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Слова на букву lowe-moth (15990)

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marriageability
See marriageable. * * *
marriageable
—marriageability, marriageableness, n. /mar"i jeuh beuhl/, adj. 1. suitable or attractive for marriage: The handsome and successful young man was considered eminently ...
marriageableness
See marriageability. * * *
marriageof convenience
marriage of convenience n. pl. marriages of convenience A marriage or joint undertaking arranged for political, economic, or social benefit rather than from personal ...
married
—marriedly, adv. /mar"eed/, adj. 1. united in wedlock; wedded: married couples. 2. of or pertaining to marriage or married persons; connubial; conjugal: married happiness. 3. ...
married print.
See composite print. [1950-55] * * *
Married Women's Property Acts
▪ United States [1839]       in U.S. law, series of statutes that gradually, beginning in 1839, expanded the rights of married women to act as independent agents in ...
Marriner
(1924– ) an English conductor, who established the Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields in 1959. He has also directed orchestras in the US. He was made a knight in 1985. * * *
Marriner, Sir Neville
▪ British musician born April 15, 1924, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, Eng.       British violinist, teacher, and conductor who in 1959 organized the Academy of St. ...
Marriott, J Willard
▪ American businessman born , Sept. 17, 1900, Marriott, Utah, U.S. died Aug. 13, 1985, Wolfeboro, N.H.       American businessman who founded one of the largest hotel ...
Marriott, J(ohn) Willard
born , Sept. 17, 1900, Marriott, Utah, U.S. died Aug. 13, 1985, Wolfeboro, N.H. U.S. businessman who founded one of the largest U.S. hotel and restaurant organizations. The son ...
marron
/mar"euhn, meuh rohn"/; Fr. /mann rddawonn"/, n. a large European chestnut, esp. as used in cookery: candied or preserved in syrup. [1970-75; < F; see MAROON1] * * *
marrons glacés
Fr. /mann rddawonn" glann say"/ marrons glazed or coated with sugar, eaten as a confection; candied chestnuts. [1870-75; < F] * * *
marrow
marrow1 —marrowish, adj. —marrowless, adj. —marrowy, adj. /mar"oh/, n. 1. Anat. a soft, fatty, vascular tissue in the interior cavities of bones that is a major site of ...
marrow bean
marrow bean n. a plump-seeded strain of the common field bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), grown for its dry, edible seeds * * *
marrow squash
any of several squashes having a smooth surface, an oblong shape, and a hard rind. [1860-65, Amer.] * * *
marrowbone
/mar"oh bohn'/ 1. a bone containing edible marrow. 2. marrowbones, Facetious. the knees. [1350-1400; ME; see MARROW1, BONE] * * *
marrowfat
/mar"oh fat'/, n. 1. a large-seeded variety of pea. 2. the seed itself. [1725-35; MARROW1 + FAT] * * *
marrowsquash
marrow squash n. An edible squash having very large, elongated greenish fruit. * * *
marrowy
See marrow. * * *
Marrucini
▪ people       ancient tribe that occupied a small area around Teate (modern Chieti) on the east coast of Italy. The Marrucini, though Samnite kinsmen, were probably not ...
Marruecos
/mahrdd rddwe"kaws/, n. Spanish name of Morocco. * * *
marry
marry1 —marrier, n. /mar"ee/, v., married, marrying. v.t. 1. to take as a husband or wife; take in marriage: Susan married Ed. 2. to perform the marriage ceremonies for (two ...
Marryat
/mar"ee euht/, n. Frederick, 1792-1848, English naval officer and novelist. * * *
Marryat, Frederick
born July 10, 1792, London, Eng. died Aug. 9, 1848, Langham, Norfolk English naval officer and novelist. He served in the Royal Navy from age 14 until he retired in 1830 as a ...
Mars
/mahrz/, n. 1. the ancient Roman god of war and agriculture, identified with the Greek god Ares. 2. Astron. the planet fourth in order from the sun, having a diameter of 4222 ...
Mars Bar{™}
(also Mars) n a chocolate bar with a soft sweet filling that is very popular in Britain. It was first sold in the 1930s and named after the American who originally made it, ...
Mars brown
1. a medium brown color. 2. a brown pigment used in painting, artificially made from an iron oxide base and characterized by strong film-forming properties and permanence. * * *
Mars Exploration Rover
 either of a pair of U.S. robotic vehicles that explored the surface of Mars beginning in January 2004. The mission of each rover was to study the chemical and physical ...
Mars Exploration Rover B
➡ Opportunity * * *
Mars Global Surveyor
▪ spacecraft  robotic U.S. spacecraft launched to the planet Mars to carry out long-term study from orbit of the entire surface, the atmosphere, and aspects of the interior. ...
Mars Pathfinder
First spacecraft to land on Mars since the Viking 1976 missions. Launched in 1996 by NASA, Pathfinder descended to the Martian surface in July 1997 using parachutes, rockets, ...
Mars red
1. a deep red-orange color. 2. a red pigment used in painting, artificially made from an iron oxide base and characterized by strong film-forming properties and ...
Mars Rover
a small vehicle made by NASA and sent to explore the surface of the planet Mars. The first Mars Rover, Sojourner was sent in 1996 and landed successfully in 1997. The second and ...
Mars violet
1. a dark grayish-purple color. 2. a purple pigment used in painting, artificially made from an iron oxide base and characterized by strong film-forming properties and ...
Mars yellow
1. a medium to deep orange-yellow color. 2. a yellow pigment used in painting, artificially made from an iron hydroxide base and characterized by strong film-forming properties ...
Mars, canals of
Apparent systems of straight-line markings on the surface of Mars, now known to be an illusion caused by the chance alignment of large craters and other surface ...
mars, composition of atmosphere
▪ Table Composition of the Martian atmosphere gas percentage by weight carbon dioxide (CO2) 95.32 molecular nitrogen (N2) 2.7 argon (Ar) 1.6 molecular oxygen ...
Mars, Forrest Edward
▪ 2000       American candy manufacturer who led Mars Inc., one of the world's largest confectionery companies. After helping to develop the Milky Way bar for his ...
Mars-la-Tour and Gravelotte, Battles of
▪ 1870, Franco-German War  (Aug. 16–18, 1870), two major engagements of the Franco-German War in which the 140,000-man French Army of the Rhine, under Marshal ...
Marsā al-Burayqah
▪ Libya also spelled  Marsa el-Brega,         Mediterranean port on the Gulf of Sidra, northeastern Libya. The site, which was located by a small fishing village ...
Marsā Maṭrūḥ
▪ Egypt       town and capital of Maṭrūḥ muḥāfaẓah (governorate), on the Mediterranean coast, Western Desert, in northwestern Egypt. The town serves as a ...
Marsala
/mahr sah"leuh/; It. /mahrdd sah"lah/, n. 1. a seaport in W Sicily. 84,280. 2. a sweet, dark, fortified wine made near Marsala, or a similar wine made elsewhere. adj. 3. made or ...
Marsalis
(1961– ) a US jazz musician who plays the trumpet. He won a Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1997 for Blood on the Fields. Earlier, he had become the first musician to receive ...
Marsalis family
▪ American musicians       American family, considered the “first family of jazz,” who (particularly brothers Wynton and Branford) had a major impact on jazz in the ...
Marsalis, Wynton
born Oct. 18, 1961, New Orleans, La., U.S. U.S. trumpeter and composer. Marsalis was a trumpet prodigy and was recognized as an important soloist in both the classical and jazz ...
Marsalis,Wynton
Mar·sal·is (mär-sălʹĭs), Wynton. Born 1961. American trumpeter. Noted for his technical brilliance, he has won acclaim as both a jazz and classical soloist. * * *
Marsaxlokk
▪ Malta also called  Marsa Scirocco,         village, southeastern Malta. It lies along Marsaxlokk Bay, southeast of Valletta. It was the first landing place and ...
Marschner, Heinrich August
▪ German composer born Aug. 16, 1795, Zittau, Saxony died Dec. 14, 1861, Hannover, Hanover  composer who helped establish the style of German Romantic ...
Marsden
(in full the Royal Marsden Hospital) a hospital in London, England, established in 1851 by William Marsden (1796–1867). It is a leading hospital for cancer treatment and ...
Marsden, William
▪ British historian and linguist born Nov. 16, 1754, Verval, Wicklow, Ire. died Oct. 6, 1836, Aldenham, Herefordshire, Eng.       British historian, linguist, and ...
marse
/mahrs/, n. Southern U.S. (used chiefly in representation of southern black speech) master. Also, mars, massa. [1870-75] * * *
Marseillaise
/mahr'seuh layz", -say ez"/; Fr. /mannrdd se yez"/, n. the French national anthem, written in 1792 by Rouget de Lisle. * * *
Marseillaise, La
▪ French national anthem       French national anthem, composed in one night during the French Revolution (April 24, 1792) by Claude-Joseph Rouget de Lisle (Rouget de ...
marseille
Marseille [mȧr se′y'; ] E [ mär sā′] seaport in SE France, on the Gulf of Lions: pop. 801,000 * * * mar·seille (mär-sālʹ) also mar·seilles (-sālzʹ) n. A heavy ...
Marseille
Marseille [mȧr se′y'; ] E [ mär sā′] seaport in SE France, on the Gulf of Lions: pop. 801,000 * * * Mar·seille also Mar·seilles (mär-sāʹ) A city of southeast ...
Marseille faience
▪ pottery       tin-glazed earthenware made in Marseille in the 18th century. The Joseph Clérissy factory, active in 1677–1733, produced wares usually in blue with ...
marseilles
/mahr saylz"/, n. a thick cotton fabric woven in figures or stripes with an embossed effect, chiefly for bedspreads and other coverings. [1755-65; after MARSEILLES] * * *
Marseilles
/mahr say"/, n. a seaport in and the capital of Bouches-du-Rhône department, in SE France. 914,356. French, Marseille /mannrdd se"yeu/. * * *
marsh
—marshlike, adj. /mahrsh/, n. a tract of low wet land, often treeless and periodically inundated, generally characterized by a growth of grasses, sedges, cattails, and ...
Marsh
/mahrsh/, n. 1. Dame (Edith) Ngaio /nuy"oh/, 1899-1982, New Zealand writer of detective novels. 2. Reginald, 1898-1954, U.S. painter and illustrator. * * * I Freshwater or ...
marsh buggy.
See swamp buggy. [1940-45, Amer.] * * *
marsh cress
any cress belonging to the genus Rorippa, of the mustard family, esp. R. islandica, that grows in marshy areas in North America and Eurasia. * * * ▪ plant also called ...
marsh deer
a large South American deer, Blastocerus dichotomus, that lives in forests near rivers and swamps: an endangered species. [1890-95] * * *
marsh elder
any of various composite plants of the genus Iva, as I. frutescens, that grow in salt marshes. [1745-55] * * *
marsh fern
a fern, Thelypteris palustris, having pinnatifid fronds and growing in wet places. [1855-60] * * *
marsh fly
▪ insect       any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera, in which the parasitic larvae are known to prey on slugs, snails, and other mollusks. These ...
marsh frog
▪ amphibian also called  lake frog   large aquatic frog of the “true frog” family Ranidae, occurring naturally from the France to the Urals and by introduction in ...
marsh gas
a gaseous decomposition product of organic matter, consisting primarily of methane. Also called swamp gas. [1775-85, Amer.] * * *
marsh grass
cordgrass. [1875-85, Amer.] * * *
marsh hawk
marsh hawk n. a large, gray American hawk (Circus cyaneus) that nests on the ground and preys on mice, frogs, snakes, etc.: the only North American harrier hawk * * ...
marsh hawk.
See northern harrier. [1765-75, Amer.] * * *
marsh hen
any of various rails or raillike birds. [1700-10, Amer.] * * *
marsh mallow
1. an Old World mallow, Althaea officinalis, having pink flowers, found in marshy places. 2. the rose mallow, Hibiscus moscheutos. [bef. 1000; ME marshmalue, OE merscmealwe. See ...
marsh marigold
a yellow-flowered plant, Caltha palustris, of the buttercup family, growing in marshes and meadows; cowslip. [1570-80] * * * Perennial herbaceous plant (Caltha palustris) of the ...
marsh pink
any of several eastern North American plants belonging to the genus Sabatia, of the gentian family, having rose-pink flowers. * * *
marsh tacky
1. South Atlantic States (chiefly South Carolina and Georgia).a small, sometimes half-wild horse of the coastal marshes. 2. Disparaging. a poor white living in the ...
marsh treader
▪ insect also called  water measurer        any insect of the family Hydrometridae (order Heteroptera), so named because of its slow, deliberate manner of moving as ...
marsh trefoil.
See buck bean. [1590-1600] * * *
marsh wren
1. Also called long-billed marsh wren. a North American wren, Cistothorus palustris, that inhabits tall reed beds. 2. See sedge wren. [1785-95, Amer.] * * *
Marsh's test
Chem. a test to detect minimal amounts of arsenic. Also, Marsh test. [after British chemist James Marsh (1794-1846), who described such a test in 1836] * * *
Marsh, Dame (Edith) Ngaio
born April 23, 1895, Christchurch, N.Z. died Feb. 18, 1982, Christchurch New Zealand writer of detective stories. Originally an artist, she later acted in and produced ...
Marsh, George Perkins
▪ American scholar born March 15, 1801, Woodstock, Vt., U.S. died July 23, 1882, Vallombrosa, Italy  U.S. diplomat, scholar, and conservationist whose greatest work, Man and ...
Marsh, John
▪ British composer born 1752, Dorking, Surrey, Eng. died 1828, Chichester, Sussex       composer and writer on music whose works include the only surviving English ...
Marsh, Ngaio
▪ New Zealander author in full  Dame Edith Ngaio Marsh   born April 23, 1895, Christchurch, N.Z. died Feb, 18, 1982, Christchurch       New Zealand author known ...
Marsh, O(thniel) C(harles)
born Oct. 29, 1831, Lockport, N.Y., U.S. died March 18, 1899, New Haven, Conn. U.S. paleontologist. He spent his entire career at Yale University (1866–99) as the first ...
Marsh, Othniel Charles
▪ American paleontologist born October 29, 1831, Lockport, New York, U.S. died March 18, 1899, New Haven, Connecticut  American paleontologist who made extensive scientific ...
Marsh, Reginald
born March 14, 1898, Paris, France died July 3, 1954, Bennington, Vt., U.S. U.S. painter and printmaker. Born to American parents in Paris and educated at Yale University, from ...
Marsh, Sir Edward Howard
▪ British scholar born November 18, 1872, London, England died January 13, 1953, London       scholar, civil servant, and art collector who influenced the development ...
Marsh, Warne
▪ American musician in full  Warne Marion Marsh  born Oct. 26, 1927, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died Dec. 18, 1987, North Hollywood, Calif.       American tenor ...
Marsh,Ngaio
Marsh (Märsh), Ngaio. 1899-1982. New Zealand writer known for her detective novels, including A Man Lay Dead (1934) and Last Ditch (1977). * * *
Marsh,Reginald
Marsh, Reginald. 1898-1954. American painter whose works, such as Why Not Use the 'L? and The Bowery (both 1930), depict life in New York City. * * *
Marsha
/mahr"sheuh/, n. a female given name. * * *
marshal
—marshalcy, marshalship, n. —marshaler; esp. Brit., marshaller, n. /mahr"sheuhl/, n., v., marshaled, marshaling or (esp. Brit.) marshalled, marshalling. n. 1. a military ...
marshalcy
See marshal. * * *
Marshall
/mahr"sheuhl/, n. 1. Alfred, 1842-1924, English economist. 2. George C(atlett) /kat"lit/, 1880-1959, U.S. general and statesman: Secretary of State 1947-49; Nobel peace prize ...
Marshall Field's
▪ American corporation  former department store chain whose flagship store on State Street in Chicago was for a time the largest in the world, comprising 73 acres of floor ...
Marshall Field’s
a well-known US department store in Chicago. It was established on State Street in 1868 when Marshall Field moved his small shop there. He increased its size in 1907, and ...
Marshall Islands
—Marshallese /-sheuh leez", -lees"/, n., pl. -ese, adj. n.pl. a group of 34 atolls in the W central Pacific: formerly a part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands; ...
Marshall Islands, flag of the
▪ Flag History       national flag consisting of a blue field with diagonal stripes of orange and white that increase in width toward the fly end; in the upper hoist ...
Marshall Plan
1. See European Recovery Program. 2. Informal. any comprehensive program for federally supported economic assistance, as for urban renewal. * * * (1948–51) U.S.-sponsored ...
Marshall University
▪ university, Huntington, West Virginia, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning, with its main campus in Huntington, West Virginia, ...
Marshall, Alfred
born July 26, 1842, London, Eng. died July 13, 1924, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire British economist, one of the founders of English neoclassical economics. The first principal of ...
Marshall, Barry J.
▪ Australian physician born Sept. 30, 1951, Kalgoorlie, W.Aus., Austl.       Australian physician who won, with J. Robin Warren (Warren, J. Robin), the 2005 Nobel Prize ...
Marshall, Burke
▪ 2004       American lawyer (b. Oct. 1, 1922, Plainfield, N.J.—d. June 2, 2003, Newton, Conn.), as assistant attorney general in charge of the Department of Justice's ...
Marshall, Clara
▪ American physician and educator born May 8, 1847, West Chester, Pa., U.S. died March 13, 1931, Bryn Mawr, Pa.       American physician and educator, whose leadership ...
Marshall, David Saul
▪ 1996       Singaporean lawyer, politician, and diplomat (b. March 12, 1908, Singapore—d. Dec. 12, 1995, Singapore), was one of the founding fathers of the city-state ...
Marshall, E G.
▪ 1999       American character actor whose resonant voice and authoritative demeanor made him particularly adept at portraying politicians, judges, and lawyers; notable ...
Marshall, George C(atlett)
born Dec. 31, 1880, Uniontown, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 16, 1959, Washington, D.C. U.S. Army officer and statesman. After graduating from the Virginia Military Institute, he served ...
Marshall, George Catlett
▪ United States general Introduction born December 31, 1880, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, U.S. died October 16, 1959, Washington, D.C.  general of the army and U.S. Army chief of ...
Marshall, John
born Sept. 24, 1755, near Germantown, Va. died July 6, 1835, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. U.S. patriot, politician, and jurist. In 1775 he joined a regiment of minutemen and served ...
Marshall, Kerry James
▪ American artist born 1955, Birmingham, Ala., U.S.       African American painter and printmaker whose work examines aspects of black culture in the United States. His ...
Marshall, Lois Catherine
▪ 1998       Canadian soprano (b. Jan. 29, 1924, Toronto, Ont.—d. Feb. 20, 1997, Toronto), was considered one of Canada's greatest singers. Even though paralysis ...
Marshall, Louis
▪ American lawyer born Dec. 14, 1856, Syracuse, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 11, 1929, Zürich, Switz.       lawyer and leader of the American Jewish community who worked to ...
Marshall, Malcolm Denzil
▪ 2000       Barbadian cricketer (b. April 18, 1958, Bridgetown, Barbados—d. Nov. 4, 1999, Bridgetown) who, despite his short stature (1.78 m [5 ft 10 in]) and slight, ...
Marshall, Paule
orig. Paule Burke born April 9, 1929, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. writer. She was born to Barbadian parents and attended Brooklyn College. Her autobiographical first novel, ...
Marshall, Penny
▪ American actress and director original name  Carole Penny Marscharelli   born Oct. 15, 1942, New York, N.Y., U.S.    American actress, comedian, and director, one of the ...
Marshall, Sir John Hubert
▪ British archaeologist born March 19, 1876, Chester, Cheshire, Eng. died Aug. 17, 1958, Guildford, Surrey       English director general of the Indian Archaeological ...
Marshall, Sir John Ross
▪ prime minister of New Zealand born March 5, 1912, Wellington, N.Z. died Aug. 30, 1988, England       lawyer, politician, and statesman who was prime minister of New ...
Marshall, Stephen
▪ English clergyman born c. 1594, , Godmanchester, Huntingdonshire, Eng. died Nov. 19, 1655, London       Presbyterian minister and popular Puritan leader. He was an ...
Marshall, the Rev. Robert James
▪ 2009       American Lutheran minister born 1918, Burlington, Iowa died Dec. 22, 2008, Allentown, Pa. promoted interdenominational cooperation as president ...
Marshall, Thomas R
▪ vice president of United States born March 14, 1854, North Manchester, Ind., U.S. died June 1, 1925, Washington, D.C.  28th vice president of the United States (1913–21) ...
Marshall, Thomas R(iley)
born March 14, 1854, North Manchester, Ind., U.S. died June 1, 1925, Washington, D.C. U.S. politician. As governor of Indiana (1909–13) he sponsored a broad program of social ...
Marshall, Thurgood
born July 2, 1908, Baltimore, Md., U.S. died Jan. 24, 1993, Bethesda, Md. U.S. jurist and civil-rights advocate. He received his law degree from Howard University in 1933. From ...
Marshall,George Catlett
Mar·shall (märʹshəl), George Catlett. 1880-1959. American soldier, diplomat, and politician. As U.S. secretary of state (1947-1949) he organized the European Recovery ...
Marshall,John
Marshall, John. 1755-1835. American jurist and politician who served as the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1801-1835) and helped establish the practice of judicial ...
Marshall,Thurgood
Marshall, Thurgood. 1908-1993. American jurist who served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. As a lawyer for the NAACP Marshall argued 32 cases ...
Marshallese
/mahr'sheuh leez", -lees"/, n., pl. Marshallese, adj. n. 1. a native or inhabitant of the Marshall Islands, esp. a member of a Micronesian people native to the Marshall ...
MarshallIslands
Marshall Islands A self-governing island group in the central Pacific Ocean. Inhabited by Micronesian peoples, the islands were sighted by Spanish explorers in the early 16th ...
Marshalltown
/mahr"sheuhl town'/, n. a city in central Iowa. 26,938. * * *
Marshalsea
/mahr"sheuhl see'/, n. Brit. Hist. 1. the court of the marshal of the royal household. 2. a debtors' prison in London, abolished in 1842. [1350-1400; ME marchalsye, var. of ...
marshalship
See marshalcy. * * *
marshbuck
/mahrsh"buk'/ sitatunga. [MARSH + BUCK1] * * *
marshelder
marsh elder n. Any of several herbs or shrubs of the genus Iva of eastern and central North America, often growing in salt marshes and having nodding, greenish flower heads with ...
Marshfield
/mahrsh"feeld'/, n. 1. a city in SE Massachusetts. 20,916. 2. a city in central Wisconsin. 18,290. * * *
marshgas
marsh gas n. Methane. * * *
marshhawk
marsh hawk n. See northern harrier. * * *
marshhen
marsh hen n. Any of various marsh birds of the family Rallidae, which includes the gallinules, coots, and rails. * * *
marshiness
See marshy. * * *
marshland
/mahrsh"land'/, n. a region, area, or district characterized by marshes, swamps, bogs, or the like. [bef. 1150; ME mershland, OE merscland. See MARSH, LAND] * * *
marshmallow
—marshmallowy, adj. /mahrsh"mel'oh, -mal'oh/, n. 1. a sweetened paste or confection made from the mucilaginous root of the marsh mallow. 2. a similar confection, usually soft ...
marshmallowy
See marshmallow. * * *
marshmarigold
marsh marigold n. Any of several plants of the genus Caltha, especially C. palustris, growing in swampy places and having bright yellow flowers. Also called cowslip. * * *
marshy
—marshiness, n. /mahr"shee/, adj., marshier, marshiest. 1. like a marsh; soft and wet; boggy. 2. pertaining to a marsh. 3. consisting of or constituting a marsh, bog, swamp, or ...
Marsi
▪ ancient Italian people       ancient people of Italy, located on the eastern shore of Lake Fucinus (now drained) in the modern province of L'Aquila. In 304 BC the ...
Marsileaceae
▪ plant family       only family of the fern order Marsileales. The three genera and about 70 species of small aquatic ferns, which are of nearly worldwide distribution, ...
Marsilid
/mahr"seuh lid/, Pharm., Trademark. a brand of iproniazid. * * *
Marsilius of Padua
/mahr sil"ee euhs/ c1280-1343?, Italian scholar and political theorist. Italian, Marsiglio dei Mainardini /mahrdd see"lyaw de"ee muy'nahrdd dee"nee/. * * * born с 1280, Padua, ...
Marsiliusof Padua
Mar·sil·i·us of Padua (mär-sĭlʹē-əs), 1280?-1343?. Italian philosopher who wrote Defender of the Peace, a work that denied the secular authority of the pope. * * *
Marsman, Hendrik
▪ Dutch poet and critic born , Sept. 30, 1899, Zeist, near Utrecht, Neth. died June 21, 1940, at sea in the English Channel       one of the outstanding Dutch poets and ...
Marston
/mahr"steuhn/, n. John, c1575-1634, English dramatist and satirical poet. * * * (as used in expressions) Hefner Hugh Marston Marston Moor Battle of Marston John * * *
Marston Moor
a former moor in NE England, west of York: Cromwell's victory over the Royalists 1644. * * *
Marston Moor, Battle of
(July 2, 1644) First major Royalist defeat in the English Civil Wars. Royalist forces under Prince Rupert relieved the siege of York and pursued the Parliamentary forces to ...
Marston, John
born Oct. 7, 1576, Oxfordshire, Eng. died June 25, 1634, London English dramatist. He began his literary career as a poet in 1598 but soon turned to writing for the theatre. ...
Marston,John
Mar·ston (märʹstən), John. 1575?-1634. English playwright whose works include The Malcontent and The Dutch Courtezan (both 1604). * * *
MarstonMoor
Marston Moor A site in northern England west of York. The first Parliamentarian victory of the English Civil War occurred here on July 2, 1644. * * *
marsupial
/mahr sooh"pee euhl/ n. 1. any viviparous, nonplacental mammal of the order Marsupialia, comprising the opossums, kangaroos, wombats, and bandicoots, the females of most species ...
marsupial bones
epipubis. [1810-20] * * *
marsupial mole
a burrowing Australian marsupial of the genus Notoryctes, resembling a common mole in form and behavior. Also called pouched mole. [1895-1900] * * * ▪ ...
marsupial mouse
1. any of various mouse-sized to rat-sized marsupials of the family Dasyuridae, occurring in Australia, New Guinea, and Tasmania: some species are rare or endangered. 2. the ...
marsupium
/mahr sooh"pee euhm/, n., pl. marsupia /-pee euh/. the pouch or fold of skin on the abdomen of a female marsupial. [1690-1700; < NL, var. of L marsuppium pouch, purse < Gk ...
Marsyas
/mahr"see euhs/, n. Class. Myth. a satyr who lost in a flute-playing competition with Apollo and was flayed alive as a penalty. * * * ▪ Greek mythology  legendary Greek ...
Marsyas Painter
flourished с 350–325 BC, Greece Greek painter of the late Classical period, known for two containers, both dated 340–330 BC. Both are painted in the so-called Kerch style, ...
mart
mart1 /mahrt/, n. 1. market; trading center; trade center. 2. a building, center, or exposition for the sale of goods by manufacturers and wholesalers to retail merchants. 3. ...
Mart.
Mart. abbr. Martinique. * * *
Marta
/mahr"teuh/; It. /mahrdd"tah/, n. a female given name. * * *
Martaban
/mahr'teuh bahn"/, n. Gulf of, an inlet of the Bay of Bengal, in Burma. * * *
Martaban,Gulf of
Mar·ta·ban (mär'tə-bănʹ, -bänʹ), Gulf of An arm of the Andaman Sea off southern Myanmar (Burma). * * *
martagon
martagon [mär′tə gən] n. 〚ME < Fr < Turk martagān, a turban〛 a Turk's-cap lily (Lilium martagon) having white or purple flowers * * * mar·ta·gon ...
Martagon lily
/mahr"teuh geuhn/. See Turk's-cap lily. [1835-45; < Turk martagan a kind of turban] * * *
martel
/mahr"tel, mahr tel"/, n. a hammerlike, shafted weapon having a head with a point at one end and a blunt face at the other. Also called martel-de-fer /mahr"tel deuh fer", mahr ...
Martel
/mahr tel"/; Fr. /mannrdd tel"/, n. Charles. See Charles Martel. * * *
Martel,Charles
Mar·tel (mär-tĕlʹ), Charles. See Charles Martel. * * *
martelé
/mahr'tl ay/; Fr. /mannrddteu lay"/, adj. Music. martellato. [ < F: hammered] * * *
martellato
/mahr'tl ah"toh/; It. /mahrdd'tel lah"taw/, adj. (of notes or chords in a musical score) heavily accented and detached. [1875-80; < It: hammered, ptp. of martellare. See MARTEL, ...
Martello tower
/mahr tel"oh/, Fort. a circular, towerlike fort with guns on the top. Also, martello tower. Also called martello, Martello. [named after Cape Mortella, Corsica, where a tower of ...
Martellotower
Mar·tel·lo tower (mär-tĕlʹō) n. A short, circular tower, usually made of stone and located near a shoreline as a defensive fortification.   [After CapeMartello, Corsica, ...
martempering
/mahr"tem peuhr ing/, n. Metall. a quenching process used to harden austenitic steel. [1940-45; MAR(TENSITE) + TEMPER + -ING1] * * *
marten
/mahr"tn/, n., pl. martens, (esp. collectively) marten. 1. any of several slender, chiefly arboreal carnivores of the genus Martes, of northern forests, having a long, glossy ...
Marten, Henry
▪ English jurist also called  Harry Marten   born 1602, Oxford died Sept. 9, 1680, Chepstow Castle, Monmouth, Eng.       a leading Parliamentary judge in the trial of ...
Martens, Fyodor Fyodorovich
▪ Russian jurist French  Frédéric De Martens,  German  Friedrich Von Martens  born Aug. 27 [Aug. 15, old style], 1845, Parnu, Livonia died June 20 [June 7, O.S.], 1909, ...
Martens, Georg Friedrich von
▪ German jurist born Feb. 22, 1756, Hamburg died Feb. 21, 1821, Frankfurt am Main       Hanoverian diplomat, professor of jurisprudence at the University of Göttingen ...
martensite
—martensitic /mahr'tn zit"ik/, adj. /mahr"tn zuyt'/, n. Metall. a metastable microconstituent of any of various forms of carbon steel, produced by undercooling sufficiently ...
martensitic
See martensite. * * *
Martha
/mahr"theuh/, n. 1. the sister of Mary and Lazarus. Luke 10:38-42; John 11:1-44. 2. a female given name: from an Aramaic word meaning "lady." * * * (as used in ...
Martha and the Vandellas
▪ American singing group later known as  Martha Reeves and the Vandellas   American soul (soul music)-pop vocal group that challenged the Supremes (Supremes, the) as ...
Martha Graham
➡ Graham (III) * * *
Martha Stewart
➡ Stewart (III) * * *
Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia
➡ Stewart (III) * * *
Martha Washington chair
a chair of the 18th century having a high upholstered back, a low upholstered seat, and short arms resting on incurvate supports. * * *
Martha Washington mirror.
See Constitution mirror. * * *
Martha Washington table
a sewing table of the 18th century having an oval top that can be lifted and a central compartment of drawers with semicircular bins at each end. * * *
Martha's Vineyard
an island off SE Massachusetts: summer resort. 6000; 1083/4 sq. mi. (282 sq. km). * * * Island, Atlantic Ocean, off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts, U.S. Situated across ...
Martha'sVineyard
Mar·tha's Vineyard (märʹthəz) An island of southeast Massachusetts off the southwest coast of Cape Cod. Settled in 1642, it was a whaling and fishing center in the 18th and ...
Martha’s Vineyard
an island off the south-east coast of Massachusetts, just south of Cape Cod. Many writers and artists live there, and it is popular with tourists in summer. In the 18th and 19th ...
Martí
/mahrdd tee"/, n. José /haw se"/, 1853-1895, Cuban patriot and writer. * * *
Martí (y Pérez), José Julián
born Jan. 28, 1853, Havana, Cuba died May 19, 1895, Dos Ríos Cuban poet, essayist, and patriot. Involved in an 1868 revolutionary uprising, Martí was deported to Spain, where ...
Martí, José Julián
▪ Cuban patriot in full  José Julián Martí y Pérez   born January 28, 1853, Havana, Cuba died May 19, 1895, Dos Ríos  poet and essayist, patriot and martyr, who became ...
Martí, JoséJulian
Mar·tí (mär-tēʹ), José Julian. 1853-1895. Cuban revolutionary leader and poet who was killed while fighting for Cuban independence from Spain. * * *
martial
—martialism, n. —martialist, n. —martially, adv. —martialness, n. /mahr"sheuhl/, adj. 1. inclined or disposed to war; warlike: The ancient Romans were a martial ...
Martial
/mahr"sheuhl/, n. (Marcus Valerius Martialis)A.D. 43?-104?, Roman epigrammatist, born in Spain. * * * I Latin Marcus Valerius Martialis born с AD 38/41, Bilbilis, ...
martial art
martial art n. any of various systems of self-defense originating in E Asia, such as karate or kung fu, also engaged in as a sport usually used in pl. * * * Any of several arts ...
martial arts
—martial artist. any of the traditional forms of Oriental self-defense or combat that utilize physical skill and coordination without weapons, as karate, aikido, judo, or kung ...
martial law
1. the law temporarily imposed upon an area by state or national military forces when civil authority has broken down or during wartime military operations. 2. the law imposed ...
martialart
martial art n. Any of several Asian arts of combat or self-defense, such as aikido, karate, judo, or tae kwon do, usually practiced as sport. Often used in the plural. * * *
martialism
See martial. * * *
martialist
See martialism. * * *
martiallaw
martial law n. 1. Temporary rule by military authorities, imposed on a civilian population especially in time of war or when civil authority has broken down. 2. The law imposed ...
martially
See martialism. * * *
Martian
/mahr"sheuhn/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or like the planet Mars or its hypothetical inhabitants. n. 2. a supposed inhabitant of the planet Mars: The science fiction novel was ...
Martignac, Jean-Baptiste-Sylvère Gay, Viscount de
▪ French politician and historian born June 20, 1778, Bordeaux, France died April 3, 1832, Paris       French politician, magistrate, and historian who, as leader of ...
Martigues
▪ France       town, Bouches-du-Rhône département, Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) région, southeastern France, northwest of Marseille. The ...
martin
/mahr"tn/, n. any of several swallows having a deeply forked tail and long, pointed wings. Cf. house martin, purple martin. [1425-75; late ME (Scots) martoune; presumably generic ...
Martin
/mahr"tn/, n. 1. Archer John Porter /ahr"cheuhr/, born 1910, English biochemist: Nobel prize for chemistry 1952. 2. Frank, 1890-1974, Swiss composer. 3. Glenn Luther, 1886-1955, ...
Martin (II)
▪ nonexistent pope       nonexistent pope. In the 13th century the papal chancery misread the names of the two popes Marinus as Martin, and as a result of this error ...
Martin Amis
➡ Amis (II) * * *
Martin du Gard
/mannrdd taonn dyuu gannrdd"/ Roger /rddaw zhay"/, 1881-1958, French novelist: Nobel prize 1937. * * *
Martin du Gard, Roger
born March 23, 1881, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France died Aug. 22, 1958, Bellême French novelist and dramatist. Originally trained as a paleographer and archivist, he brought to his ...
Martin Du Gard,Roger
Mar·tin Du Gard (mär-tăɴʹ dü gärʹ), Roger. 1881-1958. French writer whose novels include the eight-part series The Thibaults (1922-1940). He won the 1937 Nobel Prize for ...
Martin Family
▪ French family       French lacquerware artists of the period of Louis XV. The four brothers—Guillaume (d. 1749), Julien (d. 1752), Robert (b. 1706—d. 1765), and ...
Martin Gaite, Carmen
▪ 2001       Spanish writer (b. 1925, Salamanca, Spain—d. July 22, 2000, Madrid, Spain), was a member of the group of Social Realist novelists that arose in Spain in ...
Martín García Island
▪ island, Argentina Spanish  Isla Martín García        island, historically a strategic control point in the estuary of Río de la Plata, near the mouth of the ...
Martin I
died A.D. 655, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 649-655. * * * ▪ king of Sicily byname  Martin The Younger,  Italian  Martino Il Giovane  born 1374 died July 25, 1409, ...
Martin I, Saint
▪ pope born , Todi, Tuscany [Italy] died Sept. 16, 655, Cherson, Crimea [now Kherson, Ukraine]; feast day April 13       pope from 649 to 653.       Martin ...
Martin I,Saint
Mar·tin I (märʹtn), Saint. Died 655. Pope (649-655) who was banished by Emperor Constans II (630-668) because of disagreements concerning the nature of Christ. * * *
Martin II.
See Marinus I. * * *
Martin III.
See Marinus II. * * *
Martin IV
(Simon de Brie or Simon de Brion) c1210-85, French ecclesiastic: pope 1281-85. * * * ▪ pope original name  Simon De Brion, or Brie   born c. 1210, –20, Brie?, France died ...
Martin Luther King
➡ King (V) * * *
Martin Luther King Day
the third Monday in January, a legal holiday in some states of the U.S., commemorating the birthday (Jan. 15) of Martin Luther King, Jr. * * *
Martin Luther King, Jr., Day
▪ holiday  in the United States, holiday (third Monday in January) honouring the achievements of Martin Luther King, Jr. (King, Martin Luther, Jr.) A Baptist minister who ...
Martin Marietta Corporation
▪ American corporation       diversified American corporation (incorporated 1961) that was primarily involved in the production of aerospace equipment and defense ...
Martin McDonagh
➡ McDonagh * * *
Martin of Tours, Saint
born с 316, Sabaria, Pannonia died Nov. 8, 397, Candes, Gaul; Western feast day, November 11; Eastern feast day November 12 Patron saint of France. Born a pagan, he converted ...
Martin of Tours,Saint
Mar·tin of Tours (märʹtn, mär-tăɴʹ; to͝or, to͞or), Saint. A.D. 316?-397?. French prelate considered the patron saint of France. * * *
Martin Rees
➡ Rees * * *
Martin Ryle
➡ Ryle * * *
Martin Scorsese
➡ Scorsese * * *
Martin Sheen
➡ Sheen * * *
Martin V
(Oddone Colonna) 1368-1431, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1417-31. * * * orig. Oddo Colonna born 1368, Genazzano, Papal States died Feb. 20, 1431, Rome Pope (1417–31). His ...
Martin Van Buren
➡ Van Buren (II) * * *
Martin Van Buren: Against Government Aid for Business Losses
▪ Primary Source              Many of the "pet banks" in which federal funds had been deposited defaulted during the Panic of 1837. As a consequence of the bank ...
Martin Van Buren: Inaugural Address
▪ Primary Source       Monday, March 4, 1837       The practice of all my predecessors imposes on me an obligation I cheerfully fulfill-to accompany the first and ...
Martin, A.J.P.
▪ British biochemist in full  Archer John Porter Martin   born March 1, 1910 , London, England died July 28, 2002, Llangarron, Herefordshire       British biochemist ...
Martin, Agnes
born March 22, 1912, Maklin, Sask., Can. Canadian-born U.S. painter. She moved to the U.S. in 1932 and became a U.S. citizen in 1940. She studied at Columbia Teachers College ...
Martin, Agnes Bernice
▪ 2005       American painter (b. March 22, 1912, Macklin, Sask.—d. Dec. 16, 2004, Taos, N.M.), developed a spare, meticulously drawn, and meditative style that made ...
Martin, Anne Henrietta
▪ American reformer and educator born Sept. 30, 1875, Empire City, Nev., U.S. died April 15, 1951, Carmel, Calif.       American reformer who was an ardent feminist ...
Martin, Archer John Porter
▪ 2003       British biochemist (b. March 1, 1910, London, Eng.—d. July 28, 2002, Llangarron, Herefordshire, Eng.), shared with Richard L.M. Synge the Nobel Prize for ...
Martin, Bill, Jr.
▪ 2005 William Ivan Martin, Jr.        American author (b. March 20, 1916, Hiawatha, Kan.—d. Aug. 11, 2004, Commerce, Texas), wrote more than 300 children's books in ...
Martin, Billy
▪ American athlete byname  of Alfred Manuel Martin   born May 16, 1928, Berkeley, Calif., U.S. died Dec. 25, 1989, near Fenton, N.Y.       American professional ...
Martin, Charles Elmer
▪ 1996       U.S. artist whose cartoons and drawings appeared in the pages of such magazines as The New Yorker, Time, Life, Punch, and Esquire (b. Jan. 12, 1910—d. ...
Martin, Dean
▪ 1996       (DINO PAUL CROCETTI), U.S. singer-actor (b. June 17, 1917, Steubenville, Ohio—d. Dec. 25, 1995, Beverly Hills, Calif.), was a member for 10 years of one ...
Martin, Del
▪ 2009 Dorothy L. Taliaferro        American gay rights activist born May 5, 1921, San Francisco, Calif. died Aug. 27, 2008, San Francisco was in the forefront of the ...
Martin, Dick
▪ 2009 Thomas Richard Martin        American comedian born Jan. 30, 1922, Battle Creek, Mich. died May 24, 2008, Santa Monica, Calif. was the irrepressible cohost with ...
Martin, Don Edward
▪ 2001       American cartoonist (b. May 18, 1931, Passaic, N.J.—d. Jan. 6, 2000, Miami, Fla.), was renowned for the slapstick style and “sick” humour of the ...
Martin, Frank
▪ Swiss composer born Sept. 15, 1890, Geneva, Switz. died Nov. 21, 1974, Naarden, Neth.       one of the foremost Swiss composers of the 20th century.       In ...
Martin, Glenn L
▪ American aircraft inventor born Jan. 17, 1886, Macksburg, Iowa, U.S. died Dec. 4, 1955, Baltimore, Md.       American airplane inventor whose bombers and flying boats ...
Martin, Gregory
▪ British scholar born c. 1540, , Maxfield, Sussex, Eng. died Oct. 28, 1582, Reims, Fr.       Roman Catholic biblical scholar, principal translator of the Latin Vulgate ...
Martin, Henri
▪ French historian born Feb. 20, 1810, Saint-Quentin, Fr. died Dec. 14, 1883, Paris       author of a famous history of France that included excerpts from the chief ...
Martin, Homer Dodge
▪ American painter born Oct. 28, 1836, Albany, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 12, 1897, St. Paul, Minn.       landscape painter who was one of the first to introduce ...
Martin, James Slattin, Jr.
▪ 2003       American aeronautical engineer (b. June 21, 1920, Washington, D.C.—d. April 14, 2002, Rising Sun, Md.), was project manager for NASA's Viking 1 and 2 ...
Martin, Jimmy
▪ 2006 James Henry Martin        American bluegrass singer and guitarist (b. Aug. 10, 1927, Sneedville, Tenn.—d. May 14, 2005, Nashville, Tenn.), pioneered the “high ...
Martin, Joseph William, Jr.
▪ American congressman born Nov. 3, 1884, North Attleboro, Mass., U.S. died March 6, 1968, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.       U.S. Republican congressional leader and speaker ...
Martin, Lillien Jane
▪ American psychologist and educator byname  Lillie  born July 7, 1851, Olean, N.Y., U.S. died March 26, 1943, San Francisco, Calif.       American psychologist who ...


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