesterolemic
adjective see hypercholesterolemia
hypercorrect
adjective Date: 1922 of, relating to, or characterized by the production of a nonstandard linguistic form or construction on the basis of a false analogy (as “badly” in ...
hypercorrection
noun see hypercorrect
hypercorrectly
adverb see hypercorrect
hypercorrectness
noun see hypercorrect
hypercritic
noun Etymology: New Latin hypercriticus, from hyper- + Latin criticus critic Date: 1633 a carping or unduly censorious critic • hypercriticism noun
hypercritical
adjective Date: 1605 meticulously or excessively critical Synonyms: see critical • hypercritically adverb
hypercritically
adverb see hypercritical
hypercriticism
noun see hypercritic
hypercube
noun Date: 1909 1. a geometric figure (as a tesseract) in Euclidean space of n dimensions that is analogous to a cube in three dimensions 2. a computer architecture in ...
hyperdrive
noun Date: 1977 a state of extremely heightened activity
hyperemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1839 excess of blood in a body part ; congestion • hyperemic adjective
hyperemic
adjective see hyperemia
hyperesthesia
also hyperaesthesia noun Etymology: New Latin, from hyper- + -esthesia (as in anesthesia) Date: circa 1852 unusual or pathological sensitivity of the skin or of a particular ...
hyperesthetic
adjective see hyperesthesia
hypereutectic
adjective Date: 1902 hypereutectoid
hypereutectoid
adjective Date: 1908 containing the minor component in excess of that contained in the eutectoid
hyperextend
transitive verb Date: 1883 to extend so that the angle between bones of a joint is greater than normal ; also to extend (as a body part) beyond the normal range of motion ...
hyperextension
noun see hyperextend
hyperfine
adjective Date: 1926 being or relating to a fine-structure multiplet occurring in an atomic spectrum that is due to interaction between electrons and nuclear spin
hyperfocal distance
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1905 the nearest distance upon which a photographic lens may be focused to produce satisfactory definition at ...
hypergamy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1883 marriage into an equal or higher caste or social group
hypergeometric distribution
noun Date: 1936 a probability function f(x) that gives the probability of obtaining exactly x elements of one kind and n - x elements of another if n elements are chosen at ...
hyperglycemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1894 excess of sugar in the blood • hyperglycemic adjective
hyperglycemic
adjective see hyperglycemia
hypergolic
adjective Etymology: German Hypergol a hypergolic fuel, probably from hyper- + erg- + -ol (hydrocarbon) Date: 1947 1. igniting upon contact of components without external aid ...
hypergolically
adverb see hypergolic
hyperhidrosis
noun Etymology: New Latin hidrosis perspiration, from Greek hidrōsis, from hidroun to sweat, from hidrōs sweat — more at sweat Date: circa 1860 generalized or local ...
hyperinflation
noun Date: 1930 inflation growing at a very high rate in a very short time; also a period of hyperinflation • hyperinflationary adjective
hyperinflationary
adjective see hyperinflation
hyperinsulinism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1924 the presence of excess insulin in the body resulting in hypoglycemia
Hyperion
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hyperiōn Date: 1567 a Titan and the father of Aurora, Selene, and Helios
hyperirritability
noun Date: 1908 abnormally great or uninhibited response to stimuli • hyperirritable adjective
hyperirritable
adjective see hyperirritability
hyperkeratosis
noun (plural hyperkeratoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1841 hypertrophy of the corneous layer of the skin • hyperkeratotic adjective
hyperkeratotic
adjective see hyperkeratosis
hyperkinesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hyperkinesis Date: circa 1848 hyperkinesis
hyperkinesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1855 1. abnormally increased and sometimes uncontrollable activity or muscular movements 2. a condition especially of childhood ...
hyperkinetic
adjective Date: 1888 1. of, relating to, or affected with hyperkinesis or hyperactivity 2. characterized by fast-paced or frenetic activity
hyperlink
noun Date: 1988 an electronic link providing direct access from one distinctively marked place in a hypertext or hypermedia document to another in the same or a different ...
hyperlipemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1894 hyperlipidemia • hyperlipemic adjective
hyperlipemic
adjective see hyperlipemia
hyperlipidemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1961 the presence of excess fat or lipids in the blood
hypermarket
noun Date: 1970 a very large store that carries products found in a supermarket as well as merchandise commonly found in department stores
hypermedia
noun Date: 1965 a database format similar to hypertext in which text, sound, or video images related to that on a display can be accessed directly from the display
hypermeter
noun Etymology: Late Latin hypermetrus hypercatalectic, from Greek hypermetros beyond measure, beyond the meter, from hyper- + metron measure, meter Date: circa 1656 1. a ...
hypermetric
adjective see hypermeter
hypermetrical
adjective see hypermeter
hypermetropia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hypermetros + New Latin -opia Date: 1868 hyperopia • hypermetropic adjective
hypermetropic
adjective see hypermetropia
hypermnesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hyper- + -mnesia (as in amnesia) Date: 1882 abnormally vivid or complete memory or recall of the past • hypermnesic adjective
hypermnesic
adjective see hypermnesia
hyperon
noun Etymology: probably from hyper- + 2-on Date: 1953 an elementary particle of the baryon group having greater mass than a nucleon
hyperopia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1884 a condition in which visual images come to a focus behind the retina of the eye and vision is better for distant than for near objects ...
hyperopic
adjective see hyperopia
hyperostosis
noun (plural hyperostoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1836 excessive growth or thickening of bone tissue • hyperostotic adjective
hyperostotic
adjective see hyperostosis
hyperparasite
noun Date: 1833 a parasite that is parasitic upon another parasite • hyperparasitic adjective • hyperparasitism noun
hyperparasitic
adjective see hyperparasite
hyperparasitism
noun see hyperparasite
hyperparathyroidism
noun Date: 1917 the presence of excess parathyroid hormone in the body resulting in disturbance of calcium metabolism with increase in serum calcium and decrease in inorganic ...
hyperphagia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1941 abnormally increased appetite for consumption of food frequently associated with injury to the hypothalamus • hyperphagic adjective
hyperphagic
adjective see hyperphagia
hyperpituitarism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1909 excessive production of growth hormones by the pituitary gland • hyperpituitary adjective
hyperpituitary
adjective see hyperpituitarism
hyperplane
noun Date: 1903 a figure in hyperspace corresponding to a plane in ordinary space
hyperplasia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1861 an abnormal or unusual increase in the elements composing a part (as cells composing a tissue) — compare benign prostatic hyperplasia ...
hyperplastic
adjective see hyperplasia
hyperploid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1930 having a chromosome number slightly greater than an exact multiple of the monoploid number • hyperploid ...
hyperploidy
noun see hyperploid
hyperpnea
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1860 abnormally rapid or deep breathing • hyperpneic adjective
hyperpneic
adjective see hyperpnea
hyperpolarization
noun see hyperpolarize
hyperpolarize
verb Date: 1946 transitive verb to produce an increase in potential difference across (a biological membrane) intransitive verb to undergo or produce an increase in ...
hyperpyrexia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1875 exceptionally high fever (as in a particular disease)
hyperrealism
noun Date: 1937 realism in art characterized by depiction of real life in an unusual or striking manner — compare photo-realism • hyperrealist adjective • ...
hyperrealist
adjective see hyperrealism
hyperrealistic
adjective see hyperrealism
hypersensitive
adjective Date: 1871 1. excessively or abnormally sensitive 2. abnormally susceptible physiologically to a specific agent (as a drug or antigen) • hypersensitiveness ...
hypersensitiveness
noun see hypersensitive
hypersensitivity
noun see hypersensitive
hypersexual
adjective Date: 1915 exhibiting unusual or excessive concern with or indulgence in sexual activity • hypersexuality noun
hypersexuality
noun see hypersexual
hypersonic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1946 1. of or relating to speed five or more times that of sound in air — compare sonic 2. moving, capable ...
hypersonically
adverb see hypersonic
hyperspace
noun Date: 1867 1. space of more than three dimensions 2. a fictional space held to support extraordinary events (as travel faster than the speed of light)
hypersthene
noun Etymology: French hypersthène, from Greek hyper- + sthenos strength Date: circa 1808 an orthorhombic grayish or greenish black or dark brown pyroxene • hypersthenic ...
hypersthenic
adjective see hypersthene
hypersurface
noun Date: circa 1909 a figure that is the analogue in hyperspace of a surface in three-dimensional space
hypertension
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1893 1. abnormally high blood pressure and especially arterial blood pressure 2. the systemic condition ...
hypertensive
I. adjective Date: 1904 affected with or caused by hypertension II. noun Date: 1939 an individual affected with hypertension
hypertext
noun Date: 1965 a database format in which information related to that on a display can be accessed directly from the display; also material (as text) in this format • ...
hypertext markup language
noun Date: 1989 HTML
hypertext transfer protocol
noun Date: 1992 a communications protocol governing the exchange of data (as HTML files) especially on the World Wide Web — called also hypertext transport protocol
hypertext transport protocol
noun see hypertext transfer protocol
hypertextual
adjective see hypertext
hyperthermia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hyper- + therm- + -ia Date: 1887 exceptionally high fever especially when induced artificially for therapeutic purposes • hyperthermic ...
hyperthermic
adjective see hyperthermia
hyperthermophile
noun Date: 1988 an organism that lives in extremely hot environments (as hot springs) with temperatures around the boiling point of water • hyperthermophilic adjective
hyperthermophilic
adjective see hyperthermophile
hyperthyroid
adjective Etymology: back-formation from hyperthyroidism Date: 1916 of, relating to, or affected with hyperthyroidism
hyperthyroidism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 excessive functional activity of the thyroid gland; also the resulting condition marked especially by ...
hypertonia
noun Date: circa 1842 the condition of exhibiting excessive muscular tone or tension
hypertonic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1855 1. exhibiting excessive tone or tension 2. having a higher osmotic pressure than a surrounding medium ...
hypertonicity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1886 the condition of being hypertonic; especially hypertonia
hypertrophic
adjective see hypertrophy I
hypertrophy
I. noun (plural -phies) Etymology: probably from New Latin hypertrophia, from hyper- + -trophia -trophy Date: 1834 1. excessive development of an organ or part; specifically ...
hyperurbanism
noun Date: 1925 use of hypercorrect forms in language; also such a form
hyperuricemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1894 excess uric acid in the blood
hypervariable
adjective Date: 1970 relating to or being any of the relatively short extremely variable polypeptide chain segments in the light chain or heavy chain of an antibody; also ...
hypervelocity
noun Date: 1949 a high or relatively high velocity (as thousands of feet or meters per second)
hyperventilate
intransitive verb Date: 1931 to breathe rapidly and deeply ; undergo hyperventilation
hyperventilation
noun Date: 1928 excessive rate and depth of respiration leading to abnormal loss of carbon dioxide from the blood
hypervitaminosis
noun (plural hypervitaminoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1928 an abnormal state resulting from excessive intake of one or more vitamins
hypha
noun (plural hyphae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hyphē web; akin to Greek hyphos web — more at weave Date: 1866 one of the threads that make up the mycelium of a ...
hyphal
adjective see hypha
hyphen
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin & Greek; Late Latin, from Greek, from hyph' hen under one, from hypo under + hen, neuter of heis one — more at up, same Date: circa 1620 a ...

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.046 c;