Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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healthily
adverb see healthy
healthiness
noun see healthy
healthy
adjective (healthier; -est) Date: 1552 1. enjoying health and vigor of body, mind, or spirit ; well 2. evincing health 3. conducive to health 4. a. prosperous, ...
Healy
biographical name Timothy Michael 1855-1931 Irish statesman
Heaney
biographical name Seamus 1939- Irish poet
heap
I. noun Etymology: Middle English heep, from Old English hēap; akin to Old High German houf heap Date: before 12th century 1. a collection of things thrown one on another ; ...
hear
verb (heard; hearing) Etymology: Middle English heren, from Old English hīeran; akin to Old High German hōren to hear, and probably to Latin cavēre to be on guard, Greek ...
Heard
geographical name island S Indian Ocean SE of Kerguelen at 53°10′S, 74°10′E; administered by Australia
hearer
noun see hear
hearing
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. the process, function, or power of perceiving sound; specifically the special sense by which noises and tones are received as stimuli b. ...
hearing dog
noun Date: 1952 a dog trained to alert its deaf or hearing-impaired owner to sounds (as of a doorbell, alarm, or telephone) — called also hearing ear dog
hearing ear dog
noun see hearing dog
hearken
verb (hearkened; hearkening) Etymology: Middle English herknen, from Old English heorcnian; akin to Old High German hōrechen to listen, Old English hīeran to hear Date: ...
hearken back
intransitive verb Date: 1900 hark back
Hearn
biographical name Lafcadio 1850-1904 Japanese Yakumo Koizumi American (Greek-born) writer in Japan
hearsay
noun Date: circa 1532 rumor
hearsay evidence
noun Date: 1753 evidence based not on a witness's personal knowledge but on another's statement not made under oath
hearse
I. noun Etymology: Middle English herse, from Anglo-French herce harrow, frame for holding candles, from Latin hirpic-, hirpex harrow Date: 14th century 1. a. an elaborate ...
Hearst
biographical name William Randolph 1863-1951 American newspaper publisher
heart
I. noun Etymology: Middle English hert, from Old English heorte; akin to Old High German herza heart, Latin cord-, cor, Greek kardia Date: before 12th century 1. a. a ...
heart attack
noun Date: 1928 an acute episode of heart disease marked by the death or damage of heart muscle due to insufficient blood supply to the heart usually as a result of a coronary ...
heart block
noun Date: 1903 incoordination of the heartbeat in which the atria and ventricles beat independently and which is marked by decreased cardiac output
heart disease
noun Date: 1850 an abnormal organic condition of the heart or of the heart and circulation
heart failure
noun Date: 1894 1. a condition in which the heart is unable to pump blood at an adequate rate or in adequate volume 2. cessation of heartbeat ; death
heart pine
noun Date: 1838 longleaf pine
heart-free
adjective Date: 1726 not in love
heart-healthy
adjective Date: 1980 conductive to a healthy heart and circulatory system
heart-lung machine
noun Date: 1953 a mechanical pump that maintains circulation during heart surgery by shunting blood away from the heart, oxygenating it, and returning it to the body
heart-stopper
noun see heart-stopping
heart-stopping
adjective Date: 1943 extremely shocking or exciting • heart-stopper noun
heart-to-heart
I. adjective Date: 1867 sincere, frank II. noun Date: 1910 a heart-to-heart conversation
heart-warmer
noun see heartwarming
heart-whole
adjective Date: 1600 1. heart-free 2. sincere, genuine
heartache
noun Date: 1602 anguish of mind ; sorrow
heartbeat
noun Date: 1850 1. one complete pulsation of the heart 2. the vital center or driving impulse 3. a brief space of time ; flash — used chiefly in the phrase in a heartbeat
heartbreak
noun Date: 14th century crushing grief, anguish, or distress
heartbreaker
noun Date: 1863 one that causes heartbreak
heartbreaking
adjective Date: 1586 1. a. causing intense sorrow or distress b. extremely trying or difficult 2. producing an intense emotional reaction or response • ...
heartbreakingly
adverb see heartbreaking
heartbroken
adjective Date: circa 1586 overcome by sorrow
heartburn
noun Date: 1597 a burning discomfort behind the lower part of the sternum due especially to spasmodic reflux of acid from the stomach into the esophagus
heartburning
noun Date: 1513 intense or rancorous jealousy or resentment
hearted
adjective Date: 13th century 1. having a heart especially of a specified kind — usually used in combination 2. seated in the heart
hearten
transitive verb (heartened; heartening) Date: 1526 to give heart to ; cheer Synonyms: see encourage • hearteningly adverb
hearteningly
adverb see hearten
heartfelt
adjective Date: 1722 deeply felt ; earnest Synonyms: see sincere
hearth
noun Etymology: Middle English herth, from Old English heorth; akin to Old High German herd hearth, and probably to Sanskrit kūḍayāti he scorches Date: before 12th century ...
hearthstone
noun Date: 14th century 1. stone forming a hearth 2. home
heartily
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a hearty manner 2. a. with all sincerity ; wholeheartedly b. with zest or gusto 3. wholly, thoroughly
heartiness
noun see hearty I
heartland
noun Date: 1904 a central area: as a. a central land area (as northern Eurasia) having strategic advantages b. the central geographical region of the United States in ...
heartless
adjective Date: 14th century 1. archaic spiritless 2. lacking feeling ; cruel • heartlessly adverb • heartlessness noun
heartlessly
adverb see heartless
heartlessness
noun see heartless
heartrending
adjective Date: 1594 heartbreaking 1a • heartrendingly adverb
heartrendingly
adverb see heartrending
heartsease
noun Date: 15th century 1. peace of mind ; tranquillity 2. any of various violas; especially Johnny-jump-up
heartsick
adjective Date: 1526 very despondent ; depressed • heartsickness noun
heartsickness
noun see heartsick
heartsome
adjective Date: 1596 chiefly Scottish giving spirit or vigor ; animating, enlivening • heartsomely adverb, chiefly Scottish
heartsomely
adverb see heartsome
heartsore
adjective Date: 1591 heartsick
heartstring
noun Date: 15th century 1. obsolete a nerve once believed to sustain the heart 2. the deepest emotions or affections
heartthrob
noun Date: 1839 1. the throb of a heart 2. a. sentimental emotion ; passion b. sweetheart; also a usually renowned man (as an entertainer) noted for his sex appeal
heartwarming
adjective Date: 1743 inspiring sympathetic feeling ; cheering • heart-warmer noun
heartwood
noun Date: 1810 the older harder nonliving central wood of trees that is usually darker, denser, less permeable, and more durable than the surrounding sapwood
heartworm
noun Date: 1888 a filarial worm (Dirofilaria immitis) that is a parasite especially in the right heart of dogs and is transmitted by mosquitoes; also infestation or disease ...
hearty
I. adjective (heartier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. a. giving unqualified support b. enthusiastically or exuberantly cordial ; jovial c. expressed unrestrainedly ...
heat
I. verb Etymology: Middle English heten, from Old English hǣtan; akin to Old English hāt hot Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to become warm or hot 2. to ...
heat cramps
noun plural Date: 1938 a condition that is marked by sudden development of cramps in skeletal muscles and that results from prolonged work or exercise in high temperatures ...
heat engine
noun Date: circa 1895 a mechanism (as an internal combustion engine) for converting heat energy into mechanical or electrical energy
heat exchanger
noun Date: 1902 a device (as an automobile radiator) for transferring heat from one fluid to another without allowing them to mix
heat exhaustion
noun Date: 1939 a condition marked by weakness, nausea, dizziness, and profuse sweating that results from physical exertion in a hot environment — called also heat ...
heat lightning
noun Date: 1810 vivid and extensive flashes of electric light without thunder seen near the horizon especially at the close of a hot day and ascribed to far-off lightning ...
heat prostration
noun see heat exhaustion
heat pump
noun Date: 1894 an apparatus for heating or cooling (as a building) by transferring heat by mechanical means from or to an external reservoir (as the ground, water, or outside ...
heat rash
noun Date: 1887 prickly heat
heat shield
noun Date: 1962 a barrier of ablative material to protect a space capsule from heat on its entry into an atmosphere
heat sink
noun Date: 1936 a substance or device that absorbs or dissipates especially unwanted heat (as from a process or an electronic device)
heat treater
noun see heat-treat
heat treatment
noun see heat-treat
heat wave
noun Date: 1893 a period of unusually hot weather
heat-shock protein
noun Date: 1978 any of a group of proteins that are produced especially in cells subjected to stressful conditions (as high temperature), that serve to ensure proper protein ...
heat-treat
transitive verb Date: 1907 to subject to heat; especially to treat (as metals) by heating and cooling in a way that will produce desired properties • heat treater noun ...
heatable
adjective see heat I
heated
adjective Date: 1886 marked by anger or passion • heatedly adverb
heatedly
adverb see heated
heater
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that heats; especially a device that imparts heat or holds something to be heated 2. fastball
heath
noun Etymology: Middle English heth, from Old English hǣth; akin to Old High German heida heather, Old Welsh coit forest Date: before 12th century 1. a. a tract of ...
Heath
biographical name Edward 1916- British prime minister (1970-74)
heath hen
noun Date: 1644 a now extinct grouse (Tympanuchus cupido cupido) of the northeastern U.S. — compare prairie chicken
heathen
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English hethen, from Old English hǣthen; akin to Old High German heidan heathen, and probably to Old English hǣth heath Date: before 12th ...
heathendom
noun see heathen II
heathenish
adjective Date: 1567 resembling or characteristic of heathens ; barbarous • heathenishly adverb
heathenishly
adverb see heathenish
heathenism
noun see heathen II
heathenize
transitive verb see heathen II
heather
I. noun Etymology: Middle English (northern) hather Date: 14th century heath 2a; especially a common Eurasian heath (Calluna vulgaris) of northern and alpine regions that ...
heathery
adjective Date: 1535 1. of, relating to, or resembling heather 2. having flecks of various colors
heathland
noun Date: 1819 heath 1
heathless
adjective see heath
heathlike
adjective see heath
heathy
adjective see heath
heatless
adjective see heat II
heatproof
adjective see heat II
heatstroke
noun Date: 1874 a condition marked especially by cessation of sweating, extremely high body temperature, and collapse that results from prolonged exposure to high temperature ...
heave
I. verb (heaved or hove; heaving) Etymology: Middle English heven, from Old English hebban; akin to Old High German hevan to lift, Latin capere to take Date: before 12th ...
heave to
phrasal to halt the headway of a ship (as by positioning a sailboat with the jib aback and the rudder turned sharply to windward)
heave-ho
noun Etymology: from heave ho!, interjection used when heaving on a rope Date: 1947 dismissal
heaven
noun Etymology: Middle English heven, from Old English heofon; akin to Old High German himil heaven Date: before 12th century 1. the expanse of space that seems to be over ...
heaven-sent
adjective Date: 1612 providential
heavenliness
noun see heavenly
heavenly
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. of or relating to heaven or the heavens ; celestial 2. a. suggesting the blessed state of heaven ; beatific b. delightful ...
heavenward
adverb or adjective Date: 13th century toward heaven
heavenwards
adverb Date: 1650 heavenward
heaver
noun see heave I
heavier-than-air
adjective Date: 1903 of greater weight than the air displaced
heavily
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. to a great degree ; severely 2. slowly and laboriously ; dully 3. archaic with sorrow ; grievously 4. in a heavy manner
heaviness
noun see heavy I
Heaviside
biographical name Oliver 1850-1925 English physicist
Heaviside layer
noun Etymology: Oliver Heaviside Date: 1912 ionosphere
heavy
I. adjective (heavier; -est) Etymology: Middle English hevy, from Old English hefig; akin to Old High German hebīc heavy, Old English hebban to lift — more at heave Date: ...
heavy bag
noun Date: circa 1949 punching bag 1
heavy chain
noun Date: 1964 either of the two larger of the four polypeptide chains comprising antibodies — compare light chain
heavy cream
noun Date: 1930 a cream that is markedly thick; especially cream that by law contains not less than 36 percent butterfat
heavy hitter
noun Date: 1976 big shot, heavy
heavy hydrogen
noun Date: 1933 deuterium
heavy lifting
noun Date: 1980 a burdensome or laborious duty
heavy metal
noun Date: 1973 energetic and highly amplified electronic rock music having a hard beat
heavy water
noun Date: 1933 1. the compound D2O composed of deuterium and oxygen — called also deuterium oxide 2. water enriched in deuterium
heavy-duty
adjective Date: 1914 1. able or designed to withstand unusual strain 2. intensive 3. important, prominent
heavy-footed
adjective Date: 1625 heavy and slow in movement
heavy-handed
adjective Date: 1647 1. clumsy 2. oppressive, harsh • heavy-handedly adverb • heavy-handedness noun
heavy-handedly
adverb see heavy-handed
heavy-handedness
noun see heavy-handed
heavyhearted
adjective Date: 14th century despondent, saddened • heavyheartedly adverb • heavyheartedness noun
heavyheartedly
adverb see heavyhearted
heavyheartedness
noun see heavyhearted
heavyset
adjective Date: 1922 stocky and compact and sometimes tending to stoutness in build
heavyweight
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1857 1. one that is above average in weight 2. one in the usually heaviest class of contestants: as a. a boxer in an unlimited ...
Heb
abbreviation Hebrew; Hebrews
Hebbel
biographical name (Christian) Friedrich 1813-1863 German dramatist
hebdomad
noun Etymology: Latin hebdomad-, hebdomas, from Greek, from hebdomos seventh, from hepta seven — more at seven Date: 1545 1. a group of seven 2. a period of seven days ; ...
hebdomadal
adjective Date: 1711 weekly • hebdomadally adverb
hebdomadally
adverb see hebdomadal
hebe
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: short for Hebrew Date: 1926 usually offensive Jew
Hebe
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hēbē Date: 1561 the Greek goddess of youth and a cupbearer to the gods
Hebei
or Hopeh or Hopei or formerly Chihli geographical name province NE China capital Shijiazhuang area 77,079 square miles (199,635 square kilometers), population 61,082,439
hebephrenia
noun Etymology: New Latin, irregular from Greek hēbētēs young adult (from hēbē youth) + English -phrenia; from the childish behavior which is often found with it Date: ...
hebephrenic
adjective or noun see hebephrenia
Heber
biographical name Reginald 1783-1826 English prelate & hymn writer
Hébert
I. biographical name Anne 1916-2000 Canadian novelist, poet, & dramatist II. biographical name Jacques-René 1757-1794 French radical journalist
hebetate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin hebetatus, past participle of hebetare, from hebet-, hebes dull Date: 1574 to make dull or obtuse • hebetation noun
hebetation
noun see hebetate
hebetude
noun Etymology: Late Latin hebetudo, from hebēre to be dull; akin to Latin hebes dull Date: circa 1621 lethargy, dullness • hebetudinous adjective
hebetudinous
adjective see hebetude
Hebraic
adjective Etymology: Middle English Ebrayke, from Late Latin Hebraicus, from Greek Hebraikos, from Hebraios Date: 14th century of, relating to, or characteristic of the ...
Hebraically
adverb see Hebraic
Hebraism
noun Date: 1570 1. a characteristic feature of Hebrew occurring in another language 2. the thought, spirit, or practice characteristic of the Hebrews 3. a moral theory or ...
Hebraist
noun Date: 1751 a specialist in Hebrew and Hebraic studies
Hebraistic
adjective Date: 1690 1. marked by Hebraisms 2. Hebraic
hebraization
noun see hebraize
hebraize
verb (-ized; -izing) Usage: often capitalized Date: 1645 intransitive verb to use Hebraisms transitive verb to make Hebraic in character or form • hebraization noun, ...
Hebrew
noun Etymology: Middle English Ebreu, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin Hebraeus, from Latin, adjective, from Greek Hebraios, from Aramaic ‘Ebrai Date: 13th century 1. ...
Hebrews
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 14th century a theological treatise addressed to early Christians and included as a book in the New Testament — see bible ...
Hebridean
adjective or noun see Hebrides
Hebrides
geographical name islands W Scotland in the Atlantic, divided by Little Minch into Inner Hebrides (near the mainland) & Outer Hebrides (to NW) area 2900 square miles (7540 ...
Hebron
or ancient Kirjath-arba geographical name city West Bank SSW of Jerusalem; governed by Palestinian Authority since 1997 population 79,087
Hecate
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hekatē Date: 1567 a Greek goddess associated especially with the underworld, night, and witchcraft
Hecate Strait
geographical name strait Canada in W British Columbia; inlet of the Pacific between Queen Charlotte Islands & the coast
hecatomb
noun Etymology: Latin hecatombe, from Greek hekatombē, from hekaton hundred + -bē; akin to Greek bous cow — more at hundred, cow Date: circa 1592 1. an ancient Greek and ...
heck
noun Etymology: euphemism Date: 1887 1. hell 2 2. hell 4
heckle
transitive verb (heckled; heckling) Etymology: Middle English hekelen to dress flax, scratch, from heckele hackle; akin to Old High German hāko hook — more at hook Date: ...
heckler
noun see heckle
Heckman
biographical name James Joseph 1944- American economist
Hecla
geographical name see Hekla
hect-
or hecto- combining form Etymology: French, irregular from Greek hekaton hundred
hectare
noun Etymology: French, from hect- + are 2are Date: 1810 — see metric system table
hectic
adjective Etymology: Middle English etyk, from Anglo-French etique, from Late Latin hecticus, from Greek hektikos habitual, consumptive, from echein to have — more at scheme ...
hectically
adverb see hectic
hecto-
combining form see hect-
hectogram
noun Etymology: French hectogramme, from hect- + gramme gram Date: 1810 — see metric system table
hectograph
noun Etymology: German Hektograph, from hekto- hect- + -graph -graph Date: 1880 a machine for making copies of a writing or drawing produced on a gelatin surface • ...
hectoliter
noun Etymology: French hectolitre, from hect- + litre liter Date: 1810 — see metric system table
hectometer
noun Etymology: French hectomètre, from hect- + mètre meter Date: 1810 — see metric system table
hector
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hektōr Date: 14th century 1. capitalized a son of Priam, husband of Andromache, and Trojan champion slain by Achilles 2. bully, ...
hectoringly
adverb see hector II
Hecuba
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hekabē the wife of Priam in Homer's Iliad
heddle
noun Etymology: probably alteration of Middle English helde, from Old English hefeld; akin to Old Norse hafald heddle, Old English hebban to lift — more at heave Date: 1513 ...
heder
also cheder noun Etymology: Yiddish kheyder, from Hebrew ḥedher room Date: 1882 an elementary Jewish school in which children are taught to read the Torah and other books ...
hedge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English hegge, from Old English hecg; akin to Old English haga hedge, hawthorn Date: before 12th century 1. a. a fence or boundary formed by a ...
hedge fund
noun Date: 1967 an investing group usually in the form of a limited partnership that employs speculative techniques in the hope of obtaining large capital gains
hedgehog
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. any of a subfamily (Erinaceinae) of Eurasian and African nocturnal insectivores that have both hair and spines which they present outwardly ...
hedgehop
intransitive verb Etymology: back-formation from hedgehopper Date: 1926 to fly an airplane close to the ground and rise over obstacles as they appear • hedgehopper noun
hedgehopper
noun see hedgehop
hedgepig
noun Date: 1605 hedgehog
hedger
noun see hedge II
hedgerow
noun Date: before 12th century a row of shrubs or trees enclosing or separating fields
hedgingly
adverb see hedge II
Hedin
biographical name Sven Anders 1865-1952 Swedish explorer
hedonic
adjective Date: 1656 1. of, relating to, or characterized by pleasure 2. of, relating to, or characterized by hedonism • hedonically adverb
hedonically
adverb see hedonic
hedonism
noun Etymology: Greek hēdonē pleasure; akin to Greek hēdys sweet — more at sweet Date: 1856 1. the doctrine that pleasure or happiness is the sole or chief good in life ...
hedonist
noun see hedonism
hedonistic
adjective see hedonism
hedonistically
adverb see hedonism
hee-haw
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1815 1. the bray of a donkey 2. a loud rude laugh ; guffaw • hee-haw intransitive verb
heebie-jeebies
noun plural Etymology: coined by Billy DeBeck died 1942 American cartoonist Date: 1923 jitters, creeps
heed
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hēdan; akin to Old High German huota guard, Old English hōd hood Date: before 12th century intransitive verb to pay ...
heedful
adjective Date: 1540 taking heed ; attentive • heedfully adverb • heedfulness noun
heedfully
adverb see heedful
heedfulness
noun see heedful
heedless
adjective Date: 1565 not taking heed ; inconsiderate, thoughtless • heedlessly adverb • heedlessness noun
heedlessly
adverb see heedless
heedlessness
noun see heedless
Heeger
biographical name Alan Jay 1936- American physicist
heel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hēla; akin to Old Norse hæll heel, Old English hōh — more at hock Date: before 12th century 1. a. the back of the ...
heel fly
noun Date: 1878 cattle grub
heel-and-toe
adjective Date: 1827 marked by a stride in which the heel of one foot touches the ground before the toe of the other foot leaves it
heelball
noun Date: 1822 a composition of wax and lampblack used by shoemakers for polishing and by antiquarians for making rubbings of inscriptions
heeler
noun Date: 1647 1. a. one that heels b. Australian cattle dog 2. a. a henchman of a local political boss b. a worker for a local party organization; especially ...
heelless
adjective see heel I
heelpiece
noun Date: 1705 a piece designed for or forming the heel (as of a shoe)
heeltap
noun Date: 1780 a small quantity of alcoholic beverage remaining (as in a glass after drinking)
Heem
biographical name Jan Davidsz de 1606-1683(or 1684) Dutch painter
Heerlen
geographical name commune SE Netherlands in Limburg NE of Maastricht population 95,001
Hefei
or Hofei or formerly Luchow geographical name city E China capital of Anhui W of Nanjing population 733,278
heft
I. noun Etymology: from heave, after such pairs as weave : weft Date: 15th century 1. a. weight, heaviness b. importance, influence 2. archaic the greater part of ...
heftily
adverb see hefty
heftiness
noun see hefty
hefty
adjective (heftier; -est) Date: 1863 1. quite heavy 2. a. marked by bigness, bulk, and usually strength b. powerful, mighty c. impressively large ; substantial ...
hegari
noun Etymology: Arabic dialect (Sudan) ḥijērī, perhaps alteration of Arabic ḥijārī stony Date: 1919 any of several Sudanese grain sorghums having chalky white seeds ...
Hegel
biographical name Georg Wilhelm Friedrich 1770-1831 German philosopher
Hegelian
I. adjective Date: 1838 of, relating to, or characteristic of Hegel, his philosophy, or his dialectic method II. noun Date: 1843 a follower of Hegel ; an adherent of ...
Hegelianism
noun Date: 1846 the philosophy of Hegel that places ultimate reality in ideas rather than in things and that uses dialectic to comprehend an absolute idea behind phenomena
hegemon
noun Etymology: Greek hēgemōn Date: 1904 one (as a political state) possessing hegemony
hegemonic
adjective see hegemony
hegemony
noun Etymology: Greek hēgemonia, from hēgemōn leader, from hēgeisthai to lead — more at seek Date: 1567 1. preponderant influence or authority over others ; domination ...
hegira
also hejira noun Etymology: the Hegira, flight of Muhammad from Mecca in A.D. 622, from Medieval Latin, from Arabic hijra, literally, departure Date: 1753 a journey ...
Hei-lung
geographical name see Amur
Heidegger
biographical name Martin 1889-1976 German philosopher • Heideggerian adjective
Heideggerian
adjective see Heidegger
Heidelberg
geographical name city SW Germany on the Neckar SE of Mannheim population 139,392
Heidelberg man
noun Etymology: Heidelberg, Germany Date: 1920 an early Pleistocene hominid known from a massive fossilized jaw with distinctly human dentition and classified with the direct ...
heifer
noun Etymology: Middle English hayfare, from Old English hēahfore Date: before 12th century a young cow; especially one that has not had a calf
Heifetz
biographical name Jascha 1901-1987 American (Russian-born) violinist
heigh-ho
interjection Date: circa 1520 — used typically to express boredom, weariness, or sadness or sometimes as a cry of encouragement
height
noun Etymology: Middle English heighthe, from Old English hīehthu; akin to Old High German hōhida height, Old English hēah high Date: before 12th century 1. a. the ...
height to paper
Date: 1771 the height of printing type standardized at 0.9186 inch (2.333 centimeters) in English-speaking countries
heighten
verb (heightened; heightening) Date: 1523 transitive verb 1. a. to increase the amount or degree of ; augment b. to make brighter or more intense ; deepen c. to ...
Heilbronn
geographical name city SW Germany on the Neckar N of Stuttgart population 117,427
Heilong
geographical name see Amur
Heilong, Hei-lung
geographical name — see Amur
Heilongjiang
or Heilungkiang geographical name province NE China in N Manchuria bordering on the Amur capital Harbin area 178,996 square miles (465,390 square kilometers), population ...
Heilungkiang
geographical name see Heilongjiang
Heimlich maneuver
noun Etymology: Henry J. Heimlich b1920 American surgeon Date: 1974 the manual application of sudden upward pressure on the upper abdomen of a choking victim to force a ...
Heine
biographical name Heinrich 1797-1856 German poet & critic
heinie
noun Etymology: alteration of 2hinder Date: 1921 slang buttocks
heinous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French hainus, heinous, from haine hate, from hair to hate, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German haz hate — more at ...
heinously
adverb see heinous
heinousness
noun see heinous
heir
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French eir, heir, from Latin hered-, heres; akin to Greek chēros bereaved Date: 13th century 1. one who inherits or is entitled ...
heir apparent
noun (plural heirs apparent) Date: 14th century 1. an heir whose right to an inheritance is indefeasible except by exclusion under a valid will if he or she survives the ...
heir at law
Date: 1684 heir 1

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