Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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knackwurst
variant of knockwurst
knap
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnæp; akin to Old English cnotta knot Date: before 12th century 1. chiefly dialect a crest of a hill ; summit 2. chiefly ...
knapper
noun see knap II
knapsack
noun Etymology: Low German knappsack or Dutch knapzak, from Low German & Dutch knappen to make a snapping noise, eat + Low German sack or Dutch zak sack Date: 1603 a bag (as ...
knapsacked
adjective see knapsack
knapweed
noun Etymology: Middle English knopwed, from knop knop + wed weed Date: 15th century any of various weedy centaureas; especially a widely naturalized European perennial ...
knave
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnafa; akin to Old High German knabo boy Date: before 12th century 1. archaic a. a boy servant b. a male servant c. ...
knavery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1528 1. a. rascality b. a roguish or mischievous act 2. obsolete roguish mischief
knavish
adjective Date: 14th century of, relating to, or characteristic of a knave; especially dishonest • knavishly adverb
knavishly
adverb see knavish
knead
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English kneden, from Old English cnedan; akin to Old High German knetan to knead Date: before 12th century 1. a. to work and press into a ...
kneadable
adjective see knead
kneader
noun see knead
knee
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnēow; akin to Old High German kneo knee, Latin genu, Greek gony Date: before 12th century 1. ...
knee breeches
noun plural Date: 1833 breech 1a
knee jerk
noun Date: 1876 an involuntary forward kick produced by a light blow on the tendon below the patella
knee-deep
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. sunk to the knees b. deeply engaged or occupied 2. knee-high
knee-high
adjective Date: 1743 rising or reaching upward to the knees • knee-high noun
knee-jerk
adjective Date: 1951 readily predictable ; automatic ; also reacting in a readily predictable way
knee-slapper
noun Date: 1966 an extremely funny joke, line, or story
kneecap
noun Date: 1869 patella
kneecapping
noun Date: 1974 the terroristic act or practice of maiming a person's knees (as by gunshot) • kneecap transitive verb
kneed
adjective see knee I
kneehole
noun Date: 1893 an open space (as under a desk) for the knees
kneel
intransitive verb (knelt or kneeled; kneeling) Etymology: Middle English knelen, from Old English cnēowlian; akin to Old English cnēow knee Date: before 12th century to ...
kneeler
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that kneels 2. something (as a cushion or board) to kneel on
kneepan
noun Date: 15th century patella
kneesock
noun Date: 1964 a knee-high sock
knell
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnyllan; akin to Middle High German erknellen to toll Date: before 12th century transitive verb to summon or announce ...
Kneller
biographical name Sir Godfrey 1646(or 1649)-1723 originally Gottfried Kniller English (German-born) painter
knew
past of know
knickerbocker
noun Etymology: Diedrich Knickerbocker, fictitious author of History of New York (1809) by Washington Irving Date: 1848 1. capitalized a descendant of the early Dutch ...
knickers
noun plural Etymology: short for knickerbockers Date: 1881 1. loose-fitting short pants gathered at the knee 2. chiefly British underpants
knickknack
also nicknack noun Etymology: reduplication of knack Date: 1682 a small trivial article usually intended for ornament
knife
I. noun (plural knives) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English knif, from Old English cnīf, perhaps from Old Norse knīfr; akin to Middle Low German knīf knife ...
knife-edge
noun Date: 1818 1. a sharp wedge of steel or other hard material used as a fulcrum for a lever beam in a precision instrument 2. a sharp narrow knifelike edge
knifelike
adjective see knife I
knifepoint
noun Date: circa 1911 the point of a knife
knight
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cniht man-at-arms, boy, servant; akin to Old High German kneht youth, military follower Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
Knight of Columbus
noun (plural Knights of Columbus) Etymology: Christopher Columbus Date: 1882 a member of a benevolent and fraternal society of Roman Catholic men
Knight of Pythias
noun (plural Knights of Pythias) Date: 1869 a member of a secret benevolent and fraternal order
Knight of the Maccabees
noun (plural Knights of the Maccabees) Date: 1922 a member of a secret benevolent society
Knight Templar
noun (plural Knights Templars or Knights Templar) Date: 1610 1. Templar 1 2. a member of an order of Freemasonry conferring three orders in the York rite
knight-errant
noun (plural knights-errant) Date: 14th century a knight traveling in search of adventures in which to exhibit military skill, prowess, and generosity
knight-errantry
noun (plural knight-errantries) Date: 1620 1. the practice or actions of a knight-errant 2. quixotic conduct
knighthood
noun Date: 13th century 1. the rank, dignity, or profession of a knight 2. the qualities befitting a knight ; chivalry 3. knights as a class or body
knightliness
noun see knightly
knightly
adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of a knight 2. made up of knights • knightliness noun • knightly adverb
knish
noun Etymology: Yiddish, from Polish knysz Date: 1916 a small round or square of dough stuffed with a filling (as potato) and baked or fried
knit
I. verb (knit or knitted; knitting) Etymology: Middle English knitten, from Old English cnyttan; akin to Old English cnotta knot Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. ...
knit stitch
noun Date: circa 1885 a basic knitting stitch usually made with the yarn at the back of the work by inserting the right needle into the front part of a loop on the left ...
knitter
noun see knit I
knitting
noun Date: 15th century 1. the action or method of one that knits 2. work done or being done by one that knits
knitwear
noun Date: 1926 knitted clothing
knob
noun Etymology: Middle English knobbe; akin to Middle Low German knubbe knob Date: 14th century 1. a. a rounded protuberance ; lump b. a small rounded ornament or ...
knobbed
adjective see knob
knobbly
adjective Date: 1859 having very small knobs
knobby
adjective see knob
knobkerrie
noun Etymology: Afrikaans knopkierie, from knop knob + kierie club Date: 1844 a short wooden club with a knob at one end used as a missile or in close attack especially by ...
knock
I. verb Etymology: Middle English knoken, from Old English cnocian; akin to Middle High German knochen to press Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to strike ...
knock back
transitive verb Date: circa 1931 drink, swallow; specifically to toss down (an alcoholic beverage)
knock cold
phrasal knock out 2a(1)
knock dead
phrasal to move strongly especially to admiration or applause
knock down
transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. to strike to the ground with or as if with a sharp blow ; fell 2. to dispose of (an item) to a bidder at an auction sale 3. to take ...
knock for a loop
phrasal 1. a. overcome b. demolish 2. dumbfound, amaze
knock off
verb Date: 1649 intransitive verb to stop doing something transitive verb 1. to do hurriedly or routinely 2. discontinue, stop 3. deduct 4. a. kill ...
knock on wood
phrasal — used interjectionally to ward off misfortune
knock one's socks off
phrasal to overwhelm or amaze one
knock out
transitive verb Date: 1856 1. to produce roughly or hastily 2. a. (1) to defeat (a boxing opponent) by a knockout (2) to make unconscious b. to make ...
knock over
transitive verb Date: circa 1814 1. a. (1) to strike to the ground ; fell (2) overwhelm b. eliminate 2. a. steal; especially hijack b. rob
knock together
phrasal to make or assemble especially hurriedly or in a makeshift way
knock up
transitive verb Date: 1592 1. British rouse, summon 2. sometimes vulgar to make pregnant
knock-down, drag-out
or knock-down-and-drag-out adjective Date: 1834 marked by extreme violence or bitterness and by the showing of no mercy • knock-down-drag-out noun
knock-down-and-drag-out
adjective see knock-down, drag-out
knock-down-drag-out
noun see knock-down, drag-out
knock-knee
noun Date: 1879 a condition in which the legs curve inward at the knees • knock-kneed adjective
knock-kneed
adjective see knock-knee
knockabout
adjective Date: 1880 1. suitable for rough use 2. a. being noisy and rough ; boisterous b. characterized by boisterous antics and often extravagant burlesque 3. ...
knockdown
I. adjective Date: 1690 1. having such force as to strike down or overwhelm 2. that can easily be assembled or disassembled 3. chiefly British extremely low ; reduced ...
knocker
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that knocks: as a. a metal ring, bar, or hammer hinged to a door for use in knocking b. a persistently pessimistic critic 2. often vulgar ...
knockoff
noun Date: 1966 a copy that sells for less than the original; broadly a copy or imitation of someone or something popular
knockout
I. noun Date: 1887 1. a. the act of knocking out ; the condition of being knocked out b. (1) the termination of a boxing match when one boxer has been knocked down ...
knockout drops
noun plural Date: 1895 drops of a solution of a drug (as chloral hydrate) put into a drink to produce unconsciousness or stupefaction
knockwurst
also knackwurst noun Etymology: German Knackwurst, from knacken to crackle (of imitative origin) + Wurst wurst Date: circa 1929 a short thick heavily seasoned sausage
knoll
I. noun Etymology: Middle English knol, from Old English cnoll; akin to Old Norse knollr mountaintop Date: before 12th century a small round hill ; mound II. verb Etymology: ...
knop
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English -cnoppa knob Date: before 12th century a usually ornamental knob • knopped adjective
knopped
adjective see knop
Knossos
or Cnossus or Gnossus geographical name ruined city capital of ancient Crete near N coast SE of modern Iráklion
knot
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnotta; akin to Old High German knoto knot Date: before 12th century 1. a. an interlacement of the parts of one or more ...
knot garden
noun Date: 1519 an elaborately designed garden especially of flowers or herbs
knot theorist
noun see knot theory
knot theory
noun Date: 1981 a branch of topology concerned with the properties and classification of mathematical knots • knot theorist noun
knotgrass
noun Date: 1538 1. a cosmopolitan prostrate weed (Polygonum aviculare) of the buckwheat family with jointed stems, prominent sheathing stipules, and minute flowers; broadly ...
knothole
noun Date: 1726 a hole in a board or tree trunk where a knot or branch has come out
knotted
adjective Date: 12th century 1. tied in or with a knot 2. full of knots ; gnarled 3. knotty 4. ornamented with knots or knobs
knotter
noun see knot II
knottiness
noun see knotty
knotty
adjective (knottier; -est) Date: 13th century marked by or full of knots; especially so full of difficulties and complications as to be likely to defy solution Synonyms: ...
knotty pine
noun Date: circa 1898 pine wood that has a decorative distribution of knots and is used especially for interior finish
knotweed
noun Date: 1884 any of several herbs (genus Polygonum) of the buckwheat family with leaves and bracts jointed and having a very short petiole; broadly polygonum
knout
noun Etymology: Russian knut, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse knūtr knot; akin to Old English cnotta Date: 1716 a whip used for flogging • knout transitive verb
know
I. verb (knew; known; knowing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnāwan; akin to Old High German bichnāan to recognize, Latin gnoscere, noscere to come to know, ...
know from
phrasal to have knowledge of
know-all
noun Date: circa 1864 chiefly British know-it-all
know-how
noun Date: 1838 knowledge of how to do something smoothly and efficiently ; expertise
know-it-all
noun Date: 1895 one who claims to know everything; also one who disdains advice • know-it-all adjective
know-nothing
noun Date: 1827 1. a. ignoramus b. agnostic 2. capitalized K&N a member of a 19th century secret American political organization hostile to the political influence of ...
know-nothingism
noun Date: 1854 1. capitalized K&N the principles and policies of the Know-Nothings 2. the condition of knowing nothing or desiring to know nothing or the conviction that ...
knowable
adjective see know I
knower
noun see know I
knowing
I. noun Date: 14th century acquaintance, cognizance II. adjective Date: 14th century 1. having or reflecting knowledge, information, or intelligence 2. a. shrewdly and ...
knowingly
adverb see knowing II
knowingness
noun see knowing II
knowledge
noun Etymology: Middle English knowlege, from knowlechen to acknowledge, irregular from knowen Date: 14th century 1. obsolete cognizance 2. a. (1) the fact or ...
knowledge engineer
noun see knowledge engineering
knowledge engineering
noun Date: 1980 a branch of artificial intelligence that emphasizes the development and use of expert systems • knowledge engineer noun
knowledgeability
noun see knowledgeable
knowledgeable
adjective Date: 1829 having or showing knowledge or intelligence • knowledgeability noun • knowledgeableness noun • knowledgeably adverb
knowledgeableness
noun see knowledgeable
knowledgeably
adverb see knowledgeable
Knowles
biographical name William Standish 1917- American chemist
known
adjective Date: 13th century generally recognized
Knox
I. biographical name Henry 1750-1806 American general in Revolution II. biographical name John circa 1514-1572 Scottish religious reformer III. biographical name Philander ...
Knoxville
geographical name city E Tennessee on Tennessee River population 173,890
knuckle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English knokel; akin to Middle High German knöchel knuckle Date: 14th century 1. a. the rounded prominence formed by the ends of the two ...
knuckle down
intransitive verb Date: circa 1864 to apply oneself earnestly
knuckle joint
noun Date: circa 1864 a hinge joint in which a projection with an eye on one piece enters a jaw between two corresponding projections with eyes on another piece and is ...
knuckle under
intransitive verb Date: 1869 give in, submit
knuckle-duster
noun Date: 1858 knuckle 4
knuckleball
noun Date: 1910 a slow baseball pitch that moves erratically and unpredictably and that is thrown with little spin by gripping the ball with the knuckles or the tips of the ...
knuckleballer
noun see knuckleball
knucklebone
noun Date: 1577 1. a bone (as a metatarsus or metacarpus of a sheep) used in games and formerly in divination 2. plural but singular in construction a game played with ...
knuckled
adjective see knuckle I
knucklehead
noun Date: 1942 dumbbell 2 • knuckleheaded adjective
knuckleheaded
adjective see knucklehead
knuckler
noun Date: 1928 knuckleball
Knud Rasmussen Land
geographical name region N & NW Greenland NE of Baffin Bay
Knudsen
biographical name William Signius 1879-1948 American (Danish-born) industrialist & administrator
knur
noun Etymology: Middle English knorre; akin to Middle High German knorre burl Date: 14th century a hard excrescence (as on a tree trunk) ; gnarl
knurl
noun Etymology: probably blend of knur and gnarl Date: 1608 1. a small protuberance, excrescence, or knob 2. one of a series of small ridges or beads on a metal surface to ...
knurled
adjective see knurl
knurly
adjective see knurl
Knut
biographical name variant of Canute
KO
I. noun Etymology: knock out Date: 1911 knockout II. transitive verb (KO'd; KO'ing) Date: 1926 to knock out (as in boxing)
koa
noun Etymology: Hawaiian Date: 1824 1. a Hawaiian timber tree (Acacia koa) with crescent-shaped phyllodes and pale yellow flowers borne in small round heads 2. the ...
koala
noun Etymology: Dharuk (Australian aboriginal language of the Port Jackson area) gula, gulawanʸ Date: 1803 an Australian arboreal marsupial (Phascolarctos cinereus) that has ...
koala bear
noun see koala
koan
noun Etymology: Japanese kōan, from kō public + an proposition Date: 1945 a paradox to be meditated upon that is used to train Zen Buddhist monks to abandon ultimate ...
Kobarid
or Italian Caporetto geographical name village W Slovenia on the Isonzo NE of Udine, Italy
Kobe
geographical name city & port Japan in S Honshu on Osaka Bay population 1,477,423
Köbenhavn
geographical name — see Copenhagen
Koblenz
or Coblenz geographical name city W Germany SSE of Cologne at confluence of the Rhine & the Moselle population 109,046
kobo
noun (plural kobo) Etymology: alteration of 1copper Date: 1972 — see naira at money table
kobold
noun Etymology: German — more at cobalt Date: 1830 1. a gnome that in German folklore inhabits underground places 2. an often mischievous domestic spirit of German ...
Kobuk Valley National Park
geographical name reservation W Alaska N of the Arctic Circle along Kobuk River
Koca
geographical name river about 75 miles (121 kilometers) S Turkey flowing SW & S into the Mediterranean
Kocabas
or ancient Granicus geographical name river NW Turkey in Asia flowing NE to Sea of Marmara
Koch
biographical name Robert 1843-1910 German bacteriologist
Kocher
biographical name Emil Theodor 1841-1917 Swiss surgeon
Kochi
geographical name city & port Japan in S Shikoku population 317,090
Kock
biographical name Charles-Paul de 1793-1871 French novelist & dramatist
Kodály
biographical name Zoltán 1882-1967 Hungarian composer
Kodiak
geographical name island S Alaska in Gulf of Alaska E of Alaska Peninsula
Kodiak bear
noun Etymology: Kodiak Island, Alaska Date: 1899 a large brown bear of the southern coast of Alaska and adjacent islands
Kodok
or formerly Fashoda geographical name town SE Sudan on White Nile River
Koestler
biographical name Arthur 1905-1983 British (Hungarian-born) writer
Kohala Mountains
geographical name mountains Hawaii in N Hawaii (island); highest about 5500 feet (1676 meters)
Kohima
geographical name town NE India capital of Nagaland population 53,122
kohl
noun Etymology: Arabic kuḥl Date: 1799 a preparation used especially in Arabia and Egypt to darken the edges of the eyelids
Kohl
biographical name Helmut 1930- chancellor of West Germany (1982-90) chancellor of Germany (1990-98)
Kohler
biographical name Foy David 1908-1990 American diplomat
Köhler
biographical name Georges J. F. 1946-1995 German immunologist
kohlrabi
noun (plural -bies) Etymology: German, from Italian cavolo rapa, from cavolo cabbage + rapa turnip Date: 1807 a cabbage (Brassica oleracea gongylodes) having a greatly ...
Kohn
biographical name Walter 1923- American (Austrian-born) physicist
koi
noun (plural koi) Etymology: Japanese Date: 1727 a carp (Cyprinus carpio) bred especially in Japan for large size and a variety of colors and often stocked in ornamental ponds
Koil
geographical name — see Aligarh
koine
also koiné noun Etymology: Greek koinē, from feminine of koinos common Date: 1909 1. capitalized the Greek language commonly spoken and written in eastern Mediterranean ...
koiné
noun see koine
Koiso
biographical name Kuniaki 1880-1950 Japanese general
Koizumi
biographical name Junichiro 1942- prime minister of Japan (2001- )
kok-saghyz
or kok-sagyz noun Etymology: Russian kok-sagyz Date: 1932 a perennial Asian dandelion (Taraxacum kok-saghyz) cultivated for its fleshy roots that have a high rubber content
kok-sagyz
noun see kok-saghyz
Kokand
or Qŭqon geographical name 1. region & former khanate E Uzbekistan 2. city in Kokand region SE of Tashkent population 175,000
kokanee
noun Etymology: perhaps from Shuswap (Salishan language of British Columbia) kəknǽxw Date: 1933 a small landlocked sockeye salmon
Kokhba
biographical name Bar died A.D. 135 originally Simeon bar Koziba Jewish leader in Palestine
Koko Nor
geographical name — see Qinghai
Kokomo
geographical name city N central Indiana population 46,113
Kokoschka
biographical name Oskar 1886-1980 British (Austrian-born) painter
Koksoak
geographical name river 85 miles (136 kilometers) Canada N Quebec formed by confluence of the Caniapiskau and the Larch and flowing into Ungava Bay
Kol Nidre
noun Etymology: Aramaic kol nidhrē all the vows; from the opening phrase of the prayer Date: 1881 a formula for the annulment of private vows chanted in the synagogue on ...
kola nut
also cola nut noun Etymology: kola, perhaps modification of Malinke kolo kola nut Date: 1868 the bitter caffeine-containing chestnut-sized seed of a kola tree used especially ...
Kola Peninsula
geographical name peninsula 250 miles (402 kilometers) long & 150 miles (241 kilometers) wide NW Russia in Europe between Barents & White seas
kola tree
or cola tree noun Date: 1937 an African tree (genus Cola, especially C. nitida and C. acuminata of the family Sterculiaceae) cultivated in various tropical areas for its kola ...
Kolar Gold Fields
geographical name city S India in SE Karnataka population 156,398
Kolchak
biographical name Aleksandr Vasilyevich 1873-1920 Russian admiral & counterrevolutionary
Kolding
geographical name city & port Denmark population 57,128
Kolhapur
geographical name city W India in SW Maharashtra SSE of Bombay population 406,370
Kolima
geographical name see Kolyma
Kolima Mountains
geographical name see Kolyma Mountains
kolinsky
noun (plural -skies) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1851 1. any of several Asian weasels (especially Mustela siberica) 2. the fur or pelt of a kolinsky
kolkhoz
noun (plural kolkhozy or kolkhozes) Etymology: Russian, from kollektivnoe khozyaĭstvo collective farm Date: 1921 a collective farm of the former Union of Soviet Socialist ...
kolkhoznik
noun (plural kolkhozniki or -niks) Etymology: Russian, from kolkhoz + -nik, agent suffix Date: 1944 a member of a kolkhoz
Kollontay
biographical name Aleksandra Mikhaylovna 1872-1952 Russian diplomat
Kollwitz
biographical name Käthe 1867-1945 née Schmidt German artist
Kolmar
geographical name — see Colmar
Kolmogorov
biographical name Andrey Nikolayevich 1903-1987 Soviet mathematician
Köln
geographical name — see cologne
kolo
noun (plural kolos) Etymology: Serbian & Croatian, literally, circle, wheel; akin to Greek kyklos circle — more at wheel Date: 1851 a central European folk dance in which ...
Koltsov
biographical name Aleksey Vasilyevich 1808-1842 Russian poet
Kolyma
or Kolima geographical name river 1110 miles (1786 kilometers) NE Russia in Asia flowing from Kolyma Mountains NE into East Siberian Sea
Kolyma Mountains
or Kolima Mountains geographical name mountain range Russia in Asia in NE Khabarovsk Territory parallel to coast of Penzhinskaya Bay
Komandorski Islands
or Commander Islands geographical name islands E Russia in Asia in Bering Sea E of Kamchatka Peninsula area 850 square miles (2210 square kilometers)
Komati
geographical name river 500 miles (805 kilometers) S Africa flowing from N Drakensberg Mountains in NE Republic of South Africa E & N into Delagoa Bay in S Mozambique
komatik
noun Etymology: Inuit qamutik Date: circa 1824 an Eskimo sledge with wooden runners and crossbars lashed with rawhide
kombu
noun Etymology: Japanese Date: 1884 a laminarian kelp used especially in Japanese cooking as a seasoning in soup stock
Komi Republic
geographical name autonomous republic NE Russia in Europe W of N Ural Mountains capital Syktyvkar area 160,579 square miles (415,900 square kilometers), population 1,255,000
Komodo
geographical name island Indonesia in the Lesser Sundas E of Sumbawa Island & W of Flores Island area 185 square miles (481 square kilometers)
Komodo dragon
noun Etymology: Komodo Island, Indonesia Date: 1927 an Indonesian monitor lizard (Varanus komodoensis) that is the largest of all known lizards and may attain a length of 10 ...
komondor
noun (plural -dors or komondorok) Etymology: Hungarian Date: 1931 any of a breed of large powerful shaggy-coated white dogs of Hungarian origin that are used to guard sheep
Komsomol
noun Etymology: Russian, from Kommunisticheskiĭ Soyuz Molodezhi Communist Union of Youth Date: 1925 a Russian Communist youth organization
Komsomol'sk-na-Amure
geographical name city E Russia in Asia in S Khabarovsk Territory on the Amur
Komura
biographical name Marquis Jutarō 1855-1911 Japanese diplomat
Kona
geographical name coast region Hawaii in W Hawaii (island)
Kondílis
biographical name Geórgios 1879-1936 Greek general & politician
Konev
biographical name Ivan Stepanovich 1897-1973 Soviet general
Kongo
noun (plural Kongo or Kongos) Date: circa 1902 1. a member of a Bantu people of the lower Congo River 2. the Bantu language of the Kongo people
Königgrätz
geographical name — see Hradec Kralove
Königsberg
geographical name — see Kaliningrad
Köniz
geographical name commune W central Switzerland SW of Bern population 36,101
Konkan
geographical name region W India in W Maharashtra bordering on Arabian Sea & extending from Bombay S to Goa
Konkani
noun Etymology: Marathi Koṅkaṇī Date: 1873 an Indo-Aryan language of the west coast of India
Konoe
biographical name Prince Fumimaro 1891-1945 Japanese statesman
Konstanz
geographical name — see Constance
Konya
or ancient Iconium geographical name city SW central Turkey on edge of central plateau population 513,346
Koo
biographical name Vi Kyuin Wellington 1888-1985 originally Ku Wei-chün Chinese statesman & diplomat
koodoo
variant of kudu
kook
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration from cuckoo Date: 1960 one whose ideas or actions are eccentric, fantastic, or insane ; screwball
kookaburra
noun Etymology: Wiradhuri (Australian aboriginal language of central New South Wales) gugubarra Date: 1834 a brownish kingfisher (Dacelo novaeguineae syn. D. gigas) of ...
kookie
adjective see kooky
kookiness
noun see kooky
kooky
also kookie adjective (kookier; -est) Date: 1959 having the characteristics of a kook ; crazy, offbeat • kookiness noun
Koolau Range
geographical name mountains Hawaii in E Oahu
Kootenai
I. noun or Kutenai (plural -nai or -nais) Etymology: ultimately from Kootenai ktunaxa, a self-designation of some Canadian Kootenai Date: 1801 1. a member of an American ...
Kootenay
geographical name see Kootenai II
Kootenay National Park
geographical name reservation Canada in SE British Columbia including section of the upper Kootenay River
Kopar
geographical name see Koper
kopeck
or kopek; also copeck noun Etymology: Russian kopeĭka Date: 1669 — see ruble at money table
kopek
noun see kopeck
Koper
or Kopar or Italian Capodistria geographical name town & port SW Slovenia at N end of Istrian Peninsula SSW of Trieste population 25,272
Kopernik
or Koppernigk biographical name — see Copernicus
Kopeysk
geographical name city SW Russia in Asia SE of Chelyabinsk population 78,300
koph
variant of qoph
kopiyka
noun Etymology: Ukrainian, literally, kopeck Date: 1996 — see hryvnia at money table
kopje
or koppie noun Etymology: Afrikaans koppie Date: 1848 a small usually rocky hill especially on the African veld
Koppernigk
biographical name see Kopernik
koppie
noun see kopje
kor
variant of cor
Kor
abbreviation Korea; Korean
kora
noun Etymology: Malinke Date: 1799 a 21-stringed African musical instrument resembling a lute
Koran
also Quran or Qur'an noun Etymology: Arabic qur'ān Date: circa 1615 the book composed of sacred writings accepted by Muslims as revelations made to Muhammad by Allah through ...
Koranic
adjective see Koran
Korat
noun Etymology: Korat province, Thailand Date: 1967 any of a breed of short-haired domestic cats originating in Thailand and having a heart-shaped face, a silver-blue coat, ...
Kordofan
geographical name region central Sudan W & N of White Nile River; chief city El Obeid
kore
noun (plural korai) Etymology: Greek korē girl; akin to Greek koros boy — more at crescent Date: 1920 an ancient Greek statue of a clothed young woman standing with feet ...
Korea
geographical name 1. peninsula 600 miles (966 kilometers) long & 135 miles (217 kilometers) wide E Asia between Yellow Sea & Sea of Japan 2. (or Japanese Chosen) country ...

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