Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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inactive
adjective Date: 1664 not active: as a. (1) sedentary (2) indolent, sluggish b. (1) being out of use (2) relating to or being members of the armed forces ...
inactively
adverb see inactive
inactivity
noun see inactive
inadequacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1787 1. the quality or state of being inadequate 2. insufficiency, deficiency
inadequate
adjective Date: 1671 not adequate ; insufficient ; also not capable • inadequately adverb • inadequateness noun
inadequately
adverb see inadequate
inadequateness
noun see inadequate
inadmissibility
noun see inadmissible
inadmissible
adjective Date: 1776 not admissible • inadmissibility noun • inadmissibly adverb
inadmissibly
adverb see inadmissible
inadvertence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin inadvertentia, from Latin in- + advertent-, advertens, present participle of advertere to advert Date: 15th century 1. the ...
inadvertency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1592 inadvertence
inadvertent
adjective Etymology: back-formation from inadvertence Date: 1653 1. not focusing the mind on a matter ; inattentive 2. unintentional • inadvertently adverb
inadvertently
adverb see inadvertent
inadvisability
noun see inadvisable
inadvisable
adjective Date: 1870 not advisable ; not wise or prudent • inadvisability noun
Inagua
geographical name two islands in SE Bahamas: Great Inagua (50 miles or 80 kilometers long) & Little Inagua (8 miles or 13 kilometers long)
inalienability
noun see inalienable
inalienable
adjective Etymology: probably from French inaliénable, from in- + aliénable alienable Date: circa 1645 incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred • ...
inalienably
adverb see inalienable
inalterability
noun see inalterable
inalterable
adjective Date: 1541 not alterable ; unalterable • inalterability noun • inalterableness noun • inalterably adverb
inalterableness
noun see inalterable
inalterably
adverb see inalterable
inamorata
noun Etymology: Italian innamorata, from feminine of innamorato, past participle of innamorare to inspire with love, from in- (from Latin) + amore love, from Latin amor — more ...
inane
I. adjective (inaner; -est) Etymology: Latin inanis Date: 1662 1. empty, insubstantial 2. lacking significance, meaning, or point ; silly Synonyms: see insipid • ...
inanely
adverb see inane I
inaneness
noun see inane I
inanimate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin inanimatus, from Latin in- + animatus, past participle of animare to animate Date: 15th century 1. not animate: a. not ...
inanimately
adverb see inanimate
inanimateness
noun see inanimate
inanition
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being empty: a. the exhausted condition that results from lack of food and water b. the absence or loss of social, moral, ...
inanity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1603 1. the quality or state of being inane: as a. lack of substance ; emptiness b. vapid, pointless, or fatuous character ; shallowness 2. ...
inapparent
adjective Date: 1626 not apparent • inapparently adverb
inapparently
adverb see inapparent
inappeasable
adjective Date: 1803 unappeasable
inappetence
noun Date: circa 1691 loss or lack of appetite
inapplicability
noun see inapplicable
inapplicable
adjective Date: 1656 not applicable ; irrelevant • inapplicability noun • inapplicably adverb
inapplicably
adverb see inapplicable
inapposite
adjective Date: 1661 not apposite ; not apt or pertinent • inappositely adverb • inappositeness noun
inappositely
adverb see inapposite
inappositeness
noun see inapposite
inappreciable
adjective Etymology: probably from French inappréciable, from Middle French inappreciable, from in- + appreciable Date: 1802 too small to be perceived • inappreciably ...
inappreciably
adverb see inappreciable
inappreciative
adjective Date: 1869 not appreciative • inappreciatively adverb • inappreciativeness noun
inappreciatively
adverb see inappreciative
inappreciativeness
noun see inappreciative
inapproachable
adjective Date: circa 1828 not approachable ; inaccessible
inappropriate
adjective Date: 1804 not appropriate ; unsuitable • inappropriately adverb • inappropriateness noun
inappropriately
adverb see inappropriate
inappropriateness
noun see inappropriate
inapt
adjective Date: circa 1670 not apt: a. not suitable b. inept • inaptly adverb • inaptness noun
inaptitude
noun Date: 1620 lack of aptitude
inaptly
adverb see inapt
inaptness
noun see inapt
inarguable
adjective Date: circa 1875 not arguable ; not open to doubt or debate
inarguably
adverb Date: 1925 it cannot be argued ; unquestionably
inarticulacy
noun Date: 1921 the quality or state of being inarticulate
inarticulate
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin inarticulatus, from Latin in- + articulatus, past participle of articulare to utter distinctly — more at articulate Date: 1603 1. a. of ...
inarticulately
adverb see inarticulate I
inarticulateness
noun see inarticulate I
inartistic
adjective Date: 1859 1. not conforming to the principles of art 2. not appreciative of art • inartistically adverb
inartistically
adverb see inartistic
inasmuch as
conjunction Date: 14th century 1. in the degree that ; insofar as 2. in view of the fact that ; since
inattention
noun Date: circa 1670 failure to pay attention
inattentive
adjective Date: 1692 not attentive ; not paying attention • inattentively adverb • inattentiveness noun
inattentively
adverb see inattentive
inattentiveness
noun see inattentive
inaudibility
noun see inaudible
inaudible
adjective Etymology: Late Latin inaudibilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin audibilis audible Date: 1601 not audible • inaudibility noun • inaudibly adverb
inaudibly
adverb see inaudible
inaugural
I. adjective Date: 1689 1. of or relating to an inauguration 2. marking a beginning ; first in a projected series II. noun Date: 1832 1. an inaugural address 2. ...
inaugurate
transitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin inauguratus, past participle of inaugurare, literally, to practice augury, from in- + augurare to augur; from the rites ...
inauguration
noun Date: 1569 an act of inaugurating; especially a ceremonial induction into office
Inauguration Day
noun Date: 1829 January 20 following a presidential election on which the president of the United States is inaugurated
inaugurator
noun see inaugurate
inauspicious
adjective Date: 1592 not auspicious • inauspiciously adverb • inauspiciousness noun
inauspiciously
adverb see inauspicious
inauspiciousness
noun see inauspicious
inauthentic
adjective Date: 1860 not authentic • inauthenticity noun
inauthenticity
noun see inauthentic
inboard
I. adverb Date: 1830 1. inside the line of a ship's bulwarks or hull 2. toward the center line of a vehicle or craft (as a ship or aircraft) II. adjective Date: 1847 1. ...
inborn
adjective Date: 1513 1. present from or as if from birth 2. hereditary, inherited Synonyms: see innate
inbound
adjective Date: 1894 inward bound
inbounds
adjective Date: 1968 involving putting a basketball in play by passing it onto the court from out of bounds
inbounds line
noun Date: circa 1961 either of two broken lines running the length of a football field at right angles to the yard lines
inbreathe
transitive verb Date: 14th century to breathe (something) in ; inhale
inbred
adjective Date: circa 1592 1. rooted and ingrained in one's nature as deeply as if implanted by heredity 2. [from past participle of inbreed] subjected to or produced by ...
inbreed
verb (inbred; -breeding) Date: 1599 transitive verb to subject to inbreeding intransitive verb to engage in inbreeding
inbreeding
noun Date: circa 1842 1. the interbreeding of closely related individuals especially to preserve and fix desirable characters of and to eliminate unfavorable characters from ...
inbuilt
adjective Date: 1923 chiefly British built-in
inc
abbreviation 1. incomplete 2. often capitalized incorporated 3. increase
Inca
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Quechua inka ruler of the Inca empire Date: 1594 1. a. a member of the Quechuan peoples of Peru maintaining an empire until the Spanish ...
Incaic
adjective see Inca
incalculability
noun see incalculable
incalculable
adjective Date: 1795 not capable of being calculated: as a. very great b. not predictable ; uncertain • incalculability noun • incalculably adverb
incalculably
adverb see incalculable
incalescence
noun Etymology: Latin incalescere to become warm, from in- + calescere to become warm, inchoative of calēre to be warm — more at lee Date: 1646 a growing warm or ardent ...
incalescent
adjective see incalescence
Incan
adjective see Inca
incandesce
intransitive verb (-desced; -descing) Etymology: Latin incandescere Date: 1874 to be or become incandescent
incandescence
noun Date: circa 1656 the quality or state of being incandescent; especially emission by a hot body of radiation that makes it visible
incandescent
I. adjective Etymology: probably from French, from Latin incandescent-, incandescens, present participle of incandescere to become hot, from in- + candescere to become hot, from ...
incandescent lamp
noun Date: 1881 lightbulb a
incandescently
adverb see incandescent I
incant
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin incantare Date: 1945 recite, utter
incantation
noun Etymology: Middle English incantacioun, from Middle French incantation, from Late Latin incantation-, incantatio, from Latin incantare to enchant — more at enchant Date: ...
incantational
adjective see incantation
incantatory
adjective see incantation
incapability
noun see incapable
incapable
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from in- + capable capable Date: 1594 1. lacking capacity, ability, or qualification for the purpose or end in view: as a. archaic not ...
incapableness
noun see incapable
incapably
adverb see incapable
incapacitate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Date: 1657 1. to make legally incapable or ineligible 2. to deprive of capacity or natural power ; disable • incapacitation noun
incapacitation
noun see incapacitate
incapacity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: French incapacité, from Middle French, from in- + capacité capacity Date: 1611 the quality or state of being incapable; especially lack of ...
incarcerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare, from in- + carcer prison Date: 1560 1. to put in prison 2. to subject to ...
incarceration
noun see incarcerate
incardination
noun Etymology: Late Latin incardination-, incardinatio, from incardinare to ordain as chief priest, from Latin in- 2in- + Late Latin cardinalis principal — more at cardinal ...
incarnadine
I. adjective Etymology: Middle French incarnadin, from Old Italian incarnadino, from incarnato flesh-colored, from Late Latin incarnatus Date: 1591 1. having the pinkish ...
incarnate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English incarnat, from Late Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnare to incarnate, from Latin in- + carn-, caro flesh — more at carnal ...
incarnation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) the embodiment of a deity or spirit in some earthly form (2) capitalized the union of divinity with humanity in Jesus Christ b. ...
incarnational
adjective see incarnation
incaution
noun Date: circa 1720 lack of caution ; heedlessness
incautious
adjective Date: circa 1703 lacking in caution ; careless • incautiously adverb • incautiousness noun
incautiously
adverb see incautious
incautiousness
noun see incautious
incendiarism
noun Date: circa 1710 incendiary action or behavior
incendiary
I. noun (plural -aries) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incendiarius, from incendium conflagration, from incendere Date: 15th century 1. a. a person who commits ...
incense
I. noun Etymology: Middle English encens, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin incensum, from Latin, neuter of incensus, past participle of incendere to set on fire, from in- + ...
incense cedar
noun Date: 1877 a tall tree (Calocedrus decurrens syn. Libocedrus decurrens) of the cypress family found growing from Oregon to Baja California that has reddish-brown bark, ...
incent
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from incentive Date: 1981 incentivize
incenter
noun Etymology: inscribe + 1center Date: circa 1890 the single point in which the three bisectors of the interior angles of a triangle intersect and which is the center of ...
incentive
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin incentivum, from neuter of incentivus stimulating, from Latin, setting the tune, from incentus, past participle of incinere to ...
incentivize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1970 to provide with an incentive
inception
noun Etymology: Middle English incepcion, from Latin inception-, inceptio, from incipere to begin, from in- + capere to take Date: 15th century an act, process, or instance ...
inceptive
I. noun Date: 1612 an inchoative verb II. adjective Date: 1656 1. inchoative 2 2. of or relating to a beginning • inceptively adverb
inceptively
adverb see inceptive II
incertitude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin incertitudo, from Latin in- + Late Latin certitudo certitude Date: 15th century uncertainty: a. ...
incessancy
noun Date: 1615 the quality or state of being incessant
incessant
adjective Etymology: Middle English incessaunt, from Late Latin incessant-, incessans, from Latin in- + cessant-, cessans, present participle of cessare to delay — more at ...
incessantly
adverb see incessant
incest
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incestus sexual impurity, from incestus impure, from in- + castus pure — more at caste Date: 13th century sexual intercourse ...
incestuous
adjective Date: 1532 1. constituting or involving incest 2. guilty of incest 3. excessively or improperly intimate or exclusive • incestuously adverb • ...
incestuously
adverb see incestuous
incestuousness
noun see incestuous
inch
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ynce, from Latin uncia — more at ounce Date: before 12th century 1. a unit of length equal to 1/36 yard — see weight ...
inch by inch
phrasal very gradually or slowly
inched
adjective Date: 1605 measuring a specified number of inches
Incheon
geographical name see Inchon
inchmeal
adverb Etymology: 1inch + -meal (as in piecemeal) Date: 1530 little by little, gradually
inchoate
adjective Etymology: Latin inchoatus, past participle of inchoare to start work on, perhaps from in- + cohum part of a yoke to which the beam of a plow is fitted Date: 1534 ...
inchoately
adverb see inchoate
inchoateness
noun see inchoate
inchoative
adjective Date: circa 1631 1. initial, formative 2. denoting the beginning of an action, state, or occurrence — used of verbs • inchoative noun • inchoatively ...
inchoatively
adverb see inchoative
Inchon
or Incheon or formerly Chemulpo geographical name city & port NW South Korea W of Seoul population 1,386,911
inchworm
noun Date: circa 1861 looper 1
incidence
noun Date: 1626 1. a. angle of incidence b. the arrival of something (as a projectile or a ray of light) at a surface 2. a. an act or the fact or manner of falling ...
incident
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin incident-, incidens, from Latin, present participle of incidere to fall into, from in- + cadere to ...
incidental
I. adjective Date: 1644 1. a. being likely to ensue as a chance or minor consequence b. minor 1 2. occurring merely by chance or without intention or calculation II. ...
incidentally
adverb Date: 1665 1. in an incidental manner ; not intentionally 2. by way of interjection or digression ; by the way
incinerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Medieval Latin incineratus, past participle of incinerare, from Latin in- + ciner-, cinis ashes; akin to Greek konis dust, ashes ...
incineration
noun see incinerate
incinerator
noun Date: 1883 one that incinerates; especially a furnace or a container for incinerating waste materials
incipience
noun Date: circa 1864 incipiency
incipiency
noun Date: 1817 the state or fact of being incipient ; beginning
incipient
adjective Etymology: Latin incipient-, incipiens, present participle of incipere to begin — more at inception Date: 1669 beginning to come into being or to become apparent ...
incipiently
adverb see incipient
incipit
noun Etymology: Latin, it begins, from incipere Date: 1897 the first part ; beginning; specifically the opening words of a text of a medieval manuscript or early printed book
incisal
adjective Date: 1903 relating to, involving, or being the cutting edge or surface of a tooth (as an incisor)
incise
transitive verb (incised; incising) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French inciser, from Latin incisus, past participle of incidere, from in- + caedere to cut Date: ...
incised
adjective Date: 15th century 1. cut in ; engraved; especially decorated with incised figures 2. having a margin that is deeply and sharply notched
incision
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. cut, gash; specifically a wound made especially in surgery by incising the body b. a marginal notch (as in a leaf) 2. an act of ...
incisive
adjective Date: circa 1834 impressively direct and decisive (as in manner or presentation) • incisively adverb • incisiveness noun
incisively
adverb see incisive
incisiveness
noun see incisive
incisor
noun Date: 1666 a front tooth typically adapted for cutting; especially one of the cutting teeth in mammals located between the canines when canines are present — see tooth ...
incitant
noun see incite
incitation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of inciting ; stimulation 2. something that incites to action ; incentive
incite
transitive verb (incited; inciting) Etymology: Middle French inciter, from Latin incitare, from in- + citare to put in motion — more at cite Date: 15th century to move to ...
incitement
noun see incite
inciter
noun see incite
incivility
noun Etymology: Middle French incivilité, from Late Latin incivilitat-, incivilitas, from incivilis, from Latin in- + civilis civil Date: 1584 1. the quality or state of ...
incl
abbreviation include; included; including; inclusive
inclemency
noun Date: 1559 the quality or state of being inclement
inclement
adjective Etymology: Latin inclement-, inclemens, from in- + clement-, clemens clement Date: 1621 lacking mildness: as a. archaic severe in temper or action ; unmerciful ...
inclemently
adverb see inclement
inclinable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having a tendency or inclination; also disposed to favor or think well of 2. capable of being inclined
inclination
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. obsolete natural disposition ; character b. a particular disposition of mind or character ; propensity; especially liking 2. an act or ...
inclinational
adjective see inclination
incline
I. verb (inclined; inclining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French incliner, encliner, from Latin inclinare, from in- + clinare to lean — more at lean Date: 14th ...
inclined
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having inclination, disposition, or tendency 2. a. having a leaning or slope b. making an angle with a line or plane
inclined plane
noun Date: 1710 a plane surface that makes an oblique angle with the plane of the horizon
incliner
noun see incline I
inclining
noun Date: 14th century 1. inclination 2. archaic party, following
inclinometer
noun Date: 1852 an instrument for indicating the inclination to the horizontal of an axis (as of an airplane)
inclip
transitive verb Date: 1608 archaic clasp, enclose
inclose
variant of enclose
inclosure
variant of enclosure
includable
adjective see include
include
transitive verb (included; including) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin includere, from in- + claudere to close — more at close Date: 15th century 1. to shut up ; ...
includible
adjective see include
inclusion
noun Etymology: Latin inclusion-, inclusio, from includere Date: 1600 1. the act of including ; the state of being included 2. something that is included: as a. a ...
inclusion body
noun Date: 1913 an inclusion, abnormal structure, or foreign cell within a cell (as the eosinophilic body formed by a cytomegalovirus or the abnormal filament characteristic ...
inclusionary
adjective see inclusion
inclusive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. comprehending stated limits or extremes 2. a. broad in orientation or scope b. covering or intended to cover all items, costs, or ...
inclusive disjunction
noun Date: 1942 a complex sentence in logic that is true when either or both of its constituent propositions are true — see truth table table
inclusive of
preposition Date: 1709 including or taking into account
inclusively
adverb see inclusive
inclusiveness
noun see inclusive
inclusivity
noun Date: 1939 the quality or state of being inclusive ; inclusiveness
incoercible
adjective Date: 1710 incapable of being controlled, checked, or confined
incog
abbreviation incognito
incogitant
adjective Etymology: Latin incogitant-, incogitans, from in- + cogitant-, cogitans, present participle of cogitare to cogitate Date: 1628 thoughtless, inconsiderate
incognita
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, feminine of incognito Date: 1638 incognito — used only of a woman • incognita noun
incognito
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from Latin incognitus unknown, from in- + cognitus, past participle of cognoscere to know — more at cognition Date: 1635 with ...
incognizance
noun see incognizant
incognizant
adjective Date: 1837 lacking awareness or consciousness • incognizance noun
incoherence
noun Date: 1611 1. the quality or state of being incoherent 2. something that is incoherent
incoherent
adjective Date: 1626 lacking coherence: as a. lacking cohesion ; loose b. lacking orderly continuity, arrangement, or relevance ; inconsistent c. lacking normal ...
incoherently
adverb see incoherent
incombustibility
noun see incombustible
incombustible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, probably from Middle French, from in- + combustible combustible Date: 15th century not combustible ; incapable of being burned • ...
income
noun Date: 14th century 1. a coming in ; entrance, influx 2. a gain or recurrent benefit usually measured in money that derives from capital or labor; also the amount of ...
income account
noun Date: 1869 a financial statement of a business showing the details of revenues, costs, expenses, losses, and profits for a given period — called also income statement
income bond
noun Date: circa 1864 a bond that pays interest at a rate based on the issuer's earnings
income statement
noun see income account
income tax
noun Date: 1799 a tax on the net income of an individual or a business
incomer
noun Date: 1526 chiefly British one who comes in ; immigrant, newcomer
incoming
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of coming in ; arrival 2. income 2 — usually used in plural II. adjective Date: 1753 1. coming in ; arriving 2. taking a new ...
incommensurability
noun see incommensurable
incommensurable
adjective Date: 1570 not commensurable; broadly lacking a basis of comparison in respect to a quality normally subject to comparison • incommensurability noun • ...
incommensurably
adverb see incommensurable
incommensurate
adjective Date: 1650 not commensurate: as a. incommensurable b. inadequate c. disproportionate
incommode
transitive verb (-moded; -moding) Etymology: Middle French incommoder, from Latin incommodare, from incommodus inconvenient, from in- + commodus convenient — more at commode ...
incommodious
adjective Date: 1551 not commodious ; inconvenient • incommodiously adverb • incommodiousness noun
incommodiously
adverb see incommodious
incommodiousness
noun see incommodious
incommodity
noun Date: 15th century a source of inconvenience ; disadvantage
incommunicability
noun see incommunicable
incommunicable
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin incommunicabilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin communicabilis communicable Date: 1568 not ...
incommunicably
adverb see incommunicable
incommunicado
adverb or adjective Etymology: Spanish incomunicado, from past participle of incomunicar to deprive of communication, from in- (from Latin) + comunicar to communicate, from ...
incommunicative
adjective Date: 1670 uncommunicative
incommutable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incommutabilis, from in- + commutabilis commutable Date: 15th century not commutable: as a. not interchangeable b. ...
incommutably
adverb see incommutable
incomparability
noun see incomparable
incomparable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin incomparabilis, from in- + comparabilis comparable Date: 15th century 1. eminent beyond comparison ; ...
incomparably
adverb see incomparable
incompatibility
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1611 1. a. the quality or state of being incompatible b. lack of interfertility between two plants 2. plural mutually antagonistic things or ...
incompatible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin incompatibilis, from Latin in- + Medieval Latin compatibilis compatible Date: 15th century 1. incapable of being held ...
incompatibly
adverb see incompatible
incompetence
noun Date: 1663 the state or fact of being incompetent
incompetency
noun Date: 1611 incompetence
incompetent
adjective Etymology: Middle French incompétent, from in- + compétent competent Date: 1595 1. not legally qualified 2. inadequate to or unsuitable for a particular ...
incompetently
adverb see incompetent
incomplete
adjective Etymology: Middle English incompleet, from Late Latin incompletus, from Latin in- + completus complete Date: 14th century 1. not complete ; unfinished: as a. ...
incompletely
adverb see incomplete
incompleteness
noun see incomplete
incompliant
adjective Date: 1647 not compliant or pliable
incomprehensibility
noun see incomprehensible
incomprehensible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incomprehensibilis, from in- + comprehensibilis comprehensible Date: 14th century 1. archaic having or subject to no limits ...

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