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Слова на букву !kun-arti (15990)

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-eus
a suffix occurring in Latin scientific names and in the corresponding loanwords in English: nucleus. * * *
-euse
a suffix occurring in loanwords from French, forming feminine nouns corresponding to nouns ending in -eur: chanteuse. [ < F < L -osa, fem. of -osus -OSE1 ( > F -eux); taken as ...
-ey
-ey1 var. of -y1, esp. after y: clayey. -ey2 var. of -y2, esp. after y. * * *
-faced
-faced [fāst] combining form having a (specified kind of) face [round-faced] * * *
-facient
-facient [fā′shənt] 〚< L faciens (gen. facientis), prp. of facere, to make, DO1〛 combining form forming adjectives making or causing to become [liquefacient] * * ...
-faction
-faction suff. Production; making: petrifaction.   [Middle English -faccioun, from Old French -faction, from Latin -factiō, -factiōn-, from factus, past participle of facere, ...
-fer
a combining form meaning "that which carries" the thing specified by the initial element, used in the formation of compound words: aquifer; conifer; foraminifer. [ < L, deriv. of ...
-ferous
a combining form meaning "bearing," "producing," "yielding," "containing," "conveying," used in the formation of compound words: coniferous; pestiferous. Cf. -fer. [ME; see -FER, ...
-fest
a combining form occurring in compound words that have the general sense "an assembly of people engaged in a common activity"; the first element of the compound usually specifies ...
-fex
a combining form meaning "maker," used in the formation of compound words: spinifex. [ < L, equiv. to -fec- (comb. form of facere to make) + -s nom. sing. ending. See -FIC] * * *
-fic
a combining form meaning "making," "producing," "causing," appearing in adjectives borrowed from Latin: frigorific; honorific; pacific; prolific. [ < L -ficus making, producing, ...
-fication
a combining form of nouns of action or state corresponding to verbs ending in -fy: deification; pacification. [ < L -fication- (s. of -ficatio) a making, equiv. to -fica(re) -FY ...
-fid
a combining form meaning "divided," "lobed," occurring in adjectives borrowed from Latin (bifid); on this model, used in the formation of compound words (pinnatifid). [ < L ...
-flation
-flation [flā′shən] combining form inflation: used in many nonce compounds [oilflation, medflation] * * *
-flavin
a combining form occurring in compound words which denote natural derivatives of flavin: riboflavin. * * *
-florous
a combining form meaning "-flowered," "having flowers," used in the formation of adjectives: uniflorous. [ < L -florus. See FLORI-, -OUS] * * *
-fold
a native English suffix meaning "of so many parts," or denoting multiplication by the number indicated by the stem or word to which the suffix is attached: twofold; ...
-foliate
-foliate suff. Having a specified kind or number of leaves: trifoliate.   [From foliate.] * * *
-foliolate
-foliolate suff. Having a specified kind or number of leaflets: bifoliolate.   [New Latin foliolātus, from French foliole, leaflet, from Late Latin foliolum, diminutive of ...
-folious
a combining form meaning "having leaves (of a specified number or type)": unifolious. [comb. form repr. L foliosus FOLIOSE] * * *
-footer
-footer [foot′ər] combining form a person or thing (a specified number of) feet tall, high, long, etc.: used in hyphenated compounds [ six- footer] * * *
-form
a combining form meaning "having the form of": cruciform. [ < L -formis] * * *
-free
-free [frē] combining form free of or from, exempt from, without: used in hyphenated compounds [tax-free income] * * *
-friendly
-friendly [frend′lē] combining form 1. easily used or understood by [learner-friendly] 2. a) helpful to or safe for [child-friendly] b) not harmful to [environment-friendly]: ...
-fuge
a combining form occurring in compound words which have the general sense "something that repels or drives away" whatever is specified by the initial element: vermifuge. [ < F < ...
-ful
a suffix meaning "full of," "characterized by" (shameful; beautiful; careful; thoughtful); "tending to," "able to" (wakeful; harmful); "as much as will fill" (spoonful). [ME, OE ...
-fy
a verbal suffix meaning "to make," "cause to be," "render" (simplify; beautify); "to become," "be made" (liquefy). The suffix was introduced into English in loan words from Old ...
-gamous
a combining form with the meaning "having gametes or reproductive organs" of the kind specified by the initial element: heterogamous; also forming adjectives corresponding to ...
-gamy
a combining form with the meanings "marriage," "union," "fertilization, pollination," of the kind specified by the initial element: exogamy; plastogamy; allogamy; also forming ...
-gate
a combining form extracted from Watergate, occurring as the final element in journalistic coinages, usually nonce words, that name scandals resulting from concealed crime or ...
-gen
a combining form meaning "that which produces," used in the formation of compound words: endogen; hydrogen. [ < F -gène
-gene
-gene suff. Variant of -gen. * * *
-genesis
a combining form of genesis: parthenogenesis. * * *
-genetic
a suffix of adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -genesis: parthenogenetic. * * *
-genic
a combining form often corresponding to nouns ending in -gen or -geny, with the following senses: "producing or causing" (hallucinogenic); "produced or caused by" (cosmogenic); ...
-genous
a suffix of adjectives corresponding to nouns with stems in -gen: erogenous. [-GEN + -OUS] * * *
-geny
a combining form meaning "origin," used in the formation of compound words: phylogeny. [1885-90; < Gk -geneia. See -GEN, -Y3] * * *
-gerous
a combining form meaning "bearing," "producing," used in the formation of compound words: setigerous. [ < L -ger bearing, deriv. of gerere to bear, wear; see -OUS] * * *
-glot
a combining form with the meanings "having a tongue," "speaking, writing, or written in a language" of the kind or number specified by the initial element: polyglot. [ < Gk ...
-gnathous
a combining form meaning "having a jaw" of the kind or in the position specified by the initial element: prognathous. [ < Gk -gnathos -jawed, adj. deriv. of gnáthos jaw (akin to ...
-gnomy
a combining form meaning "knowledge," occurring in loanwords from Greek and used in combination with other elements of Greek origin: physiognomy. [ < LL -gnomia < Gk. See GNOMON, ...
-gnosis
a combining form meaning "knowledge," used in the formation of compound words: prognosis. [ < L -gnosis < Gk; see GNOSIS] * * *
-gnostic
a combination of -gnosis and -ic, used to form adjectives from stems ending in -gnosis: prognostic. [ < ML -gnosticus < Gk gnostikós pertaining to knowledge] * * *
-gon
a combining form meaning "angled," "angular," used in the formation of compound words: polygon; pentagon. Cf. gonio-. [ < Gk -gonos, deriv. of gonía angle, akin to góny KNEE] * ...
-gonium
a combining form of gonium: archegonium. * * *
-gony
a combining form meaning "production," "genesis," "origination," used in the formation of compound words: theogony; cosmogony. [ < L -gonia < Gk -goneia, equiv. to gón(os) (see ...
-grade
a combining form meaning "walking, moving," in the manner or by the means specified by the initial element: plantigrade. [ < L -gradus, comb. form repr. gradus step or gradi to ...
-gram
-gram1 a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek, where it meant "something written," "drawing" (epigram; diagram); on this model, used in the formation of compound ...
-graph
a combining form meaning "drawn," "written" (lithograph; monograph); specialized in meaning to indicate the instrument rather than the written product of the instrument ...
-grapher
-grapher [grə fər] combining form forming nouns the agent of a (specified) method or process for recording or describing [telegrapher, stenographer] * * * -grapher suff. One ...
-graphic
a combination of -graph and -ic, forming adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -graph: telegraphic. * * *
-graphy
a combining form denoting a process or form of drawing, writing, representing, recording, describing, etc., or an art or science concerned with such a process: biography; ...
-gyne
-gyne suff. Female reproductive organ: trichogyne.   [From Greek gunē, woman. See gʷen-. * * *
-gynous
a combining form with the meanings "of women," "of females," "having pistils or analogous organs," as specified by the initial elements: androgynous. [ < Gk -gynos. See GYNO-, ...
-gyny
a combining form occurring in nouns corresponding to adjectives ending in -gynous: androgyny. * * *
-haemia
Chiefly Brit. var. of -hemia: leukocythaemia. * * *
-haired
-haired [herd] combining form having (a specified kind of) hair [fair-haired, short-haired] * * *
-handed
-handed [han′did] combining form 1. having, or for use by one having, a (specified) handedness [right-handed] 2. having or using a (specified) number of hands [two-handed] 3. ...
-head
a native English suffix meaning "state of being" (godhead; maidenhead), occurring in words now mostly archaic or obsolete, many being superseded by forms in -hood. [ME -hede, OE ...
-headed
-headed [hed′id] combining form 1. having a (specified kind of) head [clearheaded] 2. having (a specified number of) heads [two-headed] * * *
-hearted
-hearted [härt′id] 〚ME〛 combining form having a (specified kind of) heart [stouthearted] * * *
-hedral
a combining form used to form adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -hedron: polyhedral. [-HEDR(ON) + -AL1] * * *
-hedron
a combining form meaning "face," used in the names of geometrical solid figures having the form or number of faces specified by the initial element: tetrahedron. [ < Gk -edron, ...
-hemia
var. of -emia after p, t, k: leucocythemia. * * *
-hippus
var. of hippo- as final element of compounds: eohippus. [ < L < Gk -hippos] * * *
-holic
var. of -aholic: chocoholic. * * *
-hood
a native English suffix denoting state, condition, character, nature, etc., or a body of persons of a particular character or class, formerly used in the formation of nouns: ...
-hop
-hop [häp] combining form forming verbs to go from one of a (specified) group or class of places or things to another or others in succession [table-hop, job-hopping] * * *
-hydric
a combining form of hydric1: hexahydric. * * *
-i-
the typical ending of the first element of compounds of Latin words, as -o- is of Greek words, but often used in English with a first element of any origin, if the second element ...
-ia
a noun suffix having restricted application in various fields, as in names of diseases (malaria; anemia), place names (Italia; Rumania), names of Roman feasts (Lupercalia), Latin ...
-ial
var. of -al1: grallatorial. [extracted from L loanwords in which -alis -AL1 is joined to stems ending in i; cf. FILIAL, IMPERIAL] * * *
-ian
a suffix with the same meaning and properties as -an; -ian is now the more productive of the two suffixes in recent coinages, esp. when the base noun ends in a consonant: ...
-iana
-iana [ē an′ə] suffix -ANA * * * -iana suff. Variant of -ana. * * *
-iana.
See -an, -ana. [ < L, neut. pl. of -IANUS -IAN] * * *
-iasis
a noun suffix occurring in loanwords from Greek: psoriasis. Cf. -asis. [ < Gk, equiv. to -ia- v. formative + -sis -SIS] * * *
-iatric
-iatric suff. Of or relating to a specified kind of medical practice, treatment, or healing: geriatric.   [From Greek iātrikos, medical, from iātros, physician, from ...
-iatrics
a combining form occurring in compound words that have the general sense "healing, medical practice," with the initial element usually denoting the type of person treated: ...
-iatry
a combining form occurring in compound words that have the general sense "healing, medical practice," with the initial element usually denoting the area treated: podiatry; ...
-ibility
var. of -ability: reducibility. [ < L -ibilitat-, equiv. to -ibili(s) -IBLE + -tat- -TY2] * * *
-ible
var. of -able, occurring in words borrowed from Latin (credible; horrible; visible), or modeled on the Latin type (reducible). [ < L -ibil(is) or -ibil(is), equiv. to -i- or -i- ...
-ibly
var. of -ably: credibly; visibly. [-IBLE + -LY] * * *
-ic
1. a suffix forming adjectives from other parts of speech, occurring originally in Greek and Latin loanwords (metallic; poetic; archaic; public) and, on this model, used as an ...
-ical
a combination of -ic and -al1, used in forming adjectives from nouns (rhetorical), providing synonyms to words ending in -ic (poetical), and providing an adjective with ...
-ically
a suffix used to form adverbs from adjectives ending in -ic (terrifically) and -ical (poetically; magically). * * *
-ice
a suffix of nouns, indicating state or quality, appearing in loanwords from French: notice. [ME -ice, -ise < OF < L -itius, -itia, -itium abstract n. suffix] * * *
-ician
a suffix forming personal nouns denoting occupations: beautician; mortician. [extracted from musician, physician, etc., derived, with -IAN, from words ending in -IC] * * *
-ick
-ick [ik] suffix former sp. of -IC [magick] * * *
-ics
a suffix of nouns that denote a body of facts, knowledge, principles, etc., usually corresponding to adjectives ending in -ic or -ical: ethics; physics; politics; tactics. [pl. ...
-id
-id1 a suffix of nouns that have the general sense "offspring of, descendant of," occurring originally in loanwords from Greek (Atreid; Nereid), and productive in English on the ...
-ida
Zool. a suffix of the names of orders and classes: Arachnida. [ < NL, taken as neut. pl. of L -ides offspring of < Gk; see -ID1] * * *
-idae
Zool. a suffix of the names of families: Canidae. [ < NL, L < Gk -idai, pl. of -IDES offspring of; akin to -ID1] * * *
-ide
-ide [īd, id] 〚
-ides
a Greek plural suffix appearing in scientific names: cantharides. [ < Gk, pl. of -is, suffix of source or origin. See -ID1] * * *
-idia
pl. of -idion or -idium. * * *
-idine
a suffix added to the name of one chemical compound to form the name of another compound derived from or related to the first. [-IDE + -INE2] * * *
-idion
a diminutive suffix occurring in loanwords from Greek: enchiridion. Cf. -idium. [ < Gk] * * *
-idium
a diminutive suffix, corresponding to -idion, used in zoological, biological, botanical, anatomical, and chemical terms: peridium. [ < L < Gk -idion -IDION] * * *
-ie
var. of -y2. * * *
-iensis
var. of -ensis. [generalized from derivatives of L or NL stems ending in -i-] * * *
-ier
-ier1 var. of -er1, usually in nouns designating trades: collier; clothier; furrier; glazier. [ME -ier(e), var. of -yer(e) (cf. -YER), equiv. to -i- v. stem ending + -ere -ER1, ...
-iformes
a combining form used in taxonomic names of animals, esp. orders of birds and fish, meaning "having the form of": Beryciformes; Passeriformes. [ < NL, pl. of -iformis; see -I-, ...
-ify
var. of -fy after a consonant: intensify. [ME -ifien < MF -ifier < L -ificare, equiv. to -i- -I- + -ficare -FY] * * *
-il
var. of -ile: civil. * * *
-ile
a suffix of adjectives expressing capability, susceptibility, liability, aptitude, etc.: agile; docile; ductile; fragile; prehensile; volatile. Also, -il. [ < L -ilis, -ilis] * * ...
-ility
a combination of -ile and -ity, used to form abstract nouns from adjectives with stems in -ile: agility; civility; ability. [ < F -ilité < L -ilitas; see -ILE, -ITY] * * *
-im
a plural ending occurring in loanwords from Hebrew: cherubim. [ < Heb] * * *
-in
-in1 a suffix, occurring in adjectives of Greek and Latin origin, meaning "pertaining to," and (in nouns thence derived) also imitated in English (coffin; cousin, etc.). [ME -in, ...
-in-law
-in-law [in lô′] combining form being a (specified type of relative) by marriage, not by descent in the same family line * * *
-in-residence
-in-residence [in rez′i dəns] combining form appointed to work at, and usually residing at, a given institution, as a college, for a certain period [the English Department's ...
-ina
-ina1 a suffix used in the formation of nouns of various types, esp. female proper names, musical instruments, compositions, etc.: Wilhelmina; sonatina. Cf. -in2, -ine2. [ < L ...
-inae
Zool. a suffix of the names of subfamilies. [ < NL, L, fem. pl. of -inus; see -INE1] * * *
-ine
-ine1 a suffix of adjectives of Greek or Latin origin, meaning "of or pertaining to," "of the nature of," "made of," "like": asinine; crystalline; equine; marine. Cf. -in1. [ < L ...
-ing
-ing1 a suffix of nouns formed from verbs, expressing the action of the verb or its result, product, material, etc. (the art of building; a new building; cotton wadding). It is ...
-intensive
-intensive [in ten′siv] combining form intensively using, requiring large amounts of, or concentrating within itself large amounts of (a specified thing) [energy-intensive] * * ...
-ion
a suffix, appearing in words of Latin origin, denoting action or condition, used in Latin and in English to form nouns from stems of Latin adjectives (communion; union), verbs ...
-ior
a suffix of comparatives appearing in words of Latin origin: superior; ulterior; junior. [ < L -ior, masc. and fem. comp. adj. suffix] * * *
-ious
variant of -ous, added to stems of Latin origin, often with corresponding nouns ending in -ity: atrocious; hilarious. Cf. -eous. [ME
-isation
Chiefly Brit. var. of -ization. * * *
-ise
-ise1 Chiefly Brit. var. of -ize: organise. Usage. See -ize. -ise2 a noun suffix, occurring in loanwords from French, indicating quality, condition, or function: franchise; ...
-ish
-ish1 1. a suffix used to form adjectives from nouns, with the sense of "belonging to" (British; Danish; English; Spanish); "after the manner of," "having the characteristics ...
-ism
a suffix appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it was used to form action nouns from verbs (baptism); on this model, used as a productive suffix in the formation of nouns ...
-ist
a suffix of nouns, often corresponding to verbs ending in -ize or nouns ending in -ism, that denote a person who practices or is concerned with something, or holds certain ...
-istic
a suffix of adjectives (and in the plural, of nouns from adjectives) formed from nouns ending in -ist and having reference to such nouns, or to associated nouns in -ism (deistic; ...
-istical
a combination of -istic and -al1. * * *
-istics
a combination of -ist and -ics. * * *
-ite
-ite1 a suffix of nouns denoting esp. persons associated with a place, tribe, leader, doctrine, system, etc. (Campbellite; Israelite; laborite); minerals and fossils (ammonite; ...
-itic
a combination of -ite1 and -ic, used to form adjectives from nouns ending in -ite: Semitic. [ < L -iticus < Gk -itikos, equiv. to -it(es) -ITE1 + -ikos -IC; in some words repr. F ...
-ition
a compound suffix of nouns, being -tion with a preceding original or formative vowel, or, in other words, a combination of -ite2 and -ion: expedition; extradition. [ < L -ition- ...
-itious
a compound suffix occurring in adjectives of Latin origin (adventitious) and with adjectives, formed in Latin or English, associated with nouns ending in -ition (ambitious; ...
-itis
a suffix used in pathological terms that denote inflammation of an organ (bronchitis; gastritis; neuritis) and hence, in extended senses, nouns denoting abnormal states or ...
-itive
a suffix occurring in substantives of Latin origin: definitive; fugitive. [ < L -itivus or -itivus; see -ITE2, -IVE] * * *
-itol
Chem. a suffix used in names of alcohols containing more than one hydroxyl group: inositol. [-ITE1 + -OL1] * * *
-ity
a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition: jollity; civility; Latinity. [var. of -itie, ME -ite < OF < L -itat- (s. of -itas); in many words repr. L ...
-ium
a suffix found on nouns borrowed from Latin, esp. derivatives of verbs (odium; tedium; colloquium; delirium), deverbal compounds with the initial element denoting the object of ...
-ive
a suffix of adjectives (and nouns of adjectival origin) expressing tendency, disposition, function, connection, etc.: active; corrective; destructive; detective; passive; ...
-ivus
a suffix appearing in Latin scientific names: exfoliativus. Cf. -ive. [ < NL, L -ivus] * * *
-ization
a combination of -ize and -ation: civilization. * * *
-ize
a verb-forming suffix occurring originally in loanwords from Greek that have entered English through Latin or French (baptize; barbarize; catechize); within English, -ize is ...
-kin
a diminutive suffix of nouns: lambkin. [ME < MD, MLG -ken; c. G -chen] * * *
-kinesia
a combining form with the meaning "movement, muscular activity," used in the formation of compound words: dyskinesia; hyperkinesia. Cf. -kinesis. [ < Gk -kinesia, equiv. to ...
-kinesis
a combining form with the general sense "movement, activity," used in the formation of compound words, often with the particular senses "reaction to a stimulus" (photokinesis), ...
-kinetic
a combining form found on adjectives that correspond to nouns ending in -kinesia or -kinesis: bradykinetic. [ < Gk kinet(ós) (see KINETO-) + -IC] * * *
-kinin
a combining form used in the names of hormones, esp. peptide hormones: bradykinin; cytokinin. [ < Gk kin(eîn) to move, set in motion (cf. KINESIS, KINETIC) + -IN2] * * *
-kins
-kins suff. Variant of -kin. * * *
-laden
-laden [lād′'n] combining form filled, covered, permeated, or burdened with [flower-laden, metaphor-laden, doom-laden] * * *
-lagnia
a combining form meaning "coition," used in the formation of compound words: algolagnia. [comb. form repr. Gk lagneía coition, lust] * * *
-lalia
a combining form used in the formation of nouns denoting abnormal or disordered forms of speech, as specified by the initial element: echolalia; glossolalia. [ < NL < Gk laliá ...
-land
a combining form of land: hinterland; lowland. * * *
-latry
a combining form occurring in loanwords from Greek meaning "worship" (idolatry); on this model, used in the formation of compound words (bardolatry). [ < Gk -latria. See LATRIA, ...
-le
1. a suffix of verbs having a frequentative force: dazzle; twinkle. 2. a suffix of adjectives formed originally on verbal stems and having the sense of "apt to": brittle. 3. a ...
-lect
-lect combining form a variety within a language * * *
-legged
-legged [leg′id, legd] combining form having (a specified number or kind of) legs [long-legged, four-legged] * * *
-length
-length [leŋkth, leŋth] combining form forming adjectives of a (specified) length, of such length as to reach a (specified) point or part [full-length] * * *
-lent
a suffix occurring in loanwords from Latin, var. of -ulent: pestilent. * * *
-lepsy
a combining form meaning "seizure," used in the formation of compound words: epilepsy. [comb. form repr. NL -lepsia < Gk -lepsia, equiv. to lêps(is) a seizure (lep- var. s. of ...
-less
an adjective suffix meaning "without" (childless; peerless), and in adjectives derived from verbs, indicating failure or inability to perform or be performed (resistless; ...
-let
a diminutive suffix attached to nouns (booklet; piglet; ringlet), and, by extraction from bracelet, a suffix denoting a band, piece of jewelry, or article of clothing worn on the ...
-like
a suffixal use of like1 in the formation of adjectives (childlike; lifelike), sometimes hyphenated. * * *
-ling
-ling1 a suffix of nouns, often pejorative, denoting one concerned with (hireling; underling), or diminutive (princeling; duckling). [ME, OE; c. G -ling, ON -lingr, Goth -lings; ...
-lings
var. of -ling2. [ME -linges. See -LING2, -S1] * * *
-lite
a combining form used in the names of minerals or fossils: aerolite; chrysolite. Also, -lyte2.Cf. -lith. [ < F, simplified form of -lithe < Gk líthos stone; similarly G -lit, ...
-lith
a combining form meaning "stone" (acrolith; megalith; paleolith); sometimes occurring in words as a variant form of -lite (batholith; laccolith). Cf. -lite. [see LITHO-] * * *
-lithic
a combining form used in the names of cultural phases in archaeology characterized by the use of a particular type of tool: Chalcolithic; Neolithic. [see LITHIC] * * *
-lived
-lived [līvd, livd] 〚< ME lyved: see LIFE & -ED〛 combining form having (a specified kind or duration of) life [long-lived] * * *
-log
var. of -logue: analog. * * *
-logic
a combining form used in the formation of adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -logy: analogic. [ < Gk -logikós. See LOGIC] * * *
-logical
-logical [läj′i kəl] 〚< Gr -logikos (< logikos: see LOGIC) + -AL〛 suffix forming adjectives of or relating to the science, doctrine, or theory of: also suffix -logic * * *
-logue
a combining form used in the names of kinds of discourse, spoken or written: analogue; monologue; travelogue. Also, -log. [ < F < L -logus < Gk -logos. See LOGOS] * * *
-logy
1. a combining form used in the names of sciences or bodies of knowledge: paleontology; theology. 2. a termination of nouns referring to writing, discourses, collections, etc.: ...
-ly
1. a suffix forming adverbs from adjectives: gladly; gradually; secondly. 2. a suffix meaning "every," attached to certain nouns denoting units of time: hourly; daily. 3. an ...
-lyse
Chiefly Brit. var. of -lyze. * * *
-lysis
a combining form with the meaning "breaking down, loosening, decomposition," used in the formation of compound words: analysis; electrolysis; paralysis. [ < Gk; see LYSIS] * * *
-lyte
-lyte1 a combining form used in the formation of compound words that denote something subjected to a certain process (indicated by a noun ending in -lysis): electrolyte. [ < Gk ...
-lytic
a combining form occurring in adjectives that correspond to nouns ending in -lysis: analytic; paralytic. [see LYTIC] * * *
-lyze
a combining form occurring in verbs that correspond to nouns ending in -lysis: catalyze. Also, esp. Brit., -lyse. [LY(SIS) + -(I)ZE] * * *
-machy
a combining form meaning "fighting," used in the formation of compound words: logomachy. [ < Gk -machia, equiv. to mách(e) battle + -ia -Y3] * * *
-making
-making [māk′iŋ] combining form forming adjectives Chiefly Brit. creating a (specified) state or condition [shy-making, angry-making] * * *
-man
a combining form of man: layman; postman. Usage. The use of -MAN as the last element in compounds referring to a person of either sex who performs some function (anchorman; ...
-mancy
a combining form meaning "divination," of the kind specified by the initial element: necromancy. [ME -manci(e), -mancy(e) < OF -mancie < L -mantia < Gk manteía divination. See ...
-mania
a combining form of mania (megalomania); extended to mean "enthusiasm, often of an extreme and transient nature," for that specified by the initial element (bibliomania). * * *
-maniac
-maniac [mā′nē ak΄] combining form 1. forming nouns a person affected by a (specified) mania [kleptomaniac] 2. forming adjectives affected by a (specified) mania * * *
-manship
a combination of -man and -ship, used as an independent suffix with the meaning "skill in a particular activity, esp. of a competitive nature": brinkmanship; grantsmanship; ...
-mantic
a combining form used in the formation of adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -mancy: necromantic. * * *
-mas
-mas [məs] 〚ME masse, messe, MASS1〛 combining form a (specified) festival or celebration [Martinmas] * * *
-meal
a native English combining form, now unproductive, denoting a fixed measure at a time: piecemeal. [ME -mele, OE -maelum, comb. form repr. mael MEAL1] * * *
-megalia
var. of -megaly: cardiomegalia. * * *
-megaly
a combining form meaning "irregular enlargement" of the organ of the body specified by the initial element: cardiomegaly. Also, -megalia. [ < NL -megalia. See MEGALO-, -Y3] * * *
-meister
a combining form meaning "a person expert in or renowned for" something specified by the initial element (often used derisively): schlockmeister; opinionmeister; dealmeister. [ < ...
-melia
a combining form occurring in compound words that denote a condition of the limbs, as specified by the initial element: phocomelia. [ < NL, comb. form repr. Gk mélos limb; see ...
-men
-men [men, mən] combining form pl. of-MAN * * *
-ment
a suffix of nouns, often concrete, denoting an action or resulting state (abridgment; refreshment), a product (fragment), or means (ornament). [ < F < L -mentum, suffix forming ...
-mer
Chem. a combining form meaning "member of a particular group": isomer. Cf. -mere, -merous. [ < Gk méros part, portion] * * *
-mere
a combining form meaning "part," used in the formation of compound words: blastomere. Cf. -mer, -merous. [comb. form repr. Gk méros] * * *
-merous
a combining form meaning "having parts" of the kind or number specified by the initial element: dimerous. Cf. -mer, -mere. [ < Gk -meros, adj. deriv. of méros part, portion, ...
-meter
a combining form meaning "measure," used in the names of instruments measuring quantity, extent, degree, etc.: altimeter; barometer. Cf. -metry. [ < NL -metrum < Gk métron ...
-metric
a combining form occurring in adjectives that correspond to nouns ending in -meter (barometric) or -metry (geometric). [ < Gk -metrikos; see METER2, -METRY, -IC] * * *
-metrics
a combining form with the meaning "the science of measuring" that specified by the initial element: biometrics; econometrics. [see -METRIC, -ICS] * * *
-metry
a combining form with the meaning "the process of measuring" that specified by the initial element: anthropometry; chronometry. [ < Gk -metria action or process of measuring, ...
-mo
a suffix occurring in a series of compounds that describe book sizes according to the number of leaves formed by the folding of a single sheet of paper: sixteenmo. [comb. form ...
-mobile
a combining form extracted from automobile, occurring as the final element in compounds denoting specialized types of motorized conveyances: snowmobile; esp. productive in ...
-mony
a suffix found on abstract nouns borrowed from Latin, usually denoting a status, role, or function (matrimony; testimony), or a personal quality or kind of behavior (acrimony; ...
-morph
a combining form meaning "form, structure," of the kind specified by the initial element: isomorph. [ < Gk -morphos; see -MORPHOUS] * * *
-morphic
var. of -morphous: anthropomorphic. [-MORPH + -IC] * * *
-morphism
a combining form occurring in nouns that correspond to adjectives ending in -morphic or -morphous: monomorphism. [see -MORPHOUS, -ISM] * * *
-morphous
a combining form with the meaning "having the shape, form, or structure" of the kind or number specified by the initial element, used in the formation of compound words: ...
-most
a combining form of most occurring in a series of superlatives: foremost; utmost. [ME -most; r. ME, OE -mest, double superl. suffix, equiv. to -ma superl. suffix (as in OE forma ...
-motive
a combining form of motive: automotive. * * *
-mouthed
-mouthed [mouthd] combining form having a (specified kind of) mouth [loud-mouthed] * * *
-mycete
a combining form meaning "mushroom, fungus," taken as the singular of the plural taxonomic combining form -mycetes. * * *
-mycetes
a combining form meaning "mushrooms, fungi," used in the formation of taxonomic names of fungi, esp. classes: Myxomycetes. [ < NL < Gk mykétes, pl. of mýkes mushroom + -ISM] * ...
-mycin
a combining form used in the names of antibiotics, usually fungal derivatives: neomycin. [perh. orig. in ACTINOMYCIN; see MYC-, -IN2] * * *
-n
var. of -an after a vowel: Virginian. * * *
-n't
a contraction of not: didn't; hadn't; couldn't; shouldn't; won't; mustn't. * * *
-nap
a combining form extracted from kidnap, with the general sense "abduct or steal in order to collect a ransom": artnap; petnap; starnap. * * *
-nastic
a combining form occurring in adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -nasty: hyponastic. [see NASTIC] * * *
-nasty
a combining form with the meaning "nastic pressure," of the kind or in the direction specified by the initial element: hyponasty. [ < Gk nast(ós) pressed close (see NASTIC) + ...
-natured
-natured [nā′chərd] combining form having or showing a (specified kind of) nature, disposition, or temperament [good-natured] * * *
-ness
a native English suffix attached to adjectives and participles, forming abstract nouns denoting quality and state (and often, by extension, something exemplifying a quality or ...
-nik
a suffix of nouns that refer, usually derogatorily, to persons who support or are concerned or associated with a particular political cause or group, cultural attitude, or the ...
-noia
a combining form appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant "thought": paranoia. [ < Gk -noia, equiv. to nó(os) mind + -ia -Y3] * * *
-nomics
-nomics [näm′iks] combining form economics: used in forming compounds naming a (specified) kind of economic policy or one associated with a (specified) public official ...
-nomy
a combining form of Greek origin meaning "distribution," "arrangement," "management,": astronomy; economy; taxonomy. [ < Gk -nomia law. See NOMO-, -Y3] * * *
-o
1. a suffix occurring as the final element in informal shortenings of nouns (ammo; combo; condo; limo; promo); -o also forms nouns, usually derogatory, for persons or things ...
-o-
the typical ending of the first element of compounds of Greek origin (as -i- is, in compounds of Latin origin), used regularly in forming new compounds with elements of Greek ...
-oate
a combining form used in the names of chemical compounds containing the ester or > C=O group of the compound specified by the initial element: benzoate. [-o(ic) (as in benzoic) + ...
-ock
a native English suffix of nouns, used to form descriptive names (ruddock, lit., the red one) and diminutives (hillock). [ME -ok, OE -oc, -uc] * * *
-ode
-ode1 a suffix of nouns, appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant "like"; used in the formation of compound words: phyllode. Cf. -oid. [ < Gk -odes, prob. generalized ...
-odon
-odon suff. An animal having a specified kind of teeth: sphenodon.   [New Latin, from Greek odōn, tooth. See dent-. * * *
-odont
a combining form meaning "having teeth" of the kind or number specified by the initial element: diphyodont; selenodont. Cf. -odus. [ < Gk -odont-, s. of -odous or -odon -toothed, ...
-odontia
-odontia suff. The form of, manner of treating, or condition of the teeth: orthodontia. * * *
-odus
var. of -odont, esp. in the names of genera in zoology: ceratodus. [ < NL < Gk -odous; see -ODONT] * * *
-odynia
a combining form meaning "pain," of the kind or in the place specified by the initial element: pododynia. Cf. -algia. [ < NL < Gk, equiv. to odýn(e) pain + -ia -Y3] * * *
-off
a suffixal use of the adverb off, forming nouns that denote competitions, esp. between the finalists of earlier competitions or as a means of deciding a tie: cookoff; playoff; ...
-oholic
var. of -aholic: cokeoholic. * * *
-oic
-oic suff. Containing a carboxyl group or one of its derivatives: decanoic acid.   [-o- + -ic.] * * *
-oid
a suffix meaning "resembling," "like," used in the formation of adjectives and nouns (and often implying an incomplete or imperfect resemblance to what is indicated by the ...
-oidea
a suffix used in the names of zoological classes or entomological superfamilies. [ < NL, pl. of Gk -oeides -OID; see -A1] * * *
-ol
-ol1 a suffix used in the names of chemical derivatives, representing "alcohol" (glycerol; naphthol; phenol), or sometimes "phenol" or less definitely assignable phenol ...
-ola
1. a formative of no precise significance found in a variety of commercial coinages (Crayola; granola; Victrola) and jocular variations of words (crapola). 2. a suffix extracted ...
-ole
-ole1 a suffix found in French loanwords of Latin origin, usually diminutives, and later in adaptations of words borrowed directly from Latin or in Neo-Latin coinages: areole; ...
-ology
-ology [äl′ə jē] 〚initial medial -O- + -LOGY〛 combining form -LOGY * * * -ology suff. Variant of -logy. * * *
-oma
pl. -omas, -omata. a noun suffix used to form names of tumors, of the kind specified by the base: fibroma; melanoma. [prob. extracted from CARCINOMA or SARCOMA] * * *
-ome
-ome suff. Mass: biome.   [New Latin -ōma, -ōmat-, from Greek, n. suff.] * * *
-on
-on1 a suffix used in the names of subatomic particles (gluon; meson; neutron), quanta (graviton), and other minimal entities or components (cistron; codon; magneton; ...
-one
a suffix used in the names of ketones and analogous chemical compounds: lactone; quinone. [perh. < Gk -one fem. patronymic] * * *
-onic
a suffix used in forming names of acids, esp. carboxylic acids obtained by oxidation of aldoses: gluconic acid. [perh. generalized from lactonic acid as trans. of G Lactonsäure; ...
-onium
Chem. a suffix used in the names of complex cations: oxonium. [extracted from AMMONIUM] * * *
-ont
-ont suff. Cell; organism: -biont.   [From Greek ōn, ont- present participle of einai, to be. See es-. * * *
-onym
a combining form of Greek origin, meaning "word," "name": pseudonym. [ult. < Gk -onymos having the kind of name specified, comb. form repr. ónyma, dial. var. of ÓNOMA NAME] * * ...
-onymy
-onymy suff. A set of names; the study of a kind of names: toponymy.   [Greek -ōnumiā, from -ōnumos, having a specified kind of name, from onuma, name. See nō̆-men-. * * *
-oon
a suffix occurring in words borrowed from French and other Romance languages (bassoon; balloon; dragoon; pontoon), and on this model occasionally used in the formation of new ...
-opia
a combining form occurring in compound words denoting a condition of sight or of the visual organs: diplopia; hemeralopia; myopia. Also, -opsia. [ < Gk -opia, akin to opé view, ...
-opsia
var. of -opia: hemianopsia. Also, -opsy2. * * *
-opsis
a combining form meaning "likeness," used esp. in the names of living organisms and organic structures that resemble the thing named by the initial element: coreopsis. [ < Gk ...
-opsy
-opsy1 a combining form occurring in compound words denoting a medical examination or inspection: biopsy; necropsy. [generalized from AUTOPSY] -opsy2 var. of -opsia: ...
-opy
var. of -opia. * * *
-or
-or1 a suffix occurring in loanwords from Latin, directly or through Anglo-French, usually denoting a condition or property of things or persons, sometimes corresponding to ...
-orama
a combining form extracted from panorama, diorama, or cyclorama, occurring as the final element in compounds, often nonce words used in advertising or journalism. Though the ...
-orexia
a combining form meaning "desire," "appetite," as specified by the initial element: anorexia. [ < Gk -orexia. See OREXIS, -IA] * * *
-orial
a suffix used to form adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -tor or -tory2: gladiatorial; purgatorial. [ME -oriale. See -OR2, -ORY2, -AL1] * * *
-ory
-ory1 an adjective-forming suffix, joined to bases of Latin origin in imitation of borrowed Latin words containing the suffix -tory1 (and its alternant -sory): excretory; ...
-ose
-ose1 a suffix occurring in adjectives borrowed from Latin, meaning "full of," "abounding in," "given to," "like": frondose; globose; jocose; otiose; verbose. [ < L -osus. ...
-osis
a suffix occurring in nouns that denote actions, conditions, or states (hypnosis; leukocytosis; osmosis), esp. disorders or abnormal states (chlorosis; neurofibromatosis; ...
-osity
-osity [äs′ə tē] 〚< Fr or L: Fr -osité < L -ositas: see -OSE2, -ITY〛 suffix forming nouns the quality of being (as specified): corresponds to -OSE2, -OUS * * *

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