Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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immeasurableness
noun see immeasurable
immeasurably
adverb see immeasurable
immed
abbreviation immediate; immediately
immediacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1605 1. the quality or state of being immediate 2. something that is immediate — usually used in plural
immediate
adjective Etymology: Middle English immediat, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin immediatus, from Latin in- + Late Latin mediatus intermediate — more at mediate Date: 15th ...
immediate constituent
noun Date: 1933 any of the meaningful constituents directly forming a larger linguistic construction (as a phrase or sentence)
immediately
I. adverb Date: 15th century 1. in direct connection or relation ; directly 2. without interval of time ; straightway
immediateness
noun Date: 1633 immediacy 1
immedicable
adjective Etymology: Latin immedicabilis, from in- + medicabilis medicable Date: 1533 incurable • immedicably adverb
immedicably
adverb see immedicable
Immelmann
I. noun Etymology: Max Immelmann Date: 1917 a maneuver in which an airplane reverses direction by executing half of a loop upwards followed by half of a roll — called also ...
Immelmann turn
noun see Immelmann I
immemorial
adjective Etymology: probably from French immémorial, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin immemorialis lacking memory, from Latin in- + memorialis memorial Date: 1602 ...
immemorially
adverb see immemorial
immense
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin immensus immeasurable, from in- + mensus, past participle of metiri to measure — more at measure Date: ...
immensely
adverb see immense
immenseness
noun see immense
immensity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being immense 2. something immense
immensurable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin immensurabilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin mensurabilis measurable, from mensurare to measure, from Latin mensura measure ...
immerge
intransitive verb (immerged; immerging) Etymology: Latin immergere Date: 1706 to plunge into or immerse oneself in something
immerse
transitive verb (immersed; immersing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin immersus, past participle of immergere, from in- + mergere to merge Date: 15th century 1. to ...
immersible
adjective Date: circa 1846 capable of being totally submerged in water without damage (as to the heating element of an electric appliance)
immersion
noun Date: 15th century the act of immersing or the state of being immersed: as a. baptism by complete submersion of the person in water b. absorbing involvement c. ...
immersion heater
noun Date: 1914 a usually electric unit that heats the liquid in which it is immersed
immesh
variant of enmesh
immethodical
adjective Date: 1605 not methodical • immethodically adverb
immethodically
adverb see immethodical
immigrant
noun Date: 1789 one that immigrates: as a. a person who comes to a country to take up permanent residence b. a plant or animal that becomes established in an area where ...
immigrate
verb (-grated; -grating) Etymology: Latin immigratus, past participle of immigrare to remove, go in, from in- + migrare to migrate Date: circa 1623 intransitive verb to ...
immigration
noun see immigrate
immigrational
adjective see immigrate
imminence
noun Date: 1606 1. something imminent; especially impending evil or danger 2. the quality or state of being imminent
imminency
noun Date: 1665 imminence 2
imminent
adjective Etymology: Latin imminent-, imminens, present participle of imminēre to project, threaten, from in- + -minēre (akin to Latin mont-, mons mountain) — more at ...
imminently
adverb see imminent
immingle
verb Date: 1606 blend, intermingle
immiscibility
noun see immiscible
immiscible
adjective Date: 1671 incapable of mixing or attaining homogeneity • immiscibility noun
immiseration
noun Etymology: 2in- + miserable + -ation Date: 1948 the act of making miserable; especially impoverishment
immitigable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin immitigabilis, from Latin in- + mitigare to mitigate Date: 1576 not capable of being mitigated • immitigably adverb
immitigably
adverb see immitigable
immittance
noun Etymology: impedance + admittance Date: circa 1948 electrical admittance or impedance
immix
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from immixed mixed in, from Middle English immixte, from Latin immixtus, past participle of immiscēre, from in- + miscēre to mix — ...
immixture
noun see immix
immobile
adjective Etymology: Middle English in-mobill, from Latin immobilis, from in- + mobilis mobile Date: 14th century 1. incapable of being moved ; fixed 2. not moving ; ...
immobilism
noun Date: 1949 a policy of extreme conservatism and opposition to change
immobility
noun see immobile
immobilization
noun see immobilize
immobilize
transitive verb Date: 1871 to make immobile: as a. to prevent freedom of movement or effective use of b. to reduce or eliminate motion of (the body or a part) by ...
immobilizer
noun see immobilize
immoderacy
noun Date: 1682 lack of moderation
immoderate
adjective Etymology: Middle English immoderat, from Latin immoderatus, from in- + moderatus, past participle of moderare to moderate Date: 14th century exceeding just, usual, ...
immoderately
adverb see immoderate
immoderateness
noun see immoderate
immoderation
noun see immoderate
immodest
adjective Etymology: Latin immodestus, from in- + modestus modest Date: 1550 not modest; specifically not conforming to the sexual mores of a particular time or place • ...
immodestly
adverb see immodest
immodesty
noun see immodest
immolate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin immolatus, past participle of immolare to sprinkle with meal before sacrificing, sacrifice, from in- + mola sacrificial ...
immolation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of immolating ; the state of being immolated 2. something that is immolated
immolator
noun see immolate
immoral
adjective Date: 1660 not moral; broadly conflicting with generally or traditionally held moral principles • immorally adverb
immoralism
noun see immoralist
immoralist
noun Date: 1697 an advocate of immorality • immoralism noun
immorality
noun Date: circa 1566 1. the quality or state of being immoral; especially unchastity 2. an immoral act or practice
immorally
adverb see immoral
immortal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin immortalis, from in- + mortalis mortal Date: 14th century 1. exempt from death 2. exempt from oblivion ; imperishable ...
immortalise
British variant of immortalize
immortality
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being immortal: a. unending existence b. lasting fame
immortalization
noun see immortalize
immortalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1566 to make immortal • immortalization noun • immortalizer noun
immortalizer
noun see immortalize
immortally
adverb see immortal I
immortelle
noun Etymology: French, from feminine of immortel immortal, from Latin immortalis Date: 1832 everlasting 3
immotile
adjective Date: 1872 lacking motility
immovability
noun see immovable I
immovable
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. incapable of being moved; broadly not moving or not intended to be moved 2. a. steadfast, unyielding b. not capable of being moved ...
immovableness
noun see immovable I
immovably
adverb see immovable I
immun
abbreviation 1. immunity 2. immunization
immune
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin immunis, from in- + munia services, obligations; akin to Latin munus service — more at mean Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
immune reaction
noun see immune response
immune response
noun Date: 1953 a bodily response to an antigen that occurs when lymphocytes identify the antigenic molecule as foreign and induce the formation of antibodies and lymphocytes ...
immune system
noun Date: circa 1919 the bodily system that protects the body from foreign substances, cells, and tissues by producing the immune response and that includes especially the ...
immunity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century the quality or state of being immune; especially a condition of being able to resist a particular disease especially through preventing ...
immunization
noun see immunize
immunize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1892 to make immune • immunization noun
immuno-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from immune 1. physiological immunity 2. immunologic ; immunologically ; immunology and
immunoassay
noun Date: 1959 a technique or test used to detect the presence or quantity of a substance (as a protein) based on its capacity to act as an antigen • immunoassayable ...
immunoassayable
adjective see immunoassay
immunoblot
noun Date: 1982 a blot (as a Western blot) in which a radioactively labeled antibody is used as the molecular probe • immunoblotting noun
immunoblotting
noun see immunoblot
immunochemical
adjective see immunochemistry
immunochemically
adverb see immunochemistry
immunochemist
noun see immunochemistry
immunochemistry
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1907 a branch of chemistry that deals with the chemical aspects of immunology • immunochemical adjective • ...
immunocompetence
noun Date: 1966 the capacity for a normal immune response • immunocompetent adjective
immunocompetent
adjective see immunocompetence
immunocompromised
adjective Date: 1974 having the immune system impaired or weakened (as by drugs or illness)
immunocytochemical
adjective see immunocytochemistry
immunocytochemically
adverb see immunocytochemistry
immunocytochemistry
noun Date: 1960 the application of biochemistry to cellular immunology • immunocytochemical adjective • immunocytochemically adverb
immunodeficiency
noun Date: 1969 inability to produce a normal complement of antibodies or immunologically sensitized T cells especially in response to specific antigens • immunodeficient ...
immunodeficient
adjective see immunodeficiency
immunodiagnosis
noun see immunodiagnostic
immunodiagnostic
adjective Date: 1962 of, relating to, or being analytical methods using antibodies as reagents • immunodiagnosis noun
immunodiffusion
noun Date: 1959 any of several techniques for obtaining a precipitate between an antibody and its specific antigen by suspending one in a gel and letting the other migrate ...
immunoelectrophoresis
noun (plural immunoelectrophoreses) Date: 1958 electrophoretic separation of proteins followed by identification by the formation of precipitates through specific immunologic ...
immunoelectrophoretic
adjective see immunoelectrophoresis
immunoelectrophoretically
adverb see immunoelectrophoresis
immunofluorescence
noun Date: 1960 the labeling of antibodies or antigens with fluorescent dyes especially for the purpose of demonstrating the presence of a particular antigen or antibody in a ...
immunofluorescent
adjective see immunofluorescence
immunogen
noun Etymology: from Immunogen, a trademark Date: 1959 a substance that produces an immune response
immunogenesis
noun see immunogenic
immunogenetic
adjective see immunogenetics
immunogenetically
adverb see immunogenetics
immunogeneticist
noun see immunogenetics
immunogenetics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1936 a branch of immunology concerned with the interrelations of heredity, disease, and the immune system and its components ...
immunogenic
adjective Date: circa 1923 relating to or producing an immune response • immunogenesis noun • immunogenicity noun
immunogenicity
noun see immunogenic
immunoglobulin
noun Date: 1953 antibody — abbreviation Ig
immunohematologic
adjective see immunohematology
immunohematological
adjective see immunohematology
immunohematologist
noun see immunohematology
immunohematology
noun Date: 1950 a branch of immunology that deals with the immunologic properties of blood • immunohematologic or immunohematological adjective • immunohematologist noun
immunohistochemical
adjective Date: 1960 of or relating to the application of histochemical and immunologic methods to chemical analysis of living cells and tissues • immunohistochemistry noun
immunohistochemistry
noun see immunohistochemical
immunologic
adjective see immunology
immunological
adjective see immunology
immunologically
adverb see immunology
immunologist
noun see immunology
immunology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1910 a science that deals with the immune system and the cell-mediated and humoral aspects of immunity and immune ...
immunomodulator
noun Date: 1977 a substance that affects the functioning of the immune system • immunomodulatory adjective
immunomodulatory
adjective see immunomodulator
immunopathologic
adjective see immunopathology
immunopathological
adjective see immunopathology
immunopathologist
noun see immunopathology
immunopathology
noun Date: 1959 a branch of medicine that deals with immune responses associated with disease • immunopathologic or immunopathological adjective • immunopathologist noun
immunoprecipitate
I. noun see immunoprecipitation II. transitive verb see immunoprecipitation
immunoprecipitation
noun Date: 1962 precipitation of a complex of an antibody and its specific antigen • immunoprecipitate noun • immunoprecipitate transitive verb
immunoreactive
adjective Date: 1966 reacting to particular antigens or haptens • immunoreactivity noun
immunoreactivity
noun see immunoreactive
immunoregulation
noun see immunoregulatory
immunoregulatory
adjective Date: 1971 of or relating to the regulation of the immune system • immunoregulation noun
immunosorbent
adjective Date: 1966 relating to or using a substrate consisting of a specific antibody or antigen chemically combined with an insoluble substance (as cellulose) to ...
immunosuppress
transitive verb see immunosuppression
immunosuppressant
noun or adjective see immunosuppression
immunosuppression
noun Date: 1963 suppression (as by drugs) of natural immune responses • immunosuppress transitive verb • immunosuppressant noun or adjective • immunosuppressive ...
immunosuppressive
adjective see immunosuppression
immunotherapeutic
adjective see immunotherapy
immunotherapy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1911 the treatment or prevention of disease by taking measures to increase immune system functioning (as by ...
immure
transitive verb (immured; immuring) Etymology: Medieval Latin immurare, from Latin in- + murus wall — more at munition Date: 1583 1. a. to enclose within or as if within ...
immurement
noun see immure
immutability
noun see immutable
immutable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin immutabilis, from in- + mutabilis mutable Date: 15th century not capable of or susceptible to change • immutability noun ...
immutableness
noun see immutable
immutably
adverb see immutable
IMO
abbreviation International Maritime Organization
imp
I. noun Etymology: Middle English impe, from Old English impa, from impian to imp Date: before 12th century 1. obsolete shoot, bud; also graft 2. a. a small demon ; ...
impact
I. verb Etymology: Latin impactus, past participle of impingere to push against — more at impinge Date: 1601 transitive verb 1. a. to fix firmly by or as if by ...
impact printer
noun Date: 1968 a printing device in which a printing element directly strikes a surface (as in a typewriter)
impacted
adjective Date: circa 1616 1. a. packed or wedged in b. deeply entrenched ; not easily changed or removed 2. of a tooth wedged between the jawbone and another tooth ...
impacter
noun see impact I
impactful
adjective see impact I
impaction
noun Date: 1739 the act of becoming or the state of being impacted; especially lodgment of something (as feces) in a body passage or cavity
impactive
adjective see impact I
impactor
noun see impact I
impaint
transitive verb Date: 1596 obsolete paint, depict
impair
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English empeiren, from Anglo-French empeirer, from Vulgar Latin *impejorare, from Latin in- + Late Latin pejorare to make worse — more at ...
impaired
adjective Date: 1582 being in a less than perfect or whole condition: as a. disabled or functionally defective — often used in combination b. intoxicated by alcohol ...
impairer
noun see impair
impairment
noun see impair
impala
noun (plural impalas or impala) Etymology: Zulu Date: 1875 a large brownish antelope (Aepyceros melampus) of southeastern Africa that in the male has slender curved horns ...
impale
transitive verb (impaled; impaling) Etymology: Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French empaler, from Medieval Latin impalare, from Latin in- + palus stake — more at ...
impalement
noun see impale
impaler
noun see impale
impalpability
noun see impalpable
impalpable
adjective Date: 1509 1. a. incapable of being felt by touch ; intangible b. so finely divided that no grains or grit can be felt 2. not readily discerned by the ...
impalpably
adverb see impalpable
impanel
or empanel transitive verb Date: 15th century to enroll in or on a panel
imparadise
transitive verb (-dised; -dising) Date: 1592 enrapture
imparity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Late Latin imparitas, from Latin impar unequal, from in- + par equal Date: 1563 inequality, disparity
impart
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French empartir, from Latin impartire, from in- + partire to divide, part Date: 15th century 1. to ...
impartation
noun see impart
impartial
adjective Date: 1587 not partial or biased ; treating or affecting all equally Synonyms: see fair • impartiality noun • impartially adverb
impartiality
noun see impartial
impartially
adverb see impartial
impartible
adjective Etymology: Middle English impartibil, from Late Latin impartibilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin partibilis divisible, from Latin partire Date: 14th century not ...
impartibly
adverb see impartible
impartment
noun see impart
impassability
noun see impassable
impassable
also impassible adjective Date: 1562 incapable of being passed, traveled, crossed, or surmounted • impassability noun • impassableness noun • impassably adverb
impassableness
noun see impassable
impassably
adverb see impassable
impasse
noun Etymology: French, from in- + passer to pass Date: 1851 1. a. a predicament affording no obvious escape b. deadlock 2. an impassable road or way ; cul-de-sac
impassibility
noun see impassible I
impassible
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin impassibilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin passibilis passible Date: ...
impassibly
adverb see impassible I
impassion
transitive verb (impassioned; impassioning) Etymology: probably from Italian impassionare, from in- (from Latin) + passione passion, from Late Latin passion-, passio Date: ...
impassioned
adjective Date: 1603 filled with passion or zeal ; showing great warmth or intensity of feeling Synonyms: impassioned, passionate, ardent, fervent, fervid, perfervid ...
impassive
adjective Date: 1605 1. a. archaic unsusceptible to pain b. unsusceptible to physical feeling ; insensible c. unsusceptible to or destitute of emotion ; apathetic 2. ...
impassively
adverb see impassive
impassiveness
noun see impassive
impassivity
noun see impassive
impaste
transitive verb Etymology: Italian impastare, from in- (from Latin) + pasta paste, from Late Latin Date: 1576 obsolete to make into a paste or crust
impasto
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: Italian, from impastare Date: 1784 1. the thick application of a pigment to a canvas or panel in painting; also the body of pigment so applied ...
impastoed
adjective see impasto
impatience
noun Date: 13th century the quality or state of being impatient
impatiens
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, impatient Date: 1785 any of a widely distributed genus (Impatiens of the family Balsaminaceae) of annual or perennial herbs with ...
impatient
adjective Etymology: Middle English impacient, from Anglo-French impacient, from Latin impatient-, impatiens, from in- + patient-, patiens patient Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
impatiently
adverb see impatient
impawn
transitive verb Date: 1567 archaic to put in pawn ; pledge
impeach
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English empechen, from Anglo-French empecher, enpechier to ensnare, impede, prosecute, from Late Latin impedicare to fetter, from Latin in- ...
impeachable
adjective see impeach I
impeachment
noun see impeach I
impearl
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English enperlen, from en- + perle pearl Date: 15th century to form into pearls; also to form of or adorn with pearls
impeccability
noun see impeccable
impeccable
adjective Etymology: Latin impeccabilis, from in- + peccare to sin Date: 1531 1. not capable of sinning or liable to sin 2. free from fault or blame ; flawless • ...
impeccably
adverb see impeccable
impecuniosity
noun see impecunious
impecunious
adjective Etymology: 1in- + obsolete English pecunious rich, from Middle English, from Latin pecuniosus, from pecunia money — more at fee Date: 1596 having very little or ...
impecuniously
adverb see impecunious
impecuniousness
noun see impecunious
impedance
noun Date: 1886 something that impedes ; hindrance: as a. the apparent opposition in an electrical circuit to the flow of an alternating current that is analogous to the ...
impede
transitive verb (impeded; impeding) Etymology: Latin impedire, from in- + ped-, pes foot — more at foot Date: circa 1595 to interfere with or slow the progress of ...
impeder
noun see impede
impediment
noun Date: 14th century 1. something that impedes; especially an organic obstruction to speech 2. a bar or hindrance (as lack of sufficient age) to a lawful marriage
impedimenta
noun plural Etymology: Latin, plural of impedimentum impediment, from impedire Date: 1600 1. appurtenances, equipment 2. things that impede
impel
transitive verb (impelled; impelling) Etymology: Middle English impellen, from Latin impellere, from in- + pellere to drive — more at felt Date: 15th century 1. to urge or ...
impeller
also impellor noun Date: 1685 1. one that impels 2. a. a rotor located in a conduit to impart motion to a fluid b. a blade of a rotor
impellor
noun see impeller
impend
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin impendēre, from in- + pendēre to hang — more at pendant Date: 1585 1. a. to hover threateningly ; menace b. to be about to occur ...
impendent
adjective Date: 1590 being near at hand ; approaching
impenetrability
noun Date: 1653 1. the inability of two portions of matter to occupy the same space at the same time 2. the quality or state of being impenetrable
impenetrable
adjective Etymology: Middle English impenetrabel, from Middle French impenetrable, from Latin impenetrabilis, from in- + penetrabilis penetrable Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
impenetrably
adverb see impenetrable
impenitence
noun Date: 1595 the quality or state of being impenitent
impenitent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin impaenitent-, impaenitens, from Latin in- + paenitent-, paenitens penitent Date: 15th century not penitent • ...
impenitently
adverb see impenitent
imperative
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English imperatyf, from Late Latin imperativus, from Latin imperatus, past participle of imperare to command — more at emperor Date: 15th ...
imperatively
adverb see imperative I
imperativeness
noun see imperative I
imperator
noun Etymology: Latin — more at emperor Date: circa 1580 a commander in chief or emperor of the ancient Romans • imperatorial adjective
imperatorial
adjective see imperator
imperceivable
adjective Date: circa 1617 archaic imperceptible
imperceptible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin imperceptibilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin perceptibilis perceptible Date: 15th century not ...
imperceptibly
adverb see imperceptible
imperceptive
adjective Date: 1661 not perceptive • imperceptiveness noun
imperceptiveness
noun see imperceptive
impercipience
noun Date: 1891 the quality or state of being imperceptive • impercipient adjective
impercipient
adjective see impercipience
imperf
abbreviation 1. imperfect 2. imperforate
imperfect
I. adjective Etymology: alteration of Middle English imparfit, from Latin imperfectus, from in- + perfectus perfect Date: 14th century 1. not perfect: as a. defective b. ...
imperfect fungus
noun Date: circa 1895 any of various fungi (order Fungi Imperfecti syn. Deuteromycetes) of which only the conidial stage is known
imperfection
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being imperfect; also fault, blemish
imperfective
adjective Date: 1887 of a verb form or aspect expressing action as incomplete or without reference to completion or as reiterated — compare perfective • imperfective noun
imperfectly
adverb see imperfect I
imperfectness
noun see imperfect I
imperforate
adjective Date: 1673 1. having no opening or aperture; specifically lacking the usual or normal opening 2. of a stamp or a sheet of stamps lacking perforations or roulettes
Imperia
geographical name commune & port NW Italy in Liguria SW of Genoa population 40,171
imperial
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin imperialis, from Latin imperium command, empire Date: 14th century 1. a. of, relating to, ...
Imperial Beach
geographical name city SW California S of San Diego population 26,992
imperial moth
noun Date: circa 1904 a large North American saturniid moth (Eacles imperialis) having yellow wings marked with reddish-brown spots and patches
Imperial Valley
geographical name valley United States & Mexico in SE California & NE Baja California in Colorado Desert; most of area below sea level
imperialism
noun Date: 1826 1. imperial government, authority, or system 2. the policy, practice, or advocacy of extending the power and dominion of a nation especially by direct ...

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