Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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incomprehensibleness
noun see incomprehensible
incomprehensibly
adverb see incomprehensible
incomprehension
noun Date: 1605 lack of comprehension or understanding
incompressible
adjective Date: circa 1736 incapable of or resistant to compression
incomputable
adjective Date: 1606 not computable ; very great • incomputably adverb
incomputably
adverb see incomputable
inconceivability
noun see inconceivable
inconceivable
adjective Date: 1624 not conceivable: as a. impossible to comprehend b. unbelievable • inconceivability noun • inconceivableness noun • inconceivably adverb
inconceivableness
noun see inconceivable
inconceivably
adverb see inconceivable
inconcinnity
noun Etymology: Latin inconcinnitas, from in- + concinnitas concinnity Date: circa 1616 lack of suitability or congruity ; inelegance
inconclusive
adjective Date: 1707 leading to no conclusion or definite result • inconclusively adverb • inconclusiveness noun
inconclusively
adverb see inconclusive
inconclusiveness
noun see inconclusive
incondite
adjective Etymology: Latin inconditus, from in- + conditus, past participle of condere to put together, from com- + -dere to put — more at do Date: 1539 badly put together ...
inconformity
noun Date: 1594 nonconformity
incongruence
noun Date: 1610 incongruity
incongruent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incongruent-, incongruens, from in- + congruent-, congruens congruent Date: 15th century not congruent • incongruently ...
incongruently
adverb see incongruent
incongruity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1532 1. the quality or state of being incongruous 2. something that is incongruous
incongruous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin incongruus, from Latin in- + congruus congruous Date: 1611 lacking congruity: as a. not harmonious ; incompatible b. not conforming ; ...
incongruously
adverb see incongruous
incongruousness
noun see incongruous
inconscient
adjective Etymology: probably from French, from in- + conscient mindful, from Latin conscient-, consciens, present participle of conscire to be conscious — more at conscience ...
inconsecutive
adjective Date: 1831 not consecutive
inconsequence
noun Date: 1579 the quality or state of being inconsequent
inconsequent
adjective Etymology: Late Latin inconsequent-, inconsequens, from Latin in- + consequent-, consequens consequent Date: 1579 1. a. lacking reasonable sequence ; illogical ...
inconsequential
adjective Date: 1621 1. a. illogical b. irrelevant 2. of no significance ; unimportant • inconsequentiality noun • inconsequentially adverb
inconsequentiality
noun see inconsequential
inconsequentially
adverb see inconsequential
inconsequently
adverb see inconsequent
inconsiderable
adjective Etymology: French, from in- + considerable considerable, from Medieval Latin considerabilis Date: 1637 not considerable ; slight, trivial • inconsiderableness ...
inconsiderableness
noun see inconsiderable
inconsiderably
adverb see inconsiderable
inconsiderate
adjective Etymology: Middle English inconsyderatt, from Latin inconsideratus, from in- + consideratus considerate Date: 15th century 1. a. heedless, thoughtless b. ...
inconsiderately
adverb see inconsiderate
inconsiderateness
noun see inconsiderate
inconsideration
noun see inconsiderate
inconsistence
noun Date: 1643 inconsistency
inconsistency
noun Date: 1647 1. an instance of being inconsistent 2. the quality or state of being inconsistent
inconsistent
adjective Date: 1620 lacking consistency: as a. not compatible with another fact or claim b. containing incompatible elements c. incoherent or illogical in ...
inconsistently
adverb see inconsistent
inconsolable
adjective Etymology: Latin inconsolabilis, from in- + consolabilis consolable Date: 1596 incapable of being consoled ; disconsolate • inconsolableness noun • ...
inconsolableness
noun see inconsolable
inconsolably
adverb see inconsolable
inconsonance
noun Date: circa 1811 lack of consonance or harmony ; disagreement
inconsonant
adjective Date: 1658 not consonant ; discordant
inconspicuous
adjective Etymology: Latin inconspicuus, from in- + conspicuus conspicuous Date: 1648 not readily noticeable • inconspicuously adverb • inconspicuousness noun
inconspicuously
adverb see inconspicuous
inconspicuousness
noun see inconspicuous
inconstancy
noun Date: 1526 the quality or state of being inconstant
inconstant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin inconstant-, inconstans, from in- + constant-, constans constant Date: 15th century likely to change ...
inconstantly
adverb see inconstant
inconsumable
adjective Date: 1646 not capable of being consumed • inconsumably adverb
inconsumably
adverb see inconsumable
incontestability
noun see incontestable
incontestable
adjective Etymology: French, from in- + contestable, from contester to contest Date: 1673 not contestable ; indisputable • incontestability noun • incontestably ...
incontestably
adverb see incontestable
incontinence
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being incontinent: as a. failure to restrain sexual appetite ; unchastity b. inability of the body to control the ...
incontinency
noun Date: 15th century incontinence
incontinent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin incontinent-, incontinens, from in- + continent-, continens continent Date: 14th ...
incontinently
I. adverb Date: 15th century without delay ; immediately II. adverb Date: circa 1552 in an incontinent or unrestrained manner: as a. without moral restraint ; lewdly ...
incontrollable
adjective Date: 1599 uncontrollable
incontrovertible
adjective Date: 1646 not open to question ; indisputable • incontrovertibly adverb
incontrovertibly
adverb see incontrovertible
inconvenience
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, misfortune, inconsistency, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin inconvenientia, from Latin inconvenient-, inconveniens Date: 1534 1. ...
inconveniency
noun (plural -cies) Date: circa 1552 inconvenience
inconvenient
adjective Etymology: Middle English, incongruous, harmful, from Anglo-French, from Latin inconvenient-, inconveniens, from in- + convenient-, conveniens convenient Date: 1651 ...
inconveniently
adverb see inconvenient
inconvertibility
noun see inconvertible
inconvertible
adjective Etymology: probably from Late Latin inconvertibilis, from Latin in- + convertibilis convertible Date: 1646 not convertible: as a. of paper money not exchangeable ...
inconvertibly
adverb see inconvertible
inconvincible
adjective Date: 1674 incapable of being convinced
incoordination
noun Date: 1876 lack of coordination; especially ataxia
incorporable
adjective see incorporate I
incorporate
I. verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin incorporatus, past participle of incorporare, from Latin in- + corpor-, corpus body — more at midriff ...
incorporated
adjective Date: 1599 1. united in one body 2. formed into a legal corporation
incorporation
noun see incorporate I
incorporative
adjective see incorporate I
incorporator
noun see incorporate I
incorporeal
adjective Etymology: Middle English incorporealle, from Anglo-French incorporel, from Latin incorporeus, from in- + corporeus corporeal Date: 15th century 1. not corporeal ; ...
incorporeally
adverb see incorporeal
incorporeity
noun Date: 1601 the quality or state of being incorporeal ; immateriality
incorrect
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin incorrectus, from in- + correctus correct Date: 15th century 1. obsolete not ...
incorrectly
adverb see incorrect
incorrectness
noun see incorrect
incorrigibility
noun see incorrigible
incorrigible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin incorrigibilis, from Latin in- + corrigere to correct — more at correct Date: 14th century incapable of being corrected ...
incorrigibleness
noun see incorrigible
incorrigibly
adverb see incorrigible
incorrupt
also incorrupted adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incorruptus, from in- + corruptus corrupt Date: 14th century free from corruption: as a. obsolete not ...
incorrupted
adjective see incorrupt
incorruptibility
noun see incorruptible
incorruptible
adjective Date: 14th century incapable of corruption: as a. not subject to decay or dissolution b. incapable of being bribed or morally corrupted • incorruptibility ...
incorruptibly
adverb see incorruptible
incorruption
noun Date: 14th century archaic the quality or state of being free from physical decay
incorruptly
adverb see incorrupt
incorruptness
noun see incorrupt
incr
abbreviation increase; increased
increasable
adjective see increase I
increase
I. verb (increased; increasing) Etymology: Middle English encresen, from Anglo-French encreistre, from Latin increscere, from in- + crescere to grow — more at crescent Date: ...
increased
adjective Date: 1540 made or become greater ; augmented
increaser
noun see increase I
increasingly
adverb Date: 14th century to an increasing degree
increate
adjective Etymology: Middle English increat, from Late Latin increatus, from Latin in- + creatus, past participle of creare to create Date: 15th century uncreated
incredibility
noun see incredible
incredible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin incredibilis, from in- + credibilis credible Date: 15th century 1. too extraordinary and improbable to be believed 2. ...
incredibleness
noun see incredible
incredibly
adverb Date: circa 1500 1. in an incredible manner 2. extremely
incredulity
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being incredulous ; disbelief
incredulous
adjective Etymology: Latin incredulus, from in- + credulus credulous Date: 1579 1. unwilling to admit or accept what is offered as true ; not credulous ; skeptical 2. ...
incredulously
adverb see incredulous
increment
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin incrementum, from increscere to increase Date: 15th century 1. the action or process of increasing especially in ...
incremental
adjective Date: 1696 of, relating to, being, or occurring in especially small increments • incrementally adverb
incremental repetition
noun Date: 1918 repetition in each stanza (as of a ballad) of part of the preceding stanza usually with a slight change in wording for dramatic effect
incrementalism
noun Date: 1966 a policy or advocacy of a policy of political or social change by degrees ; gradualism • incrementalist noun
incrementalist
noun see incrementalism
incrementally
adverb see incremental
increscent
adjective Etymology: Latin increscent-, increscens, present participle of increscere to increase — more at increase Date: circa 1658 becoming gradually greater ; waxing
incriminate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Late Latin incriminatus, past participle of incriminare, from Latin in- + crimin-, crimen crime Date: circa 1736 to charge with ...
incrimination
noun see incriminate
incriminatory
adjective see incriminate
incrust
variant of encrust
incrustation
also encrustation noun Etymology: Latin incrustation-, incrustatio, from incrustare to encrust Date: 1644 1. a. a crust or hard coating b. a growth or accumulation (as ...
incubate
verb (-bated; -bating) Etymology: Latin incubatus, past participle of incubare, from in- + cubare to lie Date: 1641 transitive verb 1. a. to sit on (eggs) so as to ...
incubation
noun Date: 1646 1. the act or process of incubating 2. incubation period
incubation period
noun Date: 1879 the period between the infection of an individual by a pathogen and the manifestation of the illness or disease it causes
incubative
adjective see incubate
incubator
noun Date: 1857 one that incubates: as a. an apparatus by which eggs are hatched artificially b. an apparatus with a chamber used to provide controlled environmental ...
incubatory
adjective see incubate
incubus
noun (plural incubi; also -buses) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Latin incubare Date: 13th century 1. an evil spirit that lies on persons in their sleep; ...
inculcate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin inculcatus, past participle of inculcare, literally, to tread on, from in- + calcare to trample, from calc-, calx heel ...
inculcation
noun see inculcate
inculcator
noun see inculcate
inculpable
adjective Date: 15th century free from guilt ; blameless
inculpate
transitive verb (-pated; -pating) Etymology: Late Latin inculpatus, from Latin in- + culpatus, past participle of culpare to blame, from culpa guilt Date: 1799 incriminate ...
inculpation
noun see inculpate
inculpatory
adjective see inculpate
incult
adjective Etymology: Latin incultus, from in- + cultus, past participle of colere to cultivate — more at wheel Date: 1599 coarse, uncultured
incumbency
noun (plural -cies) Date: circa 1608 1. something that is incumbent ; duty 2. the quality or state of being incumbent 3. the sphere of action or period of office of an ...
incumbent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin incumbent-, incumbens, present participle of incumbere to lie down on, from in- + -cumbere to lie down; akin to ...
incumber
archaic variant of encumber
incunable
noun Etymology: French, from New Latin incunabulum Date: 1886 incunabulum
incunabulum
noun (plural incunabula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin incunabula, plural, bands holding the baby in a cradle, from in- + cunae cradle Date: 1849 1. a book printed before ...
incur
transitive verb (incurred; incurring) Etymology: Middle English incurren, from Latin incurrere, literally, to run into, from in- + currere to run — more at car Date: 15th ...
incurable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin incurabilis, from Latin in- + curabilis curable Date: 14th century not ...
incurably
adverb see incurable
incuriosity
noun see incurious
incurious
adjective Etymology: Latin incuriosus, from in- + curiosus curious Date: circa 1618 lacking a normal or usual curiosity ; uninterested Synonyms: see indifferent • ...
incuriously
adverb see incurious
incuriousness
noun see incurious
incurrence
noun Date: circa 1656 the act or process of incurring
incurrent
adjective Etymology: Latin incurrent-, incurrens, present participle of incurrere Date: circa 1856 giving passage to a current that flows inward
incursion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin incursion-, incursio, from incurrere Date: 15th century 1. a hostile entrance into a ...
incurvate
transitive verb (-vated; -vating) Date: 1578 to cause to curve inward ; bend • incurvate adjective • incurvation noun • incurvature noun
incurvation
noun see incurvate
incurvature
noun see incurvate
incurve
transitive verb Etymology: Latin incurvare, from in- + curvare to curve, from curvus curved — more at curve Date: 1610 to bend so as to curve inward
incus
noun (plural incudes) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, anvil, from incudere Date: 1615 the middle bone of a chain of three small bones in the ear of a mammal — called also ...
incuse
adjective Etymology: Latin incusus, past participle of incudere to stamp, strike, from in- + cudere to beat — more at hew Date: 1818 formed by stamping or punching in — ...
ind
abbreviation 1. independent 2. index 3. industrial; industry
IND
abbreviation investigational new drug
Ind
I. noun Date: 13th century 1. archaic India 2. obsolete Indies II. abbreviation 1. Indian 2. Indiana
ind-
or indo- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin indicum — more at indigo 1. indigo 2. resembling indigo (as in color)
indaba
noun Etymology: Zulu, matter for discussion, affair Date: 1827 chiefly South African conference, parley
indagate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin indagatus, past participle of indagare, from indago ring of hunters encircling game, act of searching, from Old Latin indu in ...
indagation
noun see indagate
indagator
noun see indagate
IndE
abbreviation industrial engineer
indebted
adjective Etymology: Middle English indetted, from Anglo-French endetté, past participle of endetter to run into debt, from en- + dette debt Date: 13th century 1. owing ...
indebtedness
noun Date: 1647 1. the condition of being indebted 2. something (as an amount of money) that is owed
indecency
noun Date: 1589 1. the quality or state of being indecent 2. something (as a word or action) that is indecent
indecent
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French indécent, from Latin indecent-, indecens, from in- + decent-, decens decent Date: circa 1587 not decent: as a. ...
indecent assault
noun Date: 1855 an offensive sexual act or series of acts exclusive of rape committed against another person without consent
indecent exposure
noun Date: 1828 intentional exposure of part of one's body (as the genitals) in a place where such exposure is likely to be an offense against the generally accepted standards ...
indecently
adverb see indecent
indecipherable
adjective Date: 1802 incapable of being deciphered
indecision
noun Etymology: French indécision, from indécis undecided, from Late Latin indecisus, from Latin in- + decisus, past participle of decidere to decide Date: circa 1763 a ...
indecisive
adjective Date: 1726 1. not decisive ; inconclusive 2. marked by or prone to indecision ; irresolute 3. not clearly marked out ; indefinite • indecisively adverb ...
indecisively
adverb see indecisive
indecisiveness
noun see indecisive
indeclinable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin indeclinabilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin declinabilis capable of being inflected, from Latin declinare to inflect — ...
indecomposable
adjective Date: 1807 not capable of being separated into component parts or elements
indecorous
adjective Etymology: Latin indecorus, from in- + decorus decorous Date: 1668 not decorous ; conflicting with accepted standards of good conduct or good taste • ...
indecorously
adverb see indecorous
indecorousness
noun see indecorous
indecorum
noun Etymology: Latin, neuter of indecorus Date: 1575 1. something that is indecorous 2. lack of decorum ; impropriety
indeed
adverb Date: 14th century 1. without any question ; truly, undeniably — often used interjectionally to express irony or disbelief or surprise 2. in reality 3. all ...
indefatigability
noun see indefatigable
indefatigable
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Latin indefatigabilis, from in- + defatigare to fatigue, from de- + fatigare to fatigue Date: 1608 incapable of being fatigued ; ...
indefatigableness
noun see indefatigable
indefatigably
adverb see indefatigable
indefeasibility
noun see indefeasible
indefeasible
adjective Date: 1548 not capable of being annulled or voided or undone • indefeasibility noun • indefeasibly adverb
indefeasibly
adverb see indefeasible
indefectibility
noun see indefectible
indefectible
adjective Date: 1659 1. not subject to failure or decay ; lasting 2. free of faults ; flawless • indefectibility noun • indefectibly adverb
indefectibly
adverb see indefectible
indefensibility
noun see indefensible
indefensible
adjective Date: 1529 1. a. incapable of being maintained as right or valid ; untenable b. incapable of being justified or excused ; inexcusable 2. incapable of being ...
indefensibly
adverb see indefensible
indefinability
noun see indefinable
indefinable
adjective Date: 1810 incapable of being precisely described or analyzed • indefinability noun • indefinable noun • indefinableness noun • indefinably adverb
indefinableness
noun see indefinable
indefinably
adverb see indefinable
indefinite
adjective Etymology: Latin indefinitus, from in- + definitus definite Date: 1530 not definite: as a. typically designating an unidentified, generic, or unfamiliar person ...
indefinite integral
noun Date: 1831 any function whose derivative is a given function
indefinitely
adverb see indefinite
indefiniteness
noun see indefinite
indehiscence
noun see indehiscent
indehiscent
adjective Date: 1830 remaining closed at maturity • indehiscence noun
indelibility
noun see indelible
indelible
adjective Etymology: Middle English indelyble, from Medieval Latin indelibilis, alteration of Latin indelebilis, from in- + delēre to delete Date: 15th century 1. a. that ...
indelibly
adverb see indelible
indelicacy
noun Date: 1712 1. the quality or state of being indelicate 2. something that is indelicate
indelicate
adjective Date: 1742 not delicate: a. (1) lacking in or offending against propriety ; improper (2) verging on the indecent ; coarse b. marked by a lack of ...
indelicately
adverb see indelicate
indelicateness
noun see indelicate
indemnification
noun Date: 1732 1. a. the action of indemnifying b. the condition of being indemnified 2. indemnity 2b
indemnifier
noun see indemnify
indemnify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Latin indemnis unharmed, from in- + damnum damage Date: 1611 1. to secure against hurt, loss, or damage 2. to make compensation ...
indemnity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. a. security against hurt, loss, or damage b. exemption from incurred penalties or liabilities 2. a. indemnification 1 b. ...
indemonstrable
adjective Date: 1570 incapable of being demonstrated ; not subject to proof • indemonstrably adverb
indemonstrably
adverb see indemonstrable
indent
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French endenter, from en- + dent tooth, from Latin dent-, dens — more at tooth Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
indent on
phrasal 1. chiefly British to make a requisition on 2. chiefly British to draw on
indentation
noun Date: circa 1728 1. a. an angular cut in an edge ; notch b. a recess in a surface 2. the action of indenting ; the condition of being indented 3. dent 4. ...
indenter
I. noun see indent I II. noun see indent III
indention
noun Date: 1763 1. archaic indentation 1 2. a. the action of indenting ; the condition of being indented b. the blank space produced by indenting
indenture
I. noun Etymology: Middle English endenture, from Anglo-French, from endenter Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) a document or a section of a document that is indented ...
indentured servant
noun Date: 1723 a person who signs and is bound by indentures to work for another for a specified time especially in return for payment of travel expenses and maintenance
independence
noun Date: 1640 1. the quality or state of being independent 2. archaic competence 1
Independence
geographical name city W Missouri E of Kansas City population 113,288
Independence Day
noun Date: 1791 a civil holiday for the celebration of the anniversary of the beginnings of national independence; specifically July 4 observed as a legal holiday in the ...
independency
noun Date: circa 1611 1. independence 1 2. capitalized the Independent polity or movement 3. an independent political unit
independent
I. adjective Date: 1611 1. not dependent: as a. (1) not subject to control by others ; self-governing (2) not affiliated with a larger controlling unit b. ...
independent assortment
noun Date: 1941 formation of random combinations of chromosomes in meiosis and of genes on different pairs of homologous chromosomes by the passage according to the laws of ...
independent variable
noun Date: 1816 a mathematical variable that is independent of the other variables in an expression or function and whose value determines one or more of the values of the ...
independently
adverb see independent I
indescribable
adjective Date: 1751 1. that cannot be described 2. surpassing description • indescribableness noun • indescribably adverb
indescribableness
noun see indescribable
indescribably
adverb see indescribable
indestructibility
noun see indestructible
indestructible
adjective Etymology: probably from Late Latin indestructibilis, from Latin in- + destructus, past participle of destruere to tear down — more at destroy Date: 1667 ...
indestructibleness
noun see indestructible
indestructibly
adverb see indestructible
indeterminable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. incapable of being definitely decided or settled 2. incapable of being definitely fixed or ascertained • indeterminably adverb
indeterminacy
noun Date: 1649 the quality or state of being indeterminate
indeterminacy principle
noun Date: circa 1928 uncertainty principle
indeterminate
adjective Etymology: Middle English indeterminat, from Late Latin indeterminatus, from Latin in- + determinatus, past participle of determinare to determine Date: 14th century ...
indeterminately
adverb see indeterminate
indeterminateness
noun see indeterminate
indetermination
noun see indeterminate
indeterminism
noun Date: 1874 1. a. a theory that the will is free and that deliberate choice and actions are not determined by or predictable from antecedent causes b. a theory that ...
indeterminist
noun see indeterminism
indeterministic
adjective see indeterminism
index
I. noun (plural indexes or indices) Etymology: Latin indic-, index, from indicare to indicate Date: 1561 1. a. a device (as the pointer on a scale or the gnomon of a ...
index finger
noun Date: 1849 the finger next to the thumb — called also forefinger
index fossil
noun Date: 1900 a fossil usually with a narrow time range and wide spatial distribution that is used in the identification of related geologic formations
index number
noun Date: 1875 a number used to indicate change in magnitude (as of cost or price) as compared with the magnitude at some specified time usually taken as 100
index of refraction
Date: 1829 refractive index
indexation
noun Date: 1960 a system of economic control in which certain variables (as wages and interest) are tied to a cost-of-living index so that both rise or fall at the same rate ...
indexer
noun see index II
indexical
I. adjective Date: circa 1828 1. of or relating to an index 2. a. varying in reference with the individual speaker b. associated with or identifying an individual ...

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