Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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imperialist
noun or adjective see imperialism
imperialistic
adjective see imperialism
imperialistically
adverb see imperialism
imperially
adverb see imperial I
imperil
transitive verb (-iled or -illed; -iling or -illing) Date: 15th century to bring into peril ; endanger • imperilment noun
imperilment
noun see imperil
imperious
adjective Etymology: Latin imperiosus, from imperium Date: 1540 1. a. befitting or characteristic of one of eminent rank or attainments ; commanding, dominant b. ...
imperiously
adverb see imperious
imperiousness
noun see imperious
imperishability
noun see imperishable
imperishable
adjective Date: circa 1585 1. not perishable or subject to decay 2. enduring or occurring forever • imperishability noun • imperishable noun • imperishableness ...
imperishableness
noun see imperishable
imperishably
adverb see imperishable
imperium
noun Etymology: Latin — more at empire Date: 1651 1. a. supreme power or absolute dominion ; control b. empire 1 c. empire 2 2. the right to command or to ...
impermanence
noun Date: 1796 the quality or state of being impermanent
impermanency
noun Date: 1648 impermanence
impermanent
adjective Date: 1653 not permanent ; transient • impermanently adverb
impermanently
adverb see impermanent
impermeability
noun see impermeable
impermeable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin impermeabilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin permeabilis permeable Date: 1697 not permitting passage (as of a fluid) through its substance; ...
impermissibility
noun see impermissible
impermissible
adjective Date: 1858 not permissible • impermissibility noun • impermissibly adverb
impermissibly
adverb see impermissible
impersonal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin impersonalis, from Latin in- + Late Latin personalis personal Date: 15th century 1. a. denoting the verbal action of ...
impersonality
noun see impersonal
impersonalization
noun see impersonalize
impersonalize
transitive verb Date: circa 1899 to make impersonal • impersonalization noun
impersonally
adverb see impersonal
impersonate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1715 to assume or act the character of ; personate • impersonation noun • impersonator noun
impersonation
noun see impersonate
impersonator
noun see impersonate
impertinence
noun Date: 1603 1. the quality or state of being impertinent: as a. irrelevance, inappropriateness b. incivility, insolence 2. an instance of impertinence
impertinency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1589 impertinence
impertinent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin impertinent-, impertinens, from Latin in- + pertinent-, pertinens, present participle of pertinēre to ...
impertinently
adverb see impertinent
imperturbability
noun see imperturbable
imperturbable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin imperturbabilis, from Latin in- + perturbare to perturb Date: 15th century marked by extreme calm, impassivity, and ...
imperturbably
adverb see imperturbable
impervious
adjective Etymology: Latin impervius, from in- + pervius pervious Date: 1640 1. a. not allowing entrance or passage ; impenetrable b. not capable of being damaged or ...
imperviously
adverb see impervious
imperviousness
noun see impervious
impetigo
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from impetere to attack — more at impetus Date: 14th century an acute contagious staphylococcal or streptococcal skin disease ...
impetrate
transitive verb (-trated; -trating) Etymology: Latin impetratus, past participle of impetrare, from in- + patrare to accomplish — more at perpetrate Date: circa 1534 1. to ...
impetration
noun see impetrate
impetuosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being impetuous 2. an impetuous action or impulse
impetuous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin impetuosus, from Latin impetus Date: 14th century 1. marked by impulsive vehemence or passion 2. ...
impetuously
adverb see impetuous
impetuousness
noun see impetuous
impetus
noun Etymology: Latin, assault, impetus, from impetere to attack, from in- + petere to go to, seek — more at feather Date: 1641 1. a. (1) a driving force ; impulse ...
Imphal
geographical name city NE India capital of Manipur population 196,268
impiety
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. the quality or state of being impious ; irreverence 2. an impious act
impinge
intransitive verb (impinged; impinging) Etymology: Latin impingere, from in- + pangere to fasten, drive in — more at pact Date: 1605 1. to strike or dash especially with a ...
impingement
noun see impinge
impious
adjective Etymology: Latin impius, from in- + pius pious Date: 1542 not pious ; lacking in reverence or proper respect (as for God or one's parents) ; irreverent • ...
impiously
adverb see impious
impish
adjective Date: 1652 of, relating to, or befitting an imp; especially mischievous • impishly adverb • impishness noun
impishly
adverb see impish
impishness
noun see impish
implacability
noun see implacable
implacable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin implacabilis, from in- + placabilis placable Date: 15th century not placable ; not capable of being appeased, significantly ...
implacably
adverb see implacable
implant
I. verb Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to fix or set securely or deeply
implantable
adjective see implant I
implantation
noun Date: 1578 1. a. the act or process of implanting something b. the state resulting from being implanted 2. in placental mammals the process of attachment of the ...
implanter
noun see implant I
implausibility
noun see implausible
implausible
adjective Date: circa 1677 not plausible ; provoking disbelief • implausibility noun • implausibly adverb
implausibly
adverb see implausible
implead
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English empleden, from Anglo-French empleder, from en- + pleder to plead Date: 14th century to sue or prosecute at law
implement
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin implementum action of filling up, from Latin implēre to fill up, from in- + plēre to fill — more at ...
implementation
noun see implement II
implementer
noun see implement II
implementor
noun see implement II
implicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, to convey by implication, from Medieval Latin implicatus, past participle of implicare, from Latin, to entwine, ...
implication
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of implicating ; the state of being implicated b. close connection; especially an incriminating involvement 2. a. the act of ...
implicative
adjective see implication
implicatively
adverb see implication
implicativeness
noun see implication
implicit
adjective Etymology: Latin implicitus, past participle of implicare Date: 1599 1. a. capable of being understood from something else though unexpressed ; implied b. ...
implicit differentiation
noun Date: circa 1889 the process of finding the derivative of a dependent variable in an implicit function by differentiating each term separately, by expressing the ...
implicitly
adverb see implicit
implicitness
noun see implicit
implode
verb (imploded; imploding) Etymology: 2in- + -plode (as in explode) Date: 1881 intransitive verb 1. a. to burst inward b. to undergo violent compression 2. ...
implore
transitive verb (implored; imploring) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French implorer, from Latin implorare, from in- + plorare to cry out Date: circa 1540 1. to ...
imploringly
adverb see implore
implosion
noun Etymology: 2in- + -plosion (as in explosion) Date: 1877 1. the inrush of air in forming a suction stop 2. the action of imploding 3. the act or action of bringing ...
implosive
adjective or noun see implosion
imply
transitive verb (implied; implying) Etymology: Middle English emplien, from Anglo-French emplier to entangle — more at employ Date: 14th century 1. obsolete enfold, ...
impolite
adjective Etymology: Latin impolitus, from in- + politus polite Date: 1739 not polite ; rude • impolitely adverb • impoliteness noun
impolitely
adverb see impolite
impoliteness
noun see impolite
impolitic
adjective Date: circa 1600 not politic ; unwise • impolitical adjective • impolitically adverb • impoliticly adverb
impolitical
adjective see impolitic
impolitically
adverb see impolitic
impoliticly
adverb see impolitic
imponderability
noun see imponderable
imponderable
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin imponderabilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin ponderabilis ponderable Date: 1794 not ponderable ; incapable of being weighed or evaluated ...
imponderably
adverb see imponderable
impone
transitive verb (imponed; imponing) Etymology: Latin imponere to put upon, from in- + ponere to put — more at position Date: circa 1623 obsolete wager, bet
import
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin importare to bring in, cause, signify, from Latin, to bring in, cause, from in- + portare to carry — more at fare Date: ...
importable
adjective see import I
importance
noun Date: 1508 1. a. the quality or state of being important ; consequence b. an important aspect or bearing ; significance 2. obsolete import, meaning 3. obsolete ...
importancy
noun Date: 1540 archaic importance
important
adjective Etymology: Middle English importante, from Medieval Latin important-, importans, present participle of importare to signify — more at import Date: 15th century 1. ...
importantly
adverb Date: 1611 1. in an important way 2. it is important that Usage: A number of commentators have objected to importantly as a sentence modifier (sense 2) and ...
importation
noun Date: 1601 1. the act or practice of importing 2. something imported
imported cabbage worm
noun Date: 1892 a small European white butterfly (Pieris rapae) introduced into temperate regions worldwide; also its green larva that is a pest of cruciferous plants and ...
imported fire ant
noun Date: circa 1949 either of two mound-building South American fire ants (Solenopsis richteri and S. invicta) introduced into the southeastern United States that are ...
importer
noun see import I
importunate
adjective Date: 1528 1. troublesomely urgent ; overly persistent in request or demand 2. troublesome • importunately adverb • importunateness noun
importunately
adverb see importunate
importunateness
noun see importunate
importune
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French importun, from Latin importunus, from in- + -portunus (as in opportunus fit) — more at ...
importunely
adverb see importune I
importuner
noun see importune II
importunity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being importunate 2. an importunate request or demand
impose
verb (imposed; imposing) Etymology: Middle French imposer, from Latin imponere, literally, to put upon (perfect indicative imposui), from in- + ponere to put — more at ...
imposer
noun see impose
imposing
adjective Date: 1786 impressive in size, bearing, dignity, or grandeur Synonyms: see grand • imposingly adverb
imposingly
adverb see imposing
imposition
noun Date: 14th century 1. something imposed: as a. levy, tax b. an excessive or uncalled-for requirement or burden 2. the act of imposing 3. deception 4. the ...
impossibility
noun Date: 14th century 1. the quality or state of being impossible 2. something impossible
impossible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin impossibilis, from in- + possibilis possible Date: 14th century 1. a. incapable of ...
impossibleness
noun see impossible
impossibly
adverb Date: circa 1580 1. not possibly 2. to an improbable degree ; unbelievably
impost
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin impositum, from Latin, neuter of impositus, past participle of imponere Date: 1568 something imposed or levied ; tax II. ...
imposter
noun see impostor
imposthume
noun see impostume
impostor
or imposter noun Etymology: Late Latin impostor, from Latin imponere Date: 1564 one that assumes false identity or title for the purpose of deception
impostume
or imposthume noun Etymology: Middle English emposteme, ultimately from Greek apostēma, from aphistanai to remove, from apo- + histanai to cause to stand — more at stand ...
imposture
noun Etymology: Late Latin impostura, from Latin impositus, impostus, past participle of imponere Date: 1537 1. the act or practice of deceiving by means of an assumed ...
impotence
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being impotent
impotency
noun Date: 15th century impotence
impotent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin impotent-, impotens, from in- + potent-, potens potent Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
impotently
adverb see impotent
impound
transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. a. to shut up in or as if in a pound ; confine b. to seize and hold in the custody of the law c. to take possession of 2. to ...
impoundment
noun Date: circa 1665 1. the act of impounding ; the state of being impounded 2. a body of water formed by impounding
impoverish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English enpoverisshen, from Anglo-French empoveriss-, stem of empoverir, from en- + povre poor — more at poor Date: 15th century 1. to ...
impoverished
adjective Date: 1862 of a fauna or flora represented by few species or individuals
impoverisher
noun see impoverish
impoverishment
noun see impoverish
impracticability
noun see impracticable
impracticable
adjective Date: 1653 1. impassable 2. not practicable ; incapable of being performed or accomplished by the means employed or at command • impracticability noun • ...
impracticably
adverb see impracticable
impractical
adjective Date: 1865 not practical: as a. not wise to put into or keep in practice or effect b. incapable of dealing sensibly or prudently with practical matters c. ...
impracticality
noun see impractical
impractically
adverb see impractical
imprecate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin imprecatus, past participle of imprecari, from in- + precari to pray — more at pray Date: 1613 transitive verb to invoke evil on ; ...
imprecation
noun Date: 15th century 1. curse 2. the act of imprecating • imprecatory adjective
imprecatory
adjective see imprecation
imprecise
adjective Date: 1805 not precise ; inexact, vague • imprecisely adverb • impreciseness noun • imprecision noun
imprecisely
adverb see imprecise
impreciseness
noun see imprecise
imprecision
noun see imprecise
impregnability
noun see impregnable
impregnable
adjective Etymology: Middle English imprenable, from Middle French, from in- + prenable vulnerable to capture, from prendre to take — more at prize Date: 15th century 1. ...
impregnableness
noun see impregnable
impregnably
adverb see impregnable
impregnant
noun Date: 1926 a substance used for impregnating another substance
impregnate
I. transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Late Latin impraegnatus, past participle of impraegnare, from Latin in- + praegnas pregnant Date: 1605 1. a. to cause to be ...
impregnation
noun see impregnate I
impregnator
noun see impregnate I
impresa
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, undertaking Date: 1588 a device with a motto used in the 16th and 17th centuries; broadly emblem
impresario
noun (plural -rios) Etymology: Italian, from impresa undertaking, from imprendere to undertake, from Vulgar Latin *imprehendere — more at emprise Date: 1746 1. the ...
impress
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin impressus, past participle of imprimere, from in- + premere to press — more at press Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
impressibility
noun see impress I
impressible
adjective see impress I
impression
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a characteristic, trait, or feature resulting from some influence b. an effect of alteration or improvement c. a telling image ...
impressionability
noun see impressionable
impressionable
adjective Date: 1836 capable of being easily impressed • impressionability noun
impressionism
noun Date: 1882 1. often capitalized a theory or practice in painting especially among French painters of about 1870 of depicting the natural appearances of objects by means ...
impressionist
noun Date: 1876 1. often capitalized one (as a painter) who practices or adheres to the theories of impressionism 2. an entertainer who does impressions
impressionistic
adjective Date: 1886 1. (or impressionist) often capitalized of, relating to, or constituting impressionism 2. based on or involving impression as distinct from expertise ...
impressionistically
adverb see impressionistic
impressive
adjective Date: 1598 making or tending to make a marked impression ; having the power to excite attention, awe, or admiration Synonyms: see moving • impressively adverb ...
impressively
adverb see impressive
impressiveness
noun see impressive
impressment
noun Date: 1787 the act of seizing for public use or of impressing into public service
impressure
noun Date: 1600 archaic a mark made by pressure ; impression
imprest
noun Etymology: obsolete imprest to lend, probably from Italian imprestare Date: 1568 a loan or advance of money
imprimatur
noun Etymology: New Latin, let it be printed, from imprimere to print, from Latin, to imprint, impress — more at impress Date: 1640 1. a. a license to print or publish ...
imprimis
adverb Etymology: Middle English imprimis, from Latin in primis among the first (things) Date: 15th century in the first place — used to introduce a list of items or ...
imprint
I. verb Etymology: Middle English emprenten, from Anglo-French emprient, 3d singular of enpreindre to impress (from Latin imprimere) & empreinter, from emprent, past participle ...
imprinter
noun see imprint I
imprinting
noun Date: 1937 a rapid learning process that takes place early in the life of a social animal (as a goose) and establishes a behavior pattern (as recognition of and ...
imprison
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French emprisoner, from en- + prison prison Date: 14th century to put in or as if in prison ; confine • imprisonment ...
imprisonment
noun see imprison
improbability
noun see improbable
improbable
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin improbabilis, from in- + probabilis probable Date: 1598 unlikely to be true or to occur; also ...
improbably
adverb see improbable
impromptu
I. noun Etymology: French, from impromptu extemporaneously, from Latin in promptu in readiness Date: 1683 1. something that is impromptu 2. a musical composition suggesting ...
improper
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French impropre, from Latin improprius, from in- + proprius proper Date: 15th century not proper: as a. not in accord with ...
improper fraction
noun Date: 1542 a fraction whose numerator is equal to, larger than, or of equal or higher degree than the denominator
improper integral
noun Date: 1939 a definite integral whose region of integration is unbounded or includes a point at which the integrand is undefined or tends to infinity
improperly
adverb see improper
improperness
noun see improper
impropriety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: French or Late Latin; French impropriété, from Late Latin improprietat-, improprietas, from Latin improprius Date: 1607 1. an improper or ...
improv
adjective Etymology: short for improvisation Date: 1978 of, relating to, or being improvisation and especially an improvised comedy routine • improv noun
improvability
noun see improve
improvable
adjective see improve
improve
verb (improved; improving) Etymology: Middle English improuen, emprouen, from Anglo-French emprouer to make profit from, from French en- + pru, prou advantage, from Late Latin ...
improvement
noun Date: circa 1550 1. the act or process of improving 2. a. the state of being improved; especially enhanced value or excellence b. an instance of such improvement ...
improver
noun see improve
improvidence
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being improvident
improvident
adjective Etymology: Late Latin improvident-, improvidens, from Latin in- + provident-, providens provident Date: 1514 not provident ; not foreseeing and providing for the ...
improvidently
adverb see improvident
improvisation
noun Date: 1786 1. the act or art of improvising 2. something (as a musical or dramatic composition) improvised • improvisational adjective • improvisationally adverb
improvisational
adjective see improvisation
improvisationally
adverb see improvisation
improvisator
noun Date: 1795 one that improvises • improvisatorial adjective • improvisatory adjective
improvisatore
noun (plural improvisatori or -tores) Etymology: Italian improvvisatore, from improvvisare Date: 1765 one that improvises (as verse) usually extemporaneously
improvisatorial
adjective see improvisator
improvisatory
adjective see improvisator
improvise
verb (-vised; -vising) Etymology: French improviser, from Italian improvvisare, from improvviso sudden, from Latin improvisus, literally, unforeseen, from in- + provisus, past ...
improviser
noun see improvise
improvisor
noun see improvise
imprudence
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being imprudent 2. an imprudent act
imprudent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin imprudent-, imprudens, from in- + prudent-, prudens prudent Date: 14th century not prudent ; lacking discretion, wisdom, or ...
imprudently
adverb see imprudent
impudence
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being impudent
impudent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin impudent-, impudens, from in- + pudent-, pudens, present participle of pudēre to feel shame Date: 14th century 1. obsolete ...
impudently
adverb see impudent
impugn
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French empugner, from Latin inpugnare, from in- + pugnare to fight — more at pungent Date: 14th century 1. to assail ...
impugnable
adjective see impugn
impugner
noun see impugn
impuissance
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from in- + puissance puissance, power Date: 15th century weakness, powerlessness
impuissant
adjective Etymology: French Date: 1629 weak, powerless
impulse
I. transitive verb (impulsed; impulsing) Date: 1611 to give an impulse to II. noun Etymology: Latin impulsus, from impellere to impel Date: 1647 1. a. inspiration, ...
impulsion
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of impelling ; the state of being impelled b. an impelling force c. an onward tendency derived from an impulsion 2. impulse ...
impulsive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having the power of or actually driving or impelling 2. a. arising from an impulse b. prone to act on impulse 3. acting ...
impulsively
adverb see impulsive
impulsiveness
noun see impulsive
impulsivity
noun see impulsive
impunity
noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French impunité, from Latin impunitat-, impunitas, from impune without punishment, from in- + poena punishment — more at pain ...
impure
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French, from Latin impurus, from in- + purus pure Date: 15th century not pure: as a. lewd, ...
impurely
adverb see impure
impureness
noun see impure
impurity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. something that is impure or makes something else impure 2. the quality or state of being impure
imputability
noun see impute
imputable
adjective see impute
imputation
noun Date: 1581 1. the act of imputing: as a. attribution, ascription b. accusation c. insinuation 2. something imputed • imputative adjective • ...
imputative
adjective see imputation
imputatively
adverb see imputation
impute
transitive verb (imputed; imputing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French imputer, from Latin imputare, from in- + putare to consider Date: 14th century 1. to lay the ...
Imroz
geographical name — see gokceada
In
symbol indium
IN
abbreviation Indiana
in
I. preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German in in, Latin in, Greek en Date: before 12th century 1. a. — used as a function word to ...
in a bind
phrasal in trouble
in a breeze
phrasal easily
in a hurry
phrasal without delay ; as rapidly as possible
in a nutshell
phrasal in a very brief statement
in a row
phrasal one after another ; successively
in a way
phrasal 1. within limits ; with reservations 2. from one point of view
in a word
phrasal in short
in absentia
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1886 in absence
in actuality
phrasal in actual fact
in addition
phrasal besides, also II
in addition to
phrasal combined or associated with ; besides I,2
in advance
phrasal 1. to, toward, or in a place or position ahead 2. before a deadline or an anticipated event
in advance of
phrasal ahead of
in aeternum
foreign term Etymology: Latin forever
in all conscience
or in conscience phrasal in all fairness
in any case
phrasal without regard to or in spite of other considerations ; whatever else is done or is the case
in any event
phrasal in any case

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