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marblecake
marble cake n. A cake with a streaked or mottled appearance achieved by mixing light and dark batter. * * *
marbled
marbled [mär′bəld] adj. 1. covered in marble or characterized by the use of marble 2. mottled or streaked like marble 3. having fat evenly distributed in narrow streaks: said ...
marbled cat
▪ mammal       (species Felis marmorata), rare Southeast Asian cat, family Felidae, often referred to as a miniature version of the unrelated clouded leopard. The ...
marbled pottery
▪ ware       a type of ware obtained by mixing clays of various colours to imitate natural marbles or agate. The working of marbled pottery can be traced back at least ...
Marblehead
/mahr"beuhl head', mahr'beuhl hed"/, n. a resort in NE Massachusetts: yachting. 20,126. * * * Town (pop., 2000: 20,377), northeastern Massachusetts, U.S. Its harbour is ...
marbleize
—marbleization, n. /mahr"beuh luyz'/, v.t., marbleized, marbleizing. marble. Also, marbelize; esp. Brit., marbleise. [1865-75, Amer.; MARBLE + -IZE] * * *
marblewood
/mahr"beuhl wood'/, n. 1. any of several trees having wood somewhat resembling marble in graining or texture, as Diospyros marmorata, of southern Asia, or Olea paniculata, of ...
marbling
/mahr"bling/, n. 1. the act, process, or art of coloring or staining in imitation of variegated marble. 2. an appearance like that of variegated marble. 3. the intermixture of ...
marbly
/mahr"blee/, adj. like marble in appearance, hardness, coldness, etc. [1400-50; late ME; see MARBLE, -Y1] * * *
Marbot, Jean-Baptiste-Antoine-Marcelin, baron de
▪ French general born Aug. 18, 1782, Altillac, Fr. died Nov. 16, 1854, Paris       general and author of memoirs of the Napoleonic period, whose book on war, Remarques ...
Marburg
/mahrdd"boorddk/; Eng. /mahr"berrg/, n. 1. a city in central Germany. 75,092. 2. German name of Maribor. * * * ▪ Germany in full  Marburg an der Lahn        city, ...
Marburg disease
Pathol. a viral disease producing a severe and often fatal illness with fever, rash, diarrhea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal bleeding, transmitted to humans through contact with ...
Marburg, Colloquy of
▪ European history       important debate on the Lord's Supper held in Marburg, Germany, on October 1–4, 1529, between the Reformers of Germany and Switzerland. It was ...
Marburg, Philipps University of
▪ university, Marburg, Germany German  Philipps-universität Marburg,         coeducational institution of higher learning at Marburg, Ger. Marburg was the first ...
Marburgvirus
Mar·burg virus (märʹbûrg') n. A filovirus causing an acute, often fatal hemorrhagic disease that was originally transmitted to humans from green monkeys.   [After Marburg, ...
Marbury v Madison
an important US Supreme Court case in 1803 which established its right to decide if a new law is illegal under the American Constitution. William Marbury had taken Secretary of ...
Marbury v. Madison
(1803) First decision of the Supreme Court of the United States to declare an act of Congress unconstitutional, thus establishing the doctrine of judicial review. In 1801 newly ...
Marbury, Elisabeth
▪ American theatrical and literary agent born June 19, 1856, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 22, 1933, New York City       American theatrical and literary agent who ...
Marbut, Curtis Fletcher
▪ American geologist born July 19, 1863, Verona, Missouri, U.S. died August 25, 1935, Harbin, China       American geologist and authority on soils who worked closely ...
marc
/mahrk/; Fr. /mannrdd/, n. 1. the grapes contained in the wine press and the residue, as skins and pips, remaining after the juice is expressed. 2. (in France) the brandy ...
Marc
/mahrk/; for 1 also Ger. /mahrddk/, n. 1. Franz /frddahnts/, 1880-1916, German painter. 2. a male given name, form of Marcus. * * * (as used in expressions) Beliveau Jean Marc ...
MARC
/mahrk/, n. Library Science. a standardized system developed by the Library of Congress for producing and transmitting machine-readable bibliographic records. [ma(chine) ...
Marc Antony
/mahrk/. See Antony, Mark. * * *
Marc, Franz
born Feb. 8, 1880, Munich, Ger. killed in action March 4, 1916, near Verdun, France German painter. His early works were academic, but exposure to Impressionism and Jugendstil ...
Marc,Franz
Marc (märk), Franz. 1880-1928. German painter whose early expressionist works, such as Blue Horses (1911), featured intensely colored, mystical depictions of animals. His later ...
Marca
▪ Somalia also spelled  Marka, Merca, or Merka,         port city, southern Somalia, on the Indian Ocean, about 45 miles (70 km) southwest of Mogadishu, the national ...
Marca-Relli, Conrad
▪ 2001 Corrado Marcarelli        American artist (b. June 5, 1913, Boston, Mass.—d. Aug. 29, 2000, Parma, Italy), was said to have raised the status of collage to ...
Marcabru
▪ Gascon poet-musician also spelled  Marcabrun   born c. 1130–48       Gascon poet-musician and the earliest exponent of the trobar clus, an allusive and ...
Marcan
/mahr"keuhn/, adj. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of St. Mark or of the second Gospel. Also, Markan. [1900-05; < L Marc(us) MARK + -AN] * * *
Marcantonio
/mahr'kan toh"nee oh/; It. /mahrdd'kahn taw"nyaw/, n. See Raimondi, Marcantonio. * * *
marcasite
—marcasitical /mahr'keuh sit"i keuhl/, adj. /mahr"keuh suyt'/, n. 1. a common mineral, iron disulfide, FeS2, chemically similar to pyrite but crystallizing in the orthorhombic ...
marcasitical
See marcasite. * * *
marcato
/mahr kah"toh/; It. /mahrdd kah"taw/, adj. (of notes or chords in a musical score) strongly accented. [1830-40; < It: marked] * * *
Marceau
/mahr soh"/; Fr. /mannrdd soh"/, n. Marcel /mahr sel"/; Fr. /mannrdd sel"/, born 1923, French actor and pantomimist. * * *
Marceau, François-Séverin
▪ French general in full  François-Séverin Marceau-Desgraviers   born March 1, 1769, Chartres, France died September 21, 1796, Altenkirchen, Rhenish Palatinate ...
Marceau, Marcel
born March 22, 1923, Strasbourg, France French mime. After serving in World War II, he studied with the pantomimist Étienne Decroux and had his first success in the role of ...
Marceau,Marcel
Mar·ceau (mär-sōʹ), Marcel. Born 1923. French mime whose most famous character is Bip, a sad-faced clown. * * *
marcel
—marceller, n. /mahr sel"/, v., marcelled, marcelling, n. v.t. 1. to wave (the hair) by means of special irons, producing the effect of regular, continuous waves (marcel ...
Marcel
/mahr sel"/; Fr. /mannrdd sel"/, n. 1. Gabriel /gann brddee el"/, 1887-1973, French philosopher, dramatist, and critic. 2. a male given name. * * * (as used in ...
Marcel, Étienne
▪ French revolutionary born c. 1316 died July 31, 1358, Paris       bourgeois leader, a clothier and provost of the merchants of Paris, who played a major part in the ...
Marcel, Gabriel
▪ French philosopher and author Introduction born December 7, 1889, Paris died October 8, 1973, Paris  philosopher, dramatist, and critic, usually regarded as the first ...
Marcel, Gabriel (-Honoré)
born Dec. 7, 1889, Paris, France died Oct. 8, 1973, Paris French philosopher, dramatist, and critic. His philosophical works explore aspects of human existence (e.g., trust, ...
marcella
/mahr sel"euh/, n. a cotton or linen fabric constructed in pique weave, used in the manufacture of vests, mats, etc. [1805-15; alter. of MARSEILLES] * * *
Marcella
/mahr sel"euh/, n. a female given name. * * *
Marcellinus
/mahr'seuh luy"neuhs/, n. Saint, died A.D. 304, pope 296-304. * * *
Marcellinus, Saint
▪ pope born , Rome? died October 304, Rome; feast day June 2       pope probably from 291/296 to 304, although the dates of his reign, as well as those of his ...
Marcello
/mahrdd chel"law/, n. Benedetto /be'ne det"taw/, 1686-1739, Italian composer. * * *
Marcello, Benedetto
▪ Italian composer born June 24 or July 24, 1686, Venice died July 24, 1739, Brescia, Rep. of Venice       Italian composer and writer, especially remembered for two ...
Marcellus
/mahr sel"euhs/, n. Marcus Claudius, 268?-208 B.C., Roman general and consul. * * * (as used in expressions) Cassius Marcellus Clay Clay Cassius Marcellus Marcellus Marcus ...
Marcellus I
died A.D. 309, pope 308-309. * * *
Marcellus I, Saint
▪ pope born , Rome died 309; feast day January 16       pope from December 306 to January 308 or from May or June 308 to Jan. 16, 309. He succeeded St. Marcellinus ...
Marcellus II
(Marcello Cervini) 1501-55, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1555. * * * ▪ pope original name  Marcello Cervini   born May 6, 1501, Montepulciano, Tuscany died May 1, 1555, ...
Marcellus, Marcus Claudius
I born 42 died 23 BC, Baiae, Campania [Italy] Roman leader. Nephew of Augustus (he was the son of Augustus's sister Octavia), Marcellus was Augustus's presumed heir. He married ...
Marcellus, Theatre of
▪ monument, Rome, Italy       in Rome, building begun by Julius Caesar (Caesar, Julius) and completed by Augustus in 13 BC. It was dedicated in the name of Augustus's ...
Marcellus,Marcus Claudius
Mar·cel·lus (mär-sĕlʹəs), Marcus Claudius. 268?-208B.C. Roman general who in the Second Punic War took Syracuse (212) and Capua (211). * * *
marcescent
—marcescence, n. /mahr ses"euhnt/, adj. Bot. withering but not falling off, as a part of a plant. [1720-30; < L marcescent-, s. of marcescens (prp. of marcescere to wither, ...
march
march1 /mahrch/, v.i. 1. to walk with regular and measured tread, as soldiers on parade; advance in step in an organized body. 2. to walk in a stately, deliberate manner. 3. to ...
March
/mahrch/, n. the third month of the year, containing 31 days. Abbr.: Mar. [bef. 1050; ME March(e) < AF Marche; r. OE Martius < L, short for Martius mensis month of Mars (Marti-, ...
March First Movement
▪ Korean history also called  Samil Independence Movement,         series of demonstrations for Korean national independence from Japan that began on March 1, 1919, ...
March fly
any of several flies of the family Bibionidae that appear during spring and early summer. [1890-95, Amer.] * * * ▪ insect       any member of a family of stout insects ...
march fracture
Pathol. See under stress fracture. * * *
March hare
March hare n. a hare in breeding time, proverbially regarded as an example of madness * * *
March Laws
Reform measures enacted by the Hungarian Diet in 1848 (see Revolutions of 1848) that sought to create a modern national Magyar state. The program, presented to the Diet by ...
March Madness
▪ basketball  informal term that refers to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's and women's basketball championship tournaments and the ...
March of Dimes
a US charity that works to prevent the deaths of babies and to help young children born with physical problems. Its full name is the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. ...
March of Time
a series of US news films shown in cinemas from 1935 to 1951. They were produced by the company that owned Time magazine and were one of the main sources of news on film before ...
March on Washington
▪ United States history in full  March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom    political demonstration held in Washington, D.C. (Washington), in 1963 by civil rights (civil ...
March, Ausias
▪ Catalan poet born 1397, Valencia, Spain died 1459, Valencia  first major poet to write in Catalan (Catalan literature), whose verse greatly influenced other poets both of ...
March, Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of, 3rd Earl Of Ulster
▪ English noble born Nov. 6, 1391, New Forest, Hampshire, Eng. died Jan. 19, 1425, Ulster, Ire.       friend of the Lancastrian king Henry V and an unwilling royal ...
March, Francis Andrew
▪ American scholar and lexicographer born , Oct. 25, 1825, Millbury, Mass., U.S. died Sept. 9, 1911, Easton, Pa.       American language scholar and lexicographer who ...
March, Frederic
orig. Frederick Ernest McIntyre Bickel born Aug. 31, 1897, Racine, Wis., U.S. died April 14, 1975, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. actor. He began acting on Broadway, and his parody ...
March, Fredric
▪ American actor original name  Frederick Ernest McIntyre Bickel  born August 31, 1897, Racine, Wis., U.S. died April 14, 1975, Los Angeles, Calif.       versatile ...
March, Patrick Dunbar, 2nd Earl of, 9th Earl Of Dunbar
▪ Scottish noble born 1285 died 1369       Scottish noble prominent during the reigns of the Bruces Robert I and David II.       He gave refuge to Edward II of ...
March, Peyton Conway
▪ United States Army officer born Dec. 27, 1864, Easton, Pa. died April 13, 1955, Washington, D.C.  U.S. Army officer who, as chief of staff (1918—21), reorganized and ...
March, Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of, 8th Baron Of Wigmore
▪ English noble born 1287? died Nov. 29, 1330, Tyburn, near London, Eng.       lover of the English king Edward II's (Edward II) queen, Isabella Of France, with whom ...
March, Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of
▪ English noble born November 11, 1328, Ludlow, Shropshire, England died February 26, 1360, Rouvray, near Avallon, Burgundy [now in France]       a leading supporter of ...
march-order
/mahrch"awr'deuhr/, v.t. Mil. to prepare (personnel, arms, and equipment) for a march. [1530-40] * * *
march-past
/mahrch"past', -pahst'/, n. a parade or procession, esp. of troops past a reviewing stand. [1875-80; n. use of v. phrase march past] * * *
March.
Marchioness. * * *
Marchais, Georges
▪ French politician in full  Georges-René-Louis Marchais  born June 7, 1920, La Hoguette, France died November 16, 1997, Paris       French politician, leader of the ...
Marchand, Jean
born Dec. 20, 1918, Champlain, Que., Can. died Aug. 28, 1988, Saint-Augustin, Que. Canadian politician. After graduating from Laval University, he became a prominent union ...
Marchand, Jean-Baptiste
▪ French soldier and explorer born Nov. 22, 1863, Thoissey, France died Jan. 13, 1934, Paris  French soldier and explorer known for his occupation of Fashoda (Fashoda ...
Marchand, Nancy
▪ 2001       American actress (b. June 19, 1928, Buffalo, N.Y.—d. June 18, 2000, Stratford, Conn.), was an award-winning actress whose work on television—most ...
marchandde vin sauce
mar·chand de vin sauce (mär-shäɴʹ də văɴʹ) n. A rich, buttery sauce made with onions, brown gravy, and red wine and served especially with steaks and roasts.   [French ...
Marchantia
▪ plant genus       genus of liverworts (creeping ribbonlike plants) in the order Marchantiales, commonly found on moist clay or silty soils, especially on recently ...
Marche
/mahrdd"ke/, n. Le, Italian name of The Marches. * * * I Historic region, central France. Once part of Limousin, it was made a separate frontier countship (march) in the 10th ...
Marche, Antoine-Alfred
▪ French naturalist born Feb. 15, 1844, Boulogne, Fr. died 1898, Paris       naturalist, explorer, and collector of ethnological artifacts in Africa and the Philippine ...
Märchen
Märchen [mer′Hən] n. pl. Märchen 〚Ger〛 a story or tale; esp., a fairy tale or folk tale * * * Mär·chen (mĕrʹKHən) n. pl. Märchen A folktale or fairy ...
Marchena Island
▪ island, Pacific Ocean       one of the smaller (area 45 sq mi [117 sq km]) of the Galápagos Islands, in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 600 mi (965 km) west of Ecuador. ...
marcher
marcher1 /mahr"cheuhr/, n. a person who marches on foot: a line of marchers. [1605-15; MARCH1 + -ER1] marcher2 /mahr"cheuhr/, n. Hist. an inhabitant of, or an officer or lord ...
Marches
/mahr"chiz/, n. The, a region in central Italy, bordering the Adriatic. 1,397,892; 3743 sq. mi. (9695 sq. km). Italian, Le Marche. * * *
marchesa
/mahr kay"zeuh/; It. /mahrdd ke"zah/, n., pl. marchese /-zay/; It. /-ze/. 1. an Italian noblewoman, equivalent in rank to a marquise. 2. the wife or widow of a ...
marchese
/mahr kay"zay/; It. /mahrdd ke"ze/, n., pl. marchesi /-zee/. an Italian nobleman, equivalent in rank to a marquis. [1510-20; < It; see MARQUIS] * * *
Marcheshvan
Seph. Heb. /mahrdd khesh vahn"/; Ashk. Heb. /mahrdd khesh"vahn/; Eng. /mar khesh"veuhn, -hesh"-/, n. Heshvan. * * *
Marchesi de Castrone, Mathilde
▪ German singer and teacher née  Mathilde Graumann   born March 24, 1821, Frankfurt am Main died Nov. 17, 1913, London       operatic soprano whose teaching ...
marching orders
1. Mil. orders to begin a march or other troop movement. 2. Informal. a. orders to start out, move on, proceed, etc.: We're just sitting by the phone, awaiting our marching ...
marching season
n the period in July and August every year when Protestant groups in Northern Ireland, especially the Order of Orangemen, hold marches through the streets. These celebrate ...
Marching Through Georgia
a lively US song about the violent progress of General William Tecumseh Sherman and his army through Georgia during the Civil War in November 1864. The words after each verse ...
marchingorders
march·ing orders (märʹchĭng) pl.n. Orders to move on or depart. * * *
marchioness
/mahr"sheuh nis, mahr'sheuh nes"/, n. Brit. marquise (defs. 1, 2). [1770-80; < ML marchionissa, equiv. to marchion- (s. of marchio) MARQUIS + -issa -ESS] Usage. See -ess. * * *
marchland
/mahrch"land', -leuhnd/, n. borderland. [1540-50; MARCH2 + LAND] * * *
marchpane
/mahrch"payn'/, n. marzipan. [1485-95; < F, dial. var. of MASSEPAIN, MARCEPAIN < It marzapane, orig. sugar-candy box, perh. < Ar mawthaban a seated king] * * *
Marcia
/mahr"sheuh/, n. a female given name: from a Latin word meaning "warlike." * * *
Marcian
/mahr"sheuhn/, n. A.D. 392?-457, emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire 450-457. Also, Marcianus /mahr'shee ay"neuhs, mahr'see-/. * * * ▪ Roman emperor Latin  Marcianus  born ...
Marciano
/mahr'see ah"noh, -an"oh/, n. Rocky (Rocco Francis Marchegiano), 1924-69, U.S. boxer: world heavyweight champion 1952-56. * * *
Marciano, Rocky
orig. Rocco Francis Marchegiano born Sept. 1, 1923, Brockton, Mass., U.S. died Aug. 31, 1969, near Newton, Ia. U.S. boxer and world heavyweight champion. Marciano began boxing ...
Marciano,Rocco Francis
Mar·ci·a·no (mär'sē-äʹnō), Rocco Francis. Known as “Rocky.” 1924-1969. American boxer who won the world heavyweight championship in 1952 and defended it six times. ...
Marcie
/mahr"see/, n. a female given name, form of Marcia. * * *
Marcinkus, Paul Casimir
▪ 2007       American archbishop (b. Jan. 15, 1922, Cicero, Ill.—d. Feb. 20, 2006, Sun City, Ariz.), was embroiled in a banking scandal during his tenure as president ...
Marcion
/mahr"sheuhn, -shee euhn, -see euhn/, n. A.D. c100-c160, Christian Gnostic. * * *
Marcionism
/mahr"sheuh niz'euhm/, n. the doctrines and principles of the Marcionites. [1880-85; MARCION + -ISM] * * *
Marcionite
/mahr"sheuh nuyt'/, n. 1. a member of a Gnostic ascetic sect that flourished from the 2nd to 7th century A.D. and that rejected the Old Testament and denied the incarnation of ...
Marcks, Gerhard
▪ German artist born February 18, 1889, Berlin, Germany died November 13, 1981, Cologne, West Germany [now Germany]       German sculptor, printmaker, and designer who ...
Marco
(as used in expressions) Francesco di Marco di Giacomo Raibolini Marco Polo Bridge Incident Polo Marco San Marco Basilica * * *
Marco Polo
/mahr"koh poh"loh/. See Polo, Marco. * * *
Marco Polo Bridge Incident
Conflict in 1937 between Chinese and Japanese troops near the Marco Polo Bridge outside Beijing. The incident was a culmination of the growing tensions between the two ...
Marcomanni
—Marcomannic /mahr'koh man"ik/, adj. /mahr'koh man"uy/, n. (used with a pl. v.) an ancient Germanic people who lived in central Europe. * * * ▪ people also spelled ...
Marconi
/mahr koh"nee/; It. /mahrdd kaw"nee/, n. Guglielmo /gooh lyel"maw/, Marchese, 1874-1937, Italian electrical engineer and inventor, esp. in the field of wireless telegraphy: Nobel ...
Marconi mast
Naut. 1. an elaborately stayed mast. 2. Obs. a mast for a radio antenna. [after G. MARCONI] * * *
Marconi plc
➡ Marconi (I) * * *
Marconi rig
—Marconi-rigged, adj. Naut. a rig of triangular sails for a yacht. Also called Bermuda rig, Bermudan rig, Bermudian rig. [1915-20; after G. MARCONI] * * *
Marconi, Guglielmo
born April 25, 1874, Bologna, Italy died July 20, 1937, Rome Italian physicist and inventor. He began experimenting with radio waves in 1894. In 1896 he went to England, where ...
Marconi,Guglielmo
Mar·co·ni (mär-kōʹnē), Guglielmo. 1874-1937. Italian engineer and inventor who in 1901 transmitted long-wave radio signals across the Atlantic Ocean. He shared the 1909 ...
marconigram
/mahr koh"ni gram'/, n. Older Use. a radiogram. Also, Marconigram. [1900-05; MARCONI + -GRAM1] * * *
Marconirig
Marconi rig n. See Bermuda rig.   [After Marconi, Guglielmo(probably from its resemblance to the early antennas used by him for his wireless telegraphy).] * * *
MarcoPolo
Mar·co Po·lo (märʹkō pōʹlō) See Polo, Marco. * * *
Marcos
/mahr"kohs/, n. Ferdinand E(dralin) /ed"reuh lin/, born 1917, Philippine political leader: president 1965-86. * * * (as used in expressions) Castillo de San Marcos National ...
Marcos, Ferdinand (Edralin)
born Sept. 11, 1917, Sarrat, Phil. died Sept. 28, 1989, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S. Philippine head of state (1966–86). The son of a politician, he practiced as a trial lawyer ...
Marcos, Ferdinand E.
▪ ruler of Philippines in full  Ferdinand Edralin Marcos   born Sept. 11, 1917, Sarrat, Phil. died Sept. 28, 1989, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.       Philippine lawyer and ...
Marcos, Subcomandante
▪ 1996       On Feb. 9, 1995, Mexico's Pres. Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de León broke a cease-fire and ordered thousands of Mexican troops into the area of Chiapas state ...
Marcos,Ferdinand Edralin
Mar·cos (märʹkōs), Ferdinand Edralin. 1917-1989. Philippine president (1965-1986) who maintained close ties with the United States and exercised dictatorial control over his ...
Marcq-en-Baroeul
▪ town, France       town, Nord département, Nord-Pas-de-Calais région, northern France. It is a part of the Lille-Roubaix-Tourcoing urban complex. Its diversified ...
Marcus
/mahr"keuhs/, n. 1. Saint. Also, Mark. died A.D. 336, pope 336. 2. a male given name. [ < L Marcus < *mawortkos pertaining to *Mawort-s MARS] * * * (as used in ...
Marcus Aurelius
/aw ree"lee euhs, aw reel"yeuhs/, (Marcus Annius Verus) A.D. 121-180, Stoic philosopher and writer: emperor of Rome 161-180. Also called Marcus Aurelius Antoninus /an'teuh ...
Marcus Baker,Mount
Marcus Baker, Mount A peak, 4,018.7 m (13,176 ft) high, in the Chugach Mountains of southeast Alaska. It is the highest elevation in the range. * * *
Marcus Garvey
➡ Garvey * * *
Marcus, Jacob Rader
▪ 1996       U.S. Jewish historian who published his findings in hundreds of books and articles and was both a teacher and a father figure to some 2,000 rabbinical ...
Marcus, Rudolph A.
born July 21, 1923, Montreal, Que., Can. Canadian-born U.S. chemist. Educated at McGill University, he worked at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (from 1951), the ...
Marcus, Siegfried
▪ German inventor born Sept. 18, 1831, Malchin, Mecklenburg [Germany] died June 30, 1898, Vienna, Austria       inventor who built four of the world's earliest ...
Marcus, Stanley
▪ 2003       American businessman (b. April 20, 1905, Dallas, Texas—d. Jan. 22, 2002, Dallas), worked his way up to president (1950–72) and chairman of the board ...
MarcusAurelius Antoninus
Mar·cus Au·re·li·us An·to·ni·nus (märʹkəs ô-rēʹlē-əs ăn'tə-nīʹnəs), A.D. 121-180. Philosopher and emperor of Rome (161-180). His philosophical autobiography ...
Marcuse
/mahr kooh"zeuh/, n. Herbert, 1898-1979, U.S. political and social philosopher, born in Germany. * * *
Marcuse, Herbert
born July 19, 1898, Berlin died July 29, 1979, Starnberg, Ger. German-U.S. political philosopher. A member of the Frankfurt school, he fled Germany after the Nazi seizure of ...
Marcuse,Herbert
Mar·cu·se (mär-ko͞oʹzə), Herbert. 1898-1979. German-born American political philosopher whose works of social criticism include Eros and Civilization (1955) and ...
Marcy
/mahr"see/, n. 1. Mount, a mountain in NE New York: highest peak of the Adirondack Mountains, 5344 ft. (1629 m). 2. a female given name, form of Marcia. * * * (as used in ...
Marcy, Geoffrey W.
▪ 2001       One day in 1983, American astronomer Geoffrey Marcy announced to colleagues that he planned to search for planets in other solar systems. His fellow ...
Marcy, Mount
▪ mountain, New York, United States       peak in the Adirondack Mountains and the highest point in New York, U.S., reaching an elevation of 5,344 feet (1,629 metres) ...
Marcy, William L
▪ American politician born Dec. 12, 1786, Southbridge, Mass., U.S. died July 4, 1857, Ballston Spa, N.Y.  U.S. politician, governor, and Cabinet member, remembered primarily ...
Marcy, William L(earned)
born Dec. 12, 1786, Southbridge, Mass., U.S. died July 4, 1857, Ballston Spa, N.Y. U.S. politician. From 1823 to 1829 he was comptroller of New York state and a leading member ...
Mardaïte
▪ people Arabic  Jurjumānī,  plural  Jarājima,         member of a Christian people of northern Syria, employed as soldiers by Byzantine emperors. The Mardaïtes ...
Mardals Falls
▪ waterfall, Norway Norwegian  Mardalsfossen        waterfalls at the head of Eikesdalsvatnet (lake), east-southeast of Åndalsnes, Nor. The falls consisted of two ...
Mardān
▪ Pakistan       town and district in Peshāwar division, North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan. The town, the district headquarters, lies just north of the Kalpāni ...
Mardel Plata
Mar del Pla·ta (mär' dĕl pläʹtə, -tä) A city of east-central Argentina on the Atlantic Ocean south-southeast of Buenos Aires. It is a popular resort with a fishing ...
Marden, Brice
▪ American artist born Oct. 15, 1938, Bronxville, N.Y., U.S.       American artist whose spare and subtle paintings of the 1960s helped define minimalist painting ...
Marden, Luis
▪ 2004 Annibale Luigi Paragallo        American photographer, writer, and explorer (b. Jan. 25, 1913, Chelsea, Mass.—d. March 3, 2003, Arlington, Va.), discovered the ...
Mardersteig, Giovanni
▪ Italian printer original name  Hans Mardersteig   born Jan. 8, 1892, Weimar, Ger. died Dec. 27, 1977, Verona, Italy       printer and typographer who, as head of ...
Mardi Gras
/mahr"dee grah', grah"/ 1. the day before Lent, celebrated in some cities, as New Orleans and Paris, as a day of carnival and merrymaking; Shrove Tuesday. 2. a pre-Lenten ...
MardiGras
Mar·di Gras (märʹdē gräʹ) n. 1. a. Shrove Tuesday, celebrated as a holiday in many places with carnivals, masquerade balls, and parades of costumed merrymakers. b. A ...
Mardin
▪ Turkey       city, capital of Mardin il (province), southeastern Turkey. It lies on the southern slopes of a broad highland that rises to an elevation of 3,450 feet ...
Mardin, Arif
▪ 2007       Turkish-born American popular music producer and record-company executive (b. March 15, 1932, Istanbul, Turkey—d. June 25, 2006, New York, N.Y.), as a ...
Mardonius
▪ Persian general died 479 BC, Plataea, Boeotia       Achaemenid general, a nephew of King Darius I and married to Darius' daughter Artazostra. In 492 BC he was sent ...
Marduk
/mahr"dook/, n. Babylonian Relig. the chief of the Babylonian deities. Also, Merodach. Also called Baal Merodach. * * * or Bel In Mesopotamian religion, the chief god of the ...
mare
mare1 /mair/, n. a fully mature female horse or other equine animal. [bef. 900; ME, var. of mere, OE m(i)ere; c. D merrie, G Mähre, ON merr; akin to OE mearh, ON marr, Ir marc ...
Mare Acidalium
/mahr"ay as'i dal"ee euhm, mair"ee/ (Sea of Venus) an area in the northern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Australe
/aw stral"ee, -stray"lee/ (Southern Sea) an area near the south pole of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Boreum
/bawr"ee euhm, bohr"-/ (Northern Sea) an area near the north pole of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Chronium
/kroh"nee euhm/ an area in the southern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Cimmerium
/si mear"ee euhm/ (Cimmerian Sea) an area in the southern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
mare clausum
/mair"ee klaw"seuhm, mahr"ay/; Lat. /mah"rdde klow"soom/ a body of navigable water under the sole jurisdiction of a nation. Cf. mare liberum. [1645-55; < L: closed sea] * * *
Mare Crisium
/mahr"ay kree"see euhm, mair"ee/ (Sea of Crises) a dark plain in the first quadrant of the face of the moon: about 66,000 sq. mi. (170,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Erythraeum
/er'i three"euhm/ (Red Sea) an area in the southern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Fecunditatis
/fay koon'di tah"tis, fee-/ (Sea of Fertility) a dark plain in the fourth quadrant and extending into the first quadrant of the face of the moon: about 160,000 sq. mi. (415,000 ...
Mare Frigoris
/fri gawr"is, -gohr"-/ (Sea of Cold) a dark plain in the northern hemisphere, in the first and second quadrants of the face of the moon: about 55 mi. (90 km) wide at its ...
Mare Humorum
/hyooh"meuhr euhm, hyooh mawr"-, -mohr"-/ (Sea of Moisture) a dark plain in the third quadrant of the face of the moon: about 45,000 sq. mi. (117,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Imbrium
/im"bree euhm/ (Sea of Showers) a dark plain in the second quadrant of the face of the moon: about 340,000 sq. mi. (880,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Island
/mair/ an island in the N part of San Francisco Bay, California. * * * ▪ island, New Caledonia formerly  Nengone Island         southernmost of the Loyalty Islands, ...
mare liberum
/mair"ee lib"euhr euhm, mahr"ay/; Lat. /mah"rdde lee"be rddoom'/ a body of navigable water to which all nations have unrestricted access. Cf. mare clausum. [1645-55; < L: free ...
Mare Nectaris
/mahr"ay nek tahr"is, mair"ee/ (Sea of Nectar) a dark plain in the fourth quadrant of the face of the moon: about 26,000 sq. mi. (67,000 sq. km). * * *
mare nostrum
/mah"rdde nohs"trddoom/; Eng. /mair"ee nos"treuhm, mahr"ay/, Latin. our sea, esp. the Mediterranean to the ancient Romans. * * *
Mare Nubium
/mahr"ay nooh"bee euhm, nyooh"-, mair"ee/ (Sea of Clouds) a dark plain in the third quadrant of the face of the moon: about 95,000 sq. mi. (245,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Serenitatis
/seuh ren'i tah"tis/ (Sea of Serenity) a dark plain in the first quadrant of the face of the moon: about 120,000 sq. mi. (310,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Sirenum
/si ree"neuhm/ (Sea of Sirens) an area in the southern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Tranquillitatis
/trang kwil'i tah"tis/ (Sea of Tranquillity) a dark plain in the first quadrant of the face of the moon: about 110,000 sq. mi. (285,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Tyrrhenum
/ti ree"neuhm/ (Tyrrhenian Sea) an area in the southern hemisphere of Mars, appearing as a dark region when viewed telescopically from the earth. * * *
Mare Undarum
/un dahr"euhm/ (Sea of Waves) a dark plain in the first quadrant of the face of the moon: about 4800 sq. mi. (12,000 sq. km). * * *
Mare Vaporum
/vay pawr"euhm, -pohr"-/ (Sea of Vapors) a dark plain in the first quadrant and near the center of the face of the moon: about 39,000 sq. mi. (101,000 sq. km). * * *
mare's-nest
/mairz"nest'/, n. 1. something imagined to be an extraordinary discovery but proving to be a delusion or a hoax: The announced cure for the disease was merely another ...
mare's-tail
/mairz"tayl'/, n. 1. a long narrow cirrus cloud whose flowing appearance somewhat resembles a horse's tail. 2. an erect, aquatic, Old World plant, Hippuris vulgaris, having ...
mare'snest
mare's nest (mârz) n. pl. mare's nests or mares' nests 1. A hoax or fraud. 2. An extraordinarily complicated situation. * * *
Marechal, Leopoldo
▪ Argentine author born June 11, 1900, Buenos Aires died , September, 1970, Buenos Aires       Argentine writer and critic who was best known for his philosophical ...
Maréchal, Pierre-Sylvain
▪ French poet born August 15, 1750, Paris, France died January 18, 1803, Montrouge       French poet, playwright, and publicist whose plan for a secular calendar, ...
Marechera, Dambudzo
▪ Zimbabwean author born 1952, Rusape, Southern Rhodesia [now Zimbabwe] died Aug. 18, 1987, Harare, Zimbabwe       Zimbabwean novelist who won critical acclaim for his ...
mareclausum
ma·re clau·sum (mäʹrā klouʹsəm, klôʹ-) n. A navigable body of water, such as a sea, that is under the jurisdiction of one nation and closed to all others.   [New Latin ...
Mareeba
▪ Queensland, Australia       town, northeastern Queensland, Australia, on the Barron River, 40 miles (65 km) west of the port of Cairns on the Coral Sea. It was the ...
Marées, Hans von
▪ German painter born Dec. 24, 1837, Elberfeld, Prussia died June 5, 1887, Rome       painter of the so-called Idealist school in Germany.       In 1853 Marées ...
Marek's disease
/mar"iks, mahr"-/, Vet. Pathol. a contagious cancerous disease of poultry, caused by a herpesvirus and characterized by proliferation of lymphoid cells and paralysis of a limb or ...
mareliberum
ma·re li·be·rum (mäʹrā lēʹbə-ro͝om') n. A navigable body of water, such as a sea, that is open to navigation by vessels of all nations.   [New Latin mare līberum: ...
maremma
/meuh rem"euh/, n., pl. maremme /-rem"ee/. 1. a marshy region near the seashore, esp. in Italy. 2. the miasma associated with such a region. [1825-35; < It < L maritima, fem. of ...
Marengo
/meuh reng"goh/; for 1 also It. /mah rddeng"gaw/, n., pl. Marengos for 2, adj. n. 1. a village in Piedmont, in NW Italy: Napoleon defeated the Austrians 1800. 2. a former gold ...
Marengo, Battle of
(June 14, 1800) Narrow victory for Napoleon against Austria in the Napoleonic Wars, fought on the Marengo Plain in northern Italy. The initial French force was overpowered, but ...
marennes
      popular edible variety of oyster (q.v.). * * *
marenostrum
ma·re nos·trum (mäʹrā nōʹstrəm) n. A navigable body of water, such as a sea, that is under the jurisdiction of one nation or that is shared by two or more ...
Marenzio, Luca
born 1553, Coccaglio, near Brescia, Republic of Venice died Aug. 22, 1599, Rome Italian composer. He was probably trained as a choirboy in Brescia, and he was in service with ...
mareograph
/mar"ee euh graf', -grahf'/, n. Oceanog. marigraph. * * *
mares of Diomedes
/mairz/, Class. Myth. wild mares owned by Diomedes, a Thracian king, who fed them on human flesh: captured by Hercules in fulfillment of one of his labors. * * *
Maret, Hugues-Bernard, Duc De Bassano
▪ French diplomat born May 1, 1763, Dijon, Fr. died May 13, 1839, Paris       French diplomat and statesman of the Napoleonic period.       A journalist in the ...
Marett, Robert R.
▪ British anthropologist in full  Robert Ranulph Marett  born June 13, 1866, Jersey, Channel Islands died Feb. 18, 1943       English social anthropologist who, like ...
Marey, Étienne-Jules
▪ French physiologist born March 5, 1830, Beaune, Fr. died May 15, 1904, Paris  French physiologist who invented the sphygmograph, an instrument for recording graphically the ...
marezzo
/meuh ret"soh/, n. an imitation marble composed of Keene's cement, fiber, and coloring matter. [1900-05; < It, deriv. of marezzare to marble] * * *
Marfan syndrome
/mahr"fan, mahr fan"/, Pathol. a hereditary disorder characterized by abnormally elongated bones, esp. in the extremities, hypermotility of the joints, and circulatory and eye ...
Marfansyndrome
Mar·fan syndrome (märʹfăn) n. A hereditary disorder principally affecting the connective tissues of the body, manifested in varying degrees by excessive bone elongation and ...
marg
marg abbrev. 1. margin 2. marginal * * *
marg.
1. margin. 2. marginal. * * *
marga
/mahr"geuh/, n. Hinduism. any of the three ways to salvation, which are those of devotion to certain gods (bhakti-marga), of study (jnana-marga), and of actions (karma-marga). [ ...
Margai, Sir Milton
▪ prime minister of Sierra Leone born December 1895, Gbangbatok, Sierra Leone died April 28, 1964, Freetown       first prime minister of Sierra Leone, a conservative, ...
Margam
▪ Wales, United Kingdom       locality, Neath Port Talbot county borough, historic county of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), Wales. Situated inland of the sandy Margam Burrows at ...
Margaret
/mahr"geuh rit, -grit/, n. a female given name: from a Greek word meaning "pearl." * * * (as used in expressions) Frances Margaret Anderson Edith Margaret Emily Ashcroft Atwood ...
Margaret Beckett
➡ Beckett (I) * * *
Margaret Chase Smith
➡ Smith (XI) * * *
Margaret Drabble
➡ Drabble * * *
Margaret I
▪ queen of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden Introduction born 1353, Søborg, Den. died Oct. 28, 1412, Flensburg  regent of Denmark (from 1375), of Norway (from 1380), and of ...
Margaret Maultasch
▪ countess of Tirol also called  Margaret Of Tirol,  German  Margarete Maultasch, or Margarete Von Tirol  born 1318 died Oct. 3, 1369, Vienna       countess of ...
Margaret Mead
➡ Mead * * *
Margaret of Angoulême
or Margaret of Navarra French Marguerite d'Angoulême born April 11, 1492, Angoulême, France died Dec. 21, 1549, Odos-Bigorre Queen consort of Henry II of Navarra and an ...
Margaret of Anjou
1430-82, queen of Henry VI of England. * * * ▪ queen of England born March 23, 1430, probably Pont-à-Mousson, Lorraine, Fr. died Aug. 25, 1482, near Saumur  queen consort ...
Margaret of Antioch, Saint
or Saint Marina flourished 3rd or 4th century, Antioch, Syria; Eastern feast day July 13; Western feast day July 20 Early Christian martyr. Tradition held that she was a ...
Margaret of Austria
born Jan. 10, 1480, Brussels died Dec. 1, 1530, Mechelen, Spanish Netherlands Habsburg ruler who was regent of the Netherlands (1507–15, 1519–30) for her nephew, the future ...
Margaret of Navarre
1492-1549, queen of Navarre 1544-49: patron of literature, author of stories, and poet. Also called Margaret of Angoulême /ahng'goo lem"/; Fr. /ahonn gooh lem"/. * * *
Margaret of Parma
born 1522, Oudenaarde, Spanish Netherlands died Jan. 18, 1586, Ortona, Kingdom of Naples Duchess of Parma, Habsburg regent, and governor-general of the Netherlands ...
Margaret Of Provence
▪ queen of France French  Marguerite De Provence   born 1221 died Dec. 21, 1295, Paris       eldest daughter of Raymond Berengar IV, count of Provence, whose marriage ...
Margaret of Scotland, Saint
born с 1045, probably Hungary died Nov. 16, 1093, Edinburgh; canonized 1250; feast day November 16, Scottish feast day June 16 Patron saint of Scotland. Sister of Edgar the ...
Margaret of Valois
("Queen Margot") 1533-1615, 1st wife of Henry IV of France: queen of Navarre; patron of science and literature (daughter of Henry II of France and Catherine de' Medici). Also ...
Margaret Rose
born 1930, English princess (daughter of George VI; sister of Elizabeth II). * * *
Margaret Rose,Princess
Margaret Rose, Princess. Born 1930. Princess of Great Britain, the second daughter of George VI and sister of Elizabeth II. * * *
Margaret Rutherford
➡ Rutherford (II) * * *
Margaret Thatcher
➡ Thatcher * * *
Margaret Tudor
born Nov. 29, 1489, London, Eng. died Oct. 18, 1541, Methven, Perth, Scot. Queen consort of King James IV of Scotland (1503–13). The daughter of King Henry VII of England, ...
Margaret, Princess
▪ 2003 Princess Margaret Rose Windsor, countess of Snowdon        British royal (b. Aug. 21, 1930, Glamis Castle, Scot.—d. Feb. 9, 2002, London, Eng.), the second ...
Margaretof Anjou
Mar·gar·et of An·jou (märʹgə-rət, -grət; ăn-jo͞oʹ, äɴ-zho͞oʹ), 1430-1482. Queen of Henry VI of England. She led the Lancastrians in the Wars of the Roses and was ...
Margaretof Navarre
Margaret of Na·varre (nə-värʹ, nä-), 1492-1549. Queen of Navarre (1527-1549) who wrote the Heptameron, an unfinished collection of stories modeled on Boccaccio's ...
Margaretof Valois
Margaret of Val·ois (văl-wäʹ), 1553-1615. Queen consort whose marriage (1572) to Henry of Navarre, later Henry IV of France, was dissolved in 1599. * * *
margaric
mar·gar·ic (mär-gărʹĭk) adj. Resembling pearl; pearly.   [From Greek margaron, pearl. See margarine.] * * *
margaric acid
/mahr gar"ik, -gahr"-/, Chem. a colorless, crystalline, water-insoluble, fatty acid, C17H34O2, resembling stearic acid, obtained from lichens or synthetically. [1810-20; < Gk ...
margaricacid
margaric acid n. A synthetic crystalline fatty acid, C17H34O2. * * *
margarine
/mahr"jeuhr in, -jeuh reen', mahrj"rin/, n. a butterlike product made of refined vegetable oils, sometimes blended with animal fats, and emulsified, usually with water or milk. ...
Margarita
/mahr'geuh ree"teuh/, n. (often l.c.) a cocktail made of tequila, lime or lemon juice, and an orange-flavored liqueur, usually served in a salt-rimmed glass. [1960-65; < AmerSp; ...
Margarita Island
▪ island, Venezuela Spanish  Isla de Margarita         island in the Caribbean Sea, 12 mi (19 km) north of the Península de Araya in northeastern Venezuela. Also ...
margaritaceous
/mahr'geuhr i tay"sheuhs/, adj. resembling mother-of-pearl; pearly. [1820-30; < NL margaritaceus. See MARGARITE, -ACEOUS] * * *
margarite
/mahr"geuh ruyt'/, n. 1. Mineral. a. a gray, pink, or yellow mica, occurring in brittle monoclinic crystals. b. an aggregate of small, rudimentary crystals resembling minute ...
margate
/mahr"git, -gayt/, n. a red-mouthed grunt, Haemulon album, inhabiting Atlantic waters from Florida to Brazil, valued as a food fish. [1725-35; perh. after MARGATE] * * * ▪ ...
Margate
/mahr"git, -gayt/ for 1; /mahr"gayt/ for 2, n. 1. a city in NE Kent, in SE England: seaside resort. 50,145. 2. a city in SE Florida. 36,044. * * * ▪ England, United ...
margay
/mahr"gay/, n. a small tiger cat, Felis tigrina, of tropical America: now rare. [1775-85; < F (Buffon), alter. of margaia < Pg maracajá < Tupi marakaya] * * * ▪ mammal also ...
marge
marge1 /mahrj/, n. Archaic. margin; edge. [ < MF < L margo; see MARGIN] marge2 /mahrj/, n. Chiefly Brit. Informal. margarine. [shortened form] * * *
Marge
/mahrj/, n. a female given name, form of Margaret. * * *
Margelan
/mahr'geuh lahn"/; Russ. /meuhrdd gyi lahn"/, n. a city in E Uzbekistan, NW of Fergana. 111,000. * * *
margent
/mahr"jeuhnt/, n. Archaic. margin. [1475-85; alter. of MARGIN] * * *
Margery
/mahr"jeuh ree/, n. a female given name, form of Margaret. * * *
Marggraf, Andreas Sigismund
▪ German chemist born March 3, 1709, Berlin, Prussia [Germany] died Aug. 7, 1782, Berlin  German chemist whose discovery of beet sugar in 1747 led to the development of the ...
Margherita
/mahr'geuh ree"teuh/; It. /mahrdd'ge rddee"tah/, n. a female given name, Italian form of Margaret. * * *
Margherita Peak
Highest summit of the Ruwenzori Range in East Africa. It is situated on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire). The higher of the two peaks ...
Marghiloman, Alexandru
▪ Romanian statesman born , July 4, 1854, Buzău, Rom. died May 10, 1925, Buzău       Romanian statesman and Conservative leader who greatly influenced Romania's role ...
Margie
/mahr"jee/, n. a female given name, form of Margaret. * * *
Margilon
▪ Uzbekistan also spelled  Marghilon , formerly  Margilan        city, eastern Uzbekistan. It lies 19 miles (30 km) north of Fergana. Originally known as Margilan, ...
margin
/mahr"jin/, n. 1. the space around the printed or written matter on a page. 2. an amount allowed or available beyond what is actually necessary: to allow a margin for error. 3. a ...
margin account
an account opened by a customer with a brokerage house in which listed securities can be purchased on margin. Cf. cash account. * * *


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