Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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institutionalist
noun see institutionalism
institutionalization
noun see institutionalize
institutionalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1865 1. to make into an institution ; give character of an institution to ; especially to incorporate into a structured and often ...
institutionally
adverb see institutional
institutor
noun see institute I
instr
abbreviation 1. instructor 2. instrument; instrumental
instruct
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin instructus, past participle of instruere, from in- + struere to build — more at structure Date: 15th century 1. to ...
instruction
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. precept b. a direction calling for compliance ; order — usually used in plural c. plural an outline or manual of technical ...
instructional
adjective see instruction
instructive
adjective Date: 1611 carrying a lesson ; enlightening • instructively adverb • instructiveness noun
instructively
adverb see instructive
instructiveness
noun see instructive
instructor
noun Date: 15th century one that instructs ; teacher; especially a college teacher below professorial rank • instructorship noun
instructorship
noun see instructor
instructress
noun Date: 1630 a woman who is an instructor
instrument
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin instrumentum, from instruere to arrange, instruct Date: 14th century 1. a device used to produce music; also ...
instrument flying
noun Date: 1928 navigation of an airplane by instruments only
instrument landing
noun Date: 1938 a landing made with limited visibility by means of instruments and by ground radio direction
instrument panel
noun Date: 1922 a panel on which instruments are mounted; especially dashboard 2
instrumental
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. serving as a crucial means, agent, or tool b. of, relating to, or done with an instrument or tool 2. relating to, composed for, or ...
instrumentalism
noun Date: 1909 a doctrine that ideas are instruments of action and that their usefulness determines their truth
instrumentalist
noun Date: 1823 1. a player on a musical instrument 2. an exponent of instrumentalism • instrumentalist adjective
instrumentality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1651 1. the quality or state of being instrumental 2. means, agency
instrumentally
adverb see instrumental
instrumentation
noun Date: 1845 1. the arrangement or composition of music for instruments especially for a band or orchestra 2. the use or application of instruments (as for observation, ...
insubordinate
adjective Date: circa 1828 disobedient to authority • insubordinate noun • insubordinately adverb • insubordination noun
insubordinately
adverb see insubordinate
insubordination
noun see insubordinate
insubstantial
adjective Etymology: probably from French insubstantiel, from Late Latin insubstantialis, from Latin in- + Late Latin substantialis substantial Date: 1607 not substantial: ...
insubstantiality
noun see insubstantial
insufferable
adjective Date: 15th century not to be endured ; intolerable • insufferableness noun • insufferably adverb
insufferableness
noun see insufferable
insufferably
adverb see insufferable
insufficiency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1526 1. the quality or state of being insufficient: as a. lack of mental or moral fitness ; incompetence b. lack of adequate supply c. ...
insufficient
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin insufficient-, insufficiens, from Latin in- + sufficient-, sufficiens sufficient Date: 14th century ...
insufficiently
adverb see insufficient
insufflate
transitive verb see insufflation
insufflation
noun Etymology: Middle English insufflacion, from Late Latin insufflation-, insufflatio, from insufflare to blow upon, from Latin in- + sufflare to inflate, from sub- + flare to ...
insufflator
noun see insufflation
insulant
noun Date: circa 1929 chiefly British insulation 2
insular
adjective Etymology: Late Latin insularis, from Latin insula island Date: 1611 1. a. of, relating to, or constituting an island b. dwelling or situated on an island ...
insularism
noun see insular
insularity
noun see insular
insularly
adverb see insular
insulate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin insula Date: circa 1741 to place in a detached situation ; isolate; especially to separate from conducting bodies by means ...
insulation
noun Date: 1798 1. a. the action of insulating b. the state of being insulated 2. material used in insulating
insulator
noun Date: 1801 one that insulates: as a. a material that is a poor conductor (as of electricity or heat) — compare semiconductor b. a device made of an electrical ...
insulin
noun Etymology: New Latin insula islet (of Langerhans), from Latin, island Date: 1914 a protein pancreatic hormone secreted by the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans that ...
insulin resistance
noun Date: 1965 reduced sensitivity to insulin by the body's insulin-dependent processes (as glucose uptake and lipolysis) that is typical of type 2 diabetes but often ...
insulin shock
noun Date: 1925 severe hypoglycemia that is associated with the presence of excessive insulin in the system and that if left untreated may result in convulsions and ...
insulin-dependent diabetes
noun Date: 1977 type 1 diabetes
insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
noun Date: 1980 type 1 diabetes — abbreviation IDDM
insulin-like growth factor
noun Date: 1976 either of two polypeptides structurally similar to insulin that are secreted either during fetal development or during childhood and that mediate growth ...
Insull
biographical name Samuel 1859-1938 American (English-born) financier
insult
I. verb Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French insulter, from Latin insultare, literally, to spring upon, from in- + saltare to leap — more at saltation Date: 1540 ...
insulter
noun see insult I
insultingly
adverb see insult I
insuperable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin insuperabilis, from in- + superare to surmount, from super over — more at over Date: 14th century incapable of being ...
insuperably
adverb see insuperable
insupportable
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin insupportabilis, from Latin in- + supportare to support Date: circa 1530 not supportable: ...
insupportably
adverb see insupportable
insuppressible
adjective Date: 1610 irrepressible
insur
abbreviation insurance
insurability
noun see insurable
insurable
adjective Date: 1810 that may be insured • insurability noun
insurance
I. noun Date: 1651 1. a. the business of insuring persons or property b. coverage by contract whereby one party undertakes to indemnify or guarantee another against ...
insure
verb (insured; insuring) Etymology: Middle English, to assure, probably alteration of assuren Date: 1635 transitive verb 1. to provide or obtain insurance on or for 2. ...
insured
noun Date: 1681 a person whose life or property is insured
insurer
noun Date: 1654 one that insures; specifically an insurance underwriter
insurgence
noun Date: 1847 an act or the action of being insurgent ; insurrection
insurgency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1803 1. the quality or state of being insurgent; specifically a condition of revolt against a government that is less than an organized revolution ...
insurgent
I. noun Etymology: Latin insurgent-, insurgens, present participle of insurgere to rise up, from in- + surgere to rise — more at surge Date: 1765 1. a person who revolts ...
insurgently
adverb see insurgent II
insurmountable
adjective Date: 1690 incapable of being surmounted ; insuperable • insurmountably adverb
insurmountably
adverb see insurmountable
insurrection
noun Etymology: Middle English insureccion, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin insurrection-, insurrectio, from insurgere Date: 15th century an act or instance of revolting ...
insurrectional
adjective see insurrection
insurrectionary
adjective or noun see insurrection
insurrectionist
noun see insurrection
insusceptibility
noun see insusceptible
insusceptible
adjective Date: 1603 not susceptible • insusceptibility noun • insusceptibly adverb
insusceptibly
adverb see insusceptible
int
abbreviation 1. intelligence 2. intercept 3. interest 4. interim 5. interior 6. interjection 7. intermediate 8. internal 9. international 10. interpreter 11. ...
intact
adjective Etymology: Middle English intacte, from Latin intactus, from in- + tactus, past participle of tangere to touch — more at tangent Date: 15th century 1. untouched ...
intactness
noun see intact
intaglio
noun (plural -glios) Etymology: Italian, from intagliare to engrave, cut, from Medieval Latin intaliare, from Latin in- + Late Latin taliare to cut — more at tailor Date: ...
intake
noun Date: 15th century 1. an opening through which fluid enters an enclosure 2. a. a taking in b. (1) the amount taken in (2) something (as energy) taken in ; ...
intangibility
noun see intangible I
intangible
I. adjective Etymology: French or Medieval Latin; French, from Medieval Latin intangibilis, from Latin in- + Late Latin tangibilis tangible Date: 1640 not tangible ; ...
intangibleness
noun see intangible I
intangibly
adverb see intangible I
intarsia
noun Etymology: German, modification of Italian intarsio Date: 1867 1. a mosaic usually of wood fitted into a support; also the art or process of making such a mosaic 2. a ...
integer
noun Etymology: Latin, adjective, whole, entire — more at entire Date: 1571 1. any of the natural numbers, the negatives of these numbers, or zero 2. a complete entity
integer vitae scelerisque purus
foreign term Etymology: Latin upright of life and free from wickedness
integrability
noun see integrable
integrable
adjective Date: circa 1741 capable of being integrated • integrability noun
integral
I. adjective Date: 1551 1. a. essential to completeness ; constituent b. (1) being, containing, or relating to one or more mathematical integers (2) relating ...
integral calculus
noun Date: circa 1741 a branch of mathematics concerned with the theory and applications (as in the determination of lengths, areas, and volumes and in the solution of ...
integral domain
noun Date: 1937 a mathematical ring in which multiplication is commutative, which has a multiplicative identity element, and which contains no pair of nonzero elements whose ...
integrality
noun see integral I
integrally
adverb see integral I
integrand
noun Etymology: Latin integrandus, gerundive of integrare Date: 1897 a mathematical expression to be integrated
integrate
verb (-grated; -grating) Etymology: Latin integratus, past participle of integrare, from integr-, integer Date: circa 1586 transitive verb 1. to form, coordinate, or blend ...
integrated
adjective Date: 1922 1. marked by the unified control of all aspects of industrial production from raw materials through distribution of finished products 2. ...
integrated circuit
noun Date: 1959 a tiny complex of electronic components and their connections that is produced in or on a small slice of material (as silicon) • integrated circuitry noun
integrated circuitry
noun see integrated circuit
integrated pest management
noun Date: 1976 management of agricultural and horticultural pests that minimizes the use of chemicals and emphasizes natural and low-toxicity methods (as the use of crop ...
integration
noun Date: 1620 1. the act or process or an instance of integrating: as a. incorporation as equals into society or an organization of individuals of different groups (as ...
integrationist
noun Date: 1951 a person who believes in, advocates, or practices social integration • integrationist adjective
integrative
adjective Date: 1862 serving to integrate or favoring integration ; directed toward integration
integrator
noun Date: 1876 one that integrates; especially a device or computer unit that totalizes variable quantities in a manner comparable to mathematical integration
integrity
noun Etymology: Middle English integrite, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French integrité, from Latin integritat-, integritas, from integr-, integer entire Date: 14th ...
integument
noun Etymology: Latin integumentum, from integere to cover, from in- + tegere to cover — more at thatch Date: circa 1611 something that covers or encloses; especially an ...
integumentary
adjective see integument
intel
abbreviation intelligence
intellect
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin intellectus, from intellegere to understand — more at intelligent Date: 14th century ...
intellection
noun Date: 1579 1. an act of the intellect ; thought 2. exercise of the intellect ; reasoning
intellective
adjective Date: 15th century having, relating to, or belonging to the intellect ; rational • intellectively adverb
intellectively
adverb see intellective
intellectual
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. of or relating to the intellect or its use b. developed or chiefly guided by the intellect rather than by emotion or experience ; ...
intellectual property
noun Date: 1845 property (as an idea, invention, or process) that derives from the work of the mind or intellect; also an application, right, or registration relating to this
intellectualism
noun Date: 1838 devotion to the exercise of intellect or to intellectual pursuits • intellectualist noun or adjective • intellectualistic adjective
intellectualist
noun or adjective see intellectualism
intellectualistic
adjective see intellectualism
intellectuality
noun see intellectual I
intellectualization
noun see intellectualize
intellectualize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1819 to give rational form or content to • intellectualization noun • intellectualizer noun
intellectualizer
noun see intellectualize
intellectually
adverb see intellectual I
intellectualness
noun see intellectual I
intelligence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin intelligentia, from intelligent-, intelligens intelligent Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) the ability to ...
intelligence quotient
noun Date: 1916 IQ 1
intelligence test
noun Date: 1914 a test designed to determine the relative mental capacity of a person
intelligencer
noun Date: 1581 1. a secret agent ; spy 2. a bringer of news ; reporter
intelligent
adjective Etymology: Latin intelligent-, intelligens, present participle of intelligere, intellegere to understand, from inter- + legere to gather, select — more at legend ...
intelligential
adjective see intelligent
intelligently
adverb see intelligent
intelligentsia
noun Etymology: Russian intelligentsiya, from Latin intelligentia intelligence Date: 1907 intellectuals who form an artistic, social, or political vanguard or elite
intelligibility
noun see intelligible
intelligible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin intelligibilis, from intelligere Date: 14th century 1. apprehensible by the intellect only 2. capable of being understood ...
intelligibleness
noun see intelligible
intelligibly
adverb see intelligible
intemperance
noun Date: 15th century lack of moderation; especially habitual or excessive drinking of intoxicants
intemperate
adjective Etymology: Middle English intemperat, from Latin intemperatus, from in- + temperatus, past participle of temperare to temper Date: 14th century not temperate ; ...
intemperately
adverb see intemperate
intemperateness
noun see intemperate
intend
verb Etymology: Middle English entenden, intenden, from Anglo-French entendre, from Latin intendere to stretch out, direct, aim at, from in- + tendere to stretch — more at ...
intendance
noun Date: 1739 1. management, superintendence 2. an administrative department
intendant
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Latin intendent-, intendens, present participle of intendere to intend, attend Date: 1652 an administrative official (as a ...
intended
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. expected to be such in the future 2. intentional • intendedly adverb II. noun Date: 1767 the person to whom another is engaged
intendedly
adverb see intended I
intender
noun see intend
intending
adjective Date: 1788 prospective, aspiring
intendment
noun Date: 14th century the true meaning or intention especially of a law
intenerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: 2in- + Latin tener soft, tender — more at tender Date: 1576 to make tender ; soften • inteneration noun
inteneration
noun see intenerate
intense
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin intensus, from past participle of intendere to stretch out Date: 15th century 1. a. existing in an ...
intensely
adverb see intense
intenseness
noun see intense
intensification
noun see intensify
intensifier
noun Date: 1835 one that intensifies; especially intensive
intensify
verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1817 transitive verb 1. to make intense or more intensive ; strengthen 2. a. to increase the density and contrast of (a photographic image) ...
intension
noun Date: 1604 1. intensity 2. connotation 3 • intensional adjective • intensionality noun • intensionally adverb
intensional
adjective see intension
intensionality
noun see intension
intensionally
adverb see intension
intensity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1665 1. the quality or state of being intense; especially extreme degree of strength, force, energy, or feeling 2. the magnitude of a quantity (as ...
intensive
I. adjective Date: 15th century of, relating to, or marked by intensity or intensification: as a. highly concentrated b. tending to strengthen or increase; especially ...
intensive care
noun Date: 1963 1. continuous monitoring and treatment of seriously ill patients using special medical equipment and services 2. a unit in a hospital providing intensive ...
intensively
adverb see intensive I
intensiveness
noun see intensive I
intent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English entente, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin intentus, from Latin, act of stretching out, from intendere Date: 13th century 1. a. the act ...
intention
noun Date: 14th century 1. a determination to act in a certain way ; resolve 2. import, significance 3. a. what one intends to do or bring about b. the object for ...
intentional
adjective Date: circa 1677 1. done by intention or design ; intended 2. a. of or relating to epistemological intention b. having external reference Synonyms: see ...
intentionality
noun see intentional
intentionally
adverb see intentional
intently
adverb see intent II
intentness
noun see intent II
inter
transitive verb (interred; interring) Etymology: Middle English enteren, from Anglo-French enterrer, from Vulgar Latin *interrare, from in- + Latin terra earth — more at ...
inter alia
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1665 among other things
inter alios
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1670 among other persons
inter arma silent leges
foreign term Etymology: Latin in the midst of arms (i.e., in time of war) the laws are silent
inter nos
foreign term Etymology: Latin between ourselves
inter se
adverb or adjective Etymology: Latin Date: 1845 among or between themselves
inter vivos
adverb or adjective Etymology: Late Latin Date: 1837 between living persons ; especially from one living person to another
inter vivos trust
noun Date: 1949 living trust
inter-
prefix Etymology: Middle English inter-, enter-, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French inter-, entre-, from Latin inter-, from inter; akin to Old High German untar among, ...
interact
intransitive verb Date: 1839 to act upon one another
interactant
noun Date: 1949 one that interacts
interaction
noun Date: 1832 mutual or reciprocal action or influence • interactional adjective
interactional
adjective see interaction
interactive
adjective Date: 1832 1. mutually or reciprocally active 2. involving the actions or input of a user; especially of, relating to, or being a two-way electronic ...
interactively
adverb see interactive
interactivity
noun see interactive
interallied
adjective Date: 1917 relating to, composed of, or involving allies
interbreed
verb (interbred; -breeding) Date: 1859 intransitive verb to breed together: as a. crossbreed b. to breed within a closed population transitive verb to cause to ...
intercalary
adjective Etymology: Latin intercalarius, from intercalare Date: 1614 1. a. inserted in a calendar b. of a year containing an intercalary period (as a day or month) ...
intercalate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin intercalatus, past participle of intercalare, from inter- + calare to proclaim, call — more at low Date: 1603 1. to ...
intercalation
noun see intercalate
intercede
intransitive verb (-ceded; -ceding) Etymology: Latin intercedere, from inter- + cedere to go Date: 1597 to intervene between parties with a view to reconciling differences ; ...
interceder
noun see intercede
intercensal
adjective Date: 1887 occurring between censuses
intercept
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin interceptus, past participle of intercipere, from inter- + capere to take, seize — more at heave Date: 15th century ...
intercepter
noun see interceptor
interception
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the action of intercepting b. the state of being intercepted 2. something that is intercepted; especially an intercepted forward pass
interceptor
also intercepter noun Date: 1598 one that intercepts; specifically a light high-speed fast-climbing fighter plane or missile designed for defense against raiding bombers or ...
intercession
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin intercession-, intercessio, from intercedere Date: 15th century 1. the act of ...
intercessional
adjective see intercession
intercessor
noun see intercession
intercessory
adjective see intercession
interchange
I. verb Etymology: Middle English entrechaungen, from Anglo-French *entrechanger, from entre- inter- + changer to change Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to put each ...
interchangeability
noun see interchangeable
interchangeable
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being interchanged; especially permitting mutual substitution • interchangeability noun • interchangeableness noun • ...
interchangeableness
noun see interchangeable
interchangeably
adverb see interchangeable
interchanger
noun see interchange I
intercollegiate
adjective Date: circa 1874 existing, carried on, or participating in activities between colleges
intercolumniation
noun Etymology: Latin intercolumnium space between two columns, from inter- + columna column Date: 1624 1. the clear space between the columns of a series 2. the system of ...
intercom
noun Etymology: short for intercommunication system Date: 1940 a two-way communication system with a microphone and loudspeaker at each station for localized use
intercommunicate
intransitive verb Date: 1586 1. to exchange communication with one another 2. to afford passage from one to another • intercommunication noun
intercommunication
noun see intercommunicate
intercommunication system
noun Date: 1911 intercom
intercommunion
noun Date: 1921 interdenominational participation in communion
interconnect
verb Date: 1865 transitive verb to connect with one another intransitive verb to be or become mutually connected • interconnection noun • interconnectivity noun
interconnected
adjective Date: 1865 1. mutually joined or related 2. having internal connections between the parts or elements • interconnectedness noun
interconnectedness
noun see interconnected
interconnection
noun see interconnect
interconnectivity
noun see interconnect
intercontinental
adjective Date: circa 1855 1. extending among continents or carried on between continents 2. capable of traveling between continents
interconversion
noun Date: 1865 mutual conversion • interconvert transitive verb • interconvertibility noun • interconvertible adjective
interconvert
transitive verb see interconversion
interconvertibility
noun see interconversion
interconvertible
adjective see interconversion
intercooler
noun Date: 1899 a device for cooling a fluid (as air) between successive heat-generating processes
intercostal
adjective Etymology: New Latin intercostalis, from Latin inter- + costa rib — more at coast Date: 1597 situated or extending between the ribs • intercostal noun
intercourse
noun Etymology: Middle English intercurse, probably from Middle French entrecours, from Medieval Latin intercursus, from Latin, act of running between, from intercurrere to run ...
intercrop
verb Date: 1898 transitive verb to grow a crop in between (another) intransitive verb to grow two or more crops simultaneously (as in alternate rows) on the same plot ...
intercross
I. verb Date: 1711 transitive verb cross 8 intransitive verb interbreed, hybridize II. noun Date: 1859 an instance or a product of crossbreeding
intercurrent
adjective Etymology: Latin intercurrent-, intercurrens, present participle of intercurrere Date: 1611 occurring during and modifying the course of another disease
intercut
verb Date: 1932 transitive verb 1. to insert (a contrasting camera shot) into a take by cutting 2. to insert a contrasting camera shot into (a take) by cutting ...
interdental
adjective Date: circa 1874 1. situated or intended for use between the teeth 2. formed with the tip of the tongue between the upper and lower front teeth • interdentally ...
interdentally
adverb see interdental
interdict
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of entredite, from Anglo-French, from Latin interdictum prohibition, from neuter of interdictus, past participle of interdicere to ...
interdiction
noun see interdict II
interdictive
adjective see interdict II
interdictor
noun see interdict II
interdictory
adjective see interdict II
interdiffuse
intransitive verb see interdiffusion
interdiffusion
noun Date: circa 1872 the process of diffusing and mixing freely so as to approach a homogeneous mixture • interdiffuse intransitive verb
interdigitate
intransitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: inter- + Latin digitus finger — more at toe Date: circa 1849 to become interlocked like the fingers of folded hands • ...
interdigitation
noun see interdigitate
interdisciplinarity
noun see interdisciplinary
interdisciplinary
adjective Date: 1926 involving two or more academic, scientific, or artistic disciplines • interdisciplinarity noun
interest
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, probably alteration of earlier interesse, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, to be between, ...
interest group
noun Date: 1908 a group of persons having a common identifying interest that often provides a basis for action
interested
adjective Date: 1602 1. having the attention engaged 2. being affected or involved • interestedly adverb
interestedly
adverb see interested
interesting
adjective Date: 1768 holding the attention ; arousing interest • interestingness noun
interestingly
adverb Date: 1811 1. in an interesting manner 2. as a matter of interest
interestingness
noun see interesting
interface
I. noun Date: 1882 1. a surface forming a common boundary of two bodies, spaces, or phases 2. a. the place at which independent and often unrelated systems meet and act ...
interfacial
adjective see interface I
interfacing
noun Date: 1942 fabric sewn between the facing and the outside of a garment (as in a collar or cuff) for stiffening and shape retention
interfaith
adjective Date: 1932 involving persons of different religious faiths
interfere
intransitive verb (-fered; -fering) Etymology: Middle English enterferen, from Anglo-French (s')entreferir to strike one another, from entre- inter- + ferir to strike, from ...

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