Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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heir presumptive
noun (plural heirs presumptive) Date: circa 1737 an heir whose legal right to an inheritance may be defeated (as by the birth of a nearer relative)
heiress
noun Date: 1607 a woman who is an heir especially to great wealth
heirless
adjective see heir I
heirloom
noun Etymology: Middle English heirlome, from heir + lome implement — more at loom Date: 15th century 1. a piece of property that descends to the heir as an inseparable ...
heirship
noun see heir I
Heisenberg
biographical name Werner Karl 1901-1976 German physicist
Heisenberg uncertainty principle
noun Etymology: Werner Heisenberg Date: 1939 uncertainty principle — called also Heisenberg's uncertainty principle
Heisenberg's uncertainty principle
noun see Heisenberg uncertainty principle
heist
I. transitive verb Etymology: variant of 1hoist Date: 1865 1. chiefly dialect hoist 2. a. to commit armed robbery on b. steal 1a II. noun Date: 1930 armed robbery ...
Hejaz
or Al Ḩijāz geographical name region W Saudi Arabia on Red Sea; a viceroyalty capital Mecca area 134,600 square miles (348,614 square kilometers), population 1,400,000
hejira
noun see hegira
Hekla
or Hecla geographical name volcano 4747 feet (1447 meters) SW Iceland
Hel
noun Etymology: Old Norse Date: 1844 the Norse goddess of the dead and queen of the underworld
hela cell
noun Usage: often capitalized H & 1st L Etymology: Henrietta Lacks died 1951 patient from whom the cells were taken Date: 1953 a cell of a continuously cultured strain ...
held
past and past participle of hold
heldentenor
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: German, from Held hero + Tenor tenor Date: circa 1903 a tenor with a powerful dramatic voice well suited to heroic (as ...
Helen of Troy
Date: 1510 the wife of Menelaus whose abduction by Paris brings about the Trojan War
Helena
geographical name city W central Montana, its capital population 25,780
Helgoland
or Heligoland geographical name island NW Germany in North Sea, in North Frisian Islands
heli-
I. combining form or helio- Etymology: Latin, from Greek hēli-, hēlio-, from hēlios — more at solar sun II. combining form Etymology: by shortening helicopter
heli-skiing
noun Date: 1976 downhill skiing on remote mountains reached by helicopter
heliacal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin heliacus, from Greek hēliakos, from hēlios Date: 1545 relating to or near the sun — used especially of the last setting of a star before ...
heliacally
adverb see heliacal
helic-
or helico- combining form Etymology: Greek helik-, heliko-, from helik-, helix spiral — more at helix helix ; spiral
helical
adjective Date: 1591 of, relating to, or having the form of a helix; broadly spiral 1a • helically adverb
helically
adverb see helical
helico-
combining form see helic-
helicoid
or helicoidal adjective Date: circa 1704 1. forming or arranged in a spiral 2. having the form of a flat coil or flattened spiral
helicoidal
adjective see helicoid
helicon
noun Etymology: probably from Greek helik-, helix + English -on (as in bombardon); from its tube's forming a spiral encircling the player's body Date: circa 1875 a large ...
Helicon
or Modern Greek Elikón geographical name mountain 5735 feet (1748 meters) E central Greece in SW Boeotia near Gulf of Corinth
heliconia
noun Etymology: New Latin, ultimately from Greek Helikōnios, from Helikōn Helicon, mountain in Greece Date: 1838 any of a genus (Heliconia of the family Heliconiaceae) of ...
helicopter
I. noun Etymology: French hélicoptère, from Greek heliko- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1887 an aircraft whose lift is derived from the aerodynamic forces acting ...
Heligoland
geographical name see Helgoland
helio-
combining form see heli- I
heliocentric
adjective Date: 1685 1. referred to or measured from the sun's center or appearing as if seen from it 2. having or relating to the sun as center — compare geocentric
Heliogabalus
biographical name — see Elagabalus
heliograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 an apparatus for telegraphing by means of the sun's rays flashed from a mirror • heliograph transitive verb
heliographic
adjective Date: 1706 measured on the sun's disk
heliolatrous
adjective see heliolatry
heliolatry
noun Date: circa 1828 sun worship • heliolatrous adjective
heliometer
noun Etymology: French héliomètre, from hélio- 1heli- + -mètre -meter Date: 1753 a visual telescope that has a divided objective designed for measuring the apparent ...
heliometric
adjective see heliometer
heliometrically
adverb see heliometer
Heliopolis
geographical name 1. — see Baalbek 2. ancient ruined city N Egypt NE of modern Cairo
Helios
noun Etymology: Greek Hēlios Date: 1829 the god of the sun in Greek mythology — compare sol
heliosphere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1976 the region in space influenced by the sun or solar wind • heliospheric adjective
heliospheric
adjective see heliosphere
heliostat
noun Etymology: New Latin heliostata, from 1heli- + Greek -statēs -stat Date: 1747 an instrument consisting of a mirror mounted on an axis moved by clockwork by which a ...
heliotrope
noun Etymology: Latin heliotropium, from Greek hēliotropion, from hēlio- 1heli- + tropos turn; from its flowers' turning toward the sun — more at trope Date: 1605 1. any ...
heliotropic
adjective see heliotropism
heliotropism
noun Date: circa 1854 phototropism in which sunlight is the orienting stimulus • heliotropic adjective
heliozoan
noun Etymology: New Latin Heliozoa, from 1heli- + -zoa Date: circa 1889 any of a class (Heliozoa) of free-living spherical usually freshwater protozoans that reproduce by ...
helipad
noun Date: 1960 heliport
heliport
noun Date: 1948 a landing and takeoff place for a helicopter
helium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hēlios Date: 1872 a light colorless inert gaseous element found especially in natural gases and used chiefly for inflating airships and ...
helix
noun (plural helices; also helixes) Etymology: Latin, from Greek; akin to Greek eilyein to roll, wrap — more at voluble Date: 1563 1. something spiral in form: as a. an ...
hell
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old English helan to conceal, Old High German helan, Latin celare, Greek kalyptein Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
Hell Gate
geographical name a narrow part of East River in New York City between Long Island & Manhattan Island
hell on
phrasal very hard on or destructive to
hell or high water
phrasal difficulties of whatever kind or size
hell to pay
phrasal dire consequences
hell-bent
adjective Date: 1835 stubbornly and often recklessly determined or intent • hell-bent adverb
hell-for-leather
I. adverb Date: 1889 in a hell-for-leather manner ; at full speed II. adjective Date: 1920 marked by determined recklessness, great speed, or lack of restraint
hell-raiser
noun Date: 1914 one given to wild, boisterous, or intemperate behavior • hell-raising noun or adjective
hell-raising
noun or adjective see hell-raiser
hellacious
adjective Etymology: hell + -acious (as in audacious) Date: 1929 1. exceptionally powerful or violent 2. remarkably good 3. extremely difficult 4. extraordinarily ...
hellaciously
adverb see hellacious
Hellas
geographical name — see Greece
hellbender
noun Date: 1812 a large aquatic usually brownish-gray salamander (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) of streams of the eastern and central United States
hellbroth
noun Date: 1605 a brew for working black magic
hellcat
noun Date: circa 1605 1. witch 2 2. a violently temperamental person; especially an ill-tempered woman
hellebore
noun Etymology: Middle English elebre, from Anglo-French, from Latin elleborus, helleborus, from Greek helleboros Date: 15th century 1. any of a genus (Helleborus) of ...
Hellene
noun Etymology: Greek Hellēn Date: 1662 Greek 1a
Hellenic
I. adjective Date: 1644 of or relating to Greece, its people, or its language; specifically of or relating to ancient Greek history, culture, or art before the Hellenistic ...
Hellenism
noun Date: 1609 1. Grecism 1 2. devotion to or imitation of ancient Greek thought, customs, or styles 3. Greek civilization especially as modified in the Hellenistic ...
Hellenist
noun Date: 1613 1. a person living in Hellenistic times who was Greek in language, outlook, and way of life but was not Greek in ancestry; especially a hellenized Jew 2. a ...
Hellenistic
adjective Date: circa 1706 1. of or relating to Greek history, culture, or art after Alexander the Great 2. of or relating to the Hellenists • Hellenistically adverb
Hellenistically
adverb see Hellenistic
hellenization
noun see hellenize
hellenize
verb (-nized; -nizing) Usage: often capitalized Date: 1613 intransitive verb to become Greek or Hellenistic transitive verb to make Greek or Hellenistic in form or ...
heller
noun Date: circa 1895 hellion
Heller
biographical name Joseph 1923-99 American novelist
Helles, Cape
geographical name headland Turkey in Europe at S tip of Gallipoli Peninsula
Hellespont
geographical name see Dardanelles
Hellespont, Hellespontus
geographical name — see Dardanelles
Hellespontus
geographical name see Dardanelles
hellfire
noun Date: before 12th century the eternal fire of hell that tortures sinners • hellfire adjective
hellgrammite
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1866 a carnivorous aquatic North American insect larva that is the young form of a dobsonfly (especially Corydalis cornutus) and is used ...
hellhole
noun Date: 1866 a place of extreme misery or squalor
hellhound
noun Date: before 12th century 1. a dog represented in mythology as a guardian of the underworld 2. a fiendish person
hellion
noun Etymology: probably alteration (influenced by hell) of hallion scamp Date: 1787 a troublesome or mischievous person
hellish
adjective Date: circa 1530 of, resembling, or befitting hell; broadly terrible • hellishly adverb • hellishness noun
hellishly
adverb see hellish
hellishness
noun see hellish
Hellman
biographical name Lillian 1905-1984 American dramatist
hello
noun (plural hellos) Etymology: alteration of hollo Date: 1877 an expression or gesture of greeting — used interjectionally in greeting, in answering the telephone, or to ...
Hells Canyon
geographical name canyon of Snake River on Idaho-Oregon border; deepest in the United States
helm
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English Date: before 12th century helmet 1 II. transitive verb Date: before 12th century to cover or furnish with a helmet III. ...
Helmand
or Helmund geographical name river SW Afghanistan flowing SW & W into swamps on Iran border
helmet
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, diminutive of helme helmet, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English helm helmet, Old High German helan to conceal — more at ...
helmeted
adjective see helmet
helmetlike
adjective see helmet
Helmholtz
biographical name Hermann (Ludwig Ferdinand) von 1821-1894 German physicist, anatomist, & physiologist
helminth
noun Etymology: Greek helminth-, helmis Date: 1852 a parasitic worm (as a tapeworm, liver fluke, ascarid, or leech); especially an intestinal worm • helminthic adjective
helminthiasis
noun (plural helminthiases) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1811 infestation with or disease caused by parasitic worms
helminthic
adjective see helminth
helminthology
noun Date: 1819 a branch of zoology concerned with helminths; especially the study of parasitic worms
Helmond
geographical name commune S Netherlands population 70,574
helmsman
noun Date: 1590 the person at the helm ; steersman • helmsmanship noun
helmsmanship
noun see helmsman
helmsperson
noun Date: 1981 helmsman
Helmstedt
geographical name city central Germany E of Brunswick near former East Germany-West Germany border population 27,072
Helmund
geographical name see Helmand
helo
noun (plural helos) Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1968 helicopter
Héloïse
biographical name circa 1098-1164 wife of Abelard French abbess
helot
noun Etymology: Latin Helotes, plural, from Greek Heilōtes Date: 1579 1. capitalized a member of a class of serfs in ancient Sparta 2. serf, slave • helotry noun
helotry
noun see helot
help
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English helpan; akin to Old High German helfan to help, and perhaps to Lithuanian šelpti Date: before 12th century transitive ...
helper
noun Date: 13th century one that helps; especially a relatively unskilled worker who assists a skilled worker usually by manual labor
helper cell
noun see helper T cell
helper T cell
noun Date: 1974 a T cell that participates in an immune response by recognizing a foreign antigen and secreting lymphokines to activate T cell and B cell proliferation and ...
helpful
adjective Date: 14th century of service or assistance ; useful • helpfully adverb • helpfulness noun
helpfully
adverb see helpful
helpfulness
noun see helpful
helping
noun Date: 1883 1. a portion of food ; serving 2. dose 3
helping hand
noun Date: 15th century hand 8a
helping verb
noun Date: 1711 an auxiliary verb
helpless
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. lacking protection or support ; defenseless 2. a. marked by an inability to act or react b. not able to be controlled or ...
helplessly
adverb see helpless
helplessness
noun see helpless
helpmate
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from helpmeet Date: 1696 one who is a companion and helper; especially wife
helpmeet
noun Etymology: 2help + meet, adjective Date: 1673 helpmate
Helsingborg
or Hälsingborg geographical name city & port SW Sweden on Øresund opposite Helsingør, Denmark population 108,359
Helsingfors
geographical name see Helsinki
Helsingør
geographical name city & port Denmark on N Sjælland Island population 56,754
Helsinki
or Sw Helsingfors geographical name city & port capital of Finland on Gulf of Finland population 490,629
helter-skelter
I. adverb Etymology: perhaps from Middle English skelten to come, go Date: 1593 1. in undue haste, confusion, or disorder
helve
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hielfe; probably akin to Old English helma helm Date: before 12th century a handle of a tool or weapon ; haft
Helvellyn
geographical name mountain 3118 feet (950 meters) NW England in Cumbria SW of Ullswater
Helvetia
geographical name — see Switzerland • Helvetian adjective or noun
Helvetian
adjective or noun see Helvetia
Helvetii
noun plural Etymology: Latin Date: 1781 an early Celtic people in the area of western Switzerland at the time of Julius Caesar
Helvétius
biographical name Claude-Adrien 1715-1771 French philosopher
hem
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Middle High German hemmen to hem in, Armenian kamel to press Date: before 12th century 1. a border of a cloth ...
hem-
or hemo- combining form Etymology: Latin haem-, haemo-, from Greek haim-, haimo-, from haima blood
hema-
combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek haima hem-
hemacytometer
noun Date: 1877 an instrument for counting blood cells
hemagglutinate
transitive verb see hemagglutination
hemagglutination
noun Date: 1907 agglutination of red blood cells • hemagglutinate transitive verb
hemagglutinin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1903 an agglutinin (as an antibody or viral capsid protein) that causes hemagglutination
hemangioma
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hem- + angioma Date: circa 1890 a usually benign tumor made up of blood vessels that typically occurs as a purplish or reddish slightly ...
Hemans
biographical name Felicia Dorothea 1793-1835 née Browne English poet
hemat-
or hemato- combining form Etymology: Latin haemat-, haemato-, from Greek haimat-, haimato-, from haimat-, haima hem-
hematin
noun Date: 1845 a brownish-black or bluish-black derivative C34H33N4O5Fe of oxidized heme; also any of several similar compounds
hematinic
noun Date: 1855 an agent that tends to stimulate blood cell formation or to increase the hemoglobin in the blood • hematinic adjective
hematite
noun Date: 1540 a reddish-brown to black mineral consisting of ferric oxide, constituting an important iron ore, and occurring in crystals or as earthy red ocher • ...
hematitic
adjective see hematite
hemato-
combining form see hemat-
hematocrit
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hemat- + Greek kritēs judge, from krinein to judge — more at certain Date: circa 1903 the ratio of the volume of red ...
hematogenous
adjective Date: 1886 1. producing blood 2. involving, spread by, or arising in the blood
hematologic
also hematological adjective Date: 1854 of or relating to blood or to hematology
hematological
adjective see hematologic
hematologist
noun see hematology
hematology
noun Date: circa 1811 a medical science that deals with the blood and blood-forming organs • hematologist noun
hematoma
noun (plural -mas; also hematomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1849 a mass of usually clotted blood that forms in a tissue, organ, or body space as a result of a broken ...
hematophagous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1854 feeding on blood
hematopoiesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1854 the formation of blood or of blood cells in the living body • hematopoietic adjective
hematopoietic
adjective see hematopoiesis
hematoporphyrin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1885 any of several isomeric porphyrins C34H38O6N4 that are hydrated derivatives of protoporphyrins; especially the ...
hematoxylin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin Haematoxylon, plant genus Date: circa 1847 a crystalline phenolic compound C16H14O6 found in logwood and ...
hematuria
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1811 the presence of blood or blood cells in the urine
heme
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from hematin Date: 1925 the deep red iron-containing prosthetic group C34H32N4O4Fe of hemoglobin and myoglobin
hemelytron
noun (plural hemelytra) Etymology: New Latin, from hemi- + elytron Date: circa 1889 one of the basally thickened anterior wings of various insects (as true bugs)
hemerocallis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hēmerokalles, from hēmera day + kallos beauty Date: 1625 daylily
hemerythrin
noun Etymology: hem- + erythr- + 1-in Date: 1903 an iron-containing respiratory pigment in the blood of various chiefly marine invertebrates (as some brachiopods)
Hemet
geographical name city SE California SE of San Bernardino population 58,812
hemi-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek hēmi- — more at semi- half
hemiacetal
noun Date: 1893 any of a class of compounds characterized by the grouping C(OH)(OR) where R is an alkyl group and usually formed as intermediates in the preparation of acetals ...
hemic
adjective Date: 1857 of, relating to, or produced by the blood or the circulation of blood
hemicellulose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1891 any of various plant polysaccharides less complex than cellulose and easily hydrolyzable to monosaccharides and ...
hemichordate
noun Etymology: New Latin Hemichordata, from hemi- + Chordata chordates Date: 1885 any of a phylum (Hemichordata) of wormlike marine animals (as an acorn worm) that have in ...
hemicycle
noun Etymology: Latin hemicyclium, from Greek hēmikyklion, from hēmi- + kyklos circle — more at cycle Date: 15th century a curved or semicircular structure or arrangement
hemidemisemiquaver
noun Date: 1853 sixty-fourth note
hemihedral
adjective Etymology: hemi- + -hedron Date: 1837 of a crystal having half the faces required by complete symmetry — compare holohedral, tetartohedral
hemihydrate
noun Date: circa 1901 a hydrate (as plaster of paris) containing half a mole of water to one mole of the compound forming the hydrate • hemihydrated adjective
hemihydrated
adjective see hemihydrate
hemimetabolous
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Greek hemi- + metabolos changeable, from metabolē change — more at metabolism Date: 1870 characterized by incomplete metamorphosis ...
hemimorphic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 of a crystal having different crystalline forms at each end of a crystallographic axis • ...
hemimorphism
noun see hemimorphic
hemin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1857 a red-brown to blue-black crystalline salt C34H32N4O4FeCl derived from oxidized heme but usually obtained ...
Heminge
or Hemminge biographical name John circa 1556-1630 English actor
Hemingway
biographical name Ernest Miller 1899-1961 American writer & journalist • Hemingwayesque adjective
Hemingwayesque
adjective see Hemingway
hemiola
noun Etymology: Late Latin hemiolia, from Greek hēmiolia ratio of one and a half to one, from hēmi- + holos whole — more at safe Date: circa 1934 a musical rhythmic ...
hemiplegia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Middle Greek hēmiplēgia paralysis, from Greek hēmi- + -plēgia -plegia Date: 1600 total or partial paralysis of one side of the body that ...
hemiplegic
adjective or noun see hemiplegia
hemipteran
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek hēmi- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: circa 1864 any of a large order (Hemiptera) of hemimetabolous insects (as the true bugs) ...
hemipterous
adjective see hemipteran
hemisphere
noun Etymology: Middle English hemispere, from Latin hemisphaerium, from Greek hēmisphairion, from hēmi- + sphairion, diminutive of sphaira sphere Date: 14th century 1. ...
hemispherectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1941 surgical removal of a cerebral hemisphere
hemispheric
adjective see hemisphere
hemispherical
adjective see hemisphere
hemistich
noun Etymology: Latin hemistichium, from Greek hēmistichion, from hēmi- + stichos line, verse; akin to Greek steichein to go — more at stair Date: 1575 half a poetic line ...
hemizygous
adjective Date: circa 1921 having or characterized by one or more genes (as in a genetic deficiency or in an X chromosome paired with a Y chromosome) that have no allelic ...
hemline
noun Date: 1923 the line formed by the lower edge of a dress, skirt, or coat
hemlock
noun Etymology: Middle English hemlok, from Old English hemlic Date: before 12th century 1. a. any of several poisonous herbs (as a poison hemlock or a water hemlock) of ...
hemmer
noun see hem II
Hemminge
biographical name see Heminge
hemo-
— see hem-
hemochromatosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hem- + chromat- + -osis Date: 1899 a hereditary disorder of metabolism involving the deposition of iron-containing pigments in the tissues ...
hemocoel
noun Date: 1839 a body cavity (as in arthropods or some mollusks) that contains blood or hemolymph and functions as part of the circulatory system
hemocyanin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hem- + cyan- + 1-in Date: 1885 a copper-containing respiratory pigment in the circulatory fluid of various arthropods and ...
hemocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1903 a blood cell especially of an invertebrate animal
hemocytometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 hemacytometer
hemodialysis
noun Date: 1947 dialysis 2
hemodilution
noun Date: 1939 decreased concentration of cells and solids in the blood resulting from gain of fluid
hemodynamic
adjective Date: 1907 1. of, relating to, or involving hemodynamics 2. relating to or functioning in the mechanics of blood circulation • hemodynamically adverb
hemodynamically
adverb see hemodynamic
hemodynamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1857 1. a branch of physiology that deals with the circulation of the blood 2. the forces or mechanisms ...
hemoflagellate
noun Date: 1909 a flagellate (as a trypanosome) that is a blood parasite
hemoglobin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, short for earlier hematoglobulin Date: 1869 1. an iron-containing respiratory pigment of vertebrate red blood cells that ...
hemoglobin S
noun Date: 1954 an abnormal hemoglobin that occurs in the red blood cells in sickle-cell anemia and sickle-cell trait
hemoglobinopathy
noun (plural -thies) Date: 1957 a blood disorder (as sickle-cell anemia) caused by a genetically determined change in the molecular structure of hemoglobin
hemoglobinuria
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1866 the presence of free hemoglobin in the urine • hemoglobinuric adjective
hemoglobinuric
adjective see hemoglobinuria
hemolymph
noun Date: 1885 the circulatory fluid of various invertebrate animals that is functionally comparable to the blood and lymph of vertebrates
hemolysin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1900 a substance that causes the dissolution of red blood cells
hemolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1890 lysis of red blood cells with liberation of hemoglobin • hemolytic adjective
hemolytic
adjective see hemolysis
hemolytic anemia
noun Date: 1938 anemia caused by excessive destruction (as in infection or sickle-cell anemia) of red blood cells
hemolytic disease of the newborn
Date: 1948 erythroblastosis fetalis
hemolytic uremic syndrome
noun Date: 1965 any of a group of rare disorders occurring especially in young children that are characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and varying degrees of ...
hemolyze
verb (-lyzed; -lyzing) Etymology: irregular from hemolysis Date: 1902 transitive verb to cause hemolysis of intransitive verb to undergo hemolysis
hemophilia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1872 a sex-linked hereditary blood defect that occurs almost exclusively in males and is characterized by delayed clotting of the blood and ...
hemophiliac
I. adjective Date: 1896 of, resembling, or affected with hemophilia II. noun Date: 1897 one affected with hemophilia — called also bleeder
hemophilic
noun or adjective Date: 1864 hemophiliac
hemopoiesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 hematopoiesis • hemopoietic adjective
hemopoietic
adjective see hemopoiesis
hemoprotein
noun Date: 1948 a conjugated protein (as hemoglobin or cytochrome) whose prosthetic group is a porphyrin combined with iron
hemoptysis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from hem- + Greek ptysis act of spitting, from ptyein to spit — more at spew Date: 1646 expectoration of blood from some part of the respiratory ...
hemorrhage
I. noun Etymology: Latin haemorrhagia, from Greek haimorrhagia, from haimo- hem- + -rrhagia Date: 1671 1. a copious discharge of blood from the blood vessels 2. a rapid and ...
hemorrhagic
adjective see hemorrhage I
hemorrhagic fever
noun Date: 1948 any of a diverse group of virus diseases (as Lassa fever and Ebola) that are usually transmitted by arthropods or rodents and are characterized by a sudden ...
hemorrhoid
noun Etymology: Middle English emeroides, plural, from Anglo-French emorroides, from Latin haemorrhoidae, from Greek haimorrhoides, from haimorrhoos flowing with blood, from ...
hemorrhoidal
I. noun Date: 15th century a hemorrhoidal part (as an artery or vein) II. adjective Date: 1651 1. of, relating to, or involving hemorrhoids 2. rectal
hemosiderin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hem- + sider- + 1-in Date: circa 1885 a yellowish-brown granular intracellular pigment that is formed in some phagocytic ...
hemostasis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek haimostasis styptic, from haimo- hem- + -stasis Date: 1843 arrest of bleeding
hemostat
noun Date: circa 1900 hemostatic; especially an instrument for compressing a bleeding vessel
hemostatic
I. noun Date: circa 1706 a hemostatic agent II. adjective Date: 1834 1. of or caused by hemostasis 2. serving to check bleeding
hemp
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hænep; akin to Old High German hanaf hemp, Greek kannabis Date: before 12th century 1. a. a tall widely cultivated Asian ...
hemp nettle
noun Date: 1801 any of a genus (Galeopsis) of coarse Old World herbs of the mint family; especially a bristly Eurasian herb (G. tetrahit) naturalized in North America as a ...
hempen
adjective Date: 14th century composed of hemp
Hempstead
geographical name village SE New York on Long Island population 56,554
hemstitch
I. transitive verb Date: 1839 to decorate (as a border) with hemstitch • hemstitcher noun II. noun Date: 1853 1. decorative needlework similar to drawnwork that is used ...
hemstitcher
noun see hemstitch I
hen
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English henn; akin to Old English hana rooster — more at chant Date: before 12th century 1. a. a female chicken especially over ...
hen and chickens
noun Date: 1884 any of several plants having offsets, runners, or flowers that send out shoots; especially houseleek
hen party
noun Date: circa 1885 a party for women only
hen scratch
noun see hen track
hen track
noun Date: 1878 an illegible or scarcely legible mark intended as handwriting — called also hen scratch
Henan
or Honan geographical name province E central China capital Zhengzhou area 64,479 square miles (167,645 square kilometers), population 85,509,535
henbane
noun Date: 14th century a poisonous fetid Eurasian herb (Hyoscyamus niger) of the nightshade family with yellowish-brown flowers and sticky hairy leaves that yield ...
henbit
noun Date: 1597 a Eurasian herb (Lamium amplexicaule) of the mint family that has small scalloped leaves and purplish flowers and is naturalized in North America
hence
adverb Etymology: Middle English hennes, henne, from Old English heonan; akin to Old High German hinnan away, Old English hēr here Date: 13th century 1. from this place ; ...

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