Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
informal
adjective Date: 1585 1. marked by the absence of formality or ceremony 2. characteristic of or appropriate to ordinary, casual, or familiar use • informality noun ...
informality
noun see informal
informally
adverb see informal
informant
noun Date: 1657 a person who gives information: as a. informer b. one who supplies cultural or linguistic data in response to interrogation by an investigator
informatics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary information + -ics Date: circa 1967 information science
information
noun Date: 14th century 1. the communication or reception of knowledge or intelligence 2. a. (1) knowledge obtained from investigation, study, or instruction (2) ...
information highway
noun see information superhighway
information retrieval
noun Date: 1950 the techniques of storing and recovering and often disseminating recorded data especially through the use of a computerized system
information science
noun Date: 1960 the collection, classification, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of recorded knowledge treated both as a pure and as an applied science
information superhighway
noun Date: 1983 a telecommunications infrastructure or system (as of television, telephony, or computer networks) used for widespread and usually rapid access to ...
information theory
noun Date: 1950 a theory that deals statistically with information, with the measurement of its content in terms of its distinguishing essential characteristics or by the ...
informational
adjective see information
informationally
adverb see information
informative
adjective Date: 1655 imparting knowledge ; instructive • informatively adverb • informativeness noun
informatively
adverb see informative
informativeness
noun see informative
informatorily
adverb see informatory
informatory
adjective Date: circa 1879 conveying information • informatorily adverb
informed
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. having information b. based on possession of information 2. educated, knowledgeable • informedly adverb
informed consent
noun Date: circa 1957 consent to surgery by a patient or to participation in a medical experiment by a subject after achieving an understanding of what is involved
informedly
adverb see informed
informer
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that imparts knowledge or news 2. one that informs against another; specifically one who makes a practice especially for a financial reward ...
infotainment
noun Etymology: information + entertainment Date: 1980 a television program that presents information (as news) in a manner intended to be entertaining
infra
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1740 later in this writing ; below
infra dig
adjective Etymology: short for Latin infra dignitatem Date: 1824 being beneath one's dignity ; undignified
infra-
prefix Etymology: Latin infra — more at under 1. below 2. within 3. below in a scale or series
infract
transitive verb see infraction
infraction
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin infraction-, infractio, from Latin, subduing, from infringere to break — more at infringe Date: 15th century the act of ...
infrahuman
adjective Date: 1847 less or lower than human • infrahuman noun
infrangibility
noun see infrangible
infrangible
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Late Latin infrangibilis, from Latin in- + frangere to break — more at break Date: 1597 1. not capable of being broken or separated ...
infrangibly
adverb see infrangible
infraorder
noun Date: 1945 a taxonomic category in biological classification ranking above a superfamily and below a suborder
infrared
adjective Date: 1881 1. situated outside the visible spectrum at its red end — used of radiation having a wavelength between about 700 nanometers and 1 millimeter 2. ...
infrasonic
adjective Date: 1927 1. having or relating to a frequency below the audibility range of the human ear 2. utilizing or produced by infrasonic waves or vibrations
infraspecific
adjective Date: 1939 occurring within a species
infrastructural
adjective see infrastructure
infrastructure
noun Date: 1927 1. the underlying foundation or basic framework (as of a system or organization) 2. the permanent installations required for military purposes 3. the ...
infrequence
noun Date: 1611 infrequency
infrequency
noun Date: 1677 rarity of occurrence
infrequent
adjective Etymology: Latin infrequent-, infrequens, from in- + frequent-, frequens frequent Date: circa 1615 1. seldom happening or occurring ; rare 2. placed or occurring ...
infrequently
adverb see infrequent
infringe
verb (infringed; infringing) Etymology: Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- + frangere to break — more at break Date: 1513 transitive verb 1. ...
infringement
noun Date: 1628 1. the act of infringing ; violation 2. an encroachment or trespass on a right or privilege
infringer
noun see infringe
infundibular
adjective Date: 1795 of, relating to, or having an infundibulum
infundibulum
noun (plural infundibula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, funnel — more at funnel Date: 1543 any of various funnel-shaped organs or parts: as a. the hollow conical ...
infuriate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Medieval Latin infuriatus, past participle of infuriare, from Latin in- + furia fury Date: 1667 to make furious • ...
infuriatingly
adverb see infuriate I
infuriation
noun see infuriate I
infuse
transitive verb (infused; infusing) Etymology: Middle English, to pour in, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French infuser, from Latin infusus, past participle of infundere to ...
infuser
noun see infuse
infusibility
noun see infusible
infusible
adjective Date: 1555 incapable of being fused ; very difficult to fuse • infusibility noun • infusibleness noun
infusibleness
noun see infusible
infusion
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of infusing 2. a product obtained by infusing 3. the continuous slow introduction of a solution especially into a vein
infusorial earth
noun Date: 1868 kieselguhr
infusorian
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin infusus Date: 1859 any of a heterogeneous group of minute organisms found especially in water with decomposing organic matter; ...
ingather
Date: 1557 transitive verb to gather in intransitive verb assemble • ingathering noun
ingathering
noun see ingather
Inge
I. biographical name William 1913-1973 American playwright II. biographical name William Ralph 1860-1954 English prelate & author
ingenious
adjective Etymology: Middle English ingenyous, from Middle French ingenieus, from Latin ingeniosus, from ingenium natural capacity — more at engine Date: 15th century 1. ...
ingeniously
adverb see ingenious
ingeniousness
noun see ingenious
ingenue
or ingénue noun Etymology: French ingénue, feminine of ingénu ingenuous, from Latin ingenuus Date: 1848 1. a naive girl or young woman 2. the stage role of an ingenue; ...
ingénue
noun see ingenue
ingenuity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1592 1. obsolete candor, ingenuousness 2. a. skill or cleverness in devising or combining ; inventiveness b. cleverness or aptness of ...
ingenuous
I. adjective Etymology: by alteration Date: 1588 obsolete ingenious II. adjective Etymology: Latin ingenuus native, freeborn, from in- + gignere to beget — more at kin ...
ingenuously
adverb see ingenuous II
ingenuousness
noun see ingenuous II
Ingersoll
biographical name Robert Green 1833-1899 American orator
ingest
transitive verb Etymology: Latin ingestus, past participle of ingerere to carry in, from in- + gerere to bear Date: 1620 to take in for or as if for digestion • ...
ingesta
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of ingestus Date: 1727 material taken into the body by way of the digestive tract
ingestible
adjective see ingest
ingestion
noun see ingest
ingestive
adjective see ingest
ingle
noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic aingeal Date: 1508 1. a fire in a fireplace 2. fireplace 3. corner, angle
inglenook
noun Date: 1772 a nook by a large open fireplace; also a bench or settle occupying this nook
Inglewood
geographical name city SW California SW of Los Angeles population 112,580
inglorious
adjective Etymology: Latin inglorius, from in- + gloria glory Date: 1573 1. shameful, ignominious 2. not glorious ; lacking fame or honor • ingloriously adverb • ...
ingloriously
adverb see inglorious
ingloriousness
noun see inglorious
Ingolstadt
geographical name city S Germany in central Bavaria population 107,375
ingot
noun Etymology: Middle English, perhaps modification of Middle French lingot ingot of metal, incorrectly divided as l'ingot, as if from le the Date: 14th century 1. a mold in ...
ingot iron
noun Date: 1877 iron containing only small proportions of impurities (as less than 0.05 percent carbon)
ingrain
I. transitive verb also engrain Date: circa 1641 to work indelibly into the natural texture or mental or moral constitution Synonyms: see infuse II. adjective Date: 1766 1. ...
ingrained
also engrained adjective Date: 1599 1. worked into the grain or fiber 2. forming a part of the essence or inmost being ; deep-seated • ingrainedly also engrainedly ...
ingrainedly
adverb see ingrained
ingrate
noun Etymology: Latin ingratus ungrateful, from in- + gratus grateful — more at grace Date: 1622 an ungrateful person
ingratiate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: 2in- + Latin gratia grace Date: 1621 to gain favor or favorable acceptance for by deliberate effort — usually used with with ...
ingratiating
adjective Date: 1655 1. capable of winning favor ; pleasing 2. intended or adopted in order to gain favor ; flattering • ingratiatingly adverb
ingratiatingly
adverb see ingratiating
ingratiation
noun see ingratiate
ingratiatory
adjective see ingratiate
ingratitude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin ingratitudo, from Latin in- + Late Latin gratitudo gratitude Date: 14th century forgetfulness of or ...
ingredient
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ingredient-, ingrediens, present participle of ingredi to go into, from in- + gradi to go — more at grade Date: 15th century ...
Ingres
biographical name Jean-Auguste-Dominique 1780-1867 French painter
ingress
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ingressus, from ingredi Date: 15th century 1. the act of entering ; entrance 2. the power or liberty of entrance or access ...
ingression
noun see ingress
ingressive
adjective Date: 1649 1. of, relating to, or involving ingress; especially produced by ingress of air into the vocal tract 2. inchoative 2 • ingressive noun • ...
ingressiveness
noun see ingressive
inground
adjective Date: 1969 built into the ground
ingrowing
adjective Date: 1869 growing or tending inward
ingrown
adjective Date: 1670 1. grown in; specifically having the free tip or edge embedded in the flesh 2. having the direction of growth or activity or interest inward rather ...
ingrownness
noun see ingrown
ingrowth
noun Date: 1870 1. a growing inward (as to fill a void) 2. something that grows in or into a space
inguinal
adjective Etymology: Middle English inguynale, from Latin inguinalis, from inguin-, inguen groin — more at aden- Date: 15th century of, relating to, or situated in the ...
ingurgitate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin ingurgitatus, past participle of ingurgitare, from in- + gurgit-, gurges whirlpool — more at voracious Date: circa 1570 ...
ingurgitation
noun see ingurgitate
Ingush Republic
geographical name see Ingushetia
Ingushetia
or Ingushetiya or Ingush Republic geographical name autonomous republic S Russia in Europe N of Caucasus Mts. capital Nazran' area 1242 square miles (3217 square kilometers), ...
Ingushetiya
geographical name see Ingushetia
INH
abbreviation Etymology: iso-nicotinic acid hydrazide isoniazid
inhabit
verb Etymology: Middle English enhabiten, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French inhabiter, enhabiter, from Latin inhabitare, from in- + habitare to dwell, frequentative of ...
inhabitable
adjective see inhabit
inhabitancy
noun Date: 1681 inhabitation
inhabitant
noun Date: 15th century one that occupies a particular place regularly, routinely, or for a period of time
inhabitation
noun Date: 15th century the act of inhabiting ; the state of being inhabited
inhabited
adjective Date: 15th century having inhabitants
inhabiter
noun see inhabit
inhalant
noun Date: circa 1890 something (as an allergen or medication) that is inhaled • inhalant adjective
inhalation
noun Date: circa 1623 1. the act or an instance of inhaling 2. material (as medication) to be taken in by inhaling • inhalational adjective
inhalational
adjective see inhalation
inhalator
noun Date: 1925 a device providing a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide for breathing that is used especially in conjunction with artificial respiration
inhale
verb (inhaled; inhaling) Etymology: in- + exhale Date: 1725 transitive verb 1. to draw in by breathing 2. to take in eagerly or greedily intransitive verb to ...
inhaler
noun Date: 1778 1. a device by means of which medicinal material is inhaled 2. one that inhales
inharmonic
adjective Date: circa 1828 not harmonic
inharmonious
adjective Date: 1662 1. not harmonious ; discordant 2. not fitting or congenial ; conflicting • inharmoniously adverb • inharmoniousness noun
inharmoniously
adverb see inharmonious
inharmoniousness
noun see inharmonious
inharmony
noun Date: 1799 discord
inhere
intransitive verb (inhered; inhering) Etymology: Middle English enheren to be a companion, belong, from Latin inhaerēre to be attached, from in- + haerēre to adhere Date: ...
inherence
noun Date: 1577 the quality, state, or fact of inhering
inherent
adjective Etymology: Latin inhaerent-, inhaerens, present participle of inhaerēre Date: 1581 involved in the constitution or essential character of something ; belonging by ...
inherently
adverb see inherent
inherit
verb Etymology: Middle English enheriten to give right of inheritance to, from Anglo-French enheriter, from Late Latin inhereditare, from Latin in- + hereditas inheritance — ...
inheritability
noun see inheritable
inheritable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. capable of being inherited ; transmissible 2. capable of taking by inheritance • inheritability noun • inheritableness noun
inheritableness
noun see inheritable
inheritance
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of inheriting property b. the reception of genetic qualities by transmission from parent to offspring c. the acquisition of a ...
inheritance tax
noun Date: 1841 1. a tax on a decedent's net estate that is levied after the estate is transmitted to the inheritors 2. death tax; especially estate tax
inheritor
noun see inherit
inheritress
noun see inherit
inheritrix
noun see inherit
inhibin
noun Etymology: Latin inhibēre to inhibit + English 1-in Date: 1932 a glycoprotein hormone that is secreted by the pituitary gland and in the male by the Sertoli cells and ...
inhibit
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inhibitus, past participle of inhibēre, from in- 2in- + habēre to have — more at habit Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. ...
inhibition
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of inhibiting ; the state of being inhibited b. something that forbids, debars, or restricts 2. an inner impediment to free ...
inhibitive
adjective see inhibit
inhibitor
noun Date: circa 1611 one that inhibits: as a. an agent that slows or interferes with a chemical action b. a substance that reduces or suppresses the activity of another ...
inhibitory
adjective see inhibit
inholding
noun Date: 1947 privately owned land inside the boundary of a national park
inhomogeneity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1899 1. the condition or an instance of not being homogeneous 2. a part that is not homogeneous with the larger uniform mass in which it occurs; ...
inhomogeneous
adjective see inhomogeneity
inhospitable
adjective Date: circa 1570 1. not showing hospitality ; not friendly or receptive 2. providing no shelter or sustenance • inhospitableness noun • inhospitably ...
inhospitableness
noun see inhospitable
inhospitably
adverb see inhospitable
inhospitality
noun Date: circa 1576 the quality or state of being inhospitable
inhuman
adjective Etymology: Middle English inhumayne, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French inhumain, from Latin inhumanus, from in- + humanus human Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
inhumane
adjective Etymology: Middle French inhumain & Latin inhumanus Date: 1536 not humane ; inhuman 1 • inhumanely adverb
inhumanely
adverb see inhumane
inhumanity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. a. the quality or state of being cruel or barbarous b. a cruel or barbarous act 2. absence of warmth or geniality ; ...
inhumanly
adverb see inhuman
inhumanness
noun see inhuman
inhumation
noun see inhume
inhume
transitive verb (inhumed; inhuming) Etymology: probably from French inhumer, from Medieval Latin inhumare, from Latin in- + humus earth — more at humble Date: 1604 bury, ...
inimical
adjective Etymology: Late Latin inimicalis, from Latin inimicus enemy — more at enemy Date: 1573 1. being adverse often by reason of hostility or malevolence 2. a. ...
inimically
adverb see inimical
inimitable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inimitabilis, from in- + imitabilis imitable Date: 15th century not capable of being imitated ; matchless • ...
inimitableness
noun see inimitable
inimitably
adverb see inimitable
inion
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, back of the head, diminutive of in-, is sinew, tendon Date: circa 1811 the external occipital protuberance of the skull
iniquitous
adjective Date: 1726 characterized by iniquity Synonyms: see vicious • iniquitously adverb • iniquitousness noun
iniquitously
adverb see iniquitous
iniquitousness
noun see iniquitous
iniquity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English iniquite, from Anglo-French iniquité, from Latin iniquitat-, iniquitas, from iniquus uneven, from in- + aequus equal Date: 14th ...
initial
I. adjective Etymology: Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French iniciel, from Latin initialis, from initium beginning, from inire to go into, from in- + ire to go — more at issue ...
initial rhyme
noun Date: 1838 alliteration
initial side
noun Date: 1957 a stationary straight line that contains a point about which another straight line is rotated to form an angle — compare terminal side
initialism
noun Date: 1899 an abbreviation formed from initial letters
initialization
noun see initialize
initialize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1957 to set (as a computer program counter) to a starting position, value, or configuration • initialization noun
initially
adverb see initial I
initialness
noun see initial I
initiate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin initiatus, past participle of initiare, from Latin, to induct, from initium Date: 1533 1. to cause or facilitate the ...
initiation
noun Date: 1583 1. a. the act or an instance of initiating b. the process of being initiated c. the rites, ceremonies, ordeals, or instructions with which one is made ...
initiative
I. adjective Date: 1795 of or relating to initiation ; introductory, preliminary II. noun Date: 1793 1. an introductory step 2. energy or aptitude displayed in ...
initiator
noun see initiate I
initiatory
adjective Date: circa 1615 1. constituting a beginning 2. tending or serving to initiate
inject
transitive verb Etymology: Latin injectus, past participle of inicere, from in- + jacere to throw — more at jet Date: 1601 1. a. to introduce into something forcefully ...
injectable
adjective or noun see inject
injectant
noun Date: 1950 a substance that is injected into something
injection
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. an act or instance of injecting b. the placing of an artificial satellite or a spacecraft into an orbit or on a trajectory; also the ...
injection molding
noun Date: 1932 a method of forming articles (as of plastic) by heating the molding material until it can flow and injecting it into a mold • injection-molded adjective
injection-molded
adjective see injection molding
injective
adjective Date: 1952 being a one-to-one mathematical function
injector
noun see inject
injudicious
adjective Date: 1649 not judicious ; indiscreet, unwise • injudiciously adverb • injudiciousness noun
injudiciously
adverb see injudicious
injudiciousness
noun see injudicious
injunction
noun Etymology: Middle English injunccion, from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French enjunxion, from Late Latin injunction-, injunctio, from Latin injungere to enjoin — ...
injunctive
adjective see injunction
injure
transitive verb (injured; injuring) Etymology: Middle English enjuren, from Anglo-French *enjurer, from Late Latin injuriare, from Latin injuria injury Date: 15th century 1. ...
injurer
noun see injure
injurious
adjective Date: 15th century 1. inflicting or tending to inflict injury ; detrimental 2. abusive, defamatory • injuriously adverb • injuriousness noun
injuriously
adverb see injurious
injuriousness
noun see injurious
injury
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English injurie, from Anglo-French, Latin injuria, from injurus injurious, from in- + jur-, jus right — more at just Date: 14th century ...
injustice
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin injustitia, from injustus unjust, from in- + justus just Date: 14th century 1. absence of justice ; violation ...
ink
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English enke, from Anglo-French encre, enke, from Late Latin encaustum, from neuter of Latin encaustus burned in, from Greek ...
ink cap
noun see inky cap
ink-jet
adjective Date: 1976 of, relating to, or being a printer in which electrically charged droplets of ink are sprayed onto the paper • ink-jet noun
inkberry
noun Etymology: from the use of the berries for making ink Date: 1765 1. a. a holly (Ilex glabra) of eastern North America with evergreen oblong leathery leaves and small ...
inkblot test
noun Date: 1928 any of several psychological tests (as a Rorschach test) based on the interpretation of irregular figures (as blots of ink)
inkhorn
I. noun Date: 14th century a small portable bottle (as of horn) for holding ink II. adjective Date: 1543 ostentatiously learned ; pedantic
inkiness
noun see ink I
inkle
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1541 a colored linen tape or braid woven on a very narrow loom and used for trimming; also the thread used
inkling
noun Etymology: Middle English yngkiling whisper, mention, probably from inclen to hint at; akin to Old English inca suspicion Date: 1513 1. a slight indication or ...
inkstand
noun Date: 1770 inkwell; also a stand with fittings for holding ink and pens
Inkster
geographical name village SE Michigan W of Detroit population 30,115
inkstone
noun Date: circa 1889 a stone used in Chinese art and calligraphy on which dry ink and water are mixed
inkwell
noun Date: circa 1875 a container (as in a desk) for ink
inky
adjective see ink I
inky cap
noun Date: 1923 a mushroom (genus Coprinus, especially C. atramentarius) whose pileus deliquesces into an inky fluid after the spores have matured — called also ink cap
inlaid
adjective Date: 1598 1. a. set into a surface in a decorative design b. decorated with a design or material set into a surface 2. of linoleum having a design that ...
inland
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to the interior of a country 2. chiefly British not foreign ; domestic II. noun Date: 1573 the interior part of a ...
Inland Empire
geographical name region NW United States between Cascade Range & Rocky Mountains in E Washington, N Idaho, NW Montana, & NE Oregon
Inland Sea
geographical name inlet of the Pacific 240 miles (386 kilometers) long SW Japan between Honshu on E & N, Kyushu on W, & Shikoku on S
inlander
noun Date: 1610 one who lives inland
inlay
I. transitive verb (inlaid; inlaying) Date: 1596 1. a. to set into a surface or ground material b. to adorn with insertions c. to insert (as a color plate) into a mat ...
inlayer
noun see inlay I
inlet
noun Etymology: from its letting water in Date: circa 1576 1. a. a bay or recess in the shore of a sea, lake, or river; also creek b. a narrow water passage between ...
inlier
noun Etymology: 3in + outlier Date: circa 1859 1. a mass of rock whose outcrop is surrounded by rock of younger age 2. a distinct area or formation completely surrounded by ...
inly
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. inwardly 2. in a manner suggesting great depth of knowledge or understanding ; thoroughly
inmate
noun Date: 1580 any of a group occupying a single place of residence; especially a person confined (as in a prison or hospital)
inmost
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English innemest, superlative of inne, adverb, in, within, from in, adverb Date: before 12th century deepest within ; farthest ...
Inn
geographical name river 320 miles (515 kilometers) flowing from SE Switzerland NE through Austria into the Danube in SE Germany — see Engadine
inn
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old Norse inni dwelling, inn, Old English in, adverb Date: 12th century 1. a. an establishment for the lodging ...
innards
noun plural Etymology: alteration of inwards Date: circa 1825 1. the internal organs of a human being or animal; especially viscera 2. the internal parts especially of a ...
innate
adjective Etymology: Middle English innat, from Latin innatus, past participle of innasci to be born in, from in- + nasci to be born — more at nation Date: 15th century 1. ...
innately
adverb see innate
innateness
noun see innate
inner
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English innera, comparative of inne within Date: before 12th century 1. a. situated farther in b. being near a center ...
inner city
noun Date: 1961 the usually older, poorer, and more densely populated central section of a city • inner-city adjective
inner ear
noun Date: 1855 the essential organ of hearing and equilibrium that is located in the temporal bone, is innervated by the auditory nerve, and includes the vestibule, the ...
Inner Hebrides
geographical name — see Hebrides
inner light
noun Usage: often capitalized I&L Date: 1856 a divine presence held (as in Quaker doctrine) to enlighten and guide the soul
Inner Mongolia
or Nei Monggol geographical name region N China in SE Mongolia & W Manchuria capital Hohhot area 454,633 square miles (1,182,046 square kilometers), population 21,456,798
inner planet
noun Date: 1951 any of the planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars whose orbits are within the asteroid belt
inner product
noun Date: circa 1911 scalar product
inner space
noun Date: 1958 1. space at or near the earth's surface and especially under the sea 2. one's inner self
inner tube
noun Date: 1894 an inflatable usually ring-shaped rubber tube designed for use inside a pneumatic tire
inner-city
adjective see inner city
inner-directed
adjective Date: 1950 directed in thought and action by one's own scale of values as opposed to external norms
innerly
adverb see inner
innermost
I. adjective Date: 14th century farthest inward ; inmost II. noun Date: 14th century the inmost part
innersole
noun Date: 1830 insole
innerspring
adjective Date: 1928 having coil springs inside a padded casing
innervate
transitive verb (-vated; -vating) Date: 1870 to supply with nerves • innervation noun
innervation
noun see innervate
Inness
biographical name George: father 1825-1894 & son 1854-1926 American painters
Innigkeit
foreign term Etymology: German poignant intimacy of feeling — used especially of music
inning
noun Etymology: 2in + 1-ing Date: 1735 1. a. plural but singular or plural in construction a division of a cricket match b. a division of a baseball game consisting of ...
Innisfil
geographical name town Canada in SE Ontario population 28,666
Inniskilling
geographical name — see Enniskillen
innkeeper
noun Date: 15th century 1. a proprietor of an inn 2. hotelman

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.062 c;