Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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iroko
noun Etymology: Yoruba ìrokò Date: 1890 a large tropical western African tree (Chlorophora excelsa) of the mulberry family having strong streaky insect-resistant wood ...
iron
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English īsern, īren; akin to Old High German īsarn iron Date: before 12th century 1. a silver-white malleable ductile magnetic ...
Iron Age
noun Date: 1865 the period of human culture characterized by the smelting of iron and its use in industry beginning somewhat before 1000 B.C. in western Asia and Egypt
iron curtain
noun Date: 1819 1. an impenetrable barrier 2. a political, military, and ideological barrier that cuts off and isolates an area; specifically often capitalized one ...
Iron Gate
geographical name gorge 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) long in the Danube where it cuts around Transylvanian Alps on border between Romania & Serbia
iron gray
noun Date: before 12th century a slightly greenish dark gray
iron hand
noun Date: 1703 stern or rigorous control • ironhanded adjective
iron horse
noun Date: 1840 locomotive 1; especially a steam locomotive
iron in the fire
phrasal 1. a matter requiring close attention 2. a prospective course of action
iron lung
noun Date: 1932 a device for artificial respiration in which rhythmic alternations in the air pressure in a chamber surrounding a patient's chest force air into and out of the ...
iron maiden
noun Date: circa 1895 a supposed medieval torture device consisting of a hollow iron statue or coffin in the shape of a woman that is lined with spikes which impale the ...
iron man
noun Date: circa 1902 a man of unusual physical endurance
iron out
transitive verb Date: 1858 1. to make smooth or flat by or as if by pressing 2. to resolve or work out a solution to
iron oxide
noun Date: 1864 any of several oxides of iron: as a. ferric oxide b. the monoxide FeO of iron
iron pyrite
noun see iron pyrites
iron pyrites
noun Date: circa 1817 pyrite — called also iron pyrite
iron ration
noun Date: 1876 an emergency ration
iron sulfide
noun Date: 1885 any of several sulfides of iron
ironbark
noun Date: 1799 any of several Australian eucalypti having hard gray bark and heavy hard durable wood used especially in heavy construction; also this wood
ironbound
adjective Date: 14th century bound with or as if with iron: as a. harsh, rugged b. stern, rigorous
ironclad
I. adjective Date: circa 1847 1. sheathed in iron armor — used especially of naval vessels 2. so firm or secure as to be unbreakable: as a. binding b. having no ...
ironer
noun Date: 1773 one that irons; specifically mangle
ironfisted
adjective Date: 1599 1. stingy, miserly 2. being both harsh and ruthless
ironhanded
adjective see iron hand
ironhearted
adjective Date: 1600 cruel, hard-hearted
ironic
also ironical adjective Date: 1576 1. relating to, containing, or constituting irony 2. given to irony Synonyms: see sarcastic • ironicalness noun
ironical
adjective see ironic
ironically
adverb Date: 1576 1. in an ironic manner 2. it is ironic, curious, or surprising
ironicalness
noun see ironic
ironing
noun Date: circa 1710 1. the action or process of smoothing or pressing with or as if with a heated iron 2. clothes ironed or to be ironed
ironing board
noun Date: 1833 a flat padded cloth-covered surface on which clothes are ironed
ironist
noun Date: 1727 one who uses irony especially in the development of a literary work or theme
ironize
verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1602 transitive verb to make ironic in appearance or effect intransitive verb to use irony ; speak or behave ironically
ironmaster
noun Date: 1664 a manufacturer of iron
ironmonger
noun Date: 14th century British a dealer in iron and hardware
ironmongery
noun Date: 1711 something made of metal; especially British hardware 1
ironness
noun see iron II
ironside
noun Date: 13th century a man of great strength or bravery
Ironside
biographical name William Edmund 1880-1959 1st Baron Ironside British field marshal
ironstone
noun Date: 1522 1. a hard sedimentary rock rich in iron; especially a siderite in a coal region 2. ironstone china
ironstone china
noun Date: 1825 a hard heavy durable white pottery developed in England early in the 19th century
ironware
noun Date: 15th century articles made of iron
ironweed
noun Date: 1819 any of a genus (Vernonia) of mostly weedy composite plants usually having alternate leaves and perfect red, purple, or white tubular flowers in terminal ...
ironwood
noun Date: 1657 1. any of numerous trees and shrubs (as a hornbeam or hop hornbeam) with exceptionally tough or hard wood 2. the wood of an ironwood
ironwork
noun Date: 15th century 1. work in iron; also something made of iron 2. plural but singular or plural in construction a mill or building where iron or steel is smelted or ...
ironworker
noun see ironwork
irony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Latin ironia, from Greek eirōnia, from eirōn dissembler Date: 1502 1. a pretense of ignorance and of willingness to learn from another ...
Iroquoian
noun Date: 1697 1. a member of any of the peoples constituting the Iroquois 2. an American Indian language family of eastern North America including Cayuga, Cherokee, ...
Iroquois
noun (plural Iroquois) Etymology: French, probably of Algonquian origin Date: 1666 1. plural an American Indian confederacy originally of New York consisting of the Cayuga, ...
IRQ
abbreviation interrupt request
irradiance
noun Date: 1599 1. radiance 1 2. the density of radiation incident on a given surface usually expressed in watts per square centimeter or square meter
irradiate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin irradiatus, past participle of irradiare, from in- + radius ray Date: 1603 transitive verb 1. a. to cast rays of light upon ; ...
irradiation
noun Date: 1901 1. exposure to radiation (as X rays or alpha particles) 2. the application of radiation (as X rays or gamma rays) for therapeutic purposes or for ...
irradiative
adjective see irradiate
irradiator
noun see irradiate
irradicable
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin irradicabilis, from Latin in- + radic-, radix root — more at root Date: 1728 impossible to eradicate ; deep-rooted • irradicably ...
irradicably
adverb see irradicable
irrational
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin irrationalis, from in- + rationalis rational Date: 14th century not rational: as a. (1) not endowed with reason or ...
irrational number
noun Date: 1551 a number that can be expressed as an infinite decimal with no set of consecutive digits repeating itself indefinitely and that cannot be expressed as the ...
irrationalism
noun Date: 1811 1. a system emphasizing intuition, instinct, feeling, or faith rather than reason or holding that the universe is governed by irrational forces 2. the ...
irrationalist
noun or adjective see irrationalism
irrationalistic
adjective see irrationalism
irrationality
noun see irrational I
irrationally
adverb see irrational I
Irrawaddy
geographical name river 1300 miles (2092 kilometers) Myanmar flowing S into Bay of Bengal through several mouths
irreal
adjective Date: 1943 not real
irreality
noun Date: 1803 unreality
irreclaimable
adjective Date: 1662 incapable of being reclaimed • irreclaimably adverb
irreclaimably
adverb see irreclaimable
irreconcilability
noun see irreconcilable I
irreconcilable
I. adjective Date: 1587 impossible to reconcile • irreconcilability noun • irreconcilableness noun • irreconcilably adverb II. noun Date: 1748 one that is ...
irreconcilableness
noun see irreconcilable I
irreconcilably
adverb see irreconcilable I
irrecoverable
adjective Date: 15th century not capable of being recovered or rectified ; irreparable • irrecoverableness noun • irrecoverably adverb
irrecoverableness
noun see irrecoverable
irrecoverably
adverb see irrecoverable
irrecusable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin irrecusabilis, from Latin in- + recusare to reject, refuse — more at recusant Date: 1776 not subject to exception or rejection • ...
irrecusably
adverb see irrecusable
irred
abbreviation irredeemable
irredeemable
adjective Date: 1609 1. not redeemable: as a. not terminable by payment of the principal b. inconvertible a 2. being beyond remedy ; hopeless • irredeemably ...
irredeemably
adverb see irredeemable
irredenta
also irridenta noun Etymology: Italian Italia irredenta, literally, unredeemed Italy, Italian-speaking territory not incorporated in Italy Date: 1914 a territory historically ...
irredentism
noun Date: 1883 a political principle or policy directed toward the incorporation of irredentas within the boundaries of their historically or ethnically related political ...
irredentist
noun or adjective see irredentism
irreducibility
noun see irreducible
irreducible
adjective Date: 1633 1. impossible to transform into or restore to a desired or simpler condition ; specifically incapable of being factored into polynomials of lower degree ...
irreducibly
adverb see irreducible
irreflexive
adjective Date: circa 1890 being a relation for which the reflexive property does not hold for any element of a given set
irreformability
noun see irreformable
irreformable
adjective Date: 1609 1. incapable of being reformed ; incorrigible 2. not subject to revision or alteration • irreformability noun
irrefragability
noun see irrefragable
irrefragable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin irrefragabilis, from Latin in- + refragari to oppose, from re- + -fragari (as in suffragari to vote for); akin to Latin suffragium suffrage ...
irrefragably
adverb see irrefragable
irrefutability
noun see irrefutable
irrefutable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin irrefutabilis, from Latin in- + refutare to refute Date: 1607 impossible to refute ; incontrovertible • irrefutability noun • ...
irrefutably
adverb see irrefutable
irreg
abbreviation irregular
irregardless
adverb Etymology: probably blend of irrespective and regardless Date: circa 1912 nonstandard regardless Usage: Irregardless originated in dialectal American speech in ...
irregular
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English irreguler, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin irregularis not in accordance with rule, from Latin in- + regularis regular Date: 14th ...
irregularity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English irregularite, from Medieval Latin irregularitat-, irregularitas, from Late Latin irregularis Date: 14th century 1. something ...
irregularly
adverb see irregular I
irrelative
adjective Date: 1640 not relative: a. not related b. irrelevant • irrelatively adverb
irrelatively
adverb see irrelative
irrelevance
noun Date: 1843 1. the quality or state of being irrelevant 2. something irrelevant
irrelevancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1592 irrelevance
irrelevant
adjective Date: 1786 not relevant ; inapplicable • irrelevantly adverb
irrelevantly
adverb see irrelevant
irreligion
noun Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin irreligion-, irreligio, from Latin in- + religion-, religio religion Date: 1598 the quality or ...
irreligionist
noun see irreligion
irreligious
adjective Date: 15th century 1. neglectful of religion ; lacking religious emotions, doctrines, or practices 2. indicating lack of religion • irreligiously adverb
irreligiously
adverb see irreligious
irremeable
adjective Etymology: Latin irremeabilis, from in- + remeare to go back, from re- + meare to go — more at permeate Date: 1569 offering no possibility of return
irremediable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin irremediabilis, from in- + remediabilis remediable Date: 15th century not remediable ; also incurable • irremediableness ...
irremediableness
noun see irremediable
irremediably
adverb see irremediable
irremovability
noun see irremovable
irremovable
adjective Date: 1598 not removable • irremovability noun • irremovably adverb
irremovably
adverb see irremovable
irreparable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin irreparabilis, from in- + reparabilis reparable Date: 15th century not reparable ; irremediable • ...
irreparableness
noun see irreparable
irreparably
adverb see irreparable
irrepealability
noun see irrepealable
irrepealable
adjective Date: 1633 not repealable • irrepealability noun
irreplaceability
noun see irreplaceable
irreplaceable
adjective Date: 1807 not replaceable • irreplaceability noun • irreplaceableness noun • irreplaceably adverb
irreplaceableness
noun see irreplaceable
irreplaceably
adverb see irreplaceable
irrepressibility
noun see irrepressible
irrepressible
adjective Date: 1811 impossible to repress, restrain, or control • irrepressibility noun • irrepressibly adverb
irrepressibly
adverb see irrepressible
irreproachability
noun see irreproachable
irreproachable
adjective Date: 1634 not reproachable ; blameless, impeccable • irreproachability noun • irreproachableness noun • irreproachably adverb
irreproachableness
noun see irreproachable
irreproachably
adverb see irreproachable
irreproducibility
noun see irreproducible
irreproducible
adjective Date: 1868 not reproducible • irreproducibility noun
irresistability
noun see irresistible
irresistable
adjective see irresistible
irresistableness
noun see irresistible
irresistably
adverb see irresistible
irresistibility
noun see irresistible
irresistible
also irresistable adjective Date: 1597 impossible to resist • irresistibility also irresistability noun • irresistibleness also irresistableness noun • ...
irresistibleness
noun see irresistible
irresistibly
adverb see irresistible
irresoluble
adjective Etymology: Latin irresolubilis, from in- + resolvere to resolve Date: 1666 1. archaic indissoluble 2. having or admitting of no solution or explanation
irresolute
adjective Date: 1579 uncertain how to act or proceed ; vacillating • irresolutely adverb • irresoluteness noun • irresolution noun
irresolutely
adverb see irresolute
irresoluteness
noun see irresolute
irresolution
noun see irresolute
irresolvable
adjective Date: 1660 incapable of being resolved ; also not analyzable
irrespective of
preposition Date: 1833 regardless of
irresponsibility
noun see irresponsible I
irresponsible
I. adjective Date: 1648 not responsible: as a. not answerable to higher authority b. said or done with no sense of responsibility c. lacking a sense of ...
irresponsibleness
noun see irresponsible I
irresponsibly
adverb see irresponsible I
irresponsive
adjective Date: circa 1846 not responsive; especially not able, ready, or inclined to respond • irresponsiveness noun
irresponsiveness
noun see irresponsive
irretrievability
noun see irretrievable
irretrievable
adjective Date: 1702 not retrievable ; impossible to regain or recover • irretrievability noun • irretrievably adverb
irretrievably
adverb see irretrievable
irreverence
noun Date: 14th century 1. lack of reverence 2. an irreverent act or utterance
irreverent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin irreverent-, irreverens, from in- + reverent-, reverens reverent Date: 15th century lacking proper respect or seriousness; ...
irreverently
adverb see irreverent
irreversibility
noun see irreversible
irreversible
adjective Date: 1630 not reversible • irreversibility noun • irreversibly adverb
irreversibly
adverb see irreversible
irrevocability
noun see irrevocable
irrevocable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin irrevocabilis, from in- + revocabilis revocable Date: 14th century not possible to revoke ; unalterable • irrevocability ...
irrevocableness
noun see irrevocable
irrevocably
adverb see irrevocable
irridenta
variant of irredenta
irrigable
adjective Date: 1844 suitable for irrigation
irrigate
verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin irrigatus, past participle of irrigare, from in- + rigare to water; perhaps akin to Old High German regan rain — more at rain Date: ...
irrigation
noun Date: 1612 1. the therapeutic flushing of a body part with a stream of liquid 2. the watering of land by artificial means to foster plant growth
irrigator
noun see irrigate
irritability
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1755 1. the property of protoplasm and of living organisms that permits them to react to stimuli 2. the quality or state of being irritable: as ...
irritable
adjective Date: 1662 capable of being irritated: as a. easily exasperated or excited b. responsive to stimuli • irritableness noun • irritably adverb
irritable bowel syndrome
noun Date: 1943 a chronic functional disorder of the colon that is characterized especially by constipation or diarrhea, cramping abdominal pain, and the passage of mucus in ...
irritableness
noun see irritable
irritably
adverb see irritable
irritant
I. adjective Date: 1636 causing irritation; specifically tending to produce physical irritation II. noun Date: 1802 something that irritates or excites
irritate
verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin irritatus, past participle of irritare Date: 1598 transitive verb 1. to provoke impatience, anger, or displeasure in ; annoy 2. ...
irritated
adjective Date: 1595 subjected to irritation; especially roughened, reddened, or inflamed by an irritant
irritatingly
adverb see irritate
irritation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of irritating b. something that irritates c. the state of being irritated 2. a condition of irritability, soreness, ...
irritative
adjective Date: 1644 1. serving to excite ; irritating 2. accompanied with or produced by irritation
irrotational
adjective Date: 1875 1. not rotating or involving rotation 2. free of vortices
irrupt
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin irruptus, past participle of irrumpere, from in- + rumpere to break — more at reave Date: 1886 1. to rush in forcibly or violently 2. ...
irruption
noun see irrupt
irruptive
adjective Date: 1593 irrupting or tending to irrupt • irruptively adverb
irruptively
adverb see irruptive
IRS
abbreviation Internal Revenue Service
Irtysh
geographical name river over 2600 miles (4180 kilometers) central Asia flowing from Altai Mountains in China NW & N through Kazakhstan & into the Ob' in W Russia in Asia
Irún
geographical name commune N Spain in Guipúzcoa population 52,828
Irvine
geographical name city SW California SE of Santa Ana population 143,072
Irving
I. biographical name Sir Henry 1838-1905 originally John Henry Brodribb English actor II. biographical name Washington 1783-1859 American essayist, novelist, & historian III. ...
Irwin
biographical name William Henry 1873-1948 Will Irwin American journalist
IS
abbreviation information system
is
I. Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German ist is (from sīn to be), Latin est (from esse to be), Greek esti (from einai to be) present third ...
Is
abbreviation see Isa
is-
or iso- combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from isos equal 1. equal ; homogeneous ; uniform 2. isomeric 3. for or from different individuals of the same ...
Isa
or Is abbreviation Isaiah
ISA
abbreviation Industry Standard Architecture
Isaac
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Hebrew Yiṣḥāq Date: before 12th century the son of Abraham and father of Jacob according to the account in Genesis
Isaacs
I. biographical name Sir Isaac Alfred 1855-1948 Australian jurist & statesman; governor-general of Australia (1931-36) II. biographical name Rufus Daniel — see Marquis of ...
Isabela
geographical name city NW Puerto Rico population 44,444
Isabela Island
geographical name island Ecuador; largest of the Galápagos area 1650 square miles (4290 square kilometers), population 336
Isabella I
biographical name 1451-1504 wife of Ferdinand V of Castile queen of Castile (1474-1504) & of Aragon (1479-1504)
Isaiah
noun Etymology: Hebrew Yĕsha‘ăyāhū Date: 13th century 1. a major Hebrew prophet in Judah about 740 to 701 B.C. 2. a prophetic book of canonical Jewish and Christian ...
Isaias
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek Ēsaias, from Hebrew Yĕsha‘ăyāhū Date: before 12th century Isaiah
isallobar
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary is- + all- + -bar (as in isobar) Date: 1910 an imaginary line or a line on a chart connecting the places of equal change ...
isallobaric
adjective see isallobar
Isar
geographical name river 163 miles (262 kilometers) W Europe flowing from Tirol, Austria, through Bavaria, Germany, into the Danube
Isauria
geographical name ancient district in E Pisidia S Asia Minor on N slope of W Taurus Mountains • Isaurian adjective or noun
Isaurian
adjective or noun see Isauria
ISBN
abbreviation International Standard Book Number
ISC
abbreviation interstate commerce
ischaemia
chiefly British variant of ischemia
ischemia
noun Etymology: New Latin ischaemia, from ischaemus styptic, from Greek ischaimos, from ischein to restrain (akin to Greek echein to hold) + haima blood — more at scheme ...
ischemic
adjective see ischemia
Ischia
geographical name island Italy in Tyrrhenian Sea WSW of Naples area 18 square miles (47 square kilometers)
ischial
adjective see ischium
ischium
noun (plural ischia) Etymology: Latin, hip joint, from Greek ischion Date: 1646 the dorsal and posterior of the three principal bones composing either half of the pelvis • ...
ISDN
abbreviation integrated services digital network
Ise Bay
geographical name inlet of the Pacific S Japan on S coast of Honshu
isentropic
adjective Date: 1873 of or relating to equal or constant entropy; especially taking place without change of entropy • isentropically adverb
isentropically
adverb see isentropic
Iseo, Lake
geographical name lake 14 miles (22 kilometers) long N Italy in Lombardy
Isère
geographical name river 150 miles (241 kilometers) SE France flowing from Graian Alps WSW into the Rhône
Iserlohn
geographical name city W Germany population 96,976
Iseult
noun Etymology: Old French Isolt, Iseut Date: 1796 Isolde
Isfahan
geographical name — see esfahan
Isherwood
biographical name Christopher William Bradshaw 1904-1986 American (British-born) writer
Ishii
biographical name Viscount Kikujiro 1866-1945 Japanese diplomat
Ishim
geographical name river 1330 miles (2140 kilometers) flowing from N Kazakhstan N into the Irtysh in W Russia in Asia
Ishmael
noun Etymology: Hebrew Yishmā‘ēl Date: before 12th century 1. the outcast son of Abraham and Hagar according to the account in Genesis 2. a social outcast
Ishmaelite
noun Date: 14th century 1. a descendant of Ishmael 2. Ishmael 2 • Ishmaelitish adjective • Ishmaelitism noun
Ishmaelitish
adjective see Ishmaelite
Ishmaelitism
noun see Ishmaelite
Isidore of Seville
biographical name Saint circa 560-636 L. Isidorus Hispalensis Spanish prelate & scholar
isinglass
noun Etymology: probably by folk etymology from obsolete Dutch huizenblas, from Middle Dutch huusblase, from huus sturgeon + blase bladder Date: 1535 1. a semitransparent ...
Isis
I. noun Etymology: Latin Isid-, Isis, from Greek, from Egyptian 'st Date: 14th century an Egyptian nature goddess and wife and sister of Osiris II. geographical name the ...
Iskander Bey
biographical name — see Skanderbeg
Iskenderun
or formerly Alexandretta geographical name city & port S Turkey on Gulf of Iskenderun (inlet of the Mediterranean) population 154,807
isl
abbreviation island
Isla de Pascua
geographical name see Easter Island
Islam
noun Etymology: Arabic islām submission (to the will of God) Date: 1817 1. the religious faith of Muslims including belief in Allah as the sole deity and in Muhammad as his ...
Islamabad
geographical name city capital of Pakistan in NE Pakistan NE of Rawalpindi population 250,000
Islamic
adjective see Islam
Islamic calendar
noun Date: 1974 a lunar calendar reckoned from the Hegira in A.D. 622 and organized in cycles of 30 years — see month table
Islamic era
noun Date: 1969 the era used in Muslim countries for numbering Islamic calendar years since the Hegira
Islamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see Islam
Islamism
noun Date: 1747 1. the faith, doctrine, or cause of Islam 2. a popular reform movement advocating the reordering of government and society in accordance with laws prescribed ...
Islamist
noun see Islamism
Islamization
noun see Islamize
Islamize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1846 to make Islamic; especially to convert to Islam • Islamization noun
Island
or Ísland geographical name — see Iceland
island
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: alteration (influenced by Anglo-French isle) of earlier iland, from Middle English, from Old English īgland (akin to Old Norse ...
Ísland
I. geographical name see Iceland II. geographical name see Island
island universe
noun Date: 1867 a galaxy other than the Milky Way
island-hop
intransitive verb Date: 1944 to travel from island to island in a chain
islander
noun Date: circa 1550 a native or inhabitant of an island
Islas Malvinas
geographical name see Falkland Islands
Islay
geographical name island Scotland in S Inner Hebrides area 234 square miles (608 square kilometers), population 3855
isle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ile, isle, from Latin insula Date: 13th century island; especially islet 1 II. transitive verb (isled; isling) Date: ...

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