Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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inobservance
noun Etymology: French & Latin; French, from Latin inobservantia, from in- + observantia observance Date: 1611 1. lack of attention ; heedlessness 2. failure to fulfill ; ...
inobservant
adjective see inobservance
inoculant
noun Date: 1898 inoculum
inoculate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Middle English, to insert a bud in a plant, from Latin inoculatus, past participle of inoculare, from in- + oculus eye, bud — more ...
inoculation
noun Date: 1714 1. the act or process or an instance of inoculating; especially the introduction of a pathogen or antigen into a living organism to stimulate the production ...
inoculative
adjective see inoculate
inoculator
noun see inoculate
inoculum
noun (plural inocula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin inoculare Date: 1902 material used for inoculation
inoffensive
adjective Date: 1646 1. causing no harm or injury 2. a. giving no provocation ; peaceable b. not objectionable to the senses • inoffensively adverb • ...
inoffensively
adverb see inoffensive
inoffensiveness
noun see inoffensive
İnönü
biographical name İsmet 1884-1973 Turkish statesman; president of Turkey (1938-50); premier (1961-65)
inoperable
adjective Etymology: probably from French inopérable Date: 1886 1. not treatable or remediable by surgery 2. inoperative
inoperative
adjective Date: circa 1631 not operative: as a. not functioning b. having no effect or force • inoperativeness noun
inoperativeness
noun see inoperative
inopportune
adjective Etymology: Latin inopportunus, from in- + opportunus opportune Date: circa 1507 inconvenient, unseasonable • inopportunely adverb • inopportuneness noun
inopportunely
adverb see inopportune
inopportuneness
noun see inopportune
inordinate
adjective Etymology: Middle English inordinat, from Latin inordinatus, from in- + ordinatus, past participle of ordinare to arrange — more at ordain Date: 14th century 1. ...
inordinately
adverb see inordinate
inordinateness
noun see inordinate
inorg
abbreviation inorganic
inorganic
adjective Date: 1794 1. a. (1) being or composed of matter other than plant or animal ; mineral (2) forming or belonging to the inanimate world b. of, relating ...
inorganically
adverb see inorganic
inosculate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: 2in- + osculate Date: 1671 join, unite • inosculation noun
inosculation
noun see inosculate
inosine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary inosinic acid (the acid C10H13N4O8P; inosinic, from Greek in-, is sinew + International Scientific Vocabulary 2-ose + 1-in + ...
inositol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from inosite inositol, from Greek in-, is sinew + International Scientific Vocabulary 2-ose + 1-ite Date: 1891 any of ...
inotropic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ino- (from Greek in-, is sinew) + -tropic Date: 1903 relating to or influencing the force of muscular contractions
INP
abbreviation International News Photo
inpatient
noun Date: 1760 a hospital patient who receives lodging and food as well as treatment — compare outpatient
inpouring
noun Date: 1721 inrush
input
I. noun Date: circa 1888 1. something that is put in: as a. an amount put in b. power or energy put into a machine or system for storage, conversion in kind, or ...
inq
abbreviation inquire
inquest
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enqueste, from Vulgar Latin *inquaesta, feminine of *inquaestus, past participle of *inquaerere to inquire Date: 13th century ...
inquietude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin inquietudo, from Latin inquietus disturbed, from in- + quietus quiet Date: 15th century disturbed state ; disquietude
inquiline
noun Etymology: Latin inquilinus tenant, lodger, from in- + colere to cultivate, dwell — more at wheel Date: 1879 an animal that lives habitually in the nest or abode of ...
inquire
verb (inquired; inquiring) Etymology: Middle English enquiren, from Anglo-French enquerre, from Vulgar Latin *inquaerere, alteration of Latin inquirere, from in- + quaerere to ...
inquire after
phrasal to ask about the health of
inquirer
noun see inquire
inquiringly
adverb see inquire
inquiry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 15th century 1. examination into facts or principles ; research 2. a request for information 3. a systematic investigation often of a matter of ...
inquisition
noun Etymology: Middle English inquisicioun, from Anglo-French inquisition, from Latin inquisition-, inquisitio, from inquirere Date: 14th century 1. the act of inquiring ; ...
inquisitional
adjective see inquisition
inquisitive
adjective Date: 14th century 1. given to examination or investigation 2. inclined to ask questions; especially inordinately or improperly curious about the affairs of ...
inquisitively
adverb see inquisitive
inquisitiveness
noun see inquisitive
inquisitor
noun Date: 1504 one who inquires or makes inquisition; especially one who is unduly harsh, severe, or hostile in making an inquiry • inquisitorial adjective • ...
inquisitorial
adjective see inquisitor
inquisitorially
adverb see inquisitor
INRI
abbreviation Etymology: Latin Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews
inro
noun (plural inro) Etymology: Japanese inrō Date: 1617 a small compartmented and usually ornamented container hung from an obi to hold small objects (as medicines)
inroad
noun Date: 1548 1. a sudden hostile incursion ; raid 2. an advance or penetration often at the expense of someone or something — usually used in plural
inrun
noun Date: 1941 the approach ramp of a ski jump
inrush
noun Date: 1817 a crowding or flooding in
ins
abbreviation 1. inches 2. insurance
INS
abbreviation 1. Immigration and Naturalization Service 2. inertial navigation system
ins and outs
noun plural Date: circa 1670 1. characteristic peculiarities or technicalities ; workings 2. ramifications
insalubrious
adjective Etymology: Latin insalubris, from in- + salubris healthful — more at safe Date: 1615 not conducive to health ; unwholesome • insalubrity noun
insalubrity
noun see insalubrious
insane
adjective Etymology: Latin insanus, from in- + sanus sane Date: circa 1550 1. mentally disordered ; exhibiting insanity 2. used by, typical of, or intended for insane ...
insanely
adverb see insane
insaneness
noun see insane
insanitary
adjective Date: 1866 unclean enough to endanger health ; contaminated • insanitation noun
insanitation
noun see insanitary
insanity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1590 1. a deranged state of the mind usually occurring as a specific disorder (as schizophrenia) 2. such unsoundness of mind or lack of ...
insatiability
noun see insatiable
insatiable
adjective Etymology: Middle English insaciable, from Anglo-French, from Latin insatiabilis, from in- + satiare to satisfy — more at satiate Date: 15th century incapable of ...
insatiableness
noun see insatiable
insatiably
adverb see insatiable
insatiate
adjective Date: 15th century insatiable • insatiately adverb • insatiateness noun
insatiately
adverb see insatiate
insatiateness
noun see insatiate
inscribe
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inscribere, from in- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 15th century 1. a. to write, engrave, or print as a ...
inscriber
noun see inscribe
inscription
noun Etymology: Middle English inscripcioun, from Latin inscription-, inscriptio, from inscribere Date: 14th century 1. a. something that is inscribed; also ...
inscriptional
adjective see inscription
inscriptive
adjective Date: 1740 relating to or constituting an inscription • inscriptively adverb
inscriptively
adverb see inscriptive
inscroll
transitive verb Date: 1596 archaic to write on a scroll ; record
inscrutability
noun see inscrutable
inscrutable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin inscrutabilis, from Latin in- + scrutari to search — more at scrutiny Date: 15th century not readily investigated, ...
inscrutableness
noun see inscrutable
inscrutably
adverb see inscrutable
insculp
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin insculpere, from in- + scalpere to scratch, carve Date: 15th century archaic engrave, sculpture
inseam
noun Date: 1886 the seam on the inside of the leg of a pair of pants; also the length of this seam
insect
noun Etymology: Latin insectum, from neuter of insectus, past participle of insecare to cut into, from in- + secare to cut — more at saw Date: 1601 1. a. any of numerous ...
insectary
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1888 a place for the keeping or rearing of living insects
insecticidal
adjective Date: 1857 1. destroying or controlling insects 2. of or relating to an insecticide • insecticidally adverb
insecticidally
adverb see insecticidal
insecticide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 an agent that destroys insects
insectile
adjective Date: circa 1626 being or suggestive of an insect
insectivore
noun Etymology: New Latin Insectivora, from Latin insectum + -vorus -vorous Date: 1840 1. any of an order (Insectivora) of small usually nocturnal mammals (as moles, shrews, ...
insectivorous
adjective Date: 1661 feeding on insects
insecure
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin insecurus, from Latin in- + securus secure Date: 1649 1. not confident or sure ; uncertain 2. not adequately guarded or sustained ; ...
insecurely
adverb see insecure
insecureness
noun see insecure
insecurity
noun see insecure
inselberg
noun (plural -bergs; also inselberge) Etymology: German, from Insel island + Berg mountain Date: 1913 an isolated mountain
inseminate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin inseminatus, past participle of inseminare, from in- + semin-, semen seed — more at semen Date: circa 1623 1. sow 2. to ...
insemination
noun see inseminate
inseminator
noun Date: 1944 one that inseminates cattle artificially
insensate
adjective Etymology: Late Latin insensatus, from Latin in- + Late Latin sensatus having sense, from Latin sensus sense Date: 15th century 1. lacking sense or understanding; ...
insensately
adverb see insensate
insensibility
noun see insensible
insensible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin insensibilis, from in- + sensibilis sensible Date: 14th century 1. imperceptible ; ...
insensibleness
noun see insensible
insensibly
adverb see insensible
insensitive
adjective Date: 1834 1. a. not responsive or susceptible b. lacking feeling or tact 2. not physically or chemically sensitive • insensitively adverb • ...
insensitively
adverb see insensitive
insensitiveness
noun see insensitive
insensitivity
noun see insensitive
insentience
noun see insentient
insentient
adjective Date: 1764 lacking perception, consciousness, or animation • insentience noun
inseparability
noun see inseparable
inseparable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inseparabilis, from in- + separabilis separable Date: 14th century 1. incapable of being separated or disjoined 2. ...
inseparableness
noun see inseparable
inseparably
adverb see inseparable
insert
I. verb Etymology: Latin insertus, past participle of inserere, from in- + serere to join — more at series Date: 1529 transitive verb 1. to put or thrust in 2. to ...
inserter
noun see insert I
insertion
noun Date: 1539 1. something that is inserted: as a. the part of a muscle that inserts b. the mode or place of attachment of an organ or part c. embroidery or ...
insertional
adjective see insertion
inset
I. noun Date: 1559 1. a. a place where something flows in ; channel b. a setting or flowing in 2. something that is inset: as a. a small graphic representation (as ...
inshallah
foreign term Etymology: Arabic in shā' Allāh if Allah wills ; God willing
inshore
I. adjective Date: 1701 1. situated, living, or carried on near shore 2. moving toward shore II. adverb Date: 1748 to or toward shore
inside
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an interior or internal part or place ; the part within b. inward nature, thoughts, or feeling c. viscera, entrails — usually used ...
inside address
noun Date: circa 1941 address 5c
inside of
preposition Date: 1836 inside
inside out
adverb Date: circa 1600 1. in such a manner that the inner surface becomes the outer 2. to a thorough degree 3. in or into a state of disarray often involving drastic ...
Inside Passage
geographical name protected shipping route from Puget Sound, Washington, to Skagway, Alaska, following channels between mainland & coastal islands
inside track
noun Date: 1857 an advantageous competitive position
insider
noun Date: 1848 a person recognized or accepted as a member of a group, category, or organization: as a. a person who is in a position of power or has access to ...
insider trading
noun Date: 1966 the illegal use of information available only to insiders in order to make a profit in financial trading
insidious
adjective Etymology: Latin insidiosus, from insidiae ambush, from insidēre to sit in, sit on, from in- + sedēre to sit — more at sit Date: 1545 1. a. awaiting a chance ...
insidiously
adverb see insidious
insidiousness
noun see insidious
insight
noun Date: 13th century 1. the power or act of seeing into a situation ; penetration 2. the act or result of apprehending the inner nature of things or of seeing ...
insightful
adjective Date: 1907 exhibiting or characterized by insight • insightfully adverb
insightfully
adverb see insightful
insigne
noun see insignia
insignia
also insigne noun (plural -nia or -nias) Etymology: Latin insignia, plural of insigne mark, badge, from neuter of insignis marked, distinguished, from in- + signum mark — more ...
insignificance
noun Date: 1699 the quality or state of being insignificant
insignificancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1651 1. insignificance 2. an insignificant thing or person
insignificant
adjective Date: 1651 not significant: as a. lacking meaning or import ; inconsequential b. not worth considering ; unimportant c. lacking weight, position, or ...
insignificantly
adverb see insignificant
insincere
adjective Etymology: Latin insincerus, from in- + sincerus sincere Date: 1634 not sincere ; hypocritical • insincerely adverb • insincerity noun
insincerely
adverb see insincere
insincerity
noun see insincere
insinuate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin insinuatus, past participle of insinuare, from in- + sinuare to bend, curve, from sinus curve Date: 1529 transitive verb 1. a. to ...
insinuating
adjective Date: 1591 1. winning favor and confidence by imperceptible degrees ; ingratiating 2. tending gradually to cause doubt, distrust, or change of outlook often in a ...
insinuatingly
adverb see insinuating
insinuation
noun Date: 1526 1. the act or process of insinuating 2. something that is insinuated; especially a sly, subtle, and usually derogatory utterance
insinuative
adjective see insinuate
insinuator
noun see insinuate
insipid
adjective Etymology: French & Late Latin; French insipide, from Late Latin insipidus, from Latin in- + sapidus savory, from sapere to taste — more at sage Date: 1609 1. ...
insipidity
noun see insipid
insipidly
adverb see insipid
insist
verb Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French insister, from Latin insistere to stand upon, persist, from in- + sistere to take a stand; akin to Latin stare to stand — ...
insistence
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or an instance of insisting 2. the quality or state of being insistent ; urgency
insistency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1859 insistence
insistent
adjective Etymology: Latin insistent-, insistens, present participle of insistere Date: 1868 1. disposed to insist ; persistent 2. compelling attention • insistently ...
insistently
adverb see insistent
insobriety
noun Date: 1611 lack of sobriety or moderation; especially intemperance in drinking
insociability
noun see insociable
insociable
adjective Etymology: Latin insociabilis, from in- + sociabilis sociable Date: 1588 not sociable • insociability noun • insociably adverb
insociably
adverb see insociable
insofar
adverb Date: 1596 to such extent or degree
insofar as
conjunction Date: 15th century to the extent or degree that
insol
abbreviation insoluble
insolation
noun Etymology: French or Latin; French, from Latin insolation-, insolatio, from insolare to expose to the sun, from in- + sol sun — more at solar Date: 1617 1. exposure to ...
insole
noun Date: circa 1861 1. an inside sole of a shoe 2. a loose thin strip placed inside a shoe for warmth or comfort
insolence
noun Date: 14th century 1. the quality or state of being insolent 2. an instance of insolent conduct or treatment
insolent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin insolent-, insolens unaccustomed, overbearing, from in- + solens, present participle of solēre to be accustomed; perhaps akin ...
insolently
adverb see insolent
insolubility
noun see insoluble
insolubilization
noun see insolubilize
insolubilize
transitive verb Date: 1897 to make insoluble • insolubilization noun
insoluble
adjective Etymology: Middle English insolible, from Latin insolubilis, from in- + solvere to free, dissolve — more at solve Date: 14th century not soluble: as a. archaic ...
insolubleness
noun see insoluble
insolubly
adverb see insoluble
insolvable
adjective Date: 1693 admitting no solution • insolvably adverb
insolvably
adverb see insolvable
insolvency
noun Date: 1660 the fact or state of being insolvent ; inability to pay debts
insolvent
adjective Date: 1591 1. a. (1) unable to pay debts as they fall due in the usual course of business (2) having liabilities in excess of a reasonable market value ...
insomnia
noun Etymology: Latin, from insomnis sleepless, from in- + somnus sleep — more at somnolent Date: circa 1623 prolonged and usually abnormal inability to obtain adequate ...
insomniac
adjective or noun see insomnia
insomuch as
conjunction Date: 14th century inasmuch as
insomuch that
conjunction Date: 14th century so 1
insouciance
noun Etymology: French, from in- + soucier to trouble, disturb, from Old French, from Latin sollicitare — more at solicit Date: 1799 lighthearted unconcern ; nonchalance ...
insouciant
adjective see insouciance
insouciantly
adverb see insouciance
insp
abbreviation inspector
inspan
verb Etymology: Afrikaans, from Dutch inspannen Date: circa 1827 chiefly South African yoke, harness
inspect
verb Etymology: Latin inspectus, past participle of inspicere, from in- + specere to look — more at spy Date: circa 1623 transitive verb 1. to view closely in critical ...
inspection
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of inspecting b. recognition of a familiar pattern leading to immediate solution of a mathematical problem 2. a checking or ...
inspection arms
noun Etymology: from the command inspection arms! Date: circa 1884 a position in the manual of arms in which the rifle is held at port arms with the chamber open for ...
inspective
adjective see inspect
inspector
noun Date: 1602 1. a person employed to inspect something 2. a. a police officer who is in charge of usually several precincts and ranks below a superintendent or deputy ...
inspector general
noun Date: 1702 a person who heads an inspectorate or a system of inspection (as of an army)
inspectorate
noun Date: 1762 1. the office, position, work, or district of an inspector 2. a body of inspectors
inspectorship
noun see inspector
inspiration
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a divine influence or action on a person believed to qualify him or her to receive and communicate sacred revelation b. the action or power ...
inspirational
adjective see inspiration
inspirationally
adverb see inspiration
inspirator
noun Date: 1624 one that inspires
inspiratory
adjective Date: 1773 of, relating to, used for, or associated with inspiration
inspire
verb (inspired; inspiring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French inspirer, from Latin inspirare, from in- + spirare to breathe Date: 14th century ...
inspired
adjective Date: 15th century outstanding or brilliant in a way or to a degree suggestive of divine inspiration
inspirer
noun see inspire
inspiring
adjective Date: 1717 having an animating or exalting effect
inspirit
transitive verb Date: 15th century to fill with spirit Synonyms: see encourage • inspiritingly adverb
inspiritingly
adverb see inspirit
inspissate
transitive verb (-sated; -sating) Etymology: Late Latin inspissatus, past participle of inspissare, from Latin in- + spissus slow, dense; akin to Greek spidnos compact, ...
inspissated
adjective Date: 1655 thickened in consistency; broadly made or having become thick, heavy, or intense
inspissation
noun see inspissate
inspissator
noun see inspissate
inst
abbreviation 1. instant 2. institute; institution; institutional
instability
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being unstable; especially lack of emotional or mental stability
instable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin instabilis, from in- + stabilis stable Date: 15th century unstable
instal
chiefly British variant of install
install
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enstaller, installer, from Medieval Latin installare, from Latin in- + Medieval Latin stallum stall, from Old High ...
installation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of installing ; the state of being installed 2. something that is installed for use 3. a military camp, fort, or base 4. a work of art ...
installer
noun see install
installment
I. noun also instalment Date: 1589 installation 1 II. noun also instalment Etymology: alteration of earlier estallment payment by installment, from estall to arrange payments ...
installment plan
noun Date: 1876 a system of paying for goods by installments
instalment
I. noun see installment I II. noun see installment II
instance
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic urgent or earnest solicitation b. instigation, request c. obsolete an impelling cause or motive 2. a. archaic ...
instancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1515 1. urgency, insistence 2. nearness of approach ; imminence 3. immediacy of occurrence or action ; instantaneousness
instant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin instant-, instans, from instant-, instans, adjective, instant, from Latin Date: 14th century 1. an ...
instant replay
noun Date: 1966 a video recording of an action (as a play in football) that can be played back (as in slow motion) immediately after the action has been completed; also the ...
instantaneity
noun see instantaneous
instantaneous
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin instantaneus, from instant-, instans, noun Date: 1651 1. done, occurring, or acting without any perceptible duration of time 2. done ...
instantaneously
adverb see instantaneous
instantaneousness
noun see instantaneous
instanter
adverb Etymology: Medieval Latin, from instant-, instans Date: 1688 at once
instantiate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1949 to represent (an abstraction) by a concrete instance • instantiation noun
instantiation
noun see instantiate
instantly
I. adverb Date: 15th century 1. with importunity ; urgently 2. without the least delay ; immediately II. conjunction Date: 1793 as soon as
instantness
noun see instant II
instar
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, equivalent Date: 1895 a stage in the life of an arthropod (as an insect) between two successive molts; also an individual in a ...
instate
transitive verb Date: 1603 1. obsolete a. invest, endow b. bestow, confer 2. to set or establish in a rank or office ; install
instauration
noun Etymology: Latin instauration-, instauratio, from instaurare to renew, restore — more at store Date: circa 1603 1. restoration after decay, lapse, or dilapidation 2. ...
instead
adverb Date: 1667 1. as a substitute or equivalent 2. as an alternative to something expressed or implied ; rather
instead of
preposition Etymology: Middle English in sted of Date: 13th century in place of ; as a substitute for or alternative to
instep
noun Date: 15th century 1. the arched middle portion of the human foot in front of the ankle joint; especially its upper surface 2. the part of a shoe or stocking that ...
instigate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin instigatus, past participle of instigare — more at stick Date: 1542 to goad or urge forward ; provoke Synonyms: see ...
instigation
noun see instigate
instigative
adjective see instigate
instigator
noun see instigate
instil
chiefly British variant of instill
instill
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin instillare, from in- + stillare to drip, from stilla drop Date: 15th century 1. to cause to enter drop by drop 2. to ...
instillation
noun see instill
instiller
noun see instill
instillment
noun see instill
instinct
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin instinctus impulse, from instinguere to incite; akin to Latin instigare to instigate Date: 15th century 1. a natural or inherent ...
instinctive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or being instinct 2. prompted by natural instinct or propensity ; arising spontaneously Synonyms: see spontaneous • ...
instinctively
adverb see instinctive
instinctual
adjective see instinct I
instinctually
adverb see instinct I
institute
I. transitive verb (-tuted; -tuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute Date: ...
instituter
noun see institute I
institution
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of instituting ; establishment 2. a. a significant practice, relationship, or organization in a society or culture ; also something or ...
institutional
adjective Date: 1617 1. of or relating to an institution 2. characteristic of or appropriate to institutions • institutionally adverb
institutionalise
British variant of institutionalize
institutionalism
noun Date: 1862 1. emphasis on organization (as in religion) at the expense of other factors 2. public institutional care of disabled, delinquent, or dependent persons 3. ...

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