Слова на букву inob-leni (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву inob-leni (6389)

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jar
I. verb (jarred; jarring) Etymology: probably of imitative origin Date: 1526 intransitive verb 1. a. to make a harsh or discordant sound b. to have a harshly ...
Jarabulus
or Jerablus geographical name town N Syria on the Euphrates near Turkish border
Jarbah
geographical name see Jerba
jardiniere
or jardinière noun Etymology: French jardinière, literally, female gardener Date: 1841 1. a. an ornamental stand for plants or flowers b. a large usually ceramic ...
jardinière
noun see jardiniere
jarful
noun see jar III
jargon
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French jargun, gargon Date: 14th century 1. a. confused unintelligible language b. a strange, outlandish, or barbarous ...
jargonish
adjective Date: 1816 jargonistic
jargonistic
adjective Date: 1929 characterized by the use of jargon ; phrased in jargon
jargonize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1803 intransitive verb to speak or write jargon transitive verb 1. to express in jargon 2. to make into jargon
jargony
adjective see jargon I
jargoon
or jargon noun Etymology: French jargon — more at zircon Date: 1769 a colorless, pale yellow, or smoky zircon
jarhead
noun Date: 1943 slang marine 2
Jarīr
biographical name circa 650-circa 729 Arab poet
jarl
noun Etymology: Old Norse — more at earl Date: 1820 a Scandinavian noble ranking immediately below the king
jarrah
noun Etymology: Nyungar (Australian aboriginal language of southwest Western Australia) jarrilʸ Date: circa 1866 a tall eucalyptus (Eucalyptus marginata) of western ...
Jarrell
biographical name Randall 1914-1965 American writer
jarringly
adverb see jar I
Jaruzelski
biographical name Wojciech Witold 1923- general; 1st secretary of the Communist party in Poland (1981-89)
Jarvis
geographical name island central Pacific in the Line Islands; claimed by United States
Jas
abbreviation James
jasmine
also jessamine noun Etymology: Middle French jasmin, from Arabic yāsamīn, from Persian Date: 1562 1. a. any of numerous often climbing shrubs (genus Jasminum) of the ...
Jason
noun Etymology: Latin Iason, from Greek Iasōn Date: 14th century a legendary Greek hero distinguished for his successful quest of the Golden Fleece
jasper
noun Etymology: Middle English jaspre, from Anglo-French jaspre, jaspe, from Latin jaspis, from Greek iaspis, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew yāshĕpheh jasper Date: 14th ...
Jasper National Park
geographical name reservation W Canada in W Alberta on E slopes of the Rockies NW of Banff National Park
Jaspers
biographical name Karl Theodor 1883-1969 German philosopher
jasperware
noun Date: 1857 jasper 2
jaspery
adjective see jasper
jassid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek Iasos, town in Asia Minor Date: 1892 any of numerous small leafhoppers that include many economically significant pests of cultivated ...
Jassy
geographical name — see Iasi
Jastrzebie-Zdroj
geographical name city S Poland population 102,661
Jat
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu Jāṭ Date: 1622 a member of an Indo-Aryan people of the Punjab and Uttar Pradesh
JATO
abbreviation jet-assisted takeoff
jaunce
intransitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1593 archaic prance
jaundice
noun Etymology: Middle English jawnes, jaundis, from Anglo-French jaunice, galniz, from jaune, gaune yellow, from Latin galbinus greenish yellow Date: 14th century 1. ...
jaundiced
adjective Date: 1640 1. affected with or as if with jaundice 2. exhibiting or influenced by envy, distaste, or hostility
jaunt
I. intransitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1575 1. archaic to trudge about 2. to make a usually short journey for pleasure II. noun Date: 1592 1. archaic a ...
jauntily
adverb see jaunty
jauntiness
noun see jaunty
jaunting car
noun Date: 1801 a light 2-wheeled open horse-drawn vehicle used especially in Ireland with lengthwise seats placed face-to-face or back to back
jaunty
adjective (jauntier; -est) Etymology: modification of French gentil Date: 1662 1. archaic a. stylish b. genteel 2. sprightly in manner or appearance ; lively • ...
Jauregg
biographical name Julius Wagner von — see Wagner von Jauregg
Jaurès
biographical name (Auguste-Marie-Joseph-) Jean 1859-1914 French socialist
Jav
abbreviation Javanese
java
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Java, island of Indonesia Date: 1850 coffee
Java
or Indonesian Djawa geographical name island Indonesia SE of Sumatra; chief city Jakarta area 51,007 square miles (132,618 square kilometers), population 107,581,306
Java Head
geographical name cape Indonesia at W end of Java on Sunda Strait
Java man
noun Date: 1911 a Pleistocene hominid known from fragmentary skeletons found in Trinil and Djetis, Java, and classified with the direct ancestor (Homo erectus) of modern humans
Java Sea
geographical name arm of the Pacific bounded on S by Java, on W by Sumatra, on N by Borneo, & on E by Sulawesi
Javanese
noun (plural Javanese) Etymology: Java + -nese (as in Japanese) Date: 1704 1. a member of an Indonesian people inhabiting the island of Java 2. an Austronesian language of ...
Javari
or Spanish Yavarí or formerly Yacarana geographical name river about 600 miles (965 kilometers) NW South America flowing NE on Peru-Brazil boundary into the Amazon
javelin
noun Etymology: Middle English chafeveleyn, from Middle French javeline, alteration of javelot, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish gabul forked stick Date: 15th century 1. a ...
javelina
noun Etymology: American Spanish jabalina, from Spanish, feminine of jabalí wild boar, from Arabic jabalī Date: 1822 peccary
Javelle water
noun Etymology: Javel, former village in France Date: 1890 an aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite used as a disinfectant or a bleaching agent
jaw
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. a. either of two complex cartilaginous or bony structures in most vertebrates that border the mouth, support the ...
jaw-dropper
adjective see jaw-dropping
jaw-dropping
adjective Date: 1980 causing great surprise or astonishment • jaw-dropper adjective • jaw-droppingly adverb
jaw-droppingly
adverb see jaw-dropping
jawbone
I. noun Date: 15th century jaw 1a; especially mandible II. verb Date: 1965 transitive verb to speak forcefully and persuasively to intransitive verb to talk ...
jawboning
noun Date: 1969 the use of public appeals (as by a president) to influence the actions especially of business and labor leaders; broadly the use of spoken persuasion
jawbreaker
noun Date: 1839 1. a word difficult to pronounce 2. a round hard candy
jawed
adjective Date: circa 1529 having jaws — usually used in combination
jawless fish
noun Date: circa 1941 any of the taxonomic group (Agnatha) of primitive vertebrates without jaws including cyclostomes and extinct related forms — compare bony fish, ...
jawline
noun Date: 1924 the outline of the lower jaw
Jaxartes
geographical name — see Syr Dar'ya
Jay
biographical name John 1745-1829 American jurist & statesman; 1st chief justice United States Supreme Court (1789-95)
jay
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin gaius Date: 14th century 1. a. a predominantly fawn-colored Old World bird (Garrulus glandarius) of ...
Jaya, Puncak
geographical name — see Puncak Jaya
Jayapura
or formerly Hollandia or Kotabaru or Sukarnapura geographical name city & port Indonesia capital of West Papua
jaybird
noun Date: 1661 1. jay I,1 2. jay I,2
Jaycee
noun Etymology: from the initials of Junior Citizens, former name of the organization Date: 1938 a member of a major national and international civic organization
jaygee
noun Etymology: junior grade Date: 1943 lieutenant junior grade
jayhawker
noun Date: 1858 1. a. often capitalized a member of a band of antislavery guerrillas in Kansas and Missouri before and during the American Civil War b. bandit 2. ...
jayvee
noun Etymology: junior varsity Date: 1937 1. junior varsity 2. a member of a junior varsity team
jaywalk
intransitive verb Date: 1919 to cross a street carelessly or in an illegal manner so as to be endangered by traffic • jaywalker noun
jaywalker
noun see jaywalk
Jazirah, Al
geographical name — see Gezira
jazz
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1913 1. a. American music developed especially from ragtime and blues and characterized by propulsive ...
jazz-rock
noun Date: 1968 a blend of jazz and rock music
jazzily
adverb see jazzy
jazziness
noun see jazzy
jazzlike
adjective see jazz I
jazzman
noun Date: 1926 a jazz musician
jazzy
adjective (jazzier; -est) Date: 1919 1. having the characteristics of jazz 2. marked by unrestraint, animation, or flashiness • jazzily adverb • jazziness noun
JBS
abbreviation John Birch Society
JC
abbreviation junior college
JCAHO
abbreviation Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
JCB
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin juris canonici baccalaureus bachelor of canon law
JCD
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin juris canonici doctor doctor of canon law
JCL
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin juris canonici licentiatus licentiate in canon law
JCS
abbreviation joint chiefs of staff
jct
abbreviation junction
JD
abbreviation 1. [New Latin juris doctor] doctor of jurisprudence; doctor of law; [New Latin jurum doctor] doctor of laws 2. justice department 3. juvenile delinquent
je maintiendrai
foreign term Etymology: French I will maintain — motto of the Netherlands
je ne sais quoi
noun Etymology: French, literally, I know not what Date: circa 1656 something that cannot be adequately described or expressed
jealous
adjective Etymology: Middle English jelous, from Anglo-French gelus, from Vulgar Latin *zelosus, from Late Latin zelus zeal — more at zeal Date: 13th century 1. a. ...
jealously
adverb see jealous
jealousness
noun see jealous
jealousy
noun (plural -sies) Date: 13th century 1. a jealous disposition, attitude, or feeling 2. zealous vigilance
jean
noun Etymology: short for jean fustian, from Middle English Gene Genoa, Italy + fustian Date: 1577 1. a durable twilled cotton cloth used especially for sportswear and work ...
Jeanne d'Arc
biographical name — see Joan of Arc
Jeans
biographical name Sir James Hopwood 1877-1946 English physicist, astronomer, & author
Jebb
biographical name Sir Richard Claverhouse 1841-1905 Scottish scholar
Jebel Druz
geographical name see Jebel ed Druz
Jebel ed Druz
or Jebel Druz geographical name region S Syria E of Sea of Galilee on border of Jordan
Jebel Musa
geographical name — see musa (Jebel)
Jebel Toubkal
geographical name — see toubkal (Jebel)
Jebel, Bahr el
geographical name — see Bahr al-Ghazal
Jebus
geographical name — see Jerusalem
Jedburgh
geographical name royal burgh SE Scotland SE of Edinburgh
Jedda
geographical name see Jidda
Jeddah
geographical name see Jidda
Jeep
trademark — used for a civilian automotive vehicle
jeep
I. noun Etymology: probably ultimately from Eugene the Jeep, character in the comic strip Thimble Theater by Elzie C. Segar Date: 1940 a small general-purpose motor vehicle ...
jeepers
interjection Etymology: euphemism for Jesus Date: 1927 — used as a mild oath
jeepers creepers
interjection Etymology: euphemism for Jesus Christ Date: 1928 jeepers
jeepney
noun Etymology: jeep + jitney Date: circa 1949 a Philippine jitney bus converted from a jeep
jeer
I. verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1561 intransitive verb to speak or cry out with derision or mockery transitive verb to deride with jeers ; taunt Synonyms: see ...
jeerer
noun see jeer I
jeeringly
adverb see jeer I
jeez
also geez interjection Etymology: euphemism for Jesus Date: 1923 — used as a mild oath or introductory expletive (as to express surprise)
jefe
noun Etymology: Spanish, from French chef, from Old French chief — more at chief Date: 1903 chief, leader
Jeffers
biographical name (John) Robinson 1887-1962 American poet
Jefferson
I. biographical name Thomas 1743-1826 3d president of the United States (1801-09) • Jeffersonian adjective II. geographical name river over 200 miles (321 kilometers) SW ...
Jefferson City
geographical name city capital of Missouri on Missouri River population 39,636
Jefferson Davis's Birthday
noun Date: 1929 the first Monday in June observed as a legal holiday in many Southern states
Jefferson, Mount
geographical name mountain 10,495 feet (3199 meters) NW Oregon in Cascades
Jeffersonian
adjective see Jefferson I
Jeffersontown
geographical name city N Kentucky E of Louisville population 26,633
Jeffersonville
geographical name city S Indiana population 27,362
Jeffrey
biographical name Lord Francis 1773-1850 Scottish critic & jurist
Jeffrey pine
noun Etymology: John Jeffrey died 1854 Scottish botanical explorer Date: 1858 a tall pine (Pinus jeffreyi) of the western United States having elongated cones and long ...
Jeffreys
biographical name George 1645-1689 1st Baron Jeffreys of Wem English jurist
jehad
variant of jihad
Jehol
geographical name — see Chengde
Jehoshaphat
noun Etymology: Hebrew Yĕhōshāphāṭ Date: circa 1500 a king of Judah who brought Judah into an alliance with the northern kingdom of Israel in the ninth century B.C.
Jehovah
noun Etymology: New Latin, reading (as Yĕhōwāh) of Hebrew yhwh Yahweh with the vowel points of 'adhōnāy my lord Date: 1530 god 1
Jehovah's Witness
noun Date: 1931 a member of a group that witness by distributing literature and by personal evangelism to beliefs in the theocratic rule of God, the sinfulness of organized ...
jehu
noun Etymology: Hebrew Yēhū Date: 1560 1. capitalized a king of Israel in the ninth century B.C. who according to the account in II Kings had Jezebel killed in accordance ...
Jeju
geographical name — see Cheju
jejunal
adjective Date: circa 1887 of or relating to the jejunum
jejune
adjective Etymology: Latin jejunus empty of food, hungry, meager Date: 1646 1. lacking nutritive value 2. devoid of significance or interest ; dull 3. juvenile, ...
jejunely
adverb see jejune
jejuneness
noun see jejune
jejunum
noun (plural jejuna) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from neuter of Latin jejunus Date: 14th century the section of the small intestine that comprises the ...
Jekyll and Hyde
noun Etymology: Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, representing the two-sided personality of the protagonist in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) by R. L. Stevenson ...
jell
verb Etymology: back-formation from jelly Date: 1869 intransitive verb 1. to come to the consistency of jelly ; congeal, set 2. to take shape and achieve distinctness ; ...
Jell-O
trademark — used for a gelatin dessert usually with the flavor and color of fruit
Jellicoe
biographical name 1st Earl 1859-1935 John Rushworth Jellicoe British admiral
jellied gasoline
noun Date: 1944 napalm
jelly
I. noun (plural jellies) Etymology: Middle English gelly, from Anglo-French gelee, from feminine of gelé, past participle of geler to freeze, congeal, from Latin gelare — ...
jelly bean
noun Date: 1905 a sugar-glazed bean-shaped candy
jelly roll
noun Date: 1871 a thin sheet of sponge cake spread with jelly and rolled up
jellyfish
noun Date: 1841 1. a. a free-swimming marine coelenterate that is the sexually reproducing form of a hydrozoan or scyphozoan and has a nearly transparent saucer-shaped body ...
jellylike
adjective see jelly I
jelutong
noun Etymology: Malay jĕlutong Date: circa 1836 1. any of several trees (genus Dyera) of the dogbane family 2. the resinous rubbery latex of a jelutong (especially Dyera ...
Jemappes
geographical name commune SW Belgium W of Mons
jemmy
noun (plural jemmies) Etymology: from the name Jemmy Date: circa 1811 British jimmy
Jena
geographical name city E central Germany E of Erfurt population 100,967
Jenner
I. biographical name Edward 1749-1823 English physician • Jennerian adjective II. biographical name Sir William 1815-1898 English physician
Jennerian
adjective see Jenner I
jennet
noun Etymology: Middle English genett, from Anglo-French genet, from Catalan, Zenete (member of a Berber people), horse Date: 15th century 1. a small Spanish horse 2. a. ...
jenny
noun (plural jennies) Etymology: from the name Jenny Date: 1600 1. a. a female bird b. a female donkey 2. spinning jenny
Jenson
biographical name Nicolas circa 1420-1480 French printer & engraver in Venice
jeon
noun (plural jeon) Etymology: Korean chŏn Date: circa 1969 the chon of South Korea
Jeonju
geographical name — see Chonju
jeopard
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, back-formation from jeopardie Date: 14th century jeopardize
jeopardise
British variant of jeopardize
jeopardize
transitive verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1582 to expose to danger or risk ; imperil
jeopardy
noun Etymology: Middle English jeopardie, from Anglo-French juparti, jeuparti alternative, literally, divided game Date: 14th century 1. exposure to or imminence of death, ...
jequirity bean
noun Etymology: French jékwirity, from Portuguese jequiriti, juqueriti, probably of Tupi-Guarani origin; akin to Tupi jukɨrí rosary pea Date: circa 1889 1. the poisonous ...
Jequitinhonha
geographical name river 500 miles (805 kilometers) E Brazil flowing NE into the Atlantic
Jer
abbreviation Jeremiah; Jeremias
Jerablus
geographical name see Jarabulus
Jerba
or Djerba or Jarbah geographical name island SE Tunisia in the Mediterranean at entrance to Gulf of Gabès area 197 square miles (510 square kilometers)
jerboa
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Arabic yarbū‘ Date: 1662 any of several social nocturnal jumping rodents (family Dipodidae) of arid parts of Asia and northern Africa ...
jeremiad
noun Etymology: French jérémiade, from Jérémie Jeremiah, from Late Latin Jeremias Date: 1780 a prolonged lamentation or complaint; also a cautionary or angry harangue
Jeremiah
noun Etymology: Late Latin Jeremias, from Greek Hieremias, from Hebrew Yirmĕyāh Date: 14th century 1. a major Hebrew prophet of the seventh and sixth centuries B.C. 2. ...
Jeremias
noun Etymology: Late Latin Date: circa 1534 Jeremiah
Jerez
or Jerez de la Frontera or formerly Xeres geographical name city SW Spain NE of Cádiz population 182,939
Jerez de la Frontera
geographical name see Jerez
Jericho
geographical name 1. (or Arabic Ariha) town West Bank 5 miles (8 kilometers) NW of Dead Sea 2. city of ancient Palestine near site of modern Jericho
jerk
I. noun Etymology: probably alteration of yerk Date: 1575 1. a single quick motion of short duration 2. a. jolting, bouncing, or thrusting motions b. a tendency to ...
jerk around
transitive verb Date: 1932 to treat badly especially by being underhanded or inconsistent
jerk off
verb Date: circa 1896 usually vulgar masturbate
jerker
noun see jerk II
jerkily
adverb see jerky I
jerkin
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1519 a close-fitting hip-length usually sleeveless jacket
jerkiness
noun see jerky I
jerkwater
adjective Etymology: from jerkwater rural train Date: 1888 1. remote and unimportant 2. trivial
jerky
I. adjective (jerkier; -est) Date: 1670 1. a. moving along with or marked by fits and starts b. characterized by abrupt transitions 2. inane, foolish • jerkily ...
Jerne
biographical name Niels Kai 1911-1994 Danish (English-born) immunologist
jeroboam
noun Etymology: Jeroboam I died ab912 B.C. king of the northern kingdom of Israel Date: 1889 an oversize wine bottle holding about three liters
Jerome
biographical name Saint circa 347-419(or 420) L. Eusebius Hieronymus church father
jerrican
or jerry can noun Etymology: Jerry + can; from its German design Date: 1943 a narrow flat-sided container for liquids usually holding about five United States gallons (about ...
Jerry
noun (plural Jerries) Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1915 chiefly British german
jerry can
noun see jerrican
jerry-build
transitive verb (jerry-built; -building) Etymology: back-formation from jerry-built Date: 1885 to build cheaply and flimsily • jerry-builder noun
jerry-builder
noun see jerry-build
jerry-built
adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1869 1. built cheaply and unsubstantially 2. carelessly or hastily put together
jerry-rigged
adjective Etymology: probably blend of jerry-built and jury-rigged Date: 1959 organized or constructed in a crude or improvised manner
jersey
noun (plural jerseys) Etymology: Jersey, one of the Channel Islands Date: 1587 1. a plain weft-knitted fabric made of wool, cotton, nylon, rayon, or silk and used especially ...
Jersey
geographical name 1. island English Channel in the Channel Islands capital St. Helier area 45 square miles (117 square kilometers) 2. New Jersey • Jerseyan noun • ...
Jersey barrier
noun Etymology: New Jersey, United States Date: 1981 a concrete slab 32 inches high with slanted sides that is used in tandem with others to block or reroute traffic or to ...
Jersey City
geographical name city & port NE New Jersey population 240,055
Jersey pine
noun Date: 1743 Virginia pine
Jerseyan
noun see Jersey
Jerseyite
noun see Jersey
Jerusalem
or ancient Hierosolyma or biblical Jebus geographical name city SW Asia NW of Dead Sea; divided 1948-67 between Jordan (old city) & Israel (new city); capital of Israel since ...
Jerusalem artichoke
noun Etymology: Jerusalem by folk etymology from Italian girasole girasole Date: 1639 a perennial sunflower (Helianthus tuberosus) of the United States and Canada widely ...
Jerusalem cherry
noun Etymology: Jerusalem, Palestine Date: 1788 either of two plants (Solanum pseudocapsicum and S. capsicastrum) of the nightshade family cultivated as ornamental ...
Jerusalem cricket
noun Date: 1947 a large-headed burrowing nocturnal orthopteran insect (Stenopelmatus fuscus) of the southwestern United States
Jerusalem thorn
noun Date: 1866 a widely cultivated tropical American spiny shrub or small tree (Parkinsonia aculeata) of the legume family with pinnate leaves and showy racemose yellow ...
Jerusalemite
noun see Jerusalem
Jervis
biographical name John 1735-1823 Earl of St. Vincent British admiral
Jervis Bay
geographical name inlet of the Pacific SE Australia on SE coast of New South Wales on which is situated district (area 28 square miles or 73 square kilometers) that is part of ...
Jespersen
biographical name (Jens) Otto Harry 1860-1943 Danish philologist
jess
noun Etymology: Middle English ges, from Anglo-French gez, jettes, plural of get, literally, throw, from geter, jeter to throw, release (a hawk) — more at jet Date: 14th ...
jessamine
variant of jasmine
Jesse
noun Etymology: Hebrew Yishay Date: before 12th century the father of David, king of Israel, according to the account in I Samuel
jessed
adjective see jess
Jesselton
geographical name — see Kota Kinabalu
jest
noun Etymology: Middle English geste idle tale, story in verse, from Anglo-French, deed, action, narrative, from Latin gesta deeds, from neuter plural of gestus, past participle ...
jester
noun Date: 14th century 1. fool 2a 2. one given to jests
Jesuit
noun Etymology: New Latin Jesuita, from Late Latin Jesus Date: 1548 1. a member of the Roman Catholic Society of Jesus founded by St. Ignatius Loyola in 1534 and devoted to ...
jesuitic
adjective see Jesuit
jesuitical
adjective see Jesuit
jesuitically
adverb see Jesuit
jesuitism
noun see Jesuit
jesuitry
noun see Jesuit
Jesus
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek Iēsous, from Hebrew Yēshūa‘ Date: before 12th century 1. the Jewish religious teacher whose life, death, and resurrection as ...
Jesus Christ
I. noun see Jesus I II. biographical name see Jesus II
jet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French jaiet, from Latin gagates, from Greek gagatēs, from Gagas, town and river in Asia Minor Date: 14th century 1. a compact ...
jet engine
noun Date: 1943 an engine that produces motion as a result of the rearward discharge of a jet of fluid; specifically an airplane engine that uses atmospheric oxygen to burn ...
jet lag
noun Date: 1969 a condition that is characterized by various psychological and physiological effects (as fatigue and irritability), occurs following long flight through ...
jet propulsion
noun Date: 1867 propulsion of a body produced by the forwardly directed forces of the reaction resulting from the rearward discharge of a jet of fluid; especially propulsion ...
jet set
noun Date: 1951 an international social group of wealthy individuals who frequent fashionable resorts • jet-set adjective • jet-setter noun • jet-setting adjective
Jet Ski
trademark — used for a small motorized usually recreational watercraft
jet stream
noun Date: 1947 a long narrow meandering current of high-speed winds near the tropopause blowing from a generally westerly direction and often exceeding a speed of 250 miles ...
jet-black
adjective Date: 15th century black as jet
jet-lagged
adjective see jet lag
jet-propelled
adjective Date: 1877 1. moving by jet propulsion 2. suggestive of the speed and force of a jet airplane
jet-set
adjective see jet set
jet-setter
noun see jet set
jet-setting
adjective see jet set
jetbead
noun Date: circa 1930 a deciduous ornamental Asian shrub (Rhodotypos scandens) of the rose family that has black shiny fruit
jeté
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of jeter Date: 1830 a springing jump in ballet made from one foot to the other in any direction
jetlike
adjective see jet IV
jetliner
noun Date: 1949 a jet-propelled airliner
jetport
noun Date: 1961 an airport designed to handle jet airplanes
jetsam
noun Etymology: alteration of jettison Date: 1591 1. the part of a ship, its equipment, or its cargo that is cast overboard to lighten the load in time of distress and that ...
jettison
I. noun Etymology: Middle English jetteson, from Anglo-French geteson, literally, action of throwing, from Latin jactation-, jactatio, from jactare — more at jet Date: 15th ...
jettisonable
adjective see jettison II
jetty
I. noun (plural jetties) Etymology: Middle English getee, jette, from Anglo-French geté, getee, from past participle of geter, jeter to throw — more at jet Date: 15th ...
Jetway
trademark — used for a telescoping passenger ramp between an aircraft and a terminal building
jeu d'esprit
noun (plural jeux d'esprit) Etymology: French, literally, play of the mind Date: 1712 a witty comment or composition
jeu de mots
foreign term Etymology: French play on words ; pun
jeunesse dorée
noun Etymology: French, gilded youth Date: 1836 young people of wealth and fashion
Jevons
biographical name William Stanley 1835-1882 English economist
Jew
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ju, jeu, from Latin Judaeus, from Greek Ioudaios, from Hebrew Yĕhūdhī, from Yĕhūdhāh Judah, Jewish kingdom Date: 13th ...
Jew's harp
or Jews' harp noun Date: 1595 a small lyre-shaped instrument that when held between the teeth gives tones from a metal tongue struck by the finger
jewel
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English juel, from Anglo-French, diminutive of ju, jeu game, play, from Latin jocus game, joke — more at joke Date: 13th ...
jewel box
noun Date: 1727 1. a small box or case designed to hold jewelry 2. something (as a theater) of exquisite or ornate design 3. a thin plastic case for a CD or DVD — called ...
jewel case
noun see jewel box
Jewel Cave National Monument
geographical name limestone cave SW South Dakota

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