Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву gulp-innu (6389)

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Hertzog
biographical name J(ames) B(arry) M(unnik) 1866-1942 South African general & politician; prime minister (1924-39)
Herzberg
biographical name Gerhard 1904-1999 Canadian (German-born) physicist
Herzegovina
or Serb Hercegovina geographical name region S Europe S of Bosnia & NW of Montenegro; part of Bosnia and Herzegovina • Herzegovinian noun
Herzegovinian
noun see Herzegovina
Herzl
biographical name Theodor 1860-1904 Austrian (Hungarian-born) Zionist
Heshvan
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ḥeshwān Date: 1758 the second month of the civil year or the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar — see month table
Hesiod
biographical name flourished circa 800 B.C. Greek poet
hesitance
noun Date: 1601 hesitancy
hesitancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1617 1. the quality or state of being hesitant: as a. indecision b. reluctance 2. hesitation 1
hesitant
adjective Date: 1647 tending to hesitate ; slow to act or proceed Synonyms: see disinclined • hesitantly adverb
hesitantly
adverb see hesitant
hesitate
verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin haesitatus, past participle of haesitare to stick fast, hesitate, frequentative of haerēre to stick Date: 1598 intransitive verb 1. ...
hesitater
noun see hesitate
hesitatingly
adverb see hesitate
hesitation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of hesitating 2. a pausing or faltering in speech
Hesperia
geographical name city SE California N of San Bernardino population 62,582
Hesperian
adjective Etymology: Latin Hesperia, the west, from Greek, from feminine of hesperios of the evening, western, from hesperos evening — more at west Date: 15th century ...
Hesperides
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 1546 1. a legendary garden at the western extremity of the world producing golden apples 2. the nymphs in classical mythology ...
hesperidin
noun Etymology: New Latin hesperidium orange, from Latin Hesperides Date: 1838 a crystalline glycoside C28H34O15 found in most citrus fruits and especially in orange peel
hesperidium
noun (plural hesperidia) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1866 a berry (as an orange or lime) having a leathery rind
Hesperus
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek Hesperos Date: 14th century evening star 1
Hess
I. biographical name Dame Myra 1890-1965 English pianist II. biographical name (Walther Richard) Rudolf 1894-1987 German Nazi politician III. biographical name Victor Franz ...
Hesse
I. biographical name Hermann 1877-1962 German author II. geographical name or German Hessen 1. region W central Germany N of Baden-Württemberg, divided into Hesse-Darmstadt ...
Hessen
geographical name see Hesse II
hessian
noun Date: 1710 1. capitalized a. a native of Hesse b. a German mercenary serving in the British forces during the American Revolution; broadly a mercenary soldier 2. ...
Hessian boot
noun Date: 1809 a high boot that extends to just below the knee and is commonly ornamented with a tassel and that was introduced into England by the Hessians early in the ...
Hessian fly
noun Date: 1786 a small European dipteran fly (Mayetiola destructor) introduced into North America that is destructive to wheat
hessonite
also essonite noun Etymology: French, from Greek hēsson inferior; from its being less hard than true hyacinth Date: 1889 a yellow to brown garnet
hest
noun Etymology: Middle English hest, hes, from Old English hǣs; akin to Old English hātan to command — more at hight Date: before 12th century archaic command, precept
Hestia
noun Etymology: Greek Date: 1853 the Greek goddess of the hearth and chief goddess of domestic activity — compare vesta
Heston and Isleworth
geographical name former municipal borough SE England in Middlesex, now part of Hounslow
het
noun Date: circa 1972 heterosexual • het adjective
het up
adjective Etymology: het, dialect past of heat Date: 1909 highly excited ; upset
hetaera
or hetaira noun (plural hetaerae or hetaeras or hetairas or hetairai) Etymology: Greek hetaira, literally, companion, feminine of hetairos Date: 1820 1. one of a class of ...
hetaira
noun see hetaera
heter-
or hetero- combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from heteros; akin to Greek heis one — more at same 1. other than usual ; other ; different 2. containing ...
hetero
noun (plural -eros) Date: 1933 heterosexual • hetero adjective
hetero-
combining form see heter-
heteroatom
noun Date: 1900 an atom other than carbon in the ring of a heterocyclic compound
heterocercal
adjective Date: 1838 1. of a fish tail fin having the upper lobe larger than the lower with the vertebral column extending into the upper lobe 2. having or relating to a ...
heterochromatic
adjective see heterochromatin
heterochromatin
noun Etymology: German Date: 1932 densely staining chromatin that appears as nodules in or along chromosomes and contains relatively few genes • heterochromatic adjective
heteroclite
I. noun Date: 1580 1. a word irregular in inflection; especially a noun irregular in declension 2. one that deviates from common forms or rules II. adjective Etymology: ...
heterocycle
noun see heterocyclic
heterocyclic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1899 relating to, characterized by, or being a ring composed of atoms of more than one kind • heterocycle ...
heterocyst
noun Date: 1872 a large transparent thick-walled cell that is found in the filaments of some cyanobacteria and is the site of nitrogen fixation • heterocystous adjective
heterocystous
adjective see heterocyst
heterodox
adjective Etymology: Late Latin heterodoxus, from Greek heterodoxos, from heter- + doxa opinion — more at doxology Date: circa 1650 1. contrary to or different from an ...
heterodoxy
noun (plural -doxies) Date: 1659 1. the quality or state of being heterodox 2. a heterodox opinion or doctrine
heteroduplex
noun Date: 1962 a nucleic-acid molecule (as DNA) composed of two chains with each derived from a different parent molecule • heteroduplex adjective
heterodyne
I. adjective Etymology: heter- + -dyne, modification of Greek dynamis power — more at dynamic Date: 1908 of or relating to the production of an electrical beat between two ...
heteroecious
adjective Etymology: heter- + Greek oikia house — more at vicinity Date: 1882 passing through the different stages in the life cycle on alternate and often unrelated hosts ...
heteroecism
noun see heteroecious
heterogamete
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1897 either of a pair of dissimilar and usually oogamous gametes
heterogametic
adjective Date: 1910 forming two kinds of gametes of which one produces male offspring and the other female offspring • heterogamety noun
heterogamety
noun see heterogametic
heterogamous
adjective Date: 1895 having or characterized by fusion of unlike gametes — compare anisogamous, isogamous
heterogamy
noun Date: circa 1894 1. sexual reproduction involving fusion of unlike gametes often differing in size, structure, and physiology 2. the condition of reproducing by ...
heterogeneity
noun Date: 1641 the quality or state of being heterogeneous
heterogeneous
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin heterogeneus, from Greek heterogenēs, from heter- + genos kind — more at kin Date: 1630 consisting of dissimilar or diverse ingredients ...
heterogeneously
adverb see heterogeneous
heterogeneousness
noun see heterogeneous
heterogenous
adjective Date: 1695 heterogeneous
heterogeny
noun Date: 1838 a heterogenous collection or group
heteroglossia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from heter- + Greek glōssa tongue, language Date: 1988 a diversity of voices, styles of discourse, or points of view in a literary work and ...
heterogonic
adjective see heterogony
heterogony
noun Date: circa 1887 1. alternation of generations; especially alternation of a dioecious with a parthenogenetic generation 2. allometry • heterogonic adjective
heterograft
noun Date: 1923 xenograft
heterokaryon
noun Etymology: New Latin, from heter- + karyon, nucleus, from Greek, nut, kernel Date: 1941 a cell (as in the mycelium of a fungus) that contains two or more genetically ...
heterokaryosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1916 the condition of having cells that are heterokaryons • heterokaryotic adjective
heterokaryotic
adjective see heterokaryosis
heterologous
adjective Etymology: heter- + -logous (as in homologous) Date: 1893 derived from a different species • heterologously adverb
heterologously
adverb see heterologous
heterolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1938 decomposition of a compound into two oppositely charged particles or ions • heterolytic adjective
heterolytic
adjective see heterolysis
heteromorphic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 1. deviating from the usual form 2. exhibiting diversity of form or forms • heteromorphism ...
heteromorphism
noun see heteromorphic
heteronomous
adjective Date: circa 1871 subject to external controls and impositions
heteronomy
noun Etymology: heter- + -nomy (as in autonomy) Date: 1798 subjection to something else; especially a lack of moral freedom or self-determination
heteronym
noun Date: circa 1889 one of two or more homographs (as a bass voice and bass, a fish) that differ in pronunciation and meaning
heterophil
adjective see heterophile
heterophile
or heterophil adjective Date: 1920 relating to or being any of a group of antigens in organisms of different species that induce the formation of antibodies that will ...
heterophony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Greek heterophōnia diversity of note, from heter- + -phōnia -phony Date: 1919 independent variation on a single melody by two or more voices
heterophyllous
adjective Date: circa 1828 having the foliage leaves of more than one form on the same plant or stem • heterophylly noun
heterophylly
noun see heterophyllous
heteroploid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1926 having a chromosome number that deviates from and is not an integral multiple of the number characteristic ...
heteroploidy
noun see heteroploid
heteropterous
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Greek heter- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1895 of or relating to an insect order or suborder (Heteroptera) comprising the ...
heterosexism
noun Date: 1972 discrimination or prejudice by heterosexuals against homosexuals • heterosexist adjective
heterosexist
adjective see heterosexism
heterosexual
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 1. a. of, relating to, or characterized by a tendency to direct sexual desire toward the opposite ...
heterosexuality
noun see heterosexual I
heterosexually
adverb see heterosexual I
heterosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1914 the marked vigor or capacity for growth often exhibited by crossbred animals or plants — called also hybrid vigor • heterotic ...
heterosporous
adjective see heterospory
heterospory
noun Date: 1898 the production of microspores and megaspores (as in seed plants) • heterosporous adjective
heterothallic
adjective Etymology: heter- + thallus + -ic Date: 1904 1. having two or more morphologically similar haploid phases or types of which individuals from the same type are ...
heterothallism
noun see heterothallic
heterotic
adjective see heterosis
heterotopic
adjective Etymology: heter- + Greek topos place Date: 1878 occurring in an abnormal place
heterotroph
noun Date: circa 1900 a heterotrophic individual
heterotrophic
adjective Date: 1893 requiring complex organic compounds of nitrogen and carbon (as that obtained from plant or animal matter) for metabolic synthesis — compare autotrophic ...
heterotrophically
adverb see heterotrophic
heterotrophy
noun see heterotrophic
heterotypic
adjective Date: 1876 different in kind, arrangement, or form
heterozygosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1902 heterozygosity
heterozygosity
noun Date: 1912 the state of being heterozygous
heterozygote
noun Date: 1902 a heterozygous individual
heterozygous
adjective Date: 1902 having the two alleles at corresponding loci on homologous chromosomes different for one or more loci
heth
noun Etymology: Hebrew ḥēth Date: 1823 the 8th letter of the Hebrew alphabet — see alphabet table
hetman
noun (plural hetmans) Etymology: Ukrainian het'man Date: 1710 a Cossack leader
heulandite
noun Etymology: Henry Heuland, 19th century English mineral collector Date: 1822 a zeolite consisting of a hydrous aluminosilicate of sodium and calcium
heuristic
I. adjective Etymology: German heuristisch, from New Latin heuristicus, from Greek heuriskein to discover; akin to Old Irish fo-fúair he found Date: 1821 involving or ...
heuristically
adverb see heuristic I
Hevesy
biographical name Georg Karl 1885-1966 Hungarian chemist
hew
verb (hewed; hewed or hewn; hewing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hēawan; akin to Old High German houwan to hew, Lithuanian kauti to forge, Latin cudere to beat ...
HEW
abbreviation Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
hewer
noun see hew
Hewish
biographical name Antony 1924- British astronomer
hex
I. verb Etymology: Pennsylvania German hexe, from German hexen, from Hexe witch, from Old High German hagzissa; akin to Middle English hagge hag Date: 1830 intransitive verb ...
hex-
combining form see hexa-
hexa-
or hex- combining form Etymology: Greek, from hex six — more at six 1. six 2. containing six atoms, groups, or equivalents
hexachlorethane
noun see hexachloroethane
hexachloroethane
or hexachlorethane noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 a toxic crystalline compound C2Cl6 used especially in smoke bombs and in the control of ...
hexachlorophene
noun Etymology: hexa- + chlor- + phenol Date: 1948 a powdered phenolic bacteria-inhibiting agent C13H6Cl6O2
hexachord
noun Etymology: hexa- + Greek chordē string — more at yarn Date: 1730 a diatonic series of six tones having a semitone between the third and fourth tones
hexadecimal
adjective Date: 1954 of, relating to, or being a number system with a base of 16 • hexadecimal noun
hexagon
noun Etymology: Greek hexagōnon, neuter of hexagōnos hexagonal, from hexa- + gōnia angle — more at -gon Date: 1570 a polygon of six angles and six sides
hexagonal
adjective Date: 1571 1. having six angles and six sides 2. having a hexagon as section or base 3. relating to or being a crystal system characterized by three equal ...
hexagonally
adverb see hexagonal
hexagram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1871 a plane figure that has the shape of a 6-pointed star, that consists of two intersecting congruent equilateral ...
hexahedron
noun (plural -drons; also hexahedra) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek hexaedron, from neuter of hexaedros of six surfaces, from hexa- + hedra seat — more at sit Date: 1571 ...
hexahydrate
noun Date: 1908 a chemical compound with six molecules of water
hexameter
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek hexametron, from neuter of hexametros having six measures, from hexa- + metron measure — more at measure Date: 1546 a line of verse ...
hexamethonium
noun Etymology: hexa- + meth- + -onium Date: 1949 either of two compounds C12H30Br2N2 or C12H30Cl2N2 used as ganglionic blocking agents in the treatment of hypertension
hexamethylenetetramine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hexa- + methylene + tetra- + amine Date: 1888 a crystalline compound C6H12N4 used especially as an accelerator in ...
hexane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 any of several isomeric volatile liquid alkanes C6H14 found in petroleum
hexanoic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary hexane + -oic Date: 1926 caproic acid
hexaploid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1912 having or being six times the monoploid chromosome number • hexaploid noun • hexaploidy noun
hexaploidy
noun see hexaploid
hexapod
I. noun Etymology: Greek hexapod-, hexapous having six feet, from hexa- + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: 1668 insect 1b II. adjective Date: circa 1847 1. ...
Hexateuch
noun Etymology: hexa- + Greek teuchos book — more at Pentateuch Date: 1878 the first six books of the Bible
hexer
noun see hex I
hexerei
noun Etymology: Pennsylvania German, from German, from Hexe witch Date: 1898 witchcraft
hexobarbital
noun Etymology: hexo- (from hexa-) + barbital Date: 1941 a barbiturate C12H16N2O3 used as a sedative and hypnotic and in the form of its soluble sodium salt as an intravenous ...
hexokinase
noun Etymology: hexose + kinase Date: 1930 any of a group of enzymes that accelerate the phosphorylation of hexoses (as in the formation of glucose-6-phosphate from glucose ...
hexosaminidase
noun Etymology: hexose + amino + -ide + -ase Date: 1969 either of two hydrolytic enzymes that catalyze the splitting off of a hexose from a ganglioside and are deficient in ...
hexosan
noun Date: 1894 a polysaccharide yielding only hexoses on hydrolysis
hexose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 a monosaccharide (as glucose) containing six carbon atoms in a molecule
hexyl
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 any of various isomeric alkyl radicals C6H13– derived from hexane
hexylresorcinol
noun Date: 1924 a crystalline phenol C12H18O2 used as an antiseptic and anthelmintic
hey
interjection Etymology: Middle English Date: 13th century — used especially to call attention or to express interrogation, surprise, or exultation
hey presto
interjection Date: 1731 British suddenly as if by magic
heyday
I. interjection Etymology: irregular from hey Date: 1599 archaic — used to express elation or wonder II. noun Date: 1590 1. archaic high spirits 2. the period of ...
Heydrich
biographical name Reinhard 1904-1942 the Hangman German Nazi administrator
Heyerdahl
biographical name Thor 1914-2002 Norwegian explorer & writer
Heymans
biographical name Corneille-Jean-François 1892-1968 Belgian physiologist
Heyward
biographical name (Edwin) DuBose 1885-1940 American author
Heywood
I. biographical name John 1497?-?1580 English author II. biographical name Thomas 1574?-1641 English dramatist
Hezekiah
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ḥizqīyāh Date: 14th century a king of Judah under whom the kingdom underwent a ruinous Assyrian invasion at the end of the eighth century B.C.
hf
abbreviation half
Hf
symbol hafnium
HF
abbreviation high frequency
hg
abbreviation 1. hectogram 2. hemoglobin
Hg
symbol Etymology: New Latin hydrargyrum literally, water silver mercury
HGH
abbreviation human growth hormone
hgt
abbreviation height
hgwy
abbreviation highway
HH
abbreviation 1. Her Higness; His Highness 2. His Holiness
HHD
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin humanitatum doctor doctor of humanities
HHS
abbreviation Department of Health and Human Services
hi
interjection Etymology: Middle English hy Date: 15th century — used especially as a greeting
HI
abbreviation 1. Hawaii 2. high intensity 3. humidity index
hi-fi
noun Date: 1950 1. high fidelity 2. equipment for reproduction of sound with high fidelity
hi-hat
variant of high hat 2
hi-tech
variant of high-tech
Hialeah
geographical name city SE Florida N of Miami population 226,419
hiatal
adjective Date: 1909 of, relating to, or involving a hiatus
hiatal hernia
noun Date: circa 1944 protrusion of part of the stomach upward into the chest cavity through the passage in the diaphragm for the esophagus usually with movement of the ...
hiatus
noun Etymology: Latin, from hiare to yawn — more at yawn Date: 1563 1. a. a break in or as if in a material object ; gap b. a gap or passage in an anatomical part ...
hiatus hernia
noun see hiatal hernia
Hiawatha
noun Date: 1855 the Indian hero of Longfellow's poem The Song of Hiawatha
Hib
noun Etymology: Hi- (from the species name Haemophilus influenzae) + type B Date: 1984 often attributive a bacterial serotype (Haemophilus influenzae type B) that causes ...
hibachi
noun Etymology: Japanese Date: 1863 a charcoal brazier
hibernaculum
noun (plural hibernacula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, winter residence, from hibernare Date: 1789 a shelter occupied during the winter by a dormant animal (as an insect ...
hibernal
adjective Date: 1646 of, relating to, or occurring in winter
hibernate
intransitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin hibernatus, past participle of hibernare to pass the winter, from hibernus of winter; akin to Latin hiems winter, Greek ...
hibernation
noun see hibernate
hibernator
noun see hibernate
Hibernia
geographical name — see Ireland 1
Hibernian
I. adjective Etymology: Latin Hibernia Ireland Date: 1632 of, relating to, or characteristic of Ireland or the Irish II. noun Date: 1709 a native or inhabitant of Ireland
Hiberno-
combining form Etymology: Latin Hibernia 1. Irish and 2. Irish
Hiberno-English
noun Date: 1947 the English language spoken in Ireland
hibiscus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, marshmallow Date: 1706 any of a large genus (Hibiscus) of herbs, shrubs, or small trees of the mallow family with large showy flowers ...
hic et nunc
foreign term Etymology: Latin here and now
hic et ubique
foreign term Etymology: Latin here and everywhere
hic jacet
I. noun Etymology: Latin, literally, here lies Date: 1654 epitaph II. foreign term Etymology: Latin here lies — used preceding a name on a tombstone
hiccough
I. noun see hiccup I II. intransitive verb see hiccup II
hiccup
I. noun also hiccough Etymology: imitative Date: circa 1580 1. a spasmodic inhalation with closure of the glottis accompanied by a peculiar sound 2. an attack of hiccuping ...
hick
I. noun Etymology: Hick, nickname for Richard Date: 1669 an unsophisticated provincial person • hickish adjective II. adjective Date: 1913 unsophisticated, provincial ...
hickey
I. noun (plural hickeys) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1913 gadget II. noun (plural hickeys) Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1918 1. a. pimple b. a ...
hickish
adjective see hick I
Hickok
biographical name James Butler 1837-1876 Wild Bill Hickok American scout & United States marshal
hickory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: short for obsolete pokahickory, from Virginia Algonquian pawcohiccora food prepared from pounded nuts Date: 1670 1. a. any of a genus ...
Hickory
geographical name city W central North Carolina population 37,222
Hicks
biographical name Edward 1780-1849 American painter
hid
adjective Date: 12th century hidden
hidalgo
noun (plural -gos) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Spanish, from Old Spanish fijo dalgo, literally, son of something Date: 1594 a member of the lower nobility of Spain
Hidalgo
geographical name state central Mexico capital Pachuca area 8103 square miles (20,987 square kilometers), population 1,888,366
Hidatsa
noun (plural Hidatsa; also Hidatsas) Etymology: Hidatsa hirá•ca, a Hidatsa subgroup Date: 1873 1. a member of an American Indian people of the Missouri River valley in ...
hidden
adjective Date: 13th century 1. being out of sight or not readily apparent ; concealed 2. obscure, unexplained, undisclosed • hiddenness noun
hidden agenda
noun Date: 1971 an ulterior motive
hidden tax
noun Date: 1936 1. a tax that is ultimately paid by someone other than the person on whom it is levied 2. an economic inequity that reduces one's real income or buying power
hiddenite
noun Etymology: William E. Hidden died 1918 American mineralogist Date: 1881 a transparent usually green spodumene valued as a gem
hiddenness
noun see hidden
hide
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hīgid, hīd Date: before 12th century any of various old English units of land area; especially a unit of 120 acres II. ...
hide nor hair
phrasal see hide or hair
hide or hair
or hide nor hair phrasal a vestige or trace of someone or something
hide-and-seek
noun Date: circa 1727 a children's game in which one player does not look while others hide and then goes to find them
hideaway
noun Date: 1926 retreat, hideout
hidebound
adjective Date: 1603 1. of a domestic animal having a dry skin lacking in pliancy and adhering closely to the underlying flesh 2. having an inflexible or ultraconservative ...
hideosity
noun see hideous
hideous
adjective Etymology: alteration of Middle English hidous, from Anglo-French hidus, hisdos, from Old French hisde, hide terror Date: 14th century 1. offensive to the senses ...
hideously
adverb see hideous
hideousness
noun see hideous
hideout
noun Date: 1885 a place of refuge, retreat, or concealment
hider
noun see hide II
hidey-hole
or hidy-hole noun Etymology: alteration of earlier hiding-hole Date: 1817 hideaway
hidy-hole
noun see hidey-hole
hie
verb (hied; hying or hieing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hīgian to strive, hasten Date: 12th century intransitive verb to go quickly ; hasten transitive ...
hierarch
noun Etymology: Middle English ierarchis, plural, from Medieval Latin hierarcha, from Greek hierarchēs, from hieros sacred + -archēs -arch Date: 15th century 1. a religious ...
hierarchal
adjective see hierarch
hierarchic
adjective see hierarchical
hierarchical
or hierarchic adjective Date: 1561 of, relating to, or arranged in a hierarchy • hierarchically adverb
hierarchically
adverb see hierarchical
hierarchization
noun see hierarchize
hierarchize
transitive verb (-chized; -chizing) Date: 1884 to arrange in a hierarchy • hierarchization noun
hierarchy
noun (plural -chies) Etymology: Middle English ierarchie rank or order of holy beings, from Anglo-French jerarchie, from Medieval Latin hierarchia, from Late Greek, from Greek ...
hieratic
adjective Etymology: Latin hieraticus sacerdotal, from Greek hieratikos, from hierasthai to perform priestly functions, from hieros sacred; probably akin to Sanskrit iṣara ...
hieratically
adverb see hieratic
Hiero I
or Hieron biographical name died 467(or 466) B.C. tyrant of Syracuse (478-467 or 466)
hierodule
noun Etymology: Late Latin hierodulus, from Greek hierodoulos, from hieron temple + doulos slave Date: 1835 a slave or prostitute in the service of a temple (as in ancient ...
hieroglyph
noun Etymology: French hiéroglyphe, from Middle French, back-formation from hieroglyphique Date: 1598 1. a character used in a system of hieroglyphic writing 2. something ...
hieroglyphic
I. adjective also hieroglyphical Etymology: Middle French hieroglyphique, from Late Latin hieroglyphicus, from Greek hieroglyphikos, from hieros + glyphein to carve — more at ...
hieroglyphical
adjective see hieroglyphic I
hieroglyphically
adverb see hieroglyphic I
Hieron
biographical name see Hiero I
Hieronymus
biographical name Saint Eusebius — see Jerome
hierophant
noun Etymology: Late Latin hierophanta, from Greek hierophantēs, from hieros + phainein to show — more at fancy Date: 1677 1. a priest in ancient Greece; specifically the ...
hierophantic
adjective see hierophant
Hierosolyma
geographical name — see Jerusalem
Hierro
or Ferro geographical name island Spain; westernmost of the Canary Islands area 107 square miles (278 square kilometers)
hifalutin
variant of highfalutin
Higashiōsaka
geographical name city Japan in S Honshu, suburb of Osaka population 518,251
Higginson
biographical name Thomas Wentworth Storrow 1823-1911 American clergyman & writer
higgle
intransitive verb (higgled; higgling) Etymology: probably alteration of haggle Date: 1633 haggle • higgler noun
higgledy-piggledy
adverb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1598 in a confused, disordered, or random manner • higgledy-piggledy adjective
higgler
noun see higgle
Higgs boson
noun Etymology: Peter W. Higgs b1929 British physicist Date: 1974 a hypothetical elementary particle that has zero spin and large mass and that is required by some gauge ...
Higgs field
noun Date: 1980 a hypothetical physical field that endows elementary particles with mass and that is mediated by the Higgs boson
high
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hēah; akin to Old High German hōh high, Lithuanian kaukaras hill Date: before 12th century 1. a. having large ...
high altar
noun Date: before 12th century the principal altar in a church
high analysis
adjective Date: 1949 of a fertilizer containing more than 20 percent of total plant nutrients
high and dry
adjective Date: 1750 1. being out of reach of the current or tide or out of the water 2. being in a helpless or abandoned position
high and low
adverb Date: 14th century everywhere

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