Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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iguanodon
noun Etymology: New Latin Iguanodont-, Iguanodon, from Spanish iguana + Greek odōn tooth, from odont-, odous — more at tooth Date: 1830 any of a genus (Iguanodon) of very ...
Iguazú
geographical name see Iguaçú
IGY
abbreviation International Geophysical Year
ihp
abbreviation indicated horsepower
IHS
Etymology: Late Latin, part transliteration of Greek ΙΗΣ, abbreviation for ΙΗΣΟΥΣ Iēsous Jesus — used as a Christian symbol and monogram for Jesus
II
biographical name see Charles I III
IIE
abbreviation Institute of Industrial Engineers
IJssel
geographical name river 70 miles (113 kilometers) E Netherlands flowing out of the Rhine N into IJsselmeer
IJsselmeer
or Lake Ijssel geographical name freshwater lake N Netherlands separated from North Sea by a dike & bordered by reclaimed lands; part of former Zuider Zee (inlet of North Sea)
Ikaria
or Nikaria or ancient Icaria geographical name island Greece in Southern Sporades WSW of Samos area 99 square miles (257 square kilometers)
ikat
noun Etymology: Malay, tying Date: 1927 a fabric in which the yarns have been tie-dyed before weaving
ikebana
noun Etymology: Japanese, from ikeru to keep alive, arrange + hana flower Date: 1901 the Japanese art of flower arranging that emphasizes form and balance
Ikeda
biographical name Hayato 1899-1965 Japanese politician; prime minister (1960-64)
Ikhnaton
biographical name — see Akhenaton
ikon
variant of icon
IL
I. abbreviation 1. Illinois 2. interleukin — often used with an identifying number II. abbreviation interleukin — often used with an identifying number
il faut cultiver notre jardin
foreign term Etymology: French we must cultivate our garden ; we must tend to our own affairs
Il'men'
geographical name lake W Russia in Europe S of Lake Ladoga
il-
— see in-
ILA
abbreviation International Longshoremen's Association
ilang-ilang
variant of ylang-ylang
Ile des Pins
or Isle of Pines geographical name island SW Pacific in New Caledonia territory SE of New Caledonia Island area 58 square miles (151 square kilometers)
Île du Diable
geographical name — see Devil's Island
Île-de-France
geographical name region & former province N central France bounded on N by Picardy, on E by Champagne, on S by Orléanais, & on W by Normandy capital Paris
ileal
adjective see ileum
ileitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1855 inflammation of the ileum
Îles d'Hyères
geographical name see Hyères Islands
Îles de la Madeleine
geographical name see Magdalen Islands
Îles de la Société
geographical name — see Society Islands
Îles du Vent
geographical name — see Windward Islands 3
Îles Marquises
geographical name see Marquesas Islands
Îles sous le Vent
geographical name — see Leeward Islands 2
ileum
noun (plural ilea) Etymology: New Latin, alteration of Latin ilia, plural, groin, viscera Date: 1682 the last division of the small intestine extending between the jejunum ...
ileus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek eileos, from eilyein to roll — more at voluble Date: 1693 mechanical or functional obstruction of the bowel
ilex
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Date: 14th century 1. holm oak 2. holly 1
Ilford
geographical name former municipal borough SE England in Essex, now part of Redbridge
Ilfracombe
geographical name town SW England in Devon on Bristol Channel population 10,133
ILGWU
abbreviation International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Ili
geographical name river 800 miles (1287 kilometers) central Asia flowing from W Xinjiang Uygur, China, W & NW into Lake Balkhash in Kazakhstan
Ilía
geographical name — see Elis
iliac
also ilial adjective Etymology: Late Latin iliacus, from Latin ilium Date: 1541 of, relating to, or located near the ilium
Iliad
noun Etymology: Iliad, ancient Greek epic poem attributed to Homer, from Latin Iliad-, Ilias, from Greek, from Ilion Troy Date: 1603 1. a. a series of miseries or ...
Iliadic
adjective see Iliad
ilial
adjective see iliac
Iliamna
geographical name volcano 10,016 feet (3053 meters) NE of Iliamna Lake
Iliamna Lake
geographical name lake 80 miles (129 kilometers) long SW Alaska NE of Bristol Bay
Ilian
adjective or noun see Ilium
Iliescu
biographical name Ion 1930- president of Romania (1989-96)
ilium
noun (plural ilia) Etymology: New Latin, alteration of Latin ilia Date: 1706 the broad, dorsal, upper, and largest of the three principal bones composing either half of the ...
Ilium
geographical name — see troy 3 • Ilian adjective or noun
ilk
I. pronoun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ilca, from *i- that, the same (akin to Gothic is he, Latin, he, that) + *lik- form (whence Old English līc body) — more ...
ilka
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from ilk + a (indefinite article) Date: 13th century chiefly Scottish each, every
Ill
I. abbreviation Illinois II. geographical name river 129 miles (208 kilometers) NE France flowing into the Rhine
ill
I. adjective (worse; worst) Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse illr Date: 12th century 1. a. chiefly Scottish immoral, vicious b. resulting from, accompanied by, ...
ill at ease
adjective Date: 14th century not feeling easy ; uncomfortable
ill will
noun Date: 14th century unfriendly feeling Synonyms: see malice
ill-advised
adjective Date: circa 1592 resulting from or showing lack of wise and sufficient counsel or deliberation • ill-advisedly adverb
ill-advisedly
adverb see ill-advised
ill-being
noun Date: 1840 a condition of being deficient in health, happiness, or prosperity
ill-boding
adjective Date: 1591 boding evil ; inauspicious
ill-bred
adjective Date: 1604 badly brought up or showing bad upbringing ; impolite
ill-fated
adjective Date: 1710 1. having or destined to a hapless fate ; unfortunate 2. that causes or marks the beginning of misfortune
ill-favored
adjective Date: circa 1530 1. unattractive in physical appearance; especially having an ugly face 2. offensive, objectionable
ill-gotten
adjective Date: 1552 acquired by illicit or improper means
ill-humored
adjective Date: 1687 surly, irritable • ill-humoredly adverb
ill-humoredly
adverb see ill-humored
ill-mannered
adjective Date: 15th century having bad manners ; rude
ill-natured
adjective Date: 1605 1. malevolent, spiteful 2. having a bad disposition ; cross, surly • ill-naturedly adverb
ill-naturedly
adverb see ill-natured
ill-sorted
adjective Date: 1691 1. not well matched 2. Scottish much displeased
ill-starred
adjective Date: 1604 ill-fated, unlucky
ill-tempered
adjective Date: 1601 ill-natured, quarrelsome • ill-temperedly adverb
ill-temperedly
adverb see ill-tempered
ill-treat
transitive verb Date: 1689 to treat cruelly or improperly ; maltreat • ill-treatment noun
ill-treatment
noun see ill-treat
ill-usage
noun Date: 1593 harsh, unkind, or abusive treatment
ill-use
transitive verb Date: 1841 to use badly ; maltreat, abuse
ill-wisher
noun Date: 1607 one that wishes ill to another
Illampu
geographical name 1. (or Sorata) massif in the Andes W Bolivia E of Lake Titicaca — see Ancohuma 2. peak 20,867 feet (6360 meters) in the Illampu Massif
illation
noun Etymology: Late Latin illation-, illatio, from Latin, action of bringing in, from inferre (past participle illatus) to bring in, from in- + ferre to carry — more at ...
illative
I. noun Date: 1591 1. a word (as therefore) or phrase (as as a consequence) introducing an inference 2. illation 2 II. adjective Date: 1611 inferential • illatively ...
illatively
adverb see illative II
illaudable
adjective Etymology: Latin illaudabilis, from in- + laudabilis laudable Date: 1589 deserving no praise • illaudably adverb
illaudably
adverb see illaudable
illegal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle French or Medieval Latin; Middle French illegal, from Medieval Latin illegalis, from Latin in- + legalis legal Date: 1538 not according to or ...
illegality
noun see illegal I
illegalization
noun see illegalize
illegalize
transitive verb Date: circa 1818 to make or declare illegal • illegalization noun
illegally
adverb see illegal I
illegibility
noun see illegible
illegible
adjective Date: 1580 not legible ; indecipherable • illegibility noun • illegibly adverb
illegibly
adverb see illegible
illegitimacy
noun Date: 1680 1. the quality or state of being illegitimate 2. bastardy 2
illegitimate
adjective Date: 1536 1. not recognized as lawful offspring; specifically born of parents not married to each other 2. not rightly deduced or inferred ; illogical 3. ...
illegitimately
adverb see illegitimate
iller
adjective see ill I, 2b
illiberal
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin illiberalis ignoble, stingy, from Latin in- + liberalis liberal Date: 1535 not liberal: as a. ...
illiberalism
noun Date: 1839 opposition to or lack of liberalism
illiberality
noun see illiberal
illiberally
adverb see illiberal
illiberalness
noun see illiberal
illicit
adjective Etymology: Latin illicitus, from in- + licitus lawful — more at licit Date: 1506 not permitted ; unlawful • illicitly adverb
illicitly
adverb see illicit
Illimani
geographical name mountain 21,201 feet (6462 meters) Bolivia E of La Paz
illimitability
noun see illimitable
illimitable
adjective Date: 1596 incapable of being limited or bounded ; measureless • illimitability noun • illimitableness noun • illimitably adverb
illimitableness
noun see illimitable
illimitably
adverb see illimitable
Illinois
I. noun (plural Illinois) Etymology: French, earlier Eriniouai, singular, probably from a word in an Algonquian language derived from Proto-Algonquian *elen- ordinary + *-we• ...
Illinoisan
adjective or noun see Illinois II
illiquid
adjective Date: 1913 1. not being cash or readily convertible into cash 2. deficient in liquid assets • illiquidity noun
illiquidity
noun see illiquid
illite
noun Etymology: Illinois, state of United States + 1-ite Date: 1937 any of a group of clay minerals having essentially the crystal structure of muscovite • illitic ...
illiteracy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1660 1. the quality or state of being illiterate; especially inability to read or write 2. a mistake or crudity (as in speaking) typical of one ...
illiterate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin illiteratus, from in- + litteratus literate Date: 15th century 1. having little or no education; especially unable to read ...
illiterately
adverb see illiterate
illiterateness
noun see illiterate
illitic
adjective see illite
illness
noun Date: circa 1500 1. obsolete a. wickedness b. unpleasantness 2. a. an unhealthy condition of body or mind b. sickness 2
illocutionary
adjective Etymology: 2in- + locution Date: 1955 relating to or being the communicative effect (as commanding or requesting) of an utterance
illogic
noun Etymology: back-formation from illogical Date: 1856 the quality or state of being illogical ; illogicality
illogical
adjective Date: 1588 1. not observing the principles of logic 2. devoid of logic ; senseless • illogicality noun • illogically adverb • illogicalness noun
illogicality
noun see illogical
illogically
adverb see illogical
illogicalness
noun see illogical
illume
transitive verb (illumed; illuming) Date: 1602 illuminate
illuminable
adjective see illumine
illuminance
noun Date: circa 1938 illumination 2
illuminant
noun Date: 1644 an illuminating device or substance
illuminate
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. archaic brightened with light 2. archaic intellectually or spiritually enlightened II. transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: ...
illuminati
noun plural Etymology: Italian & New Latin; Italian, from New Latin, from Latin, plural of illuminatus Date: 1599 1. capitalized any of various groups claiming special ...
illuminatingly
adverb see illuminate II
illumination
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of illuminating or state of being illuminated: as a. spiritual or intellectual enlightenment b. (1) a lighting up (2) ...
illuminative
adjective Date: 1644 of, relating to, or producing illumination ; illuminating
illuminator
noun see illuminate II
illumine
transitive verb (-mined; -mining) Date: 14th century illuminate • illuminable adjective
illuminism
noun Date: 1798 1. belief in or claim to a personal enlightenment not accessible to mankind in general 2. capitalized beliefs or claims viewed as forming doctrine or ...
illuminist
noun see illuminism
illus
or illust abbreviation illustrated; illustration
illusion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin illusion-, illusio, from Latin, action of mocking, from illudere to mock at, from in- + ludere to play, mock ...
illusional
adjective see illusion
illusionary
adjective Date: 1866 illusory
illusionism
noun Date: 1911 the use of artistic techniques (as perspective or shading) to create the illusion of reality especially in a work of art
illusionist
noun Date: 1850 a person who produces illusory effects: as a. one (as an artist) whose work is marked by illusionism b. a sleight-of-hand performer or a magician • ...
illusionistic
adjective see illusionist
illusionistically
adverb see illusionist
illusive
adjective Date: 1606 illusory • illusively adverb • illusiveness noun
illusively
adverb see illusive
illusiveness
noun see illusive
illusorily
adverb see illusory
illusoriness
noun see illusory
illusory
adjective Date: circa 1631 based on or producing illusion ; deceptive Synonyms: see apparent • illusorily adverb • illusoriness noun
illust
abbreviation see illus
illustrate
verb (-trated; -trating) Etymology: Latin illustratus, past participle of illustrare, from in- + lustrare to purify, make bright — more at luster Date: 1526 transitive verb ...
illustration
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the action of illustrating ; the condition of being illustrated b. archaic the action of making illustrious or honored or distinguished 2. ...
illustrational
adjective see illustration
illustrative
adjective Date: 1643 serving, tending, or designed to illustrate • illustratively adverb
illustratively
adverb see illustrative
illustrator
noun see illustrate
illustrious
adjective Etymology: Latin illustris, probably from illustrare Date: 1588 1. notably or brilliantly outstanding because of dignity or achievements or actions ; eminent 2. ...
illustriously
adverb see illustrious
illustriousness
noun see illustrious
illuviated
adjective see illuviation
illuviation
noun Etymology: 2in- + -luviation (as in eluviation) Date: 1928 accumulation of dissolved or suspended soil materials in one area or horizon as a result of eluviation from ...
illy
adverb Date: 1549 not wisely or well ; badly, ill
Illyria
geographical name ancient region S Europe in Balkan Peninsula bordering on the Adriatic • Illyric adjective
Illyrian
noun Date: 1549 1. a native or inhabitant of ancient Illyria 2. the poorly attested Indo-European languages of the Illyrians — see Indo-European languages table • ...
Illyric
adjective see Illyria
Illyricum
geographical name province of Roman Empire in Illyria
ilmenite
noun Etymology: German Ilmenit, from Ilmen range, Ural Mts., Russia Date: circa 1827 a usually massive iron-black mineral that consists of an oxide of iron and titanium and ...
ILO
abbreviation International Labor Organization
Ilocano
or Ilokano noun (plural Ilocano or Ilocanos or Ilokano or Ilokanos) Date: 1898 1. a member of a major people of northern Luzon in the Philippines 2. the Austronesian ...
Iloilo
geographical name city Philippines on Panay Island population 311,000
Ilokano
noun see Ilocano
ILS
abbreviation instrument landing system
ils ne passeront pas
foreign term Etymology: French they shall not get past
IM
abbreviation 1. individual medley 2. intramural
im-
— see in-
image
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, short for imagene, from Latin imagin-, imago; perhaps akin to Latin imitari to imitate Date: 13th century 1. a ...
image converter
noun see image tube
image tube
noun Date: 1936 an electron tube in which incident electromagnetic radiation (as light or infrared) produces a visible image on its fluorescent screen duplicating the original ...
imager
noun see image II
imagery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 14th century 1. a. the product of image makers ; images; also the art of making images b. pictures produced by an imaging system 2. ...
imaginable
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being imagined ; conceivable • imaginableness noun • imaginably adverb
imaginableness
noun see imaginable
imaginably
adverb see imaginable
imaginal
I. adjective Etymology: imagine + 1-al Date: 1647 of or relating to imagination, images, or imagery II. adjective Etymology: New Latin imagin-, imago Date: 1877 of or ...
imaginarily
adverb see imaginary
imaginariness
noun see imaginary
imaginary
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. existing only in imagination ; lacking factual reality b. formed or characterized imaginatively or arbitrarily 2. containing or ...
imaginary number
noun Date: circa 1911 a complex number (as 2 + 3i) in which the coefficient of the imaginary unit is not zero — called also imaginary — compare pure imaginary
imaginary part
noun Date: 1845 the part of a complex number (as 3i in 2 + 3i) that has the imaginary unit as a factor
imaginary unit
noun Date: circa 1911 the positive square root of minus 1 denoted by i or + √-1
imagination
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin imagination-, imaginatio, from imaginari Date: 14th century 1. the act or power of forming a mental image of ...
imaginative
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. of, relating to, or characterized by imagination b. devoid of truth ; false 2. given to imagining ; having a lively imagination 3. ...
imaginatively
adverb see imaginative
imaginativeness
noun see imaginative
imagine
verb (imagined; imagining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French imaginer, from Latin imaginari, from imagin-, imago image Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to ...
imaginings
noun plural Date: 1605 products of the imagination ; thoughts, images
imagism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1912 a 20th century movement in poetry advocating free verse and the expression of ideas and emotions through clear precise images • ...
imagist
noun or adjective see imagism
imagistic
adjective see imagism
imagistically
adverb see imagism
imago
noun (plural imagoes or imagines) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, image Date: circa 1797 1. an insect in its final, adult, sexually mature, and typically winged state 2. ...
imam
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Arabic imām Date: 1613 1. the prayer leader of a mosque 2. a Muslim leader of the line of Ali held by Shiites to be the divinely ...
imamate
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: circa 1741 1. the office of an imam 2. the region or country ruled over by an imam
imaret
noun Etymology: Turkish Date: 1613 an inn or hospice in Turkey
Imari
noun Etymology: Imari, Japan Date: 1875 a multicolored Japanese porcelain usually characterized by elaborate floral designs • Imari adjective
imbalance
noun Date: circa 1890 lack of balance ; the state of being out of equilibrium or out of proportion • imbalanced adjective
imbalanced
adjective see imbalance
imbecile
noun Etymology: French imbécile, noun, from adjective, weak, weak-minded, from Latin imbecillus Date: 1802 1. usually offensive a person affected with moderate mental ...
imbecilic
adjective see imbecile
imbecility
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1533 1. the quality or state of being imbecile or an imbecile 2. a. utter foolishness; also futility b. something that is foolish or ...
imbed
variant of embed
imbibe
verb (imbibed; imbibing) Etymology: Middle English enbiben to absorb, cause to absorb, from Latin imbibere to drink in, absorb, from in- + bibere to drink — more at potable ...
imbiber
noun see imbibe
imbibition
noun Date: 15th century the act or action of imbibing; especially the taking up of fluid by a colloidal system resulting in swelling • imbibitional adjective
imbibitional
adjective see imbibition
imbitter
archaic variant of embitter
imbosom
archaic variant of embosom
imbricate
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin imbricatus, past participle of imbricare to cover with pantiles, from Latin imbric-, imbrex pantile, from imbr-, imber rain; akin to Greek ...
imbrication
noun Date: 1713 1. an overlapping of edges (as of tiles or scales) 2. a decoration or pattern showing imbrication
imbroglio
noun (plural -glios) Etymology: Italian, from imbrogliare to entangle, from Middle French embrouiller — more at embroil Date: 1750 1. a confused mass 2. a. an ...
imbrown
archaic variant of embrown
imbrue
also embrue transitive verb (imbrued; also embrued; imbruing; also embruing) Etymology: Middle English enbrewen, embrowen, from Anglo-French embrower to soil, probably ...
imbrute
verb (imbruted; imbruting) Date: 1634 intransitive verb to sink to the level of a brute transitive verb to degrade to the level of a brute
imbue
transitive verb (imbued; imbuing) Etymology: Latin imbuere Date: 1555 1. to permeate or influence as if by dyeing 2. to tinge or dye deeply 3. endow 3 Synonyms: see ...
IMF
abbreviation International Monetary Fund
IMHO
abbreviation in my humble opinion
imidazole
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 a white crystalline heterocyclic base C3H4N2 that is an antimetabolite related to histidine; broadly any of ...
imide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, alteration of amide Date: 1857 a compound containing the NH group that is derived from ammonia by replacement of two ...
imidic
adjective see imide
imido
adjective Date: 1937 relating to or containing the NH group or its substituted form NR united to one or two acid groups
imine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, alteration of amine Date: 1883 a compound containing the NH group or its substituted form NR that is derived from ammonia ...
imino
adjective Date: 1901 relating to or containing the NH group or its substituted form NR united to a group other than an acid group
imipramine
noun Etymology: imide + propyl + amine Date: 1958 a tricyclic antidepressant drug C19H24N2
imitable
adjective Date: 1550 capable or worthy of being imitated or copied
imitate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin imitatus, past participle of imitari — more at image Date: 1534 1. to follow as a pattern, model, or example 2. to be ...
imitation
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of imitating 2. something produced as a copy ; counterfeit 3. a literary work designed to reproduce the style of another ...
imitative
adjective Date: 1584 1. a. marked by imitation b. reproducing or representing a natural sound ; onomatopoeic c. exhibiting mimicry 2. inclined to imitate 3. ...
imitatively
adverb see imitative
imitativeness
noun see imitative
imitator
noun see imitate
immaculacy
noun Date: 1799 the quality or state of being immaculate
immaculate
adjective Etymology: Middle English immaculat, from Latin immaculatus, from in- + maculatus stained — more at maculate Date: 15th century 1. having no stain or blemish ; ...
Immaculate Conception
noun Date: 1687 1. the conception of the Virgin Mary in which as decreed in Roman Catholic dogma her soul was preserved free from original sin by divine grace 2. December ...
immaculately
adverb see immaculate
immane
adjective Etymology: Latin immanis, from in- + manus good — more at mature Date: 1602 archaic huge; also monstrous in character
immanence
noun Date: 1816 the quality or state of being immanent; especially inherence
immanency
noun Date: 1659 immanence
immanent
adjective Etymology: Late Latin immanent-, immanens, present participle of immanēre to remain in place, from Latin in- + manēre to remain — more at mansion Date: 1535 1. ...
immanentism
noun Date: 1907 any of several theories according to which God or an abstract mind or spirit pervades the world • immanentist noun or adjective • immanentistic adjective
immanentist
noun or adjective see immanentism
immanentistic
adjective see immanentism
immanently
adverb see immanent
Immanuel
or Emmanuel noun Etymology: Middle English Emanuel, from Late Latin Emmanuel, from Greek Emmanouēl, from Hebrew ‘immānū'ēl, literally, with us is God Date: 15th century ...
immaterial
adjective Etymology: Middle English immaterial, from Late Latin immaterialis, from Latin in- + Late Latin materialis material Date: 14th century 1. not consisting of matter ; ...
immaterialism
noun Date: 1713 a philosophical theory that material things have no reality except as mental perceptions • immaterialist noun
immaterialist
noun see immaterialism
immateriality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1570 1. the quality or state of being immaterial 2. something immaterial
immaterialize
transitive verb Date: 1661 to make immaterial or incorporeal
immature
adjective Etymology: Latin immaturus, from in- + maturus mature Date: 1548 1. archaic premature 2. a. lacking complete growth, differentiation, or development b. ...
immaturely
adverb see immature
immaturity
noun see immature
immeasurable
adjective Date: 14th century incapable of being measured; broadly indefinitely extensive • immeasurableness noun • immeasurably adverb

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