Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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indweller
noun see indwell
indwelling
adjective Date: 1646 1. being an inner activating or guiding force 2. left within a bodily organ or passage especially to promote drainage — used of an implanted tube (as ...
Indy car
noun Etymology: indy by shortening & alteration from Indianapolis, Indiana Date: 1964 a single-seat open-cockpit racing car with the engine in the rear
Indy, d'
biographical name (Paul-Marie-Théodore-) Vincent 1851-1931 French composer
inebriant
noun Date: 1819 intoxicant
inebriate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English inebryat, from Latin inebriatus, past participle of inebriare, from in- + ebriare to intoxicate, from ebrius drunk ...
inebriated
adjective Date: 1609 exhilarated or confused by or as if by alcohol ; intoxicated
inebriation
noun see inebriate I
inebriety
noun Etymology: probably blend of inebriation and ebriety drunkenness Date: 1801 the state of being inebriated ; drunkenness
inedible
adjective Date: 1786 not fit to be eaten
ineducability
noun see ineducable
ineducable
adjective Date: 1884 incapable of being educated • ineducability noun
ineffability
noun see ineffable
ineffable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ineffabilis, from in- + effabilis capable of being expressed, from effari to speak out, from ex- + fari to speak — more at ...
ineffableness
noun see ineffable
ineffably
adverb see ineffable
ineffaceability
noun see ineffaceable
ineffaceable
adjective Etymology: probably from French ineffaçable, from Middle French, from in- + effaçable effaceable Date: 1804 not effaceable ; ineradicable • ineffaceability ...
ineffaceably
adverb see ineffaceable
ineffective
adjective Date: 1649 1. not producing an intended effect ; ineffectual 2. not capable of performing efficiently or as expected ; incapable • ineffectively adverb • ...
ineffectively
adverb see ineffective
ineffectiveness
noun see ineffective
ineffectual
adjective Date: 15th century 1. not producing the proper or intended effect ; futile 2. ineffective 2 • ineffectuality noun • ineffectually adverb • ineffectualness ...
ineffectuality
noun see ineffectual
ineffectually
adverb see ineffectual
ineffectualness
noun see ineffectual
inefficacious
adjective Date: 1658 lacking the power to produce a desired effect ; ineffective • inefficaciously adverb • inefficaciousness noun
inefficaciously
adverb see inefficacious
inefficaciousness
noun see inefficacious
inefficacy
noun Etymology: Late Latin inefficacia, from Latin inefficac-, inefficax inefficacious, from in- + efficac-, efficax efficacious Date: circa 1615 lack of power to produce a ...
inefficiency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1749 1. the quality or state of being inefficient 2. something that is inefficient
inefficient
adjective Date: 1750 not efficient: as a. not producing the effect intended or desired b. wasteful of time or energy c. incapable, incompetent • inefficient ...
inefficiently
adverb see inefficient
inegalitarian
adjective Date: 1940 marked by disparity in social and economic standing
inelastic
adjective Date: 1748 not elastic: as a. slow to react or respond to changing conditions b. inflexible, unyielding • inelasticity noun
inelastic collision
noun Date: 1937 a collision in which part of the kinetic energy of the colliding particles changes into another form of energy (as heat or radiation)
inelastic scattering
noun Date: 1938 a scattering of particles as the result of inelastic collision in which the total kinetic energy of the colliding particles changes
inelasticity
noun see inelastic
inelegance
noun Date: 1726 lack of elegance
inelegant
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Latin inelegant-, inelegans, from in- + elegant-, elegans elegant Date: circa 1570 lacking in refinement, grace, or good taste • ...
inelegantly
adverb see inelegant
ineligibility
noun see ineligible
ineligible
adjective Etymology: French inéligible, from in- + éligible eligible Date: 1770 not eligible: as a. not qualified for an office or position b. not permitted under ...
ineloquent
adjective Date: circa 1530 not eloquent ; having or showing a lack of eloquence • ineloquently adverb
ineloquently
adverb see ineloquent
ineluctability
noun see ineluctable
ineluctable
adjective Etymology: Latin ineluctabilis, from in- + eluctari to struggle clear of, from ex- + luctari to struggle, wrestle; akin to Latin luxus dislocated — more at lock ...
ineluctably
adverb see ineluctable
ineludible
adjective Date: 1662 inescapable
inenarrable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inenarrabilis, from in- + enarrare to explain in detail, from e- + narrare to narrate Date: 15th century incapable of being ...
inept
adjective Etymology: Middle French inepte, from Latin ineptus, from in- + aptus apt Date: 1542 1. lacking in fitness or aptitude ; unfit 2. lacking sense or reason ; ...
ineptitude
noun Etymology: Latin ineptitudo, from ineptus Date: 1615 the quality or state of being inept; especially incompetence
ineptly
adverb see inept
ineptness
noun see inept
inequality
noun Etymology: Middle English inequalite, from Latin inaequalitat-, inaequalitas, from inaequalis unequal, from in- + aequalis equal Date: 15th century 1. the quality of ...
inequitable
adjective Date: 1667 not equitable ; unfair • inequitably adverb
inequitably
adverb see inequitable
inequity
noun Date: 1556 1. injustice, unfairness 2. an instance of injustice or unfairness
ineradicability
noun see ineradicable
ineradicable
adjective Date: 1818 incapable of being eradicated • ineradicability noun • ineradicably adverb
ineradicably
adverb see ineradicable
inerrancy
noun Date: circa 1834 exemption from error ; infallibility
inerrant
adjective Etymology: Latin inerrant-, inerrans, from in- + errant-, errans, present participle of errare to err Date: 1837 free from error
inert
adjective Etymology: Latin inert-, iners unskilled, idle, from in- + art-, ars skill — more at arm Date: 1647 1. lacking the power to move 2. very slow to move or act ; ...
inert gas
noun Date: 1898 noble gas
inertia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, lack of skill, from inert-, iners Date: 1713 1. a. a property of matter by which it remains at rest or in uniform motion in the same ...
inertial
adjective see inertia
inertial guidance
noun Date: circa 1948 guidance (as of an aircraft or spacecraft) by means of self-contained automatically controlling devices that respond to inertial forces — called also ...
inertial navigation
noun see inertial guidance
inertially
adverb see inertia
inertly
adverb see inert
inertness
noun see inert
Inés de Castro
biographical name — see Castro
inescapable
adjective Date: 1792 incapable of being avoided, ignored, or denied ; inevitable • inescapably adverb
inescapably
adverb see inescapable
inessential
adjective Date: 1677 1. having no essence 2. not essential ; unessential • inessential noun
inestimable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin inaestimabilis, from in- + aestimabilis estimable Date: 14th century 1. incapable of being estimated or ...
inestimably
adverb see inestimable
inevitability
noun see inevitable
inevitable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inevitabilis, from in- + evitabilis evitable Date: 14th century incapable of being avoided or evaded • inevitability ...
inevitableness
noun see inevitable
inevitably
adverb Date: 15th century 1. in an inevitable way 2. as is to be expected
inexact
adjective Etymology: French, from in- + exact exact Date: circa 1828 1. not precisely correct or true ; inaccurate 2. not rigorous and careful • inexactly adverb ...
inexactitude
noun Etymology: French, from inexact Date: 1782 1. lack of exactitude or precision 2. an instance of inexactness
inexactly
adverb see inexact
inexactness
noun see inexact
inexcusable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inexcusabilis, from in- + excusabilis excusable Date: 15th century impossible to excuse or justifify • inexcusableness ...
inexcusableness
noun see inexcusable
inexcusably
adverb see inexcusable
inexhaustibility
noun see inexhaustible
inexhaustible
adjective Date: 1601 not exhaustible: as a. incapable of being used up b. incapable of being wearied or worn out • inexhaustibility noun • inexhaustibleness ...
inexhaustibleness
noun see inexhaustible
inexhaustibly
adverb see inexhaustible
inexistence
noun Date: circa 1623 absence of existence ; nonexistence
inexistent
adjective Etymology: Late Latin inexsistent-, inexsistens, from Latin in- + exsistent-, exsistens, present participle of exsistere to exist Date: 1646 not having existence ; ...
inexorability
noun see inexorable
inexorable
adjective Etymology: Latin inexorabilis, from in- + exorabilis pliant, from exorare to prevail upon, from ex- + orare to speak — more at oration Date: 1542 not to be ...
inexorableness
noun see inexorable
inexorably
adverb see inexorable
inexpedience
noun Date: 1608 inexpediency
inexpediency
noun Date: 1641 the quality or fact of being inexpedient
inexpedient
adjective Date: 1608 not expedient ; inadvisable • inexpediently adverb
inexpediently
adverb see inexpedient
inexpensive
adjective Date: circa 1846 reasonable in price ; cheap • inexpensively adverb • inexpensiveness noun
inexpensively
adverb see inexpensive
inexpensiveness
noun see inexpensive
inexperience
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Late Latin inexperientia, from Latin in- + experientia experience Date: 1598 1. lack of practical experience 2. lack of knowledge of the ...
inexperienced
adjective see inexperience
inexpert
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inexpertus, from in- + expertus expert Date: 15th century not expert ; unskilled • inexpert noun • inexpertly adverb ...
inexpertly
adverb see inexpert
inexpertness
noun see inexpert
inexpiable
adjective Etymology: Middle English inexpyable, from Latin inexpiabilis, from in- + expiare to expiate Date: 15th century 1. not capable of being atoned for 2. obsolete ...
inexpiably
adverb see inexpiable
inexplainable
adjective Date: circa 1623 inexplicable
inexplicability
noun see inexplicable
inexplicable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inexplicabilis, from in- + explicabilis explicable Date: 15th century incapable of being explained, interpreted, or accounted ...
inexplicableness
noun see inexplicable
inexplicably
adverb see inexplicable
inexplicit
adjective Date: circa 1812 not explicit
inexpressibility
noun see inexpressible
inexpressible
adjective Date: 1625 not capable of being expressed ; indescribable • inexpressibility noun • inexpressibleness noun • inexpressibly adverb
inexpressibleness
noun see inexpressible
inexpressibly
adverb see inexpressible
inexpressive
adjective Date: 1652 1. archaic inexpressible 2. lacking expression or meaning • inexpressively adverb • inexpressiveness noun
inexpressively
adverb see inexpressive
inexpressiveness
noun see inexpressive
inexpugnable
adjective Etymology: Middle English in-expungnabull, from Latin inexpugnabilis, from in- + expugnare to take by storm, from ex- + pugnare to fight — more at pungent Date: ...
inexpugnableness
noun see inexpugnable
inexpugnably
adverb see inexpugnable
inexpungible
adjective Etymology: in- + expunge Date: 1888 incapable of being obliterated
inextinguishable
adjective Date: 15th century not extinguishable ; unquenchable • inextinguishably adverb
inextinguishably
adverb see inextinguishable
inextricability
noun see inextricable
inextricable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin inextricabilis, from in- + extricabilis extricable Date: 15th century 1. forming a ...
inextricably
adverb see inextricable
inf
abbreviation 1. infantry 2. infinitive
INF
abbreviation intermediate range nuclear forces
infall
noun see infalling
infallibility
noun see infallible
infallible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin infallibilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin fallibilis fallible Date: 15th century 1. incapable of error ; unerring ...
infallibly
adverb see infallible
infalling
adjective Date: 1964 moving under the influence of gravity toward a celestial object (as a black hole) • infall noun
infeasibility
noun see infeasible
infeasible
adjective Date: 1533 not feasible ; impracticable • infeasibility noun
infect
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin infectus, past participle of inficere, from in- + facere to make, do — more at do Date: 14th century 1. to contaminate ...
infection
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or result of affecting injuriously 2. an infective agent or material contaminated with an infective agent 3. a. the state produced by ...
infectious
adjective Date: 1542 1. a. capable of causing infection b. communicable by infection — compare contagious 2. that corrupts or contaminates 3. spreading or ...
infectious hepatitis
noun Date: circa 1941 hepatitis A
infectious mononucleosis
noun Date: 1920 an acute infectious disease caused by the Epstein-Barr virus and characterized by fever, swelling of lymph nodes, and lymphocytosis
infectiously
adverb see infectious
infectiousness
noun see infectious
infective
adjective Date: 14th century 1. producing or capable of producing infection 2. affecting others ; infectious • infectivity noun
infectivity
noun see infective
infector
noun see infect
infelicitous
adjective Date: 1835 not felicitous: as a. not appropriate or well-timed b. awkward, unfortunate • infelicitously adverb
infelicitously
adverb see infelicitous
infelicity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English infelicite unhappiness, from Latin infelicitas, from infelic-, infelix unhappy, from in- + felic-, felix fruitful — more at ...
infer
verb (inferred; inferring) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French inferer, from Latin inferre, literally, to carry or bring into, from in- + ferre to carry — more at ...
inferable
adjective see infer
inference
noun Date: 1594 1. the act or process of inferring: as a. the act of passing from one proposition, statement, or judgment considered as true to another whose truth is ...
inferential
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin inferentia, from Latin inferent-, inferens, present participle of inferre Date: 1657 1. relating to, involving, or resembling inference ...
inferentially
adverb Date: 1691 by way of inference ; through inference
inferior
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, comparative of inferus lower — more at under Date: 15th century 1. situated lower down ; lower 2. a. of low or lower ...
inferior conjunction
noun Date: 1833 a conjunction of an inferior planet with the sun in which the planet is aligned between the earth and the sun
inferior planet
noun Date: 1633 either of the planets Mercury and Venus whose orbits lie within that of the earth
inferiority
noun see inferior
inferiority complex
noun Date: 1922 1. an acute sense of personal inferiority often resulting either in timidity or through overcompensation in exaggerated aggressiveness 2. a collective sense ...
inferiorly
adverb see inferior
infernal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enfernal, from Late Latin infernalis, from infernus hell, from Latin, lower, from inferus Date: 14th century 1. of or ...
infernal machine
noun Date: 1810 a machine or apparatus maliciously designed to explode and destroy life or property; especially a concealed or disguised bomb
infernally
adverb see infernal
inferno
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: Italian, hell, from Late Latin infernus Date: 1834 a place or a state that resembles or suggests hell ; also an intense fire ; conflagration
inferrer
noun see infer
inferrible
adjective see infer
infertile
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Late Latin infertilis, from Latin in- + fertilis fertile Date: 1597 not fertile or productive ; especially incapable of or ...
infertility
noun see infertile
infest
transitive verb Etymology: French infester, from Latin infestare, from infestus hostile Date: 1602 1. to spread or swarm in or over in a troublesome manner 2. to live ...
infestant
noun see infest
infestation
noun see infest
infester
noun see infest
infibulation
noun Etymology: Latin infibulare to fasten the labia majora or prepuce with stitches or a clasp, from in- + fibula clasp, fibula Date: 1798 extreme female genital mutilation ...
infidel
noun Etymology: Middle English infidele, from Middle French, from Late Latin infidelis unbelieving, from Latin, unfaithful, from in- + fidelis faithful — more at fidelity ...
infidelity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. lack of belief in a religion 2. a. unfaithfulness to a moral obligation ; disloyalty b. marital unfaithfulness or an ...
infield
noun Date: 1606 1. a field near a farmhouse 2. a. the area of a baseball field enclosed by the three bases and home plate b. the defensive positions comprising first ...
infield hit
noun Date: 1907 a base hit on a ball that does not leave the infield
infield out
noun Date: 1926 a ground ball on which the batter is put out by an infielder
infielder
noun Date: 1867 a baseball player who plays in the infield
infight
intransitive verb see infighting
infighter
noun see infighting
infighting
noun Date: 1816 1. fighting or boxing at close quarters 2. rough-and-tumble fighting 3. prolonged and often bitter dissension or rivalry among members of a group or ...
infiltrate
verb (-trated; -trating) Date: 1758 transitive verb 1. to cause (as a liquid) to permeate something by penetrating its pores or interstices 2. to pass into or through (a ...
infiltration
noun see infiltrate
infiltrative
adjective see infiltrate
infiltrator
noun see infiltrate
infinite
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English infinit, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin infinitus, from in- + finitus finite Date: 14th century 1. extending ...
infinitely
adverb see infinite I
infiniteness
noun see infinite I
infinitesimal
I. noun Etymology: New Latin infinitesimus infinite in rank, from Latin infinitus Date: 1706 an infinitesimal quantity or variable II. adjective Date: 1710 1. taking on ...
infinitesimal calculus
noun Date: 1801 calculus 1b
infinitesimally
adverb see infinitesimal II
infinitival
adjective Date: 1869 relating to the infinitive
infinitive
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English infinityf, from Late Latin infinitivus, from Latin infinitus Date: 15th century formed with the infinitive • infinitively adverb II. ...
infinitively
adverb see infinitive I
infinitude
noun Date: 1641 1. the quality or state of being infinite ; infiniteness 2. something that is infinite especially in extent 3. an infinite number or quantity
infinity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a. the quality of being infinite b. unlimited extent of time, space, or quantity ; boundlessness 2. an indefinitely great ...
infirm
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin infirmus, from in- + firmus firm Date: 14th century 1. of poor or deteriorated vitality; especially feeble from age 2. ...
infirmary
noun (plural -ries) Date: 15th century a place where the infirm or sick are lodged for care and treatment
infirmity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a. the quality or state of being infirm b. the condition of being feeble ; frailty 2. disease, malady 3. a personal failing ...
infirmly
adverb see infirm
infix
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin infixus, past participle of infigere, from in- + figere to fasten — more at fix Date: 1502 1. to fasten or fix by piercing or thrusting ...
infixation
noun see infix I
infl
abbreviation influenced
inflame
also enflame verb (inflamed; also enflamed; inflaming; also enflaming) Etymology: Middle English enflamen, from Anglo-French enflamer, from Latin inflammare, from in- + flamma ...
inflamer
noun see inflame
inflammability
noun see inflammable
inflammable
adjective Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin inflammabilis, from Latin inflammare Date: 1605 1. flammable 2. easily inflamed, excited, or angered ; irascible • ...
inflammableness
noun see inflammable
inflammably
adverb see inflammable
inflammation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a local response to cellular injury that is marked by capillary dilatation, leukocytic infiltration, redness, heat, and pain and that serves as a ...
inflammatorily
adverb see inflammatory
inflammatory
adjective Date: circa 1711 1. tending to excite anger, disorder, or tumult ; seditious 2. tending to inflame or excite the senses 3. accompanied by or tending to cause ...
inflammatory bowel disease
noun Date: 1977 either of two inflammatory diseases of the bowel: a. Crohn's disease b. ulcerative colitis
inflatable
adjective Date: 1878 capable of being inflated • inflatable noun
inflate
verb (inflated; inflating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inflatus, past participle of inflare, from in- + flare to blow — more at blow Date: 15th century transitive ...
inflated
adjective Date: 1652 1. elaborated or heightened by artificial or empty means 2. distended with air or gas 3. expanded to an abnormal or unjustifiable volume or level ...
inflater
noun see inflate
inflation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of inflating ; a state of being inflated: as a. distension b. a hypothetical extremely brief period of very rapid expansion of the ...
inflationary
adjective Date: 1920 of, characterized by, or productive of inflation
inflationary spiral
noun Date: 1931 a continuous rise in prices that is sustained by the tendency of wage increases and cost increases to react on each other
inflationism
noun Date: 1919 the policy of economic inflation • inflationist noun or adjective
inflationist
noun or adjective see inflationism
inflator
noun see inflate
inflect
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inflectere, from in- + flectere to bend Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to turn from a direct line or course ; curve 2. ...
inflectable
adjective see inflect
inflection
noun Date: 1531 1. the act or result of curving or bending ; bend 2. change in pitch or loudness of the voice 3. a. the change of form that words undergo to mark such ...
inflection point
noun Date: circa 1721 a point on a curve that separates an arc concave upward from one concave downward and vice versa
inflectional
adjective Date: 1832 of, relating to, or characterized by inflection • inflectionally adverb
inflectionally
adverb see inflectional
inflective
adjective see inflect
inflexed
adjective Etymology: Latin inflexus, past participle of inflectere Date: 1661 bent or turned abruptly inward or downward or toward the axis
inflexibility
noun see inflexible
inflexible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inflexibilis, from in- + flexibilis flexible Date: 14th century 1. rigidly firm in will or purpose ; unyielding 2. not ...
inflexibleness
noun see inflexible
inflexibly
adverb see inflexible
inflexion
chiefly British variant of inflection
inflict
transitive verb Etymology: Latin inflictus, past participle of infligere, from in- + fligere to strike — more at profligate Date: 1566 1. afflict 2. a. to give by or ...
inflicter
noun see inflict
infliction
noun Date: 1534 1. the act of inflicting 2. something (as punishment or suffering) that is inflicted
inflictive
adjective see inflict
inflictor
noun see inflict
inflorescence
noun Etymology: New Latin inflorescentia, from Late Latin inflorescent-, inflorescens, present participle of inflorescere to begin to bloom, from Latin in- + florescere to begin ...
inflow
noun Date: 1839 a flowing in
influence
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin influentia, from Latin influent-, influens, present participle of influere to flow in, from in- + fluere ...
influenceable
adjective see influence II
influent
I. adjective Date: 15th century flowing in II. noun Date: 1859 1. something that flows in: as a. a tributary stream b. fluid input into a reservoir or process 2. a ...
influential
I. adjective Date: 1570 exerting or possessing influence • influentially adverb II. noun Date: 1831 one who has great influence
influentially
adverb see influential I
influenza
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, influence, from Medieval Latin influentia; from the belief that epidemics were due to the influence of the stars Date: 1743 1. a. an ...
influenzal
adjective see influenza
influx
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin influxus, from Latin influere Date: 1626 a coming in
info
noun Date: 1907 information
infobahn
noun see information superhighway
infold
verb Date: 15th century transitive verb enfold, envelop intransitive verb to fold inward or toward one another
infomercial
noun Etymology: information + 2commercial Date: 1981 a television program that is an extended advertisement often including a discussion or demonstration
inform
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enformer, from Latin informare, from in- + forma form Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. obsolete to give material form ...

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