Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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inventorial
adjective see inventory I
inventorially
adverb see inventory I
inventory
I. noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English inventarie, inventorie, from Anglo-French inventaire, inventorie, from Latin inventarium, from inventum thing found, topic, ...
inventress
noun see invent
Inver Grove Heights
geographical name city SE Minnesota population 29,751
Invercargill
geographical name city New Zealand on S coast of South Island population 56,059 — see bluff
Inverclyde
geographical name administrative area of W Scotland area 62 square miles (162 square kilometers)
inverness
noun Etymology: Inverness, Scotland Date: 1859 a loose belted coat having a cape with a close-fitting round collar
Inverness
geographical name 1. (or Inverness-shire) former county NW Scotland 2. burgh NW Scotland, formerly capital of Highland region population 63,090
Inverness-shire
geographical name see Inverness 1
inverse
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, turned upside down, from Latin inversus, from past participle of invertere Date: 15th century 1. opposite in order, nature, or ...
inverse function
noun Date: 1816 a function that is derived from a given function by interchanging the two variables — compare logarithmic function
inverse square law
noun Date: 1921 a statement in physics: a given physical quantity (as illumination) varies with the distance from the source inversely as the square of the distance
inverse variation
noun Date: 1936 1. mathematical relationship between two variables which can be expressed by an equation in which the product of two variables is equal to a constant 2. an ...
inversely
adverb Date: 1660 1. in an inverse order or manner 2. in the manner of inverse variation
inversely proportional
adjective Date: 1864 related by inverse variation — compare directly proportional
inversion
noun Date: 1586 1. a reversal of position, order, form, or relationship: as a. (1) a change in normal word order; especially the placement of a verb before its ...
inversive
adjective Date: 1875 marked by inversion
invert
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin invertere, from in- + vertere to turn — more at worth Date: 1533 1. a. to reverse in position, order, or relationship b. to ...
invert sugar
noun Date: 1880 a mixture of dextrose and levulose found in fruits or produced artificially by the inversion of sucrose
invertase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose
invertebrate
adjective Etymology: New Latin invertebratus, from Latin in- + New Latin vertebratus vertebrate Date: 1832 1. lacking a spinal column; also of, relating to, or concerned ...
inverted comma
noun Date: 1789 chiefly British quotation mark
inverter
noun Date: 1611 1. one that inverts 2. a device for converting direct current into alternating current
invertible
adjective Date: 1881 capable of being inverted or subjected to inversion
invest
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin investire to clothe, surround, from in- + vestis garment — more at wear Date: circa 1534 1. [Medieval Latin investire, from Latin, to ...
investable
adjective see invest II
investigate
verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin investigatus, past participle of investigare to track, investigate, from in- + vestigium footprint, track Date: circa 1510 transitive ...
investigation
noun see investigate
investigational
adjective Date: 1905 1. of or relating to investigation 2. relating to or being a drug or medical procedure that is not approved for general use but is under investigation ...
investigative
adjective see investigate
investigator
noun see investigate
investigatory
adjective see investigate
investiture
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin investitura, from investitus, past participle of investire Date: 14th century 1. the act of establishing in office or ...
investment
I. noun Etymology: 1invest Date: 1597 1. a. archaic vestment b. an outer layer ; envelope 2. investiture 1 3. blockade, siege II. noun Etymology: 2invest Date: ...
investment company
noun Date: circa 1917 a company whose primary business is holding securities of other companies purely for investment purposes — compare holding company
investor
noun see invest II
inveteracy
noun Etymology: inveterate + -cy Date: circa 1719 the quality or state of being obstinate or persistent ; tenacity
inveterate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inveteratus, from past participle of inveterare to age (v.t.), from in- + veter-, vetus old — more at wether Date: 14th ...
inveterately
adverb see inveterate
inviability
noun see inviable
inviable
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1918 incapable of surviving especially because of a deleterious genetic constitution • inviability noun
invidious
adjective Etymology: Latin invidiosus envious, invidious, from invidia envy — more at envy Date: 1606 1. tending to cause discontent, animosity, or envy 2. envious 3. ...
invidiously
adverb see invidious
invidiousness
noun see invidious
invigilate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin invigilatus, past participle of invigilare to stay awake, be watchful, from in- + vigilare to stay awake — more at vigilant Date: ...
invigilation
noun see invigilate
invigilator
noun see invigilate
invigorate
transitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: probably from in- + vigor Date: 1646 to give life and energy to ; animate; also stimulate 1 • invigoratingly adverb • ...
invigoratingly
adverb see invigorate
invigoration
noun see invigorate
invigorator
noun see invigorate
invincibility
noun see invincible
invincible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin invincibilis, from Latin in- + vincere to conquer — more at victor Date: ...
invincibleness
noun see invincible
invincibly
adverb see invincible
inviolability
noun see inviolable
inviolable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin inviolabilis, from in- + violare to violate Date: 15th century 1. secure from ...
inviolableness
noun see inviolable
inviolably
adverb see inviolable
inviolacy
noun Date: circa 1846 the quality or state of being inviolate
inviolate
adjective Date: 15th century not violated or profaned; especially pure • inviolately adverb • inviolateness noun
inviolately
adverb see inviolate
inviolateness
noun see inviolate
inviscid
adjective Date: circa 1889 1. having zero viscosity 2. of or relating to an inviscid fluid
invisibility
noun see invisible
invisible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin invisibilis, from in- + visibilis visible Date: 14th century 1. a. incapable by nature of being seen ...
invisible hand
noun Date: 1776 a hypothetical economic force that in a freely competitive market works for the benefit of all
invisibleness
noun see invisible
invisibly
adverb see invisible
invita Minerva
foreign term Etymology: Latin Minerva being unwilling ; without natural talent or inspiration
invitation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of inviting b. an often formal request to be present or participate 2. incentive, inducement
invitational
adjective Date: 1918 1. limited to invited participants 2. prepared or entered in response to a request • invitational noun
invitatory
I. adjective Date: 14th century containing an invitation II. noun (plural -ries) Date: 14th century an invitatory psalm or antiphon
invite
I. transitive verb (invited; inviting) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French inviter, from Latin invitare Date: 1533 1. a. to offer an incentive or inducement ...
invitee
noun Date: 1837 an invited person
inviter
noun see invite I
inviting
adjective Date: 1604 attractive, tempting • invitingly adverb
invitingly
adverb see inviting
invocate
transitive verb Date: 1526 archaic invoke
invocation
noun Etymology: Middle English invocacioun, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French invocation, from Latin invocation-, invocatio, from invocare Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
invocational
adjective see invocation
invocatory
adjective see invocation
invoice
I. noun Etymology: modification of Middle French envois, plural of envoi message — more at envoi Date: 1560 1. an itemized list of goods shipped usually specifying the ...
invoke
transitive verb (invoked; invoking) Etymology: Middle English envoken, from Middle French invoquer, from Latin invocare, from in- + vocare to call, from voc-, vox voice — more ...
invoker
noun see invoke
involucral
adjective see involucre
involucrate
adjective see involucre
involucre
noun Etymology: French, from New Latin involucrum Date: 1785 one or more whorls of bracts situated below and close to a flower, flower cluster, or fruit • involucral ...
involucrum
noun (plural involucra) Etymology: New Latin, sheath, involucre, from Latin, wrapper, from involvere to wrap Date: 1657 a surrounding envelope or sheath
involuntarily
adverb see involuntary
involuntariness
noun see involuntary
involuntary
adjective Etymology: Middle English involuntari, from Late Latin involuntarius, from Latin in- + voluntarius voluntary Date: 15th century 1. done contrary to or without ...
involuntary manslaughter
noun Date: circa 1879 manslaughter resulting from the failure to perform a legal duty expressly required to safeguard human life, from the commission of an unlawful act not ...
involuntary muscle
noun Date: 1840 muscle governing reflex functions and not under direct voluntary control; especially smooth muscle
involute
I. adjective Etymology: Latin involutus concealed, from past participle of involvere Date: 1661 1. a. curled spirally b. (1) curled or curved inward (2) having ...
involution
noun Etymology: Latin involution-, involutio, from involvere Date: circa 1611 1. a. (1) the act or an instance of enfolding or entangling ; involvement (2) an ...
involutional
adjective see involution
involve
transitive verb (involved; involving) Etymology: Middle English, to roll up, wrap, from Latin involvere, from in- + volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 14th century 1. ...
involved
adjective Date: 15th century 1. involute, twisted 2. a. marked by extreme and often needless or excessive complexity b. difficult to deal with because of complexity or ...
involvedly
adverb see involved
involvement
noun see involve
involver
noun see involve
invulnerability
noun see invulnerable
invulnerable
adjective Etymology: Latin invulnerabilis, from in- + vulnerare to wound — more at vulnerable Date: 1595 1. incapable of being wounded, injured, or harmed 2. immune to or ...
invulnerableness
noun see invulnerable
invulnerably
adverb see invulnerable
inward
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English inweard (akin to Old High German inwert), from in + -weard 1-ward Date: before 12th century 1. situated on the inside ...
Inward Light
noun Date: circa 1632 inner light
inwardly
adverb Date: before 12th century 1. in the innermost being ; mentally, spiritually 2. a. beneath the surface ; internally b. to oneself ; privately
inwardness
noun Date: 14th century 1. internal quality or substance 2. close acquaintance ; familiarity 3. fundamental nature ; essence 4. absorption in one's own mental or ...
inwards
adverb see inward II
inweave
transitive verb (inwove; also -weaved; inwoven; also -weaved; -weaving) Date: 15th century interweave, interlace
Io
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Iō Date: 1563 a maiden loved by Zeus and changed by him into a heifer so that she might escape the jealous rage of Hera
Io moth
noun Etymology: Latin Io Date: 1870 a chiefly North American saturniid moth (Automeris io) having a large circular eyelike spot on the upper surface of each hind wing and a ...
Ioannina
geographical name city NW Greece in N Epirus population 56,496
IOC
abbreviation International Olympic Committee
iod-
or iodo- combining form Etymology: French iode iodine
iodate
noun Etymology: French, from iode Date: 1826 a salt containing the IO3- ion
iodide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1822 a salt of hydriodic acid; also the monovalent anion I- of such a salt
iodinate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1908 to treat or cause to combine with iodine or a compound of iodine • iodination noun
iodination
noun see iodinate
iodine
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French iode, from Greek ioeidēs violet colored, from ion violet Date: 1814 1. a nonmetallic halogen element obtained usually as ...
iodise
British variant of iodize
iodize
transitive verb (iodized; iodizing) Date: 1841 to treat with iodine or an iodide
iodo-
combining form see iod-
iodoform
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary iod- + -form (as in chloroform) Date: 1838 a yellow crystalline volatile compound CHI3 with a penetrating persistent odor ...
iodophor
noun Etymology: iod- + Greek -phoros carrier — more at -phore Date: 1952 a complex of iodine and a surface-active agent that releases iodine gradually and serves as a ...
iodopsin
noun Etymology: iod- (from Greek ioeidēs violet colored) + Greek opsis sight, vision + English -in — more at optic Date: 1938 a photosensitive violet pigment in the ...
IOM
abbreviation Isle of Man
ion
noun Etymology: Greek, neuter of iōn, present participle of ienai to go — more at issue Date: circa 1834 1. an atom or group of atoms that carries a positive or negative ...
Ion
abbreviation Ionic
ion channel
noun Date: 1985 a cell membrane channel that is selectively permeable to certain ions (as of calcium or sodium)
ion engine
noun Date: 1958 a reaction engine deriving thrust from the ejection of a stream of ionized particles
ion exchange
noun Date: 1923 a reversible interchange of one kind of ion present on an insoluble solid with another of like charge present in a solution surrounding the solid with the ...
ion exchange resin
noun Date: 1943 an insoluble material of high molecular weight that contains groups which can be exchanged with ions in a solution with which it is in contact
ion exchanger
noun see ion exchange
Iona
geographical name island Scotland in S Inner Hebrides off SW tip of Mull Island area 6 square miles (16 square kilometers), population 120
Ionesco
biographical name Eugène 1909-1994 French (Romanian-born) dramatist
Ionia
geographical name ancient region W Asia Minor bordering on the Aegean W of Lydia & Caria • Ionian adjective or noun
Ionian
noun Etymology: Ionia, Asia Minor Date: 1550 1. a member of any of the Greek peoples who settled on the islands of the Aegean Sea and the western shore of Asia Minor toward ...
Ionian Islands
geographical name islands W Greece in Ionian Sea population 191,003
Ionian Sea
geographical name arm of the Mediterranean Sea between SE Italy & W Greece
ionic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 1. of, relating to, existing as, or characterized by ions 2. based on or functioning by means of ions ...
Ionic
I. adjective Etymology: Latin & Middle French; Middle French ionique, from Latin ionicus, from Greek iōnikos, from Iōnia Ionia Date: 1585 1. of or relating to the ancient ...
ionic bond
noun Date: 1939 a chemical bond formed between oppositely charged species because of their mutual electrostatic attraction
ionicity
noun see ionic
ionise
British variant of ionize
ionium
noun Etymology: ion; from its ionizing action Date: 1907 a natural radioactive isotope of thorium having a mass number of 230
ionizable
adjective see ionize
ionization
noun see ionize
ionization chamber
noun Date: 1904 a partially evacuated tube provided with electrodes so that its conductivity due to the ionization of the residual gas reveals the presence of ionizing ...
ionize
verb (ionized; ionizing) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 transitive verb to convert wholly or partly into ions intransitive verb to become ...
ionizer
noun see ionize
ionophore
noun Date: circa 1955 a compound that facilitates transmission of an ion (as of calcium) across a lipid barrier (as in a cell membrane) by combining with the ion or by ...
ionosphere
noun Date: 1926 the part of the earth's atmosphere in which ionization of atmospheric gases affects the propagation of radio waves, which extends from about 30 miles (50 ...
ionospheric
adjective see ionosphere
ionospherically
adverb see ionosphere
iontophoresis
noun (plural iontophoreses) Etymology: New Latin, from ionto- ion (from Greek iont-, iōn, present participle of ienai) + -phoresis Date: 1909 the introduction of an ionized ...
iontophoretic
adjective see iontophoresis
iontophoretically
adverb see iontophoresis
IOOF
abbreviation Independent Order of Odd Fellows
iota
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek iōta, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew yōdh yod Date: 1542 1. the 9th letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet table 2. an ...
IOU
noun Etymology: from the pronunciation of I owe you Date: 1795 1. a paper that has on it the letters IOU, a stated sum, and a signature and that is given as an ...
IOW
abbreviation Isle of Wight
Iowa
geographical name 1. river 291 miles (468 kilometers) Iowa flowing SE into Mississippi River 2. state central United States capital Des Moines area 56,275 square miles ...
Iowa City
geographical name city E Iowa population 62,220
Iowan
adjective or noun see Iowa
IP
abbreviation 1. initial point 2. innings pitched 3. intermediate pressure 4. Internet protocol
IP address
noun Etymology: Internet protocol Date: 1985 the numeric address of a computer on the Internet
IPA
I. noun Etymology: International Phonetic Alphabet Date: 1933 an alphabet designed to represent each human speech sound with a unique symbol II. abbreviation individual ...
Ipatieff
biographical name Vladimir Nikolayevich 1867-1952 American (Russian-born) chemist
ipecac
also ipecacuanha noun Etymology: Portuguese ipecacuanha, from Tupi ɨpekakwánʸa, from ɨpéka duck + akwánʸa penis Date: 1682 1. the dried rhizome and roots of either of ...
ipecacuanha
noun see ipecac
Iphigenia
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Iphigeneia Date: 1563 a daughter of Agamemnon nearly sacrificed by him to Artemis but saved by her and made a priestess
ipm
abbreviation inches per minute
IPM
abbreviation integrated pest management
IPO
noun (plural IPOs) Etymology: initial public offering Date: 1980 an initial public offering of a company's stock
Ipoh
geographical name city Malaysia capital of Perak population 125,766
iproniazid
noun Etymology: blend of isoniazid and propyl Date: 1952 a derivative C9H13N3O of isoniazid that is used as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and was formerly used in treating ...
ips
abbreviation inches per second
ipse dixit
noun Etymology: Latin, he himself said it Date: 15th century an assertion made but not proved ; dictum
ipsilateral
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin ipse self, himself + later-, latus side Date: 1907 situated or appearing on or affecting the same side of ...
ipsilaterally
adverb see ipsilateral
ipsissima verba
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, literally, the selfsame words Date: 1807 the exact language used by someone quoted
ipso facto
adverb Etymology: New Latin, literally, by the fact itself Date: 1548 by that very fact or act ; as an inevitable result
Ipswich
geographical name 1. city E Australia in SE Queensland population 73,299 2. town SE England capital of Suffolk population 115,500
IPTS
abbreviation International Practical Temperature Scale
iq
abbreviation Etymology: Latin idem quod the same as
IQ
noun Etymology: intelligence quotient Date: 1920 1. a number used to express the apparent relative intelligence of a person: as a. the ratio of the mental age (as reported ...
Iqaluit
geographical name town Canada capital of Nunavut on Baffin Island population 5236
Iquique
geographical name city & port N Chile on the Pacific population 148,511
Iquitos
geographical name city NE Peru on the Amazon population 269,500
Ir
symbol iridium
IR
abbreviation 1. information retrieval 2. infrared 3. British inland revenue 4. intelligence ratio 5. internal revenue
ir-
— see in-
IRA
I. noun (plural IRAs) Etymology: individual retirement account Date: 1974 a retirement savings account in which income taxes on certain deposits and on all gains are deferred ...
ira furor brevis est
foreign term Etymology: Latin anger is a brief madness
Iráklion
or Candia geographical name city & port Greece capital of Crete population 117,167
Iran
or especially formerly Persia geographical name country SW Asia bordering in N on Caspian Sea & in S on Persian Gulf & Gulf of Oman; an Islamic republic since 1979, formerly an ...
Irani
adjective or noun see Iran
Iranian
noun Date: 1789 1. a native or inhabitant of Iran 2. a branch of the Indo-European family of languages that includes Persian — see Indo-European languages table • ...
Iraq
geographical name country SW Asia in Mesopotamia; a republic since 1958, formerly a kingdom capital Baghdad area 168,927 square miles (437,521 square kilometers), population ...
Iraqi
adjective or noun see Iraq
irascibility
noun see irascible
irascible
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Late Latin irascibilis, from Latin irasci to become angry, be angry, from ira Date: circa 1530 marked by hot temper and easily ...
irascibleness
noun see irascible
irascibly
adverb see irascible
irate
adjective Date: 1838 1. roused to ire 2. arising from anger • irately adverb • irateness noun
irately
adverb see irate
irateness
noun see irate
Irbīl
geographical name — see arbil
IRBM
abbreviation intermediate range ballistic missile
IRD
abbreviation integrated receiver decoder; integrated receiver descrambler
ire
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin ira; perhaps akin to Greek oistros gadfly, frenzy Date: 14th century intense and usually openly displayed anger ...
Ire
abbreviation Ireland
Iredell
biographical name James 1751-1799 American jurist
ireful
adjective see ire
Ireland
geographical name 1. (or Latin Hibernia) island W Europe in the Atlantic, one of the British Isles area 32,052 square miles (83,015 square kilometers); divided between Ireland ...
irenic
adjective Etymology: Greek eirēnikos, from eirēnē peace Date: circa 1864 favoring, conducive to, or operating toward peace, moderation, or conciliation • irenically ...
irenically
adverb see irenic
Ireton
biographical name Henry 1611-1651 English soldier & politician
Irian Jaya
geographical name — see West Papua
irid
abbreviation iridescent
irid-
or irido- combining form 1. [Latin irid-, iris] rainbow 2. [New Latin irid-, iris] iris of the eye
iridescence
noun Date: 1804 1. a lustrous rainbowlike play of color caused by differential refraction of light waves (as from an oil slick, soap bubble, or fish scales) that tends to ...
iridescent
adjective Date: 1796 having or exhibiting iridescence • iridescently adverb
iridescently
adverb see iridescent
iridic
adjective Date: circa 1890 of or relating to the iris of the eye
iridium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin irid-, iris; from the colors produced by its dissolving in hydrochloric acid Date: 1804 a rare silver-white hard brittle very heavy ...
irido-
combining form see irid-
iridologist
noun see iridology
iridology
noun (plural -gies) Date: 1916 the study of the iris of the eye for indications of bodily health and disease • iridologist noun
iridosmine
noun Etymology: German, from New Latin iridium + osmium Date: 1827 a mineral that is a native iridium osmium alloy usually containing some rhodium and platinum
Irigoyen
biographical name Hipólito 1852-1933 president of Argentina (1916-22; 1928-30)
Iris
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 15th century the Greek goddess of the rainbow and a messenger of the gods
iris
I. noun (plural irises; also irides) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin irid-, iris rainbow, iris plant, from Greek, rainbow, iris plant, iris of the eye — more at wire ...
iris diaphragm
noun Date: 1867 an adjustable diaphragm of thin opaque plates that can be turned by a ring so as to change the diameter of a central opening usually to regulate the aperture ...
Irish
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English *Īrisc, from Īras Irishmen, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish Ériu Ireland Date: 13th century 1. plural in construction ...
Irish bull
noun Date: 1802 an incongruous statement (as “it was hereditary in his family to have no children”)
Irish coffee
noun Date: 1948 hot sugared coffee and Irish whiskey topped with whipped cream
Irish confetti
noun Date: 1913 a rock or brick used as a missile
Irish Gaelic
noun Date: 1891 Irish 2a
Irish mail
noun Date: 1908 a 3- or 4-wheeled toy vehicle activated by a hand lever
Irish moss
noun Date: 1837 1. the dried and bleached plants of a red alga (especially Chondrus crispus) used as an agent for thickening or emulsifying or as a demulcent and as a source ...
Irish potato
noun Date: 1664 potato 2b
Irish Sea
geographical name arm of the Atlantic between Great Britain & Ireland
Irish setter
noun Date: 1866 any of a breed of bird dogs resembling English setters but with a glossy mahogany-red coat
Irish stew
noun Date: 1800 a stew having as its principal ingredients meat (as lamb), potatoes, and onions in a thick gravy
Irish terrier
noun Date: 1857 any of a breed of active medium-sized terriers characterized by a dense close usually reddish wiry coat
Irish water spaniel
noun Date: 1865 any of a breed of medium-sized retrievers characterized by a topknot, a heavy curly coat which is dark liver in color, and a short-haired tail
Irish whiskey
noun Date: 1798 whiskey made in Ireland chiefly of barley
Irish wolfhound
noun Date: 1838 any of a breed of very tall heavily built hounds having a rough wiry coat
Irishism
noun Date: 1734 1. a word, phrase, or expression characteristic of the Irish 2. Irish bull
Irishly
adverb Date: 1571 in a manner characteristic of the Irish
Irishman
noun Date: 13th century 1. a native or inhabitant of Ireland 2. a person who is of Irish descent
Irishness
noun Date: 1804 the fact or quality of being Irish
Irishry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 14th century 1. Irish 1 2. a. Irish quality or character b. an Irish peculiarity or trait
Irishwoman
noun Date: 15th century a woman born in Ireland or of Irish descent
iritis
noun Etymology: New Latin, irregular from iris Date: 1818 inflammation of the iris of the eye
irk
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century to make weary, irritated, or bored Synonyms: see annoy II. noun Date: circa 1570 1. the fact of being ...
irksome
adjective Date: 15th century tending to irk ; tedious • irksomely adverb • irksomeness noun
irksomely
adverb see irksome
irksomeness
noun see irksome
Irkutsk
geographical name city S Russia in Asia on the Angara near Lake Baikal population 639,000

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