Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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intervocalic
adjective Date: 1887 immediately preceded and immediately followed by a vowel • intervocalically adverb
intervocalically
adverb see intervocalic
interweave
verb (interwove; also -weaved; interwoven; also -weaved; -weaving) Date: 1598 transitive verb 1. to weave together 2. to mix or blend together intransitive verb ...
interwoven
adjective see interweave
intestacy
noun Date: 1767 the quality or state of being or dying intestate
intestate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin intestatus, from in- + testatus testate Date: 14th century 1. having made no valid will 2. not disposed of by will ...
intestinal
adjective Date: 15th century 1. affecting, occurring, or living in the intestine 2. of, relating to, or being the intestine • intestinally adverb
intestinal fortitude
noun Etymology: euphemism for guts Date: circa 1937 courage, stamina
intestinally
adverb see intestinal
intestine
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French intestin, from Latin intestinus, from intus within — more at ent- Date: 15th century ...
inti
noun Etymology: Quechua, sun Date: 1985 the basic monetary unit of Peru from 1985 to 1990
intifada
noun Etymology: Arabic intifāḍa, literally, the act of shaking off Date: 1985 uprising, rebellion; specifically an armed uprising of Palestinians against Israeli ...
intima
noun (plural intimae or -mas) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, feminine of intimus Date: 1873 the innermost coat of an organ (as a blood vessel) consisting usually of an ...
intimacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1641 1. the state of being intimate ; familiarity 2. something of a personal or private nature
intimal
adjective see intima
intimate
I. transitive verb (-mated; -mating) Etymology: Late Latin intimatus, past participle of intimare to put in, announce, from Latin intimus innermost, superlative of Old Latin ...
intimately
adverb see intimate II
intimateness
noun see intimate II
intimater
noun see intimate I
intimation
noun see intimate I
intimidate
transitive verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Medieval Latin intimidatus, past participle of intimidare, from Latin in- + timidus timid Date: 1646 to make timid or fearful ; ...
intimidatingly
adverb see intimidate
intimidation
noun see intimidate
intimidator
noun see intimidate
intimidatory
adjective Date: circa 1846 tending or intended to intimidate
intinction
noun Etymology: Late Latin intinction-, intinctio baptism, from Latin intingere to dip in, from in- + tingere to dip, moisten — more at tinge Date: 1872 the administration ...
intine
noun Etymology: probably from German, from Latin intus within + New Latin in- fibrous tissue, from Greek in-, is tendon Date: 1835 the inner mostly cellulose wall of some ...
intitule
transitive verb (-uled; -uling) Etymology: Middle English intitulen, entitlen to give a title to — more at entitle Date: 15th century British to furnish (as a legislative ...
intl
or intnl abbreviation international
intnl
abbreviation see intl
into
preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Old English intō, from 2in + tō to Date: before 12th century 1. — used as a function word to indicate entry, introduction, ...
into commission
phrasal see in commission
into the act
or in on the act phrasal into an undertaking or situation as an active participant
into the bargain
also in the bargain phrasal besides
into the ground
phrasal beyond what is necessary or tolerable ; to exhaustion
into the tank
phrasal see in the tank
intolerability
noun see intolerable
intolerable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin intolerabilis, from in- + tolerabilis tolerable Date: 15th century 1. not tolerable ; unbearable 2. ...
intolerableness
noun see intolerable
intolerably
adverb see intolerable
intolerance
noun Date: 1765 1. the quality or state of being intolerant 2. exceptional sensitivity (as to a drug); specifically inability to properly metabolize or absorb a substance
intolerant
adjective Date: circa 1735 1. unable or unwilling to endure 2. a. unwilling to grant equal freedom of expression especially in religious matters b. unwilling to ...
intolerantly
adverb see intolerant
intolerantness
noun see intolerant
intonate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1795 intone, utter
intonation
noun Date: 1620 1. something that is intoned; specifically the opening tones of a Gregorian chant 2. the act of intoning and especially of chanting 3. the ability to play ...
intonational
adjective see intonation
intone
verb (intoned; intoning) Etymology: Middle French entoner, from Medieval Latin intonare, from Latin in- + tonus tone Date: 1513 transitive verb to utter in musical or ...
intoner
noun see intone
intoxicant
noun Date: 1863 something that intoxicates; especially an alcoholic drink • intoxicant adjective
intoxicate
I. adjective Date: 15th century archaic intoxicated II. transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin intoxicatus, past participle of ...
intoxicated
adjective Date: 1576 affected by or as if by alcohol ; drunk • intoxicatedly adverb
intoxicatedly
adverb see intoxicated
intoxication
noun Date: 15th century 1. an abnormal state that is essentially a poisoning 2. a. the condition of being drunk ; inebriation b. a strong excitement or elation
intra muros
foreign term Etymology: Latin within the walls
intra-
prefix Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin intra, from Old Latin *interus, adjective, inward — more at interior 1. a. within b. during c. between layers of 2. ...
intra-arterial
adjective Date: 1897 situated or occurring within, administered into, or involving entry by way of an artery • intra-arterially adverb
intra-arterially
adverb see intra-arterial
intra-articular
adjective Date: circa 1888 situated within, occurring within, or administered by entry into a joint
intracardiac
also intracardial adjective Date: 1876 situated or occurring within or introduced or involving entry into the heart • intracardially adverb
intracardial
adjective see intracardiac
intracardially
adverb see intracardiac
intracellular
adjective Date: 1876 existing, occurring, or functioning within a cell • intracellularly adverb
intracellularly
adverb see intracellular
intracerebral
adjective Date: 1881 situated or occurring within or introduced or administered into the cerebrum • intracerebrally adverb
intracerebrally
adverb see intracerebral
intracompany
adjective Date: 1926 occurring within or taking place between branches or employees of a company
intracranial
adjective Date: circa 1849 existing or occurring within the cranium; also affecting or involving intracranial structures • intracranially adverb
intracranially
adverb see intracranial
intractability
noun see intractable
intractable
adjective Etymology: Latin intractabilis, from in- + tractabilis tractable Date: 1531 1. not easily governed, managed, or directed 2. not easily manipulated or wrought ...
intractably
adverb see intractable
intracutaneous
adjective Date: 1885 intradermal • intracutaneously adverb
intracutaneously
adverb see intracutaneous
intraday
adjective Date: 1950 occurring in the course of a single day
intradermal
adjective Date: circa 1900 situated, occurring, or done within or between the layers of the skin; also administered by entering the skin • intradermally adverb
intradermal test
noun Date: 1916 a test for immunity or hypersensitivity made by injecting a minute amount of diluted antigen into the skin
intradermally
adverb see intradermal
intrados
noun (plural intrados or intradoses) Etymology: French, from Latin intra within + French dos back — more at dossier Date: 1772 the interior curve of an arch — see arch ...
intrafallopian
adjective Date: 1976 occurring within a fallopian tube
intragalactic
adjective Date: 1964 situated or occurring within the confines of a single galaxy
intragenic
adjective Date: 1937 being or occurring within a gene
intramolecular
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 existing or acting within the molecule; also formed by reaction between different parts of the same ...
intramolecularly
adverb see intramolecular
intramural
adjective Date: 1846 1. a. being or occurring within the limits usually of a community, organization, or institution b. competed only within the student body 2. ...
intramurally
adverb see intramural
intramuscular
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1874 situated in, occurring in, or administered by entering a muscle • intramuscularly adverb
intramuscularly
adverb see intramuscular
intranasal
adjective Date: 1886 lying within or administered by way of the nasal structures • intranasally adverb
intranasally
adverb see intranasal
intranet
noun Date: 1993 a network operating like the World Wide Web but having access restricted to a limited group of authorized users (as employees of a company)
intrans
abbreviation intransitive
intransigeance
noun Etymology: French Date: 1899 intransigence • intransigeant adjective or noun • intransigeantly adverb
intransigeant
adjective or noun see intransigeance
intransigeantly
adverb see intransigeance
intransigence
noun Date: 1882 the quality or state of being intransigent
intransigent
adjective Etymology: Spanish intransigente, from in- + transigente, present participle of transigir to compromise, from Latin transigere to come to an agreement — more at ...
intransigently
adverb see intransigent
intransitive
adjective Etymology: Late Latin intransitivus, from Latin in- + Late Latin transitivus transitive Date: 1612 not transitive; especially characterized by not having or ...
intransitively
adverb see intransitive
intransitiveness
noun see intransitive
intransitivity
noun see intransitive
intraocular
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1872 implanted in, occurring in, or administered by entering the eyeball • intraocularly adverb
intraocularly
adverb see intraocular
intraperitoneal
adjective Date: circa 1836 existing within or administered by entry into the peritoneum • intraperitoneally adverb
intraperitoneally
adverb see intraperitoneal
intrapersonal
adjective Date: 1909 occurring within the individual mind or self
intraplate
adjective Date: 1973 relating to or occurring within the interior of a tectonic plate
intrapopulation
adjective Date: 1959 occurring within or taking place between members of a population
intrapreneur
noun Etymology: intra- + entrepreneur Date: 1978 a corporate executive who develops new enterprises within the corporation • intrapreneurial adjective
intrapreneurial
adjective see intrapreneur
intrapsychic
adjective Date: 1917 being or occurring within the psyche, mind, or personality • intrapsychically adverb
intrapsychically
adverb see intrapsychic
intraspecies
adjective Date: 1927 intraspecific
intraspecific
adjective Date: 1919 occurring within a species or involving members of one species
intrastate
adjective Date: 1903 existing or occurring within a state
intrathecal
adjective Date: 1887 introduced into or occurring in the space under the arachnoid membrane of the brain or spinal cord • intrathecally adverb
intrathecally
adverb see intrathecal
intrathoracic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1862 situated or occurring within the thorax • intrathoracically adverb
intrathoracically
adverb see intrathoracic
intrauterine
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1836 situated, used, or occurring within the uterus ; also involving the part of development that ...
intrauterine contraceptive device
noun see intrauterine device
intrauterine device
noun Date: 1964 a device inserted into and left in the uterus to prevent effective conception — called also intrauterine contraceptive device, IUD
intravascular
adjective Date: 1876 situated in, occurring in, or administered by entry into a blood vessel • intravascularly adverb
intravascularly
adverb see intravascular
intravenous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1849 situated, performed, or occurring within or entering by way of a vein; also used in or using ...
intravenously
adverb see intravenous
intraventricular
adjective Date: 1875 situated within, occurring within, or administered into a ventricle • intraventricularly adverb
intraventricularly
adverb see intraventricular
intravital
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 1. performed upon or found in a living subject 2. having or utilizing the property of staining ...
intravitally
adverb see intravital
intravitam
adjective Etymology: New Latin intra vitam during life Date: 1881 intravital
intrazonal
adjective Date: 1927 of, relating to, or being a soil or a major soil group marked by relatively well-developed characteristics that are determined primarily by essentially ...
intreat
archaic variant of entreat
intrench
variant of entrench
intrepid
adjective Etymology: Latin intrepidus, from in- + trepidus alarmed — more at trepidation Date: 1680 characterized by resolute fearlessness, fortitude, and endurance • ...
intrepidity
noun see intrepid
intrepidly
adverb see intrepid
intrepidness
noun see intrepid
intricacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1602 1. the quality or state of being intricate 2. something intricate
intricate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin intricatus, past participle of intricare to entangle, from in- + tricae trifles, complications Date: 15th century 1. having ...
intricately
adverb see intricate
intricateness
noun see intricate
intrigant
or intriguant noun Etymology: French intrigant, from Italian intrigante, present participle of intrigare Date: 1781 one that intrigues
intriguant
noun see intrigant
intrigue
I. noun Etymology: French intricate affair, from Italian intrigo, from intrigare to entangle, from Latin intricare Date: 1609 1. a. a secret scheme ; machination b. the ...
intriguer
noun see intrigue II
intriguing
adjective Date: 1752 engaging the interest to a marked degree ; fascinating
intriguingly
adverb Date: 1742 1. in an intriguing manner 2. as a matter of marked interest
intrinsic
adjective Etymology: French intrinsèque internal, from Late Latin intrinsecus, from Latin, adverb, inwardly; akin to Latin intra within — more at intra- Date: 1635 1. a. ...
intrinsic factor
noun Date: 1932 a substance produced by normal gastrointestinal mucosa that facilitates absorption of vitamin B12
intrinsical
adjective Date: circa 1548 archaic intrinsic
intrinsically
adverb see intrinsic
intro
noun (plural intros) Date: circa 1899 introduction
intro-
prefix Etymology: Latin, from intro inside, to the inside, from Old Latin *interus, adjective, inward 1. in ; into 2. inward ; within — compare extro-
introd
abbreviation introduction
introduce
transitive verb (-duced; -ducing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin introducere, from intro- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 15th century 1. to lead or bring in ...
introducer
noun see introduce
introduction
noun Etymology: Middle English introduccioun act of introducing, from Anglo-French introduction, from Latin introduction-, introductio, from introducere Date: 14th century 1. ...
introductorily
adverb see introductory
introductory
adjective Date: 1605 of, relating to, or being a first step that sets something going or in proper perspective • introductorily adverb
introgressant
adjective or noun see introgression
introgression
noun Etymology: intro- + -gression (as in regression) Date: 1938 the entry or introduction of a gene from one gene complex into another (as by hybridization) • ...
introgressive
adjective see introgression
introit
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin introitus, from Latin, entrance, from introire to go in, from intro- + ire to go — more at issue Date: 15th century 1. ...
introject
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from introjection, from International Scientific Vocabulary intro- + projection Date: 1924 to incorporate (attitudes or ideas) into ...
introjection
noun see introject
intromission
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin intromission-, intromissio, from Latin intromittere Date: 1601 the act or process of intromitting; especially ...
intromit
transitive verb (-mitted; -mitting) Etymology: Latin intromittere, from intro- + mittere to send Date: circa 1588 to send or put in ; insert • intromittent adjective • ...
intromittent
adjective see intromit
intromitter
noun see intromit
intron
noun Etymology: intervening sequence + 2-on Date: 1978 a polynucleotide sequence in a nucleic acid that does not code information for protein synthesis and is removed before ...
introrse
adjective Etymology: Latin introrsus, adverb, inward, from intro- + versus toward, from past participle of vertere to turn — more at worth Date: 1842 facing inward or ...
introspect
verb see introspection
introspection
noun Etymology: Latin introspectus, past participle of introspicere to look inside, from intro- + specere to look — more at spy Date: circa 1677 a reflective looking inward ...
introspectional
adjective see introspection
introspectionism
noun Date: 1922 a doctrine that psychology must be based essentially on data derived from introspection — compare behaviorism • introspectionist or introspectionistic ...
introspectionist
I. adjective see introspectionism II. noun see introspectionism
introspectionistic
adjective see introspectionism
introspective
adjective see introspection
introspectively
adverb see introspection
introspectiveness
noun see introspection
introversion
noun Etymology: intro- + -version (as in diversion) Date: 1654 1. the act of introverting ; the state of being introverted 2. the state of or tendency toward being wholly ...
introversive
adjective see introversion
introversively
adverb see introversion
introvert
I. transitive verb Etymology: intro- + -vert (as in divert) Date: 1669 to turn inward or in upon itself: as a. to concentrate or direct upon oneself b. to produce ...
intrude
verb (intruded; intruding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin intrudere to thrust in, from in- + trudere to thrust — more at threat Date: 15th century intransitive verb ...
intruder
noun see intrude
intrusion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin intrusion-, intrusio, from Latin intrudere Date: 15th century 1. the act of intruding or the state of ...
intrusive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. characterized by intrusion b. intruding where one is not welcome or invited 2. a. projecting inward b. (1) of a rock ...
intrusively
adverb see intrusive
intrusiveness
noun see intrusive
intrust
variant of entrust
intubate
transitive verb see intubation
intubation
noun Date: 1887 the introduction of a tube into a hollow organ (as the trachea) • intubate transitive verb
intuit
transitive verb Date: 1855 to know, sense, or understand by intuition • intuitable adjective
intuitable
adjective see intuit
intuition
noun Etymology: Middle English intuycyon, from Late Latin intuition-, intuitio act of contemplating, from Latin intuēri to look at, contemplate, from in- + tuēri to look at ...
intuitional
adjective see intuition
intuitionism
noun Date: 1847 1. a. a doctrine that objects of perception are intuitively known to be real b. a doctrine that there are basic truths intuitively known 2. a doctrine ...
intuitionist
adjective or noun see intuitionism
intuitive
adjective Date: circa 1645 1. a. known or perceived by intuition ; directly apprehended
intuitively
adverb see intuitive
intuitiveness
noun see intuitive
intumescence
noun Etymology: French, from Latin intumescere to swell up, from in- + tumescere to swell — more at tumescence Date: 1650 a swollen or enlarged part of a plant or animal; ...
intumescent
adjective Date: 1953 of paint swelling and charring when exposed to flame
intussuscept
verb Etymology: back-formation from intussusception Date: 1802 transitive verb to take in by or cause to undergo intussusception; especially invaginate intransitive ...
intussusception
noun Etymology: Latin intus within + susception-, susceptio action of undertaking, from suscipere to take up — more at susceptible Date: 1707 a drawing in of something ...
intussusceptive
adjective see intussusception
Inuit
also Innuit noun Etymology: Inuit inuit, plural of inuk person Date: 1765 1. plural Inuit or Inuits also Innuit or Innuits a. (1) the Eskimo people of North America ...
Inuk
noun (plural Inuit) Etymology: Inuit inuk Date: 1951 a member of the Inuit people
Inuktitut
noun Etymology: Inuit, from inuk person + -titut like, in the manner of Date: 1974 the group of Eskimo dialects spoken by the Inuit of central and eastern arctic Canada
inulin
noun Etymology: probably from German Inulin, from Latin inula elecampane Date: 1813 a white plant polysaccharide used especially to improve the flavor and texture of low-fat ...
inunction
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inunction-, inunctio, from inunguere to anoint — more at anoint Date: 15th century an act of applying oil or ointment ; anointing
inundate
transitive verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Latin inundatus, past participle of inundare, from in- + unda wave — more at water Date: 1590 1. to cover with a flood ; ...
inundation
noun see inundate
inundator
noun see inundate
inundatory
adjective see inundate
Inupiaq
noun see Inupiat
Inupiat
also Inupiaq noun Etymology: Inupiat inʸupiaq, plural inʸupiat, literally, real person Date: 1967 1. plural Inupiat or Inupiats also Inupiaq or Inupiaqs a member of the ...
inure
verb (inured; inuring) Etymology: Middle English enuren, from in ure customary, from putten in ure to use, put into practice, part translation of Anglo-French mettre en ovre, en ...
inurement
noun see inure
inurn
transitive verb Date: 1602 1. entomb 2. to place (as cremated remains) in an urn • inurnment noun
inurnment
noun see inurn
inutile
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin inutilis, from in- + utilis useful — more at utility Date: 15th century useless, unusable • inutility ...
inutility
noun see inutile
inv
abbreviation 1. inventor 2. invoice
invade
transitive verb (invaded; invading) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin invadere, from in- + vadere to go — more at wade Date: 15th century 1. to enter for conquest or ...
invader
noun see invade
invaginate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Medieval Latin invaginatus, past participle of invaginare, from Latin in- + vagina sheath Date: circa 1656 transitive verb 1. enclose, ...
invagination
noun Date: circa 1658 1. an act or process of invaginating; specifically the formation of a gastrula by an infolding of part of the wall of the blastula 2. an invaginated ...
invalid
I. adjective Etymology: Latin invalidus weak, from in- + validus strong — more at valid Date: 1542 not valid: a. being without foundation or force in fact, truth, or law ...
invalidate
transitive verb Date: 1649 to make invalid; especially to weaken or destroy the cogency of Synonyms: see nullify • invalidation noun • invalidator noun
invalidation
noun see invalidate
invalidator
noun see invalidate
invalidism
noun Date: 1794 a chronic condition of being an invalid
invalidity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1550 1. lack of validity or cogency 2. incapacitating bodily disability; also invalidism
invalidly
adverb see invalid I
invaluable
adjective Etymology: 1in- + value, verb + -able Date: 1576 valuable beyond estimation ; priceless • invaluableness noun • invaluably adverb
invaluableness
noun see invaluable
invaluably
adverb see invaluable
invar
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: from Invar, a trademark Date: 1902 an iron-nickel alloy that expands little on heating
invariability
noun see invariable
invariable
adjective Date: 15th century not changing or capable of change ; constant • invariability noun • invariable noun
invariably
adverb Date: 1646 on every occasion ; always
invariance
noun Date: 1878 the quality or state of being invariant
invariant
adjective Date: 1874 constant, unchanging; specifically unchanged by specified mathematical or physical operations or transformations • invariant noun
invasion
noun Etymology: Middle English invasioune, from Anglo-French invasion, from Late Latin invasion-, invasio, from Latin invadere to invade Date: 15th century 1. an act of ...
invasive
adjective Date: 1598 1. of, relating to, or characterized by military aggression 2. tending to spread; especially tending to invade healthy tissue 3. tending to ...
invasiveness
noun see invasive
invective
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English invectif, from Middle French, from Latin invectivus, from invectus, past participle of invehere Date: 15th century of, relating to, or ...
invectively
adverb see invective I
invectiveness
noun see invective I
inveigh
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin invehi to attack, inveigh, passive of invehere to carry in, from in- + vehere to carry — more at way Date: 1529 to protest or complain ...
inveigher
noun see inveigh
inveigle
transitive verb (inveigled; inveigling) Etymology: Anglo-French enveegler, aveogler, avogler to blind, hoodwink, from avogle, enveugle blind, from Medieval Latin ab oculis, ...
inveiglement
noun see inveigle
inveigler
noun see inveigle
invenit
foreign term Etymology: Latin he or she devised it
invent
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inventus, past participle of invenire to come upon, find, from in- + venire to come — more at come Date: 15th century ...
invention
noun Date: 14th century 1. discovery, finding 2. productive imagination ; inventiveness 3. a. something invented: as (1) a product of the imagination; especially a ...
inventive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. adept or prolific at producing inventions ; creative 2. characterized by invention • inventively adverb • inventiveness noun
inventively
adverb see inventive
inventiveness
noun see inventive
inventor
noun see invent

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