Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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henceforth
adverb Date: 14th century from this point on
henceforward
adverb Date: 14th century henceforth
Hench
biographical name Philip Showalter 1896-1965 American physician
henchman
noun Etymology: Middle English henshman, hengestman groom, from hengest stallion (from Old English) + man; akin to Old High German hengist gelding Date: 15th century 1. ...
hendecasyllabic
adjective Etymology: Latin hendecasyllabus, from Greek hendeka eleven (from hen-, heis one + deka ten) + syllabē syllable — more at same, ten Date: circa 1751 consisting ...
hendecasyllable
noun see hendecasyllabic
Henderson
I. biographical name Arthur 1863-1935 British labor leader & statesman II. biographical name Sir Nevile Meyrick 1882-1942 British diplomat III. geographical name 1. city ...
Hendersonville
geographical name city N Tennessee NE of Nashville population 40,620
hendiadys
noun Etymology: Late Latin hendiadys, hendiadyoin, modification of Greek hen dia dyoin, literally, one through two Date: circa 1577 the expression of an idea by the use of ...
Hendon
geographical name urban district SE England in Middlesex; part of Barnet
Hendricks
biographical name Thomas Andrews 1819-1885 American politician; vice president of the United States (1885)
henequen
noun Etymology: Spanish henequén Date: 1880 a strong yellowish or reddish hard fiber obtained from the leaves of a tropical American agave (Agave fourcroydes) found chiefly ...
Hengelo
geographical name commune E Netherlands in Overijssel population 76,726
Hengest
biographical name see Hengist
Hengist
or Hengest; & his brother Horsa biographical name 5th century Jute invaders of Britain
Hengyang
geographical name city SE central China in SE Hunan on the Xiang population 487,148
henhouse
noun Date: 1509 a house or shelter for fowl
Henle's loop
noun Date: circa 1890 loop of Henle
Henley
I. biographical name William Ernest 1849-1903 English editor & author II. geographical name or Henley on Thames town SE central England in Oxfordshire W of London population ...
Henley on Thames
geographical name see Henley II
Henlopen, Cape
geographical name headland SE Delaware at entrance to Delaware Bay
henna
I. noun Etymology: Arabic ḥinnā' Date: 1600 1. a reddish-brown dye obtained from leaves of the henna plant and used especially on hair 2. an Old World tropical shrub or ...
Hennepin
biographical name Louis 1626-after 1701 Belgian friar & explorer in America
hennery
noun (plural -neries) Date: 1850 a poultry farm; also an enclosure for poultry
henotheism
noun Etymology: German Henotheismus, from Greek hen-, heis one + theos god — more at same Date: 1860 the worship of one god without denying the existence of other gods • ...
henotheist
noun see henotheism
henotheistic
adjective see henotheism
henpeck
transitive verb Date: 1671 to subject (one's husband) to persistent nagging and domination
Henri
biographical name Robert 1865-1929 American painter
henry
noun (plural henrys or henries) Etymology: Joseph Henry Date: circa 1890 the practical meter-kilogram-second unit of inductance equal to the self-inductance of a circuit or ...
Henry
I. biographical name name of 8 kings of England: I 1068-1135 (reigned 1100-35); II 1133-1189 (reigned 1154-89); III 1207-1272 (reigned 1216-72); IV 1366-1413 (reigned ...
Henry, Cape
geographical name headland SE Virginia S of entrance to Chesapeake Bay
Henslowe
biographical name Philip circa 1550-1616 English theater manager
Henson
I. biographical name James Maury 1936-1990 American puppeteer II. biographical name Matthew Alexander 1866-1955 American polar explorer
hent
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hentan — more at hunt Date: before 12th century archaic seize
hep
I. interjection Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1862 — used to mark a marching cadence II. adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1903 hip IV
heparin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek hēpar liver Date: 1918 a mucopolysaccharide sulfuric acid ester that is found especially in the liver and ...
heparinized
adjective see heparin
hepat-
or hepato- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek hēpat-, hēpato-, from hēpat-, hēpar; akin to Latin jecur liver 1. liver 2. hepatic and
hepatectomized
adjective see hepatectomy
hepatectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1890 excision of the liver or of part of the liver • hepatectomized adjective
hepatic
I. adjective Etymology: Latin hepaticus, from Greek hēpatikos, from hēpat-, hēpar Date: 1599 of, relating to, affecting, associated with, supplying, or draining the liver ...
hepatica
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin, liverwort, from Latin, feminine of hepaticus Date: 1578 any of a genus (Hepatica) of herbs of the buttercup family with lobed ...
hepatitis
noun (plural hepatitides; also -titises) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1751 1. inflammation of the liver 2. a disease or condition (as hepatitis A or hepatitis B) marked ...
hepatitis A
noun Date: 1972 an acute usually benign hepatitis caused by a picornavirus (species Hepatitis A virus of the genus Hepatovirus) that does not persist in the blood serum and is ...
hepatitis B
noun Date: 1971 a sometimes fatal hepatitis caused by a double-stranded DNA virus (species Hepatitis B virus of the genus Orthohepadnavirus, family Hepadnaviridae) that tends ...
hepatitis C
noun Date: 1978 a hepatitis caused by a flavivirus (species Hepatitis C virus of the genus Hepacivirus) that tends to persist in the blood serum and is usually transmitted by ...
hepato-
combining form see hepat-
hepatocellular
adjective Date: 1940 of or involving hepatocytes
hepatocyte
noun Date: 1965 an epithelial parenchymatous cell of the liver
hepatoma
noun (plural -mas; also hepatomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1905 a usually malignant tumor of the liver
hepatomegaly
noun (plural -lies) Date: circa 1901 enlargement of the liver
hepatopancreas
noun Date: 1884 a glandular structure (as of a crustacean) that combines the digestive functions of the vertebrate liver and pancreas
hepatotoxic
adjective Date: 1926 relating to or causing injury to the liver
hepatotoxicity
noun Date: 1952 1. a state of toxic damage to the liver 2. a tendency or capacity to cause hepatotoxicity
Hepburn
biographical name Katharine 1907- American actress
hepcat
noun Date: 1937 hipster
Hephaestus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hēphaistos Date: 1658 the Greek god of fire and metalworking — compare Vulcan
hepped up
adjective Etymology: alteration of 3hipped Date: 1939 enthusiastic
Hepplewhite
I. adjective Etymology: George Hepplewhite Date: 1897 of, relating to, or imitating a style of furniture originating in late 18th century England II. biographical name ...
hept-
combining form see hepta-
hepta-
or hept- combining form Etymology: Greek, from hepta — more at seven 1. seven 2. containing seven atoms, groups, or equivalents
heptachlor
noun Etymology: hepta- + chlorine Date: 1949 a cyclodiene chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide C10H5Cl7 that causes liver disease in animals and is a suspected human carcinogen
heptad
noun Etymology: Greek heptad-, heptas, from hepta Date: 1660 a group of seven
heptagon
noun Etymology: Greek heptagōnos heptagonal, from hepta + gōnia angle — more at -gon Date: 1570 a polygon of seven angles and seven sides • heptagonal adjective
heptagonal
adjective see heptagon
heptameter
noun Date: circa 1849 a line of verse consisting of seven metrical feet
heptane
noun Date: 1877 any of several isomeric alkanes C7H16; especially the liquid normal isomer occurring in petroleum and used especially as a solvent and in determining octane ...
heptarchy
noun Date: 1576 a hypothetical confederacy of seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of the seventh and eighth centuries
Heptateuch
noun Etymology: Late Latin heptateuchos, from Greek, from hepta + teuchos book — more at Pentateuch Date: 1678 the first seven books of the canonical Jewish and Christian ...
heptathlete
noun Etymology: blend of heptathlon and athlete Date: 1981 an athlete who competes in a heptathlon
heptathlon
noun Etymology: hept- + -athlon (as in decathlon) Date: 1977 a 7-event athletic contest; specifically a composite contest for female athletes that consists of the 100-meter ...
heptose
noun Date: 1890 any of various monosaccharides C7H14O7 containing seven carbon atoms in a molecule
Hepworth
biographical name Dame Barbara 1903-1975 British sculptor
her
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English hire, from Old English hiere, genitive of hēo she — more at he Date: before 12th century of or relating to her or herself especially ...
Hera
noun Etymology: Greek Hēra, Hērē Date: 1584 the sister and consort of Zeus — compare Juno
Heracleitus
or Heraclitus biographical name circa 540-circa 480 B.C. Greek philosopher • Heraclitean adjective
Heracles
noun Etymology: Greek Hēraklēs Date: 1846 Hercules
Heraclitean
adjective see Heracleitus
Heraclitus
biographical name see Heracleitus
Heraclius
biographical name circa 575-641 Byzantine emperor (610-641)
herald
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French heraud, herald, from Frankish *heriwald-, literally, leader of an armed force, from *heri- army + *wald- rule; akin to Old ...
heraldic
adjective Date: 1772 of or relating to heralds or heraldry • heraldically adverb
heraldically
adverb see heraldic
heraldry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1572 1. the practice of devising, blazoning, and granting armorial insignia and of tracing and recording genealogies 2. an armorial ensign; ...
Herat
or ancient Aria geographical name city NW Afghanistan on the Harīrūd population 177,300
herb
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English herbe, from Anglo-French, from Latin herba Date: 14th century 1. a seed-producing annual, biennial, or perennial that ...
herb doctor
noun Date: 1828 herbalist 1
herb Robert
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin herba Roberti, probably from Robertus (Saint Robert) died 1067 French ecclesiastic Date: 13th century a low annual or biennial geranium ...
herbaceous
adjective Date: 1640 1. a. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an herb b. of a stem having little or no woody tissue and persisting usually for a single ...
herbage
noun Date: 14th century 1. herbaceous vegetation (as grass) especially when used for grazing 2. the succulent parts of herbaceous plants
herbal
I. noun Date: 1516 1. a book about plants especially with reference to their medicinal properties 2. archaic herbarium 1 II. adjective Date: 1612 of, relating to, ...
herbal medicine
noun Date: 1848 1. the art or practice of using herbs and herbal preparations to maintain health and to prevent, alleviate, or cure disease 2. a plant or plant part or an ...
herbalism
noun Date: 1855 herbal medicine 1
herbalist
noun Date: 1589 1. a person who practices healing by the use of herbs 2. a person who collects or grows herbs
herbarium
noun (plural herbaria) Date: 1776 1. a collection of dried plant specimens usually mounted and systematically arranged for reference 2. a place that houses an herbarium
Herbart
biographical name Johann Friedrich 1776-1841 German philosopher & educator
herbed
adjective Date: 1950 seasoned with herbs
Herbert
I. biographical name George 1593-1633 English divine & poet II. biographical name Victor 1859-1924 American (Irish-born) composer & conductor III. biographical name William ...
herbicidal
adjective see herbicide
herbicidally
adverb see herbicide
herbicide
noun Etymology: Latin herba + International Scientific Vocabulary -cide Date: 1899 an agent used to destroy or inhibit plant growth • herbicidal adjective • ...
herbivore
noun Etymology: New Latin Herbivora, group of mammals, from neuter plural of herbivorus Date: 1854 a herbivorous animal
herbivorous
adjective Etymology: New Latin herbivorus, from Latin herba grass + -vorus -vorous Date: 1661 feeding on plants • herbivory noun
herbivory
noun see herbivorous
herblike
adjective see herb
Herblock
biographical name — see Herbert Lawrence block
herbology
noun Date: 1961 herbal medicine 1
herby
adjective see herb
Hercegovina
geographical name see Herzegovina
Herculaneum
geographical name ancient city S Italy in Campania on Tyrrhenian Sea; destroyed A.D. 79 by eruption of Mt. Vesuvius
Herculean
adjective Date: 1513 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Hercules 2. often not capitalized of extraordinary power, extent, intensity, or difficulty
Hercules
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hēraklēs Date: 13th century 1. a mythical Greek hero renowned for his great strength and especially for performing 12 labors imposed on ...
Hercules'-club
noun Date: 1847 1. a small prickly eastern United States tree (Aralia spinosa) of the ginseng family with large compound leaves — called also angelica tree 2. a small ...
herd
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English heord; akin to Old High German herta herd, Middle Welsh cordd troop, Lithuanian kerdžius shepherd Date: before 12th ...
herder
noun Date: 1635 one that herds; specifically herdsman 1
Herder
biographical name Johann Gottfried von 1744-1803 German philosopher
herdlike
adjective see herd I
herdsman
noun Date: 1567 1. a manager, breeder, or tender of livestock 2. capitalized bootes
here
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hēr; akin to Old High German hier here, Old English hē he Date: before 12th century 1. a. in or at this place — ...
here and now
noun Date: 1829 the present time — used with the
here and there
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in one place and another 2. from time to time
here goes
phrasal — used interjectionally to express resolution or resignation especially at the beginning of a difficult or unpleasant undertaking
hereabout
adverb see hereabouts
hereabouts
or hereabout adverb Date: 13th century in this vicinity
hereafter
I. adverb Date: before 12th century 1. after this in sequence or in time 2. in some future time or state II. noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1546 1. future 2. an ...
hereaway
or hereaways adverb Date: 14th century dialect hereabouts
hereaways
adverb see hereaway
hereby
adverb Date: 13th century by this means
Heredia
biographical name José María de 1842-1905 French (Cuban-born) poet
hereditament
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin hereditamentum, from Late Latin hereditare to inherit, from Latin hered-, heres Date: 15th century heritable property
hereditarian
noun Date: 1881 an advocate of the theory that individual differences in human beings can be accounted for primarily on the basis of genetics • hereditarian adjective
hereditarily
adverb see hereditary
hereditary
adjective Etymology: Middle English hereditarie, from Latin hereditarius, from hereditas Date: 15th century 1. a. genetically transmitted or transmittable from parent to ...
heredity
noun Etymology: Middle French heredité, from Latin hereditat-, hereditas, from hered-, heres heir — more at heir Date: circa 1540 1. a. inheritance b. tradition 2. ...
Hereford
I. noun Etymology: Hereford former county in England Date: 1805 any of a breed of hardy red-coated beef cattle of English origin with white faces and markings II. ...
Herefordshire
geographical name see Hereford II, 1
herein
adverb Date: before 12th century in this
hereinabove
adverb Date: circa 1812 at a prior point in this writing or document
hereinafter
adverb Date: 1590 in the following part of this writing or document
hereinbefore
adverb Date: 1687 in the preceding part of this writing or document
hereinbelow
adverb Date: 1946 at a subsequent point in this writing or document
hereof
adverb Date: before 12th century of this
hereon
adverb Date: 12th century on this
Herero
noun (plural Herero or Hereros) Date: 1880 a member of a Bantu people of central Namibia
heresiarch
noun Etymology: Late Latin haeresiarcha, from Late Greek hairesiarchēs, from hairesis + Greek -archēs -arch Date: 1624 an originator or chief advocate of a heresy
heresy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Middle English heresie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin haeresis, from Late Greek hairesis, from Greek, action of taking, choice, sect, from ...
heretic
noun Date: 14th century 1. a dissenter from established religious dogma; especially a baptized member of the Roman Catholic Church who disavows a revealed truth 2. one who ...
heretical
also heretic adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or characterized by heresy 2. of, relating to, or characterized by departure from accepted beliefs or standards ...
heretically
adverb see heretical
hereto
adverb Date: 12th century to this writing or document
heretofore
adverb Date: 13th century up to this time ; hitherto
hereunder
adverb Date: 15th century under or in accordance with this writing or document
hereunto
adverb Date: 1509 to this
hereupon
adverb Date: 12th century on this ; immediately after this
herewith
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. with this communication ; enclosed in this 2. hereby
Herez
or Heriz noun Etymology: Herez, Heriz, town in Iran Date: circa 1922 a Persian rug characterized by a large central geometric medallion and by angular floral designs
Herford
I. biographical name Oliver 1863-1935 English writer & illustrator II. geographical name city W central Germany in North Rhine-Westphalia NE of Bielefeld population 64,732
Hering
biographical name Ewald 1834-1918 German physiologist & psychologist
heriot
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English heregeatwe, plural, military equipment, from here army (akin to Old High German heri army) + geatwe equipment — more at harry ...
Herisau
geographical name commune NE Switzerland capital of Appenzell Outer Rhodes population 15,560
heritability
noun Date: 1832 1. the quality or state of being heritable 2. the proportion of observed variation in a particular trait (as height) that can be attributed to inherited ...
heritable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. capable of being inherited or of passing by inheritance 2. hereditary
heritage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from heriter to inherit, from Late Latin hereditare, from Latin hered-, heres heir — more at heir Date: 13th century 1. ...
heritor
noun Date: 15th century one that inherits ; inheritor
Heriz
noun see Herez
Herkimer
biographical name Nicholas 1728-1777 American general
herky-jerky
adjective Etymology: reduplication of jerky Date: 1957 characterized by sudden, irregular, or unpredictable movement or style
herm
noun Etymology: Latin hermes, from Greek hermēs statue of Hermes, herm, from Hermēs Date: circa 1580 a statue in the form of a square stone pillar surmounted by a bust or ...
herma
noun (plural hermae or hermai) Date: 1638 herm
Herman
biographical name Woodrow Charles 1913-1987 Woody Herman American musician & bandleader
hermaphrodite
noun Etymology: Middle English hermofrodite, from Latin hermaphroditus, from Greek hermaphroditos, from Hermaphroditos Date: 14th century 1. an animal or plant having both ...
hermaphroditic
adjective see hermaphrodite
hermaphroditism
noun see hermaphrodite
Hermaphroditus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hermaphroditos, from Hermēs + Aphroditē Aphrodite Date: 1565 a son of Hermes and Aphrodite who becomes joined in one body with a nymph ...
hermatypic
adjective Etymology: Greek herma prop, reef + typtein to strike, coin + English -ic — more at type Date: 1950 building reefs
hermeneutic
noun Date: 1737 1. plural but singular or plural in construction the study of the methodological principles of interpretation (as of the Bible) 2. a method or principle of ...
hermeneutical
or hermeneutic adjective Etymology: Greek hermēneutikos, from hermēneuein to interpret, from hermēneus interpreter Date: 1678 of or relating to hermeneutics ; ...
hermeneutically
adverb see hermeneutical
Hermes
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hermēs Date: 14th century a Greek god of commerce, eloquence, invention, travel, and theft who serves as herald and messenger of the other ...
Hermes Trismegistus
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Greek Hermēs trismegistos, literally, Hermes thrice greatest Date: 1583 a legendary author of works embodying magical, astrological, ...
hermetic
also hermetical adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin hermeticus, from Hermet-, Hermes Trismegistus Date: 1605 1. often capitalized a. of or relating to the Gnostic writings ...
hermetical
adjective see hermetic
hermetically
adverb see hermetic
hermeticism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1897 hermetism
hermetism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1897 1. a. a system of ideas based on hermetic teachings b. adherence to or practice of hermetic doctrine 2. the practice of being ...
hermetist
noun see hermetism
hermit
noun Etymology: Middle English heremite, eremite, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin eremita, from Late Greek erēmitēs, from Greek, adjective, living in the desert, from ...
hermit crab
noun Date: 1735 any of numerous chiefly marine small decapod crustaceans (especially families Diogenidae, Paguridae, and Parapaguridae) having soft asymmetrical abdomens and ...
hermitage
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the habitation of a hermit b. a secluded residence or private retreat ; hideaway c. monastery 2. the life or condition of a hermit
Hermitage
noun Etymology: Tain-l'Ermitage, commune in France Date: 1680 a red or white Rhone valley wine
Hermitian matrix
noun Etymology: Charles Hermite died 1901 French mathematician Date: 1935 a square matrix having the property that each pair of elements in the ith row and jth column and in ...
hermitism
noun see hermit
Hermon, Mount
geographical name mountain 9232 feet (2814 meters) on border between Syria & Lebanon; highest in Anti-Lebanon Mountains
Hermosillo
geographical name city NW Mexico capital of Sonora on Sonora River population 449,472
Hermoúpolis
geographical name — see ermoupolis
hern
dialect variant of heron
Herndon
biographical name William Henry 1818-1891 American lawyer
Herne
geographical name city W Germany in the Ruhr population 179,137
hernia
noun (plural -nias or herniae) Etymology: Latin — more at yarn Date: 14th century a protrusion of an organ or part (as the intestine) through connective tissue or through a ...
hernial
adjective see hernia
herniate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: circa 1922 to protrude through an abnormal body opening ; rupture • herniation noun
herniation
noun see herniate
Herning
geographical name city Denmark in central Jutland population 56,376
hero
noun (plural heroes) Etymology: Latin heros, from Greek hērōs Date: 14th century 1. a. a mythological or legendary figure often of divine descent endowed with great ...
Hero
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Hērō Date: 14th century a legendary priestess of Aphrodite loved by Leander II. biographical name or Heron 1st century A.D. Greek ...
hero worship
noun Date: 1774 1. veneration of a hero 2. foolish or excessive adulation for an individual
hero-worship
transitive verb Date: 1884 to feel or express hero worship for • hero-worshiper noun
hero-worshiper
noun see hero-worship
Herod
biographical name 73-4 B.C. the Great Roman king of Judea (37-4)
Herod Antipas
biographical name 21 b.c.-a.d. 39 son of preceding Roman tetrarch of Galilee (4 b.c.-a.d. 39)
Herodotean
adjective see Herodotus
Herodotus
biographical name circa 484-between 430 and 420 B.C. Greek historian • Herodotean adjective
heroic
I. adjective also heroical Date: 1549 1. of, relating to, resembling, or suggesting heroes especially of antiquity 2. a. exhibiting or marked by courage and daring b. ...
heroic couplet
noun Date: 1828 a rhyming couplet in iambic pentameter
heroic line
noun see heroic verse
heroic meter
I. noun see heroic verse II. noun see heroic verse
heroic poem
noun Date: 1693 an epic or a poem in epic style
heroic quatrain
noun see heroic stanza
heroic stanza
noun Date: circa 1922 a rhymed quatrain in heroic verse with a rhyme scheme of abab — called also heroic quatrain
heroic verse
noun Date: 1586 1. dactylic hexameter especially of epic verse of classical times — called also heroic meter 2. the iambic pentameter used especially in English epic ...
heroical
adjective see heroic I
heroically
adverb see heroic I
heroicize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1897 heroize
heroicomic
or heroicomical adjective Etymology: French héroïcomique, from héroïque heroic + comique comic Date: 1756 comic by being ludicrously noble, bold, or elevated
heroicomical
adjective see heroicomic
heroin
noun Etymology: from Heroin, a trademark Date: 1898 a strongly physiologically addictive narcotic C21H23NO5 that is made by acetylation of but is more potent than morphine ...
heroine
noun Etymology: Latin heroina, from Greek hērōinē, feminine of hērōs Date: 1609 1. a. a mythological or legendary woman having the qualities of a hero b. a woman ...
heroinism
noun see heroin
heroism
noun Date: 1717 1. heroic conduct especially as exhibited in fulfilling a high purpose or attaining a noble end 2. the qualities of a hero
heroize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1738 to make heroic
heron
noun (plural herons; also heron) Etymology: Middle English heiroun, hayroun, from Anglo-French heiron, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German heigaro heron Date: 14th ...
Heron
biographical name see Hero II
heronry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1616 a heron rookery
herpes
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek herpēs, from herpein to creep — more at serpent Date: 14th century any of several inflammatory diseases of the skin caused by ...
herpes simplex
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, simple herpes Date: 1907 either of two diseases caused by a herpesvirus (species Human herpesvirus 1 and Human herpesvirus 2 of the ...
herpes zoster
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, girdle herpes Date: 1807 shingles
herpesvirus
noun Date: 1925 any of a family (Herpesviridae) of double-stranded DNA viruses including the causative agents of herpes
herpetic
adjective see herpes
herpetological
adjective see herpetology
herpetologist
noun see herpetology
herpetology
noun Etymology: Greek herpeton quadruped, reptile, from neuter of herpetos crawling, from herpein Date: 1824 a branch of zoology dealing with reptiles and amphibians • ...
Herr
noun (plural Herren) Etymology: German Date: 1653 — used among German-speaking people as a title equivalent to Mr.
herrenvolk
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: German Date: 1940 master race
Herrera
biographical name Francisco de 1576-circa 1656 el Viejo Spanish painter
Herrick
biographical name Robert 1591-1674 English poet
herring
noun (plural herring or herrings) Etymology: Middle English hering, from Old English hǣring; akin to Old High German hārinc herring Date: before 12th century 1. either of ...
herring gull
noun Date: 1857 a common large gull (Larus argentatus) of the northern hemisphere that as an adult is largely white with a gray mantle, dark wing tips, pink feet, and yellow ...
herringbone
I. noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1659 1. a pattern made up of rows of parallel lines which in any two adjacent rows slope in opposite directions 2. a. a twilled ...
Herriot
biographical name Édouard 1872-1957 French statesman
Herrmann
biographical name Bernard 1911-1975 American composer & conductor
hers
pronoun, singular or plural in construction that which belongs to her — used without a following noun as a pronoun equivalent in meaning to the adjective her
Herschbach
biographical name Dudley Robert 1932- American chemist
Herschel
biographical name Sir John Frederick William 1792-1871 & his father Sir William 1738-1822 English astronomers
herself
pronoun Date: before 12th century 1. that identical female one — used reflexively, for emphasis, in absolute constructions, and in place of her especially when joined to ...
Hersey
biographical name John Richard 1914-1993 American novelist & journalist
herstory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: blend of her and history Date: 1970 history; specifically history considered or presented from a feminist viewpoint or with special attention ...
Herten
geographical name city W Germany in North Rhine-Westphalia N of Essen population 69,374
Herter
biographical name Christian Archibald 1895-1966 American diplomat; secretary of state (1959-61)
Hertford
geographical name town SE England capital of Hertfordshire population 21,412
Hertfordshire
or Hertford geographical name county SE England area 654 square miles (1699 square kilometers), population 951,500
Hertogenbosch, 's
geographical name — see 's Hertogenbosch
Herts
abbreviation Hertfordshire
hertz
noun (plural hertz) Etymology: Heinrich R. Hertz Date: circa 1928 a unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second — abbreviation Hz
Hertz
I. biographical name Gustav Ludwig 1887-1975 German physicist II. biographical name Heinrich Rudolf 1857-1894 German physicist

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