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Слова на букву lowe-moth (15990)

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Martin, Luther
▪ American lawyer born February 9, 1744/48, New Brunswick, New Jersey [U.S.] died July 10, 1826, New York, New York, U.S.       American lawyer best known for defending ...
Martin, Maria
▪ American artist born July 3, 1796, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S. died December 27, 1863, Columbia       American artist known for her highly detailed watercolours ...
Martin, Mary
▪ American actress in full  Mary Virginia Martin  born Dec. 1, 1913, Weatherford, Texas, U.S. died Nov. 3, 1990, Rancho Mirage, Calif.       American singer and ...
Martin, Mary (Virginia)
born Dec. 1, 1913, Weatherford, Texas, U.S. died Nov. 3, 1990, Rancho Mirage, Calif. U.S. singer and actress. She co-owned a dancing school in her native Weatherford, Texas, ...
Martin, Paul
in full Paul Joseph Martin, Jr. born Aug. 28, 1938, Windsor, Ont., Can. Canadian prime minister (from 2003). The son of Paul Joseph Martin, who served as a minister in four ...
Martin, Paul Joseph James
▪ Canadian politician and diplomat born June 23, 1903, Ottawa, Ont., Can. died Sept. 14, 1992, Windsor, Ont.       Canadian politician and diplomat who served with ...
Martin, Pierre-Émile
▪ French engineer born Aug. 18, 1824, Bourges, Fr. died May 23, 1915, Fourchambault  French engineer who invented the Siemens–Martin (open-hearth) process, which produced ...
Martin, Steve
born Aug. 14, 1945, Waco, Texas, U.S. U.S. comedian and writer. He began writing for the Smothers Brothers in 1967. In the 1970s he wrote for and performed on shows such as ...
Martin, William McChesney, Jr.
▪ 1999       American economist who served as chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve from 1951 to 1970, under the administrations of five presidents; during his tenure the ...
Martin,Homer Dodge
Martin, Homer Dodge. 1836-1897. American painter whose landscapes include Lake Sanford (1870) and The Harp of the Winds (1895). * * *
Martin,Mary
Martin, Mary. 1913-1990. American actress who appeared in numerous Broadway hits, including Peter Pan (1954) and The Sound of Music (1959-1960). * * *
Martín-Santos, Luis
▪ Spanish author and physician born Nov. 11, 1924, Larache, Morocco died Jan. 21, 1964, San Sebastian, Spain       Spanish psychiatrist and ...
Martina
/mahr tee"neuh/, n. a female given name. Also, Martine. * * *
Martina Franca
▪ Italy       town, Puglia (Apulia) regione, southeastern Italy. It has numerous Baroque buildings, such as the Church of San Martino, the Corte palace, and ...
Martina Navratilova
➡ Navratilova * * *
Martineau
/mahr"tn oh'/, n. 1. Harriet, 1802-76, English novelist and economist. 2. her brother, James, 1805-1900, English theologian and philosopher. * * *
Martineau, Harriet
born June 12, 1802, Norwich, Norfolk, Eng. died June 27, 1876, near Ambleside, Westmorland English essayist, novelist, and economic and historical writer. She became prominent ...
Martineau, James
▪ English theologian born April 21, 1805, Norwich, Norfolk, Eng. died Jan. 11, 1900, London       English Unitarian theologian and philosopher whose writings emphasized ...
Martineau,Harriet
Mar·ti·neau (märʹtn-ō), Harriet. 1802-1876. British writer whose Illustrations of Political Economy (1832-1834) explained the theories of Thomas Robert Malthus, John Stuart ...
Martinelli
/mahr'tn el"ee/; It. /mahrdd'tee nel"lee/, n. Giovanni /jee'euh vah"nee/; It. /jaw vahn"nee/, 1885-1969, U.S. operatic tenor, born in Italy. * * *
martinet
—martinetish, adj. —martinetism, n. /mahr'tn et", mahr"tn et'/, n. 1. a strict disciplinarian, esp. a military one. 2. someone who stubbornly adheres to methods or ...
Martinez
/mahr tee"nis/, n. a town in W California. 22,582. * * * (as used in expressions) Alicia Martínez Hoyo Benavente y Martínez Jacinto Montañés Juan de Martínez Perón Isabel ...
Martínez Campos, Arsenio
▪ prime minister of Spain born December 14, 1831, Segovia, Spain died September 23, 1900, Zarauz       general and politician whose pronunciamiento (military ...
Martínez de la Rosa, Francisco de Paula
▪ Spanish writer and statesman born March 10, 1787, Granada, Spain died February 7, 1862, Madrid       Spanish dramatist, poet, and conservative ...
Martínez Estrada, Ezequiel
▪ Argentine author born September 14, 1895, San José de la Esquina, Argentina died November 3, 1964, Bahía Blanca       leading post- Modernismo Argentine writer who ...
Martínez Ruiz
/mahrdd tee"neth rddooh eeth"/ José /haw se"/. See Azorín. * * *
Martínez Sierra, Gregorio
▪ Spanish dramatist born May 6, 1881, Madrid died Oct. 1, 1947, Madrid       poet and playwright whose dramatic works contributed significantly to the revival of the ...
Martínez, Pedro
▪ Dominican [republic] baseball player born October 25, 1971, Manoguayabo, Dominican Republic       professional baseball player who in 1997 became the first Latin ...
Martinez, Tomas Eloy
▪ 2003       In the spring of 2002, the announcement in Madrid that Argentine writer and journalist Tomás Eloy Martínez had been awarded the Alfaguara Prize for his ...
martingale
/mahr"tn gayl'/, n. 1. Also called standing martingale. part of the tack or harness of a horse, consisting of a strap that fastens to the girth, passes between the forelegs and ...
martini
/mahr tee"nee/, n., pl. martinis. a cocktail made with gin or vodka and dry vermouth, usually served with a green olive or a twist of lemon peel. [1885-90; perh. alter. of ...
Martini
/mahr tee"nee/; It. /mahrdd tee"nee/, n. Simone /see maw"ne/, 1283-1344, Italian painter. * * *
Martini, Arturo
▪ Italian sculptor born August 11, 1889, Treviso, Italy died March 22, 1947, Milan       Italian sculptor who was active between the World Wars. He is known for ...
Martini, Giovanni Battista
▪ Italian composer byname  Padre Martini   born April 24, 1706, Bologna, Papal States died Aug. 3, 1784, Bologna  Italian composer, music theorist, and music historian who ...
Martini, Simone
born с 1284, Siena, Republic of Siena died 1344, Avignon, Provence Italian painter. An exponent of Gothic art, he did much to spread the influence of Sienese painting. Duccio ...
Martini,Simone
Mar·ti·ni (mär-tēʹnē), Simone. 1283?-1344. Italian painter whose work is representative of the Sienese Gothic style. * * *
Martini-Henry
/mahr tee"nee hen"ree/, n. a breech-loaded .45 caliber rifle adopted in 1871 as the standard British service weapon, using a center-fire metallic cartridge filled with black ...
Martinican
See Martinique. * * *
Martinique
—Martinican /mahr'tn ee"keuhn/, n. /mahr'tn eek"/, n. an island in the E West Indies; an overseas department of France. 342,000; 425 sq. mi. (1100 sq. km). Cap.: ...
MartinLuther King Day
Mar·tin Luther King Day (märʹtn) n. The third Monday in January, observed in the United States in commemoration of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. * * *
Martinmas
/mahr"tn meuhs/, n. a church festival, November 11, in honor of St. Martin. [1250-1300; ME Martinmasse. See Saint MARTIN, -MAS] * * *
Martino, Donald
▪ 2006       American composer and professor (b. May 16, 1931, Plainfield, N.J.—d. Dec. 8, 2005, at sea in the Caribbean en route to Antigua), created works that were ...
Martinon
/mannrdd tee nawonn"/, n. Jean /zhahonn/, 1910-76, French violinist, conductor, and composer. * * *
Martins
/mahr"tnz/, n. Peter, born 1946, U.S. choreographer and ballet master, born in Denmark. * * *
Martins Ferry
▪ Ohio, United States       city, Belmont county, eastern Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Ohio River (there bridged to Wheeling, W.Va.), about 60 miles (100 km) west of ...
Martins, Peter
born Oct. 27, 1946, Copenhagen, Den. Danish-born U.S. dancer, choreographer, and director of the New York City Ballet. He trained at the Royal Danish Ballet School and became a ...
Martins,Peter
Mar·tins (märʹtnz), Peter. Born 1946. Danish-born ballet dancer who became co-ballet master of the New York City Ballet in 1983. * * *
Martinsburg
/mahr"tnz berrg'/, n. a city in NE West Virginia. 13,063. * * * ▪ West Virginia, United States       city, seat (1772) of Berkeley county, eastern panhandle of West ...
Martinson
/mahr"tn seuhn/; Sw. /mahrdd"tin sawn'/, n. Harry Edmund /har"ee ed"meuhnd/; Sw. /hah"rddi ed"moont/, 1904-78, Swedish novelist and poet: Nobel prize 1974. * * *
Martinson, Harry
▪ Swedish author in full  Harry Edmund Martinson   born May 6, 1904, Jämshög, Swed. died Feb. 11, 1978, Stockholm       Swedish novelist and poet who was the first ...
Martinson, Harry (Edmund)
born May 6, 1904, Jämshög, Swed. died Feb. 11, 1978, Stockholm Swedish novelist and poet. He spent his childhood in foster homes and his young adulthood as a merchant seaman, ...
Martinson, Moa
▪ Swedish author original name  Helga Swartz   born Nov. 2, 1890, Vardnass, Swed. died Aug. 5, 1964, Södertälje       Swedish novelist who was among the first to ...
Martinson,Harry Edmund
Mar·tin·son (märʹtn-sôn', -tēn-), Harry Edmund. 1904-1978. Swedish writer whose works include the proletarian novel The Road (1948) and Aniara (1956), an epic poem about ...
Martinsville
/mahr"tnz vil'/, n. 1. a city in S Virginia. 18,149. 2. a town in central Indiana. 11,311. * * * ▪ Virginia, United States       city, seat (1793) of Henry county ...
Martinu
/mahrdd"tyi nooh'/, n. Bohuslav /baw"hoo slahf'/ 1890-1959, Czech composer. * * *
Martinů, Bohuslav
▪ Czech composer born Dec. 8, 1890, Polička, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary [now in Czech Republic] died Aug. 28, 1959, Liestal, Switz.  modern Czech composer whose works exhibit ...
Martinů, Bohuslav (Jan)
born Dec. 8, 1890, Polic̆ka, Bohemia died Aug. 28, 1959, Liestal, Switz. Czech (Bohemian) composer. He started composing at age 10 but was expelled from the conservatory for ...
Martinu, Bohuslav Jan
Mar·ti·nů (märʹtyĭ-no͞o), Bohuslav Jan. 1890-1959. Czech composer and violinist. His modern symphonies combine Czech folk music with the formal principles of ragtime, ...
Martinů,Bohuslav Jan
Mar·ti·nů (märʹtyĭ-no͞o), Bohuslav Jan. 1890-1959. Czech composer and violinist. His modern symphonies combine Czech folk music with the formal principles of ragtime, ...
Martinus Gosia
▪ Italian jurist born c. 1100, Bologna [Italy] died c. 1166       jurist, one of the “four doctors” of the Bologna Law School, and an important successor of ...
Martinuzzi, György
▪ Hungarian cardinal original name  Juraj Utje-šenović , byname  Brother , or  Friar, George , Latin-Hungarian  Frater György , Latin  Frater Georgius  born 1482, ...
MartinV
Martin V, Originally Oddo Colonna. 1366-1431. Pope (1417-1431) who restored the authority of the Church in the Papal States. * * *
Martius, Karl Friedrich Philipp von
▪ German botanist born April 17, 1794, Erlangen, Bavaria died Dec. 13, 1868, Munich       German botanist best known for his work on Brazilian ...
martlet
/mahrt"lit/, n. 1. Brit. Dial. a house martin. 2. Heraldry. a representation of a swallow close and without legs, used esp. as the cadency mark of a fourth son. [1530-40; < MF ...
martnet
/mahrt"net/, n. Naut. an arrangement of lines formerly used for gathering up a leech of a sail. [1475-85; orig. uncert.] * * *
Martos
▪ Spain       town, Jaén provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain, southwest of Jaén city, on a western ...
Martov, L.
orig. Yuly Osipovich Tsederbaum born Nov. 24, 1873, Constantinople, Ottoman Empire died April 4, 1923, Berlin, Ger. Russian revolutionary. He first lived in Vilna, where he ...
Marty, Francois Cardinal
▪ 1995       French Roman Catholic prelate (b. May 18, 1904, Pachins, France—d. Feb. 16, 1994, near Villefranche-de-Rouergue, France), as archbishop of Paris ...
Marty, Martin E
▪ 1999       Despite reaching the age of 70 in February 1998 and retiring from his teaching post at the University of Chicago in March, American church historian Martin ...
Martyn
(1948– ) an English folk rock singer, songwriter and guitarist. Since his first album, London Conversation in 1967, he has made more than 30 albums. * * *
Martyn, Edward
▪ Irish dramatist born Jan. 30, 1859, Tulira, County Galway, Ire. died Dec. 5, 1923, Tulira       Irish dramatist who with William Butler Yeats and Lady Gregory formed ...
Martyn, John
▪ English botanist born Sept. 12, 1699, London died Jan. 29, 1768, Chelsea, London       botanist and author known for his translations of Virgil. During the 1720s ...
martyr
—martyrish, adj. —martyrly, adv., adj. /mahr"teuhr/, n. 1. a person who willingly suffers death rather than renounce his or her religion. 2. a person who is put to death or ...
martyrdom
/mahr"teuhr deuhm/, n. 1. the condition, sufferings, or death of a martyr. 2. extreme suffering; torment. [bef. 900; ME martirdom, OE martyrdom. See MARTYR, -DOM] * * *
Martyrdom of Polycarp
▪ patristic literature       letter that describes the death by burning of Polycarp (Polycarp, Saint), bishop of Smyrna in Asia Minor. It was sent to the Christian ...
martyrium
/mahr tir"ee euhm/, n., pl. martyria /-tir"ee euh/. 1. a place where the relics of a martyr are kept. 2. a church built above the tomb of a martyr or in honor of a ...
martyrization
See martyrize. * * *
martyrize
—martyrization, n. /mahr"teuh ruyz'/, v.t., martyrized, martyrizing. 1. to make a martyr of: The ancient Romans martyrized many Christians. 2. to torment. Also, esp. Brit., ...
martyrologist
See martyrology. * * *
martyrology
—martyrological /mahr'teuhr euh loj"i keuhl/, martyrologic, adj. —martyrologist, n. /mahr'teuh rol"euh jee/, n., pl. martyrologies. 1. the branch of knowledge dealing with ...
martyry
/mahr"teuh ree/, n., pl. martyries. a shrine, chapel, or the like, erected in honor of a martyr. [1250-1300; ME martirie suffering, martyrdom < ML marty-rium martyrdom, martyr's ...
Marugame
▪ Japan       city, Kagawa ken (prefecture), Shikoku, Japan, on the coast of the Inland Sea. Founded as a castle town in 1597, Marugame flourished from the Tokugawa ...
Maruki, Iri
▪ 1996       Japanese painter with his wife, Toshi, of 15 murals and panels that depicted the bombing of Hiroshima (b. June 20, 1901—d. Oct. 18 or 19, 1995). * * *
Marulanda Velez, Manuel
▪ 2009 Pedro Antonio Marín; “Tirofijo”        Colombian guerrilla leader born May 12, 1930?, Génova, Colom. died March 26, 2008, unknown mountain encampment, ...
Marulić, Marko
▪ Croatian writer born August 18, 1450, Split, Dalmatia [now in Croatia] died January 6, 1524, Split       Croatian moral philosopher and poet whose vernacular verse ...
marumi kumquat
/meuh rooh"mee/. See round kumquat. [marumi < Japn, equiv. to mara round + mi(y) fruit ( < *mui)] * * *
Marusthali
▪ region, India Sanskrit“Land of the Dead”       sand-dune-covered eastern portion of the Great Indian (Thar) Desert (Thar Desert) in western Rajasthan ...
Marut
/meuh root"/, n. Hinduism. any of a group of storm gods, the offspring of Rudra. * * *
Maruyama, Masao
▪ 1997       Japanese political scientist, writer, and educator (b. March 22, 1914, Osaka, Japan—d. Aug. 15, 1996, Tokyo, Japan), as one of Japan's leading political ...
marv
/mahrv/, adj. Slang. marvelous; wonderful. [by shortening] * * *
Marv
/mahrv/, n. a male given name, form of Marvin. * * *
marvel
—marvelment, n. /mahr"veuhl/, n., v., marveled, marveling or (esp. Brit.) marvelled, marvelling. n. 1. something that causes wonder, admiration, or astonishment; a wonderful ...
Marvel, Carl Shipp
▪ American chemist born Sept. 11, 1894, Waynesville, Ill., U.S. died Jan. 4, 1988, Tucson, Ariz.       American chemist whose early research was in classic organic ...
marvel-of-Peru
/mahr"veuhl euhv peuh rooh"/, n. the four-o'clock, Mirabilis jalapa. [1590-1600] * * *
Marvell
/mahr"veuhl/, n. Andrew, 1621-78, English poet and satirist. * * *
Marvell, Andrew
born March 31, 1621, Winestead, Yorkshire, Eng. died Aug. 18, 1678, London English poet and politician. He was employed as a tutor, including to Oliver Cromwell's ward, before ...
Marvell,Andrew
Mar·vell (märʹvəl), Andrew. 1621-1678. English metaphysical poet whose frequently satirical work includes the poems “To His Coy Mistress” (1650) and “The Definition of ...
marvelous
—marvelously, adv. —marvellousness, n. /mahr"veuh leuhs/, adj. 1. superb; excellent; great: a marvelous show. 2. such as to cause wonder, admiration, or astonishment; ...
marvelously
See marvelous. * * *
marvelousness
See marvelously. * * *
marver
/mahr"veuhr/, n. 1. a hard, flat surface of stone, wood, or metal, on which a mass of molten glass is rolled and shaped in glassmaking. v.t. 2. to roll (glass) on a ...
Marvin
/mahr"vin/, n. a male given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Gaye Marvin Pentz Marvin Pentz Gay Minsky Marvin Lee Simon Marvin Neil * * *
Marvin Gaye
➡ Gaye * * *
Marvin, Lee
▪ American actor born February 19, 1924, New York, N.Y., U.S. died August 29, 1987, Tucson, Ariz.       rugged, durable American actor who was perhaps the ...
marvy
/mahr"vee/, adj. Slang. marvelous; delightful. [1965-70; MARV(ELOUS) + -Y1] * * *
Marwa
/mahr"weuh/, n. Islam. See Safa and Marwa. * * *
Marwān I ibn al-Hakam
▪ Umayyad caliph born 623 died 685       first of the Marwānid caliphs of the Umayyad dynasty (reigned 684–685).       A governor of Medina and the Hejaz ...
Marwān II
▪ Umayyad caliph born c. 684 died 750, Egypt       last of the Umayyad caliphs (reigned 744–750). He was killed while fleeing the forces of Abū al-ʿAbbās ...
Marwar
/mahr"wahr/, n. Jodhpur (def. 1). * * *
Marwedel, Emma Jacobina Christiana
▪ American educator born Feb. 27, 1818, Münden [near Göttingen], Ger. died Nov. 17, 1893, San Francisco, Calif., U.S.       German-born educator who was instrumental ...
Marwell Zoological Park
▪ zoo, Winchester, England, United Kingdom       zoo in Winchester, Hampshire, Eng., that is known for its large breeding groups of hoofed stock and carnivores. It was ...
marwysgafn
▪ Welsh religious ode       (Welsh: “deathbed song”), religious ode in which the poet, sensing the approach of death, confesses his sins and prays for forgiveness. ...
Marx
/mahrks/; Ger. /mahrddks/, n. Karl (Heinrich) /kahrl huyn"rik/; Ger. /kahrddl huyn"rddikh/, 1818-83, German economist, philosopher, and socialist. * * * (as used in ...
Marx Brothers
a family of U.S. comedians, including Julius Henry ("Groucho"), 1890-1977, Arthur (Adolph Marx) ("Harpo"), 1888-1964, Leonard ("Chico"), 1887-1961, and Herbert ("Zeppo"), ...
Marx, Karl
▪ German philosopher Introduction in full  Karl Heinrich Marx  born May 5, 1818, Trier, Rhine province, Prussia [Germany] died March 14, 1883, London  revolutionary, ...
Marx, Karl (Heinrich)
born May 5, 1818, Trier, Rhine province, Prussia [Ger.] died March 14, 1883, London, Eng. German political philosopher, economic theorist, and revolutionary. He studied ...
Marx, Wilhelm
▪ German statesman born Jan. 15, 1863, Cologne, Prussia [Germany] died Aug. 5, 1946, Bonn, Ger.       German statesman, leader of the Roman Catholic Centre Party, and ...
Marx,Karl
Marx, Karl. 1818-1883. German philosopher, economist, and revolutionary. With the help and support of Friedrich Engels he wrote The Communist Manifesto (1848) and Das Kapital ...
Marxian
—Marxianism, n. /mahrk"see euhn/, adj. of or pertaining to Karl Marx or his theories. [1885-90; MARX + -IAN] * * *
Marxianism
See Marxian. * * *
Marxism
/mahrk"siz euhm/, n. the system of economic and political thought developed by Karl Marx, along with Friedrich Engels, esp. the doctrine that the state throughout history has ...
Marxism-Leninism
Marx·ism-Len·in·ism (märkʹsĭz'əm-lĕnʹĭ-nĭz'əm) n. An expanded form of Marxism that emphasizes Lenin's concept of imperialism as the final stage of capitalism and ...
Marxist
/mahrk"sist/, n. 1. an adherent of Karl Marx or his theories. adj. 2. of Karl Marx or his theories. [1885-90; MARX + -IST] * * *
Mary
/mair"ee/, n. 1. Also called Virgin Mary. the mother of Jesus. 2. the sister of Lazarus and Martha. Luke 10:38-42; John 11:1,2. 3. See Mary, Queen of Scots. 4. (Princess Victoria ...
Mary Baker Eddy
➡ Eddy * * *
Mary Cassatt
➡ Cassatt * * *
Mary Celeste
a ship that was discovered empty in the North Atlantic Ocean in 1872, in perfect condition but with its crew all gone. What happened to them has never been explained. * * *
Mary Gregory glass
▪ decorative arts       variety of glass produced in the United States toward the end of the 19th century in imitation of the then popular English cameo glass. It was ...
Mary Had a Little Lamb
the title and first line of a traditional nursery rhyme. The first verse is: Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow; And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure ...
Mary I
("Bloody Mary") 1516-58, queen of England 1553-58 (wife of Philip II of Spain; daughter of Henry VIII). Also called Mary Tudor. * * * or Mary Tudor born Feb. 18, 1516, ...
Mary II
1662-94, queen of England 1689-94: joint ruler with her husband William III (daughter of James II). * * * born April 30, 1662, London, Eng. died Dec. 28, 1694, London Queen of ...
Mary Immaculate, Oblates of
▪ Roman Catholic congregation       (O.M.I.), one of the largest missionary (mission) congregations of the Roman Catholic Church, inaugurated at Aix-en-Provence, Fr., on ...
Mary Jane
1. a small, round sponge cake, usually with a circular indentation on top, for topping with fruit, whipped cream, etc., and served as an individual portion. 2. Mary Janes, ...
Mary Janes
Mary Janes pl.n. ☆ 〚< Mary Jane, a trademark for such shoes〛 low-heeled shoes for girls, usually of patent leather with a strap across the instep * * *
Mary Kathleen
▪ district, Queensland, Australia       district and former mining settlement, northwestern Queensland, Australia, in the Selwyn Range. In 1954 a major deposit of ...
Mary Magdalene
Mary of Magdala, whom Jesus healed of possession by devils, Luke 8:2: traditionally identified with the repentant woman whom Jesus forgave. Luke 7:37-50. * * *
Mary Magdalene, Saint
flourished 1st century, Palestine; feast day July 22 Follower of Jesus and the first person to see the resurrected Christ. According to Luke 8:2 and Mark 16:9, Jesus cleansed ...
Mary McCarthy
➡ McCarthy (III) * * *
Mary Of Lorraine
▪ regent of Scotland also called  Mary Of Guise,  French  Marie De Lorraine, or De Guise  born Nov. 22, 1515, Bar-le-Duc, Lorraine, Fr. died June 11, 1560, ...
Mary of Modena
▪ queen of England original name  Marie Beatrice d'Este  born October 5, 1658, Modena, Modena [Italy] died May 7, 1718, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France  second wife of King ...
Mary Of Orange
▪ regent of The Netherlands byname of  Mary Henrietta Stuart,  Dutch  Maria Van Oranje, or Maria Henriette Stuart  born Nov. 4, 1631 died Dec. 24, 1660, [Jan. 3, 1661, new ...
Mary of Teck
➡ Mary * * * ▪ queen of Great Britain in full  Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes   born May 26, 1867, Kensington Palace, London died March 24, ...
Mary Of The Incarnation
▪ French mystic original name  Barbe-jeanne Avrillot, Mme Acarie   born Feb. 26, 1566, Paris died April 18, 1618, Pontoise, Fr.       mystic whose activity and ...
Mary Pickford
➡ Pickford * * *
Mary Poppins
a popular Walt Disney film (1964), based on the character created by the Australian writer P L Travers. Mary is a nanny (= a woman who looks after young children) who can fly ...
Mary Quant
➡ Quant * * *
Mary Rose
a ship built for King Henry VIII in 1509–10 which sank off the south coast of England in 1545 and was brought up from the bottom of the sea in 1982. It can now be seen in a ...
Mary Shelley
➡ Shelley (I) * * *
Mary Stuart
➡ Mary, Queen of Scots * * *
Mary Tudor
➡ Mary I * * * ▪ English princess born March 1495/96 died June 24, 1533, Westhorpe, Suffolk, Eng.       English princess, the third wife of King Louis XII of France; ...
Mary Tudor.
See Mary I. * * *
Mary Tyler Moore
➡ Moore (VII) * * *
Mary Tyler Moore Show
▪ American television series       American television situation comedy that aired on the Columbia Broadcasting System (now CBS Corporation) for seven seasons ...
Mary Whitehouse
➡ Whitehouse * * *
Mary Wollstonecraft
➡ Wollstonecraft * * *
Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
▪ Primary Source        Mary Wollstonecraft was 33 years old when she wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, one of the first feminist tracts published. Unhappy ...
Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary
the title and first line of a traditional nursery rhyme, sometimes set to music. The full poem is: Mary, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With silver bells and ...
Mary, Queen of Scots
(Mary Stuart) 1542-87, queen of Scotland 1542-67; beheaded for plotting to assassinate her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. * * * orig. Mary Stuart born Dec. 8, 1542, Linlithgow ...
Marya
/mahr"yeuh/, n. a female given name, form of Mary. * * *
Maryann
/mair'ee an"/, n. a female given name. Also, Maryanne. * * *
Marybeth
/mair'ee beth", mair"ee beth'/, n. a female given name. * * *
Maryborough
/mair"ee berr"oh, -bur"oh, -beuhr e, -breuh/, n. a seaport in E Australia. 20,111. * * * ▪ Queensland, Australia       city, southeastern Queensland, Australia, 20 ...
Maryellen
/mair'ee el"euhn/, n. a female given name. * * *
MaryI
Mary I or Mary Tu·dor (to͞oʹdər, tyo͞oʹ-), 1516-1558. Queen of England and Ireland (1553-1558) who reestablished Roman Catholicism (1555). Her persecution of Protestants ...
MaryII
Mary II, 1662-1694. Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1689-1694). The eldest daughter of James II, she ruled jointly with her husband, William III, the former William of ...
MaryJane
Mary Jane n. Slang Marijuana.   [Alteration of marijuana.] * * *
MaryJanes
Mary Janes (jānz) A trademark used for patent leather shoes for girls, usually having a low heel and a single strap that fastens at the side. * * *
Maryland
—Marylander, n. /mer"euh leuhnd/, n. a state in the E United States, on the Atlantic coast. 4,216,446; 10,577 sq. mi. (27,395 sq. km). Cap.: Annapolis. Abbr.: MD (for use with ...
Maryland yellowthroat
(in former systems of nomenclature) the common yellowthroat, Geothlypis trichas, esp. the eastern U.S. subspecies. [1695-1705, Amer.] * * *
Maryland Zoo
▪ zoo, Baltimore, Maryland, United States in full  Maryland Zoo in Baltimore,  formerly (until 2004)  Baltimore Zoo        zoo in Baltimore, Md., that is the third ...
Maryland, flag of
▪ Flag History       U.S. state flag consisting of a quartered design of alternating red-white and black-yellow panels.       Alone of the 13 original states, ...
Maryland, University of
▪ university system, Maryland, United States in full  University System of Maryland,        state university system consisting of 11 coeducational campuses in eight ...
Marylander
Marylander [Mar ylən dər, Mar ylan΄dər] n. a person born or living in Maryland * * * See Maryland. * * *
Marylebone
a district of central London in the borough of Westminster(1). It lies south of Regent’s Park and contains famous buildings such as the Royal Academy of Music, Madame ...
Marylebone Cricket Club
(abbr the MCC) a cricket club, established in 1787, which used to be the main administrative organization for all cricket in England and Wales. It owns and has its headquarters ...
Marylou
/mair'ee looh"/, n. a female given name. * * *
MaryMagdalene
Mary Mag·da·lene (măgʹdə-lən, -lēn') In the New Testament, a woman whom Jesus cured of evil spirits. She is also identified with the repentant prostitute who washed the ...
Maryof Teck
Mary of Teck (tĕk) See Mary3. * * *
Maryology
/mair'ee ol"euh jee/, n. Mariology. * * *
MaryQueen of Scots
Mary Queen of Scots, also Mary Stuart 1542-1587. Queen of Scotland (1542-1567). The Catholic monarch during the bitter Scottish Reformation, she was forced to abdicate in favor ...
Marysville
▪ California, United States       city, seat (1850) of Yuba county, north-central California, U.S. It is situated in the Central Valley, at the junction of the Feather ...
MaryTudor
Mary Tu·dor (to͞oʹdər, tyo͞oʹ-) See Mary I. * * *
Maryville
/mair"ee vil'/, n. a city in E Tennessee. 17,480. * * * ▪ Missouri, United States       city, seat (1845) of Nodaway county, northwestern Missouri, U.S. It lies about ...
marzipan
/mahr"zeuh pan'/, n. a confection made of almonds reduced to a paste with sugar and often molded into various forms, usually diminutive fruits and vegetables. Also called ...
mas
mas abbrev. masculine * * *
Mas Canosa, Jorge
▪ 1998       Cuban exile leader (b. Sept. 21, 1939, Santiago de Cuba—d. Nov. 23, 1997, Miami, Fla.), headed an anti-Castro organization that became one of the most ...
mas.
masculine. * * *
mas. pil.
(in prescriptions) a pill mass. [ < L massa pilularis] * * *
masa
/mah"seuh/; Sp. /mah"sah/, n. Mexican Cookery. flour or dough made of dried, ground corn, used esp. for tortillas. [ < Sp: dough < L massa; see MASS] * * *
Masaccio
/mah saht"chaw/; Eng. /meuh sah"chee oh'/, n. (Tommaso Guidi) 1401-28?, Italian painter. * * * orig. Tommaso Di Giovanni Di Simone Guidi born Dec. 21, 1401, Castel San ...
Masada
/meuh sah"deuh/; Heb. /meuh tsah dah"/, n. a mountaintop fortress in E Israel on the SW shore of the Dead Sea: site of Zealots' last stand against the Romans during revolt of ...
Masai
/meuh suy"/, n., pl. Masais, (esp. collectively) Masai. 1. a member of an African people inhabiting the highlands of Kenya and Tanzania and having a largely pastoral economy and ...
Masaka
▪ Uganda       town located in southern Uganda, situated about 80 miles (130 km) southwest of Kampala at an elevation of 4,300 feet (1,310 metres). Roads connect it ...
Masākin
▪ town, Tunisia also spelled  Msaken        town located in eastern Tunisia, on Al-Sāḥil (Sāḥil, Al-) (Sahel), the coastal strip, 7 miles (11 km) from the ...
Masamune
orig. Okazaki Gorōnyūdō born 1264?, Japan died 1343?, Kamakura Japanese swordsmith. Masamune was appointed chief swordsmith by the emperor Fushimi in 1287. He founded the ...
Masamune Hakuchō
▪ Japanese author pseudonym of  Masamune Tadao   born March 3, 1879, Bizen, Okayama prefecture, Japan died Oct. 28, 1962, Tokyo  writer and critic who was one of the great ...
Masan
/mah"sahn/, n. a seaport in SE South Korea. 186,890. Formerly, Masampo /meuh sahm"poh/. * * * ▪ South Korea       city, Kyŏngsang-nam do (province), southeastern South ...
Masaniello
▪ Italian agitator byname of  Tommaso Aniello   born June 1620, Naples [Italy] died July 16, 1647, Naples  leader of a popular insurrection in Naples against Spanish rule ...
Masaoka Shiki
▪ Japanese author pseudonym of  Masaoka Tsunenori   born Oct. 14, 1867, Matsuyama, Japan died Sept. 19, 1902, Tokyo       poet, essayist, and critic who revived the ...
Masaryk
/mas"euh rik/; Czech. /mah"sah rddik/, n. 1. Jan /yahn/, 1886-1948, Czech statesman (son of Tomás). 2. Tomás Garrigue /taw"mahsh gah"rddik/, 1850-1937, Czech statesman: 1st ...
Masaryk, Jan (Garrigue)
born Sept. 14, 1886, Prague, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary died March 10, 1948, Prague, Czech. Czech statesman. The son of Tomáš Masaryk, he entered the foreign service of the ...
Masaryk, Tomáš (Garrigue)
born March 7, 1850, near Gölding, Moravia, Austrian Empire died Sept. 14, 1937, Lány, Czech. First president of Czechoslovakia (1918–35). After receiving a doctorate from ...
Masaryk, TomásGarrigue
Mas·a·ryk (măsʹə-rĭk, mäʹsä-), Tomáš Garrigue. 1850-1937. Czechoslovakian politician who served as the first president of independent Czechoslovakia (1918-1935). His ...
Masaya
/mah sah"yah/, n. a city in SW Nicaragua. 34,127. * * * ▪ Nicaragua       city, southwestern Nicaragua, at the eastern foot of Masaya Volcano, just east of the small ...
Masbate
/mahs bah"teuh/, n. 1. one of the central islands of the Philippines. 584,520; 1262 sq. mi. (3269 sq. km). 2. a city on this island. 52,944. * * * Island (pop. 2000: 707,668) of ...
masc
masc abbrev. masculine * * *
masc.
masculine. * * *
Mascagni
/mahs kah"nyee/, n. Pietro /pye"trddaw/, 1863-1945, Italian operatic composer. * * *
Mascagni, Pietro
born Dec. 7, 1863, Livorno, Italy died Aug. 2, 1945, Rome Italian composer. He began to compose when very young. At the Milan Conservatory he studied with Amilcare Ponchielli ...
Mascagni,Pietro
Mas·ca·gni (mäs-känʹyē), Pietro. 1863-1945. Italian composer noted for his operas, including Cavalleria Rusticana (1889). * * *
mascara
/ma skar"euh/; Brit. /ma skahr"euh/, n. 1. a substance used as a cosmetic to color the eyelashes and eyebrows. v.t. 2. to apply mascara to. [1885-90; < Sp: mask; see MASK] * * ...
mascarene grass
/mas'keuh reen"/ a creeping grass, Zoysia tenuifolia, naturalized in California and Florida, having fine leaves and shoots that make good turf. [1955-60; after the Mascarene ...
Mascarene Islands
Mascarene Islands [mas΄kə rēn′] group of islands in the W Indian Ocean, east of Madagascar, including Mauritius & Réunion * * * ▪ islands, Indian Ocean French  Îles ...
MascareneIslands
Mas·ca·rene Islands (măs'kə-rēnʹ) A group of islands in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar. Mauritius and the French island of Réunion are in the group. * * *
mascaron
/mas"keuh ron'/, n. Archit. mask (def. 11). [1655-65; < F < It mascherone, aug. of maschera; see MASK] * * *
mascarpone
/mas'kahr poh"nee/, n. a very soft Italian cream cheese made from cow's milk. * * *
mascarpone cheese
mascarpone cheese or mascarpone [mas΄kär pō′nē] n. a very rich, white cream cheese of Italy * * *
mascle
/mas"keuhl/, n. Heraldry. a lozenge represented as having a lozenge-shaped hole at the center. [1300-50; ME, deriv. of mask (now dial.), var. of MESH; see -LE] * * *
Mascolo, Dionys
▪ 1998       French writer, intellectual, and political activist who was known both for his protests in support of various causes, such as opposition to the torture of ...
mascon
/mas"kon'/, n. Geol. a massive concentration of high-density material beneath the surface of the moon. [1965-70; MAS(S) + CON(CENTRATION)] * * * ▪ astrophysics       a ...
mascot
/mas"kot, -keuht/, n. an animal, person, or thing adopted by a group as its representative symbol and supposed to bring good luck: The U.S. Navy mascot is a goat. [1880-85; < F ...
Mascouche
/ma skoohsh"/; Fr. /manns koohsh"/, n. a town in S Quebec, in E Canada. 20,345. * * *
masculine
—masculinely, adv. —masculinity, masculineness, n. /mas"kyeuh lin/, adj. 1. pertaining to or characteristic of a man or men: masculine attire. 2. having qualities ...
masculine caesura
Pros. a caesura occurring immediately after a stressed or a long syllable. * * *
masculine rhyme
Pros. a rhyme of but a single stressed syllable, as in disdain, complain. [1575-85] * * * ▪ linguistics       in verse, a monosyllabic rhyme or a rhyme that occurs ...
masculineending
masculine ending n. 1. A stressed syllable that ends a line of verse. 2. Grammar. A final syllable or termination that marks or forms words in the masculine gender. * * *
masculinely
See masculine. * * *
masculineness
See masculinely. * * *
masculinerhyme
masculine rhyme n. A rhyme made on a single stressed syllable, as in sky/fly. * * *
masculinity
mas·cu·lin·i·ty (măs'kyə-lĭnʹĭ-tē) n. pl. mas·cu·lin·i·ties 1. The quality or condition of being masculine. 2. Something traditionally considered to be ...
masculinization
See masculinize. * * *
masculinize
—masculinization, n. /mas"kyeuh leuh nuyz'/, v.t., masculinized, masculinizing. 1. Med. to produce certain male secondary sex characteristics in (a female). 2. to make ...
Masdevallia
▪ plant genus       genus of 410 species of tropical American orchids, family Orchidaceae, that have brightly coloured flowers with unusual shapes. Most species are ...
Masefield
/mays"feeld', mayz"-/, n. John, 1878-1967, English poet: poet laureate 1930-67. * * *
Masefield, John
born June 1, 1878, Ledbury, Herefordshire, Eng. died May 12, 1967, near Abingdon, Berkshire English poet. He went to sea in his youth, then lived precariously for several years ...
Masefield,John
Mase·field (māsʹfēld'), John. 1878-1967. British writer primarily known for his poetry, including Everlasting Mercy (1911) and the Chaucerian Reynard the Fox (1919). He ...
Masekela, Hugh
▪ 1996       The 1995 album Johannesburg surely was a surprise to trumpeter Hugh Masekela's longtime fans. The title promised South African-styled music by that ...
maser
/may"zeuhr/, n. a device for amplifying electromagnetic waves by stimulated emission of radiation. Cf. laser. [1950-55; m(icrowave) a(mplification by) s(timulated) e(mission of) ...
Maseru
/mah'seuh rooh", maz"euh rooh'/, n. a town in and the capital of Lesotho, in the NW part. 29,000. * * * City (pop., 1999 est.: metro. area, 373,000), capital of Lesotho. It ...
mash
mash1 /mash/, v.t. 1. to crush: He mashed his thumb with a hammer. 2. to reduce to a soft, pulpy mass, as by beating or pressure, esp. in the preparation of food. 3. to mix ...
MASH
/mash/, n. mobile army surgical hospital. * * *
mash note
☆ mash note n. Slang an effusive note or letter expressing affection or passion for the recipient, usually a stranger or someone known only casually * * *
Masham, Abigail, Baroness Masham Of Otes
▪ British lady-in-waiting née  Hill   died Dec. 6, 1734       favourite of Queen Anne of England. That she turned against both her patrons—Sarah Jennings, Duchess ...
Masham, Samuel Cunliffe Lister, 1st Baron
▪ British inventor born January 1, 1815, Calverley Hall, near Bradford, Yorkshire, England died February 2, 1906, Swinton Park, Yorkshire       English inventor whose ...
Masharbrum
/mush"euhr broom'/, n. a mountain in N India, in the Himalayas. 25,660 ft. (7821 m). Also, Masherbrum. * * *
mashed
/masht/, n. Informal. mashed potatoes: The pork chop comes with string beans and mashed. [1920-25] * * *
masher
masher1 /mash"euhr/, n. a person or thing that mashes. [1490-1500; MASH1 + -ER1] masher2 /mash"euhr/, n. Slang. a man who makes advances, esp. to women he does not know, with a ...
Masherbrum
Ma·sher·brum (mŭshʹər-bro͞om') A peak, 7,826.3 m (25,660 ft) high, in the Karakoram Range of the Himalaya Mountains in Kashmir. It was first scaled in 1960. * * *
mashgiach
/mahsh gee"ahkh/, n., pl. mashgichim Seph. /mahsh gee kheem"/; Ashk. /mahsh gee"khim/. Hebrew. mashgiah. * * *
mashgiah
/mahsh gee"ahkh/, n., pl. mashgihim Seph. /mahsh gee kheem"/; Ashk. /mahsh gee"khim/. Hebrew. an inspector appointed by a board of Orthodox rabbis to guard against any violation ...
Mashhad
/mash had"/, n. Persian name of Meshed. * * * or Meshed City (pop., 1996: 1,887,405), northeastern Iran. It is situated in the valley of the Kashaf River. For centuries it has ...
mashie
/mash"ee/, n. Golf. a club with an iron head, the face having more slope than a mashie iron but less slope than a mashie niblick. Also, mashy. Also called number five ...
mashie iron
Golf. a club with an iron head, the face having more slope than a mid-mashie but less slope than a mashie. Also called number four iron. * * *
mashie niblick
Golf. a club with an iron head whose face has more slope than a mashie but less slope than a pitcher. Also called number six iron. [1905-10] * * *
mashieniblick
mashie niblick n. A seven iron used in golf. * * *
mashlam
/mash"leuhm/, n. Brit. Dial. maslin. * * *
Mashona
/meuh shon"euh, -shoh"neuh/, n., pl. Mashonas, (esp. collectively) Mashona. Shona (def. 1). * * *
Mashonaland
▪ region, Zimbabwe  traditional region in northeastern Zimbabwe, bordering Zambia to the north and Mozambique to the northeast and east. It is the traditional homeland of the ...
mashrebeeyah
/mah'shri bee"euh/, n. meshrebeeyeh. Also, mashrebeeyeh. * * *
Mashriq
▪ geographical region, Middle East       geographic region extending from the western border of Egypt to the western border of Iran. It includes the modern states of ...
mashriq al-adhkār
▪ Bahāʾī temple  (Arabic: “place where the uttering of the name of God arises at dawn”), temple or house of worship in the Bahāʾī faith. The mashriq is ...
mashup
      a combination of multiple data formats or sources, such as maps, music, photographs, video, and animations, into one digital file. Mashup originally referred to ...
mashy
/mash"ee/, n., pl. mashies. Golf. mashie. * * *
Mashye and Mashyane
/mash"yeuh; mahsh yah"neuh/, Zoroastrianism. (in the Avesta) the first couple, man and woman, created by Ahura Mazda from a rhubarb plant grown from the seed of Gayomart. Also ...
Masina, Giulia Anna
▪ 1995       ("GIULIETTA"), Italian actress (b. Feb. 22, 1921, San Giorgio di Piano, near Bologna, Italy—d. March 23, 1994, Rome, Italy), was artistic muse, adviser, ...


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