Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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landing
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or process of one that lands; especially a going or bringing to a surface (as land or shore) after a voyage or flight 2. a place for ...
landing craft
noun Date: 1940 any of numerous naval craft designed for conveying troops and equipment from a transport to a beach in an amphibious assault
landing field
noun Date: circa 1920 a field where aircraft may land and take off
landing gear
noun Date: 1911 the part that supports the weight of an airplane or spacecraft when in contact with the land or water
landing strip
noun Date: 1930 airstrip
Landis
biographical name Kenesaw Mountain 1866-1944 American jurist & baseball commissioner
landlady
noun Date: circa 1536 a woman who is a landlord
landless
adjective see land I
landlessness
noun see land I
landline
noun Date: 1865 a line of communication (as by telephone cable) on land
landlocked
adjective Date: 1622 1. enclosed or nearly enclosed by land 2. confined to freshwater by some barrier 3. living or located away from the ocean
landlord
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the owner of property (as land, houses, or apartments) that is leased or rented to another 2. the master of an inn or lodging house ; ...
landlordism
noun Date: 1844 an economic system or practice by which ownership of land is vested in one who leases it to cultivators
landlubber
noun Date: circa 1700 landsman 2 • landlubberliness noun • landlubberly adjective • landlubbing adjective
landlubberliness
noun see landlubber
landlubberly
adjective see landlubber
landlubbing
adjective see landlubber
landmark
noun Date: before 12th century 1. an object (as a stone or tree) that marks the boundary of land 2. a. a conspicuous object on land that marks a locality b. an ...
landmass
noun Date: 1856 a large area of land
Landon
biographical name Alf(red Mossman) 1887-1987 American politician
Landor
biographical name Walter Savage 1775-1864 English author
landowner
noun Date: circa 1733 an owner of land • landownership noun • landowning adjective or noun
landownership
noun see landowner
landowning
adjective or noun see landowner
Landowska
biographical name Wanda Louise 1879-1959 Polish pianist
Landrace
noun Etymology: Danish, from land + race Date: 1935 a swine of any of several breeds locally developed in northern Europe
landscape
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Dutch landschap, from land + -schap -ship Date: 1598 1. a. a picture representing a view of natural inland scenery b. the ...
landscape architect
noun Date: 1863 a person who develops land for human use and enjoyment through effective placement of structures, vehicular and pedestrian ways, and plantings • landscape ...
landscape architecture
noun see landscape architect
landscape gardener
noun Date: circa 1763 a person who is engaged in the development and decorative planting of gardens and grounds • landscape gardening noun
landscape gardening
noun see landscape gardener
landscaper
noun see landscape II
landscapist
noun Date: 1843 a painter of landscapes
Landseer
biographical name Sir Edwin Henry 1802-1873 English painter
landslide
I. noun Date: 1838 1. the usually rapid downward movement of a mass of rock, earth, or artificial fill on a slope; also the mass that moves down 2. a. a great majority ...
landslip
noun Date: 1679 landslide 1
Landsmaal
noun see Landsmål
Landsmål
or Landsmaal noun Etymology: Norwegian, from land country + mål speech Date: 1886 Nynorsk
landsman
noun Date: 1598 1. a fellow countryman 2. a person who lives on the land; especially one who knows little or nothing of the sea or seamanship
Landsteiner
biographical name Karl 1868-1943 American (Austrian-born) pathologist
landward
adverb or adjective Date: 15th century to or toward the land
Lane
biographical name Edward William 1801-1876 English orientalist
lane
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lanu; akin to Middle Dutch lane lane Date: before 12th century 1. a narrow passageway between fences or hedges 2. a ...
laneway
noun Date: 1882 British lane
Lanfranc
biographical name 1005?-1089 Italian-born prelate in England
lang
abbreviation language
Lang
I. biographical name Andrew 1844-1912 Scottish scholar & author II. biographical name Cosmo Gordon 1864-1945 British prelate; archbishop of Canterbury (1928-42)
lang syne
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from lang long + syne since Date: 15th century chiefly Scottish at a distant time in the past II. noun Date: 1694 chiefly ...
langbeinite
noun Etymology: German Langbeinit, from A. Langbein, 19th century German industrialist Date: circa 1897 a mineral that is a sulfate of potassium and magnesium used in the ...
Langdale Pikes
geographical name two mountain peaks NW England in Cumbria in Lake District
Lange
I. biographical name Christian Louis 1869-1938 Norwegian pacifist & historian II. biographical name David Russell 1942- prime minister of New Zealand (1984-89) III. ...
Langer
biographical name Susanne Knauth 1895-1985 American philosopher & educator
Langerhans cell
noun Etymology: Paul Langerhans died 1888 German physician Date: 1890 a cell that is found in the epidermis and functions as an antigen-presenting cell which binds antigen ...
Langland
biographical name William circa 1330-circa 1400 English poet
langlauf
noun Etymology: German, from lang long + Lauf race Date: 1927 cross-country running or racing on skis • langlaufer noun
langlaufer
noun see langlauf
langley
noun (plural langleys) Etymology: Samuel P. Langley Date: 1947 a unit of solar radiation equivalent to one gram calorie per square centimeter of irradiated surface
Langley
I. biographical name Samuel Pierpont 1834-1906 American astronomer & airplane pioneer II. geographical name city Canada in British Columbia ESE of Vancouver population ...
Langmuir
biographical name Irving 1881-1957 American chemist
Langobard
noun Etymology: Latin Langobardus Date: 1788 Lombard 1a • Langobardic adjective
Langobardic
adjective see Langobard
langostino
noun (plural -tinos) Etymology: Spanish, diminutive of langosta spiny lobster, locust, from Vulgar Latin *lacusta, alteration of Latin locusta Date: 1915 any of several ...
langouste
noun Etymology: French, grasshopper, lobster, from Old French languste, from Old Occitan langosta, from Vulgar Latin *lacusta Date: 1832 spiny lobster
langoustine
noun Etymology: French, diminutive of langouste Date: 1946 a small edible lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) of European seas having long slender claws — called also Dublin Bay ...
Langton
biographical name Stephen died 1228 English prelate
Langtry
biographical name Lillie 1853-1929 née (Emilie Charlotte) Le Breton; the Jersey Lily British actress
language
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French langage, from lange, langue tongue, language, from Latin lingua — more at tongue Date: 14th century 1. a. the words, ...
language arts
noun plural Date: 1948 the subjects (as reading, spelling, literature, and composition) that aim at developing the student's comprehension and capacity for use of written and ...
langue
noun Etymology: French, literally, language Date: 1924 language viewed abstractly as a system of forms and conventions used for communication in a community; also competence ...
langue d'oc
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, literally, language of oc; from the Occitan use of the word oc for “yes” Date: 1703 Occitan
langue d'oïl
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, literally, language of oïl; from the French use of the word oïl for “yes” Date: 1703 french 1
Languedoc
geographical name region & former province S France extending from Auvergne to the Mediterranean
languet
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French languete, diminutive of langue Date: 15th century something resembling the tongue in form or function
languid
adjective Etymology: Middle French languide, from Latin languidus, from languēre to languish — more at slack Date: 1597 1. drooping or flagging from or as if from ...
languidly
adverb see languid
languidness
noun see languid
languish
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French languiss-, stem of languir, from Vulgar Latin *languire, from Latin languēre Date: 14th century 1. a. to be ...
languisher
noun see languish
languishingly
adverb see languish
languishment
noun see languish
languor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French langur, from Latin languor, from languēre Date: 14th century 1. weakness or weariness of body or mind 2. listless ...
languorous
adjective Date: 15th century 1. producing or tending to produce languor 2. full of or characterized by languor Synonyms: see languid • languorously adverb
languorously
adverb see languorous
langur
noun Etymology: Hindi lãgūr & Urdu langūr Date: 1825 any of several slender long-tailed Asian monkeys (subfamily Colobinae)
Lanier
biographical name Sidney 1842-1881 American poet
lank
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hlanc; akin to Old High German hlanca loin Date: before 12th century 1. not well filled out ; slender, thin 2. ...
Lankester
biographical name Sir Edwin Ray 1847-1929 English zoologist
lankily
adverb see lanky
lankiness
noun see lanky
lankly
adverb see lank
lankness
noun see lank
lanky
adjective (lankier; -est) Date: circa 1818 ungracefully tall and thin Synonyms: see lean • lankily adverb • lankiness noun
lanner
noun Etymology: Middle English laner, from Anglo-French laner, lanier Date: 14th century a falcon (Falco biarmicus) of southern Europe, southwestern Asia, and Africa; ...
lanneret
noun Date: 15th century a male lanner
Lannes
biographical name Jean 1769-1809 Duc de Montebello French soldier
lanolin
noun Etymology: Latin lana wool + International Scientific Vocabulary 3-ol + 1-in Date: 1885 wool grease especially when refined for use in ointments and cosmetics
Lansing
I. biographical name Robert 1864-1928 American lawyer & statesman II. geographical name 1. village NE Illinois SSE of Chicago population 28,332 2. city S Michigan, its ...
lantana
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Italian dialect, viburnum Date: 1791 any of a genus (Lantana) of tropical shrubs or perennial herbs of the vervain family with showy heads ...
lantern
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English lanterne, from Anglo-French, from Latin lanterna, from Greek lamptēr, from lampein to shine — more at lamp Date: ...
lantern fish
noun Date: circa 1753 any of a family (Myctophidae) of small deep-sea bony fishes that have a large mouth, large eyes, and usually numerous photophores
lantern fly
noun Date: circa 1753 any of several large brightly marked homopterous insects (family Fulgoridae) having the front of the head prolonged into a hollow structure
lantern jaw
noun Date: 1711 an undershot jaw • lantern-jawed adjective
lantern-jawed
adjective see lantern jaw
lanthanide
also lanthanoid noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1926 any of the series of elements with increasing atomic numbers that begins with lanthanum or ...
lanthanoid
noun see lanthanide
lanthanum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek lanthanein to escape notice — more at latent Date: 1841 a white soft malleable metallic element that occurs in rare-earth minerals — ...
lanthorn
noun Date: 1587 chiefly British lantern
lanuginous
adjective Etymology: Latin lanuginosus, from lanugin-, lanugo Date: 1575 covered with down or fine soft hair ; downy
lanugo
noun Etymology: Latin, down, from lana wool — more at wool Date: 15th century a dense cottony or downy growth of hair; specifically the soft woolly hair that covers the ...
Lanús
geographical name city E Argentina S of Buenos Aires population 466,755
lanyard
noun Etymology: Middle English lanyer thong, lanyard, from Anglo-French lanier Date: 15th century 1. a piece of rope or line for fastening something in a ship; especially ...
Lanzhou
or Lan-chou geographical name city N central China capital of Gansu population 1,194,640
Lao
noun (plural Lao or Laos) Date: 1808 1. a member of a Buddhist people living in Laos and adjacent parts of northeastern Thailand 2. the Thai language of the Lao people • ...
Lao-tzu
biographical name originally Li Erh 6th century B.C. Chinese philosopher
Laocoön
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Laokoōn Date: 1582 a Trojan priest killed with his sons by two sea serpents after warning the Trojans against the wooden horse
Laodicea
geographical name 1. ancient city W central Asia Minor in Phrygia 2. — see latakia 2 • Laodicean adjective or noun
Laodicean
adjective Etymology: from the reproach to the church of the Laodiceans in Revelation 3:15-16 Date: 1633 lukewarm or indifferent in religion or politics • Laodicean noun
Laoighis
or Leix or formerly Queen's geographical name county central Ireland in Leinster capital Portlaoighise area 664 square miles (1726 square kilometers), population 52,314
Laon
geographical name commune N France NE of Paris population 28,670
Laos
geographical name country SE Asia; a republic, until 1975 a kingdom; formerly a state of French Indochina; capital Vientiane area 91,428 square miles (236,799 square ...
Laotian
noun Etymology: probably from French laotien, adjective & noun, from Lao Date: 1847 1. a native or inhabitant of Laos; also Lao 1 2. Lao 2 • Laotian adjective
lap
I. noun Etymology: Middle English lappe, from Old English læppa; akin to Old High German lappa flap Date: before 12th century 1. a. a loose overlapping or hanging panel ...
lap belt
noun Date: 1952 a seat belt that fastens across the lap
lap dance
noun see lap dancing
lap dancer
noun see lap dancing
lap dancing
noun Date: 1988 an activity in which a usually seminude performer sits and gyrates on the lap of a customer • lap dance noun • lap dancer noun
lap joint
noun Date: 1823 a joint made by overlapping two ends or edges and fastening them together • lap-jointed adjective
lap robe
noun Date: circa 1866 a covering (as a blanket) for the legs, lap, and feet especially of a passenger in a car or carriage
lap-jointed
adjective see lap joint
laparo-
combining form Etymology: Greek lapara flank, from laparos slack abdominal wall
laparoscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1923 a fiberoptic instrument inserted through an incision in the abdominal wall and used to examine visually ...
laparoscopic
adjective see laparoscopy
laparoscopist
noun see laparoscopy
laparoscopy
noun (plural -pies) Date: 1916 1. visual examination of the abdomen by means of a laparoscope 2. an operation (as tubal ligation or gall bladder removal) involving ...
laparotomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1878 surgical incision of the abdominal wall
lapboard
noun Date: 1804 a board used on the lap as a table or desk
lapdog
noun Date: 1645 1. a small dog that may be held in the lap 2. a servile dependent or follower
lapel
noun Etymology: diminutive of 1lap Date: 1789 the part of a garment that is turned back; specifically the fold of the front of a coat that is usually a continuation of the ...
lapeled
adjective see lapel
lapelled
adjective see lapel
lapful
noun see lap I
lapidarian
adjective Date: 1864 lapidary 1
lapidary
I. noun (plural -daries) Date: 14th century 1. a cutter, polisher, or engraver of precious stones usually other than diamonds 2. the art of cutting gems II. adjective ...
Lapidus
biographical name Morris 1902-2001 American (Russian-born) architect
lapillus
noun (plural lapilli) Etymology: Latin, diminutive of lapis Date: 1747 a small stony or glassy fragment of lava ejected in a volcanic eruption
lapin
noun Etymology: French Date: 1905 1. rabbit; specifically a castrated male rabbit 2. rabbit fur usually sheared and dyed
lapis
noun see lapis lazuli
lapis lazuli
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Latin lapis + Medieval Latin lazuli, genitive of lazulum lapis lazuli, from Arabic lāzaward — more at azure Date: ...
Laplace
biographical name Pierre-Simon 1749-1827 Marquis de Laplace French astronomer & mathematician
Laplace transform
Etymology: Pierre Simon, Marquis de Laplace Date: 1942 a transformation of a function f(x) into the function g(t) = ∫0∞ e-xt f(x) dx that is useful especially in ...
Lapland
geographical name region N Europe above the Arctic Circle in N Norway, N Sweden, N Finland, & Kola Peninsula of Russia • Laplander noun
Laplander
noun see Lapland
Lapp
noun Etymology: Swedish Date: 1641 sometimes offensive Sami • Lappish adjective or noun
lapper
I. noun see lap II II. noun see lap IV
lappet
noun Date: 1573 1. a fold or flap on a garment or headdress 2. a flat overlapping or hanging piece
Lappish
adjective or noun see Lapp
Lapsang souchong
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1878 a souchong tea having a pronounced smoky flavor and aroma
lapse
I. noun Etymology: Latin lapsus, from labi to slip — more at sleep Date: 1526 1. a. a slight error typically due to forgetfulness or inattention b. a temporary ...
lapse rate
noun Date: 1918 the adiabatic rate of decrease of atmospheric temperature with increasing altitude
lapsed
adjective Date: 1638 having ceased to be active in practice, membership, or belief
lapser
noun see lapse II
lapstrake
adjective Date: 1771 clinker-built
lapsus calami
foreign term Etymology: Latin slip of the pen
lapsus linguae
foreign term Etymology: Latin slip of the tongue
Laptev Sea
or formerly Nordenskjöld Sea geographical name arm of Arctic Ocean Russia between Taymyr Peninsula & New Siberian Islands
laptop
I. adjective Date: 1984 of a size and design that makes operation and use on one's lap convenient — compare desktop II. noun Date: 1984 a portable microcomputer having ...
Laputan
noun Date: 1726 an inhabitant of a flying island in Swift's Gulliver's Travels characterized by a neglect of useful occupations and a devotion to visionary projects • ...
lapwing
noun Etymology: Middle English, by folk etymology from Old English hlēapewince; akin to Old English hlēapan to leap and to Old English wincian to wink Date: 14th century a ...
Lar
noun (plural Lares) Etymology: Latin — more at larva Date: 1586 a tutelary god or spirit associated with Vesta and the Penates as a guardian of the household by the ...
Laramie
geographical name 1. river 216 miles (348 kilometers) N Colorado & SE Wyoming flowing N & NE into North Platte River 2. city SE Wyoming population 27,204
larboard
noun Etymology: Middle English ladeborde Date: 14th century port V • larboard adjective
larcener
noun Date: circa 1635 larcenist
larcenist
noun Date: 1803 a person who commits larceny
larcenous
adjective Date: 1742 1. having the character of or constituting larceny 2. committing larceny • larcenously adverb
larcenously
adverb see larcenous
larceny
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French larecin theft, from Latin latrocinium robbery, from latron-, latro mercenary soldier, probably from Greek ...
larch
noun Etymology: probably from German Lärche, from Middle High German lerche, from Latin laric-, larix Date: 1548 any of a genus (Larix) of northern hemisphere trees of the ...
Larch
geographical name river 270 miles (434 kilometers) Canada in W Quebec flowing NE to unite with the Caniapiskau forming Koksoak River
lard
I. transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. a. to dress (meat) for cooking by inserting or covering with something (as strips of fat) b. to cover or soil with grease 2. ...
larder
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from lard Date: 14th century 1. a place where food is stored ; pantry 2. a supply of food
Lardner
biographical name Ring 1885-1933 in full Ringgold Wilmer Lardner American writer
lardon
noun see lardoon
lardoon
or lardon noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French lardun piece of fat pork, from lard Date: 14th century a strip (as of salt pork) with which meat is larded
lardy
adjective see lard II
Laredo
geographical name city S Texas on Rio Grande population 176,576
Laredo Brú
biographical name Federico 1875-1946 Cuban soldier; president of Cuba (1936-40)
Lares
geographical name city W central Puerto Rico population 34,415
lares and penates
noun plural Date: 1775 1. household gods 2. personal or household effects
large
I. adjective (larger; largest) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, broad, wide, generous, from Latin largus generous, plentiful Date: 12th century 1. obsolete ...
large calorie
noun Date: circa 1909 calorie 1b
large intestine
noun Date: 1823 the more terminal division of the vertebrate intestine that is wider and shorter than the small intestine, typically divided into cecum, colon, and rectum, and ...
large-minded
adjective Date: 1725 generous or comprehensive in outlook, range, or capacity • large-mindedly adverb • large-mindedness noun
large-mindedly
adverb see large-minded
large-mindedness
noun see large-minded
large-print
adjective Date: 1968 being set in a large size of type (as 14 point or larger) especially for use by the partially sighted
large-scale integration
noun Date: 1966 the process of placing a large number of circuits on a small chip
largehearted
adjective Date: 1645 having a generous disposition ; sympathetic • largeheartedness noun
largeheartedness
noun see largehearted
largely
adverb Date: 13th century in a large manner; especially to a large extent ; mostly, primarily
largemouth
noun see largemouth bass
largemouth bass
noun Date: 1941 a large North American black bass (Micropterus salmoides) that is blackish green above and lighter below and has the maxillary bones of the upper jaw extending ...
largemouth black bass
noun see largemouth bass
largeness
noun see large I
larger-than-life
adjective Date: 1950 of the sort legends are made of ; broadly extraordinary
largess
noun see largesse
largesse
also largess noun Etymology: Middle English largesse, from Anglo-French, from large Date: 13th century 1. liberal giving (as of money) to or as if to an inferior; also ...
larghetto
I. noun (plural -tos) Date: circa 1724 a movement played larghetto II. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, somewhat slow, from largo Date: circa 1801 slower than ...
largish
adjective see large I
Largo
geographical name town W Florida S of Clearwater population 69,371
largo
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, slow, broad, from Latin largus abundant Date: 1683 at a very slow tempo — used as a direction in music II. noun (plural largos) ...
lari
noun (plural lari) Etymology: Georgian, literally, treasury, valuables Date: 1995 — see money table
lariat
noun Etymology: American Spanish la reata the lasso, from Spanish la the + American Spanish reata lasso, from Spanish reatar to tie again, from re- + atar to tie, from Latin ...
Larissa
geographical name city N central Greece in E Thessaly population 113,426
Laristan
geographical name region S Iran bordering on Persian Gulf
lark
I. noun Etymology: Middle English laveroc, laverke, from Old English lāwerce; akin to Old High German lērihha lark Date: before 12th century any of a family (Alaudidae) of ...
larker
noun see lark III
larkiness
noun see larky
larkspur
noun Date: 1578 1. delphinium 2. any of the delphiniums that are annuals, have the upper two petals of the corolla united and the bottom two missing, are now often placed in ...
larky
adjective (larkier; -est) Date: 1841 1. given to or ready for larking ; sportive 2. resulting from a lark • larkiness noun
Larne
geographical name district NE Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 131 square miles (341 square kilometers), population 29,181
Larousse
biographical name Pierre (-Athanase) 1817-1875 French grammarian & lexicographer
larrigan
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1886 an oil-tanned moccasin with a leg often reaching the knee
larrikin
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1868 chiefly Australian hoodlum, rowdy • larrikin adjective
larrup
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1820 dialect blow V II. verb Date: circa 1823 transitive verb 1. dialect to flog soundly ; whip 2. dialect to defeat ...
Lartet
biographical name Édouard (Armand Isidore Hippolyte) 1801-1871 French archaeologist
larum
noun Etymology: short for alarum Date: 15th century archaic alarm
larva
noun (plural larvae; also larvas) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, specter, mask; akin to Latin lar Lar Date: 1768 1. the immature, wingless, and often wormlike feeding ...
larval
adjective see larva
larvicidal
adjective see larvicide
larvicide
noun Date: circa 1888 an agent for killing larval pests • larvicidal adjective
Larvik
geographical name town & port SE Norway population 38,019
laryng-
or laryngo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from laryng-, larynx larynx
laryngeal
I. adjective Date: 1795 1. of, relating to, or used on the larynx 2. produced by or with constriction of the larynx II. noun Date: circa 1902 1. an anatomical part ...
laryngectomee
noun Date: 1956 a person who has undergone laryngectomy
laryngectomized
adjective see laryngectomy
laryngectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1888 surgical removal of all or part of the larynx • laryngectomized adjective
laryngitic
adjective see laryngitis
laryngitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1834 inflammation of the larynx • laryngitic adjective
laryngo-
combining form see laryng-
laryngology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1842 a branch of medicine dealing with diseases of the larynx and nasopharynx
laryngoscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1860 an endoscope for examining the interior of the larynx • laryngoscopy noun
laryngoscopy
noun see laryngoscope
larynx
noun (plural larynges or larynxes) Etymology: New Latin laryng-, larynx, from Greek Date: 1578 the modified upper part of the trachea of air-breathing vertebrates that in ...
Las Casas
biographical name Bartolomé de 1474-1566 Spanish Dominican missionary & historian
Las Cruces
geographical name city S New Mexico population 74,267
Las Palmas
geographical name 1. province Spain comprising the E Canary Islands area 1569 square miles (4064 square kilometers), population 767,969 2. city & port, its capital, in NE ...
Las Piedras
geographical name city E Puerto Rico population 34,485
Las Vegas
geographical name city SE corner of Nevada population 478,434
lasagna
noun Etymology: Italian lasagna, from Vulgar Latin *lasania cooking pot, its contents, from Latin lasanum chamber pot, from Greek lasanon Date: 1846 1. (also lasagne) pasta ...
lasagne
noun see lasagna 1
LaSalle
geographical name town Canada in S Quebec on the St. Lawrence population 73,983
lascar
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu lashkar army Date: 1615 an Indian sailor, army servant, or artilleryman
Lascaux
geographical name cave SW central France near town of Montignac
lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate
foreign term Etymology: Italian abandon all hope, ye who enter
lascivious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin lasciviosus, from Latin lascivia wantonness, from lascivus wanton — more at lust Date: 15th century lewd, lustful ...
lasciviously
adverb see lascivious
lasciviousness
noun see lascivious
lase
intransitive verb (lased; lasing) Etymology: back-formation from laser Date: 1962 to emit coherent light
laser
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation Date: 1957 1. a device that utilizes the natural oscillations of atoms or ...
laser disc
noun Date: 1979 optical disk; especially one containing a video recording (as of a motion picture)
laser printer
noun Date: 1979 a high-resolution printer for computer output that xerographically prints an image formed by a laser
lash
I. verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to move violently or suddenly ; dash 2. to thrash or beat violently 3. to make a verbal ...
LASIK
noun Etymology: laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis Date: 1994 a surgical operation to reshape the cornea for correction of myopia, farsightedness, or astigmatism in which ...
Laski
biographical name Harold Joseph 1893-1950 English politician scientist
lass
noun Etymology: Middle English las Date: 14th century 1. a young woman ; girl 2. sweetheart

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