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Слова на букву lowe-moth (15990)

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MasterCard
➡ credit cards * * *
masterclass
master class n. An advanced music class taught by an eminent musician. * * *
masterdom
masterdom [mas′tər dəm] n. Now Rare complete control; mastery * * * See master. * * *
masterful
—masterfully, adv. —masterfulness, n. /mas"teuhr feuhl, mah"steuhr-/, adj. 1. dominating; self-willed; imperious. 2. having or showing the qualities of a master; ...
masterfully
See masterful. * * *
masterfulness
See masterfully. * * *
mastergunnery sergeant
master gunnery sergeant n. 1. Abbr. MgySgt A noncommissioned rank in the U.S. Marine Corps that is above master sergeant and equivalent to the position of sergeant major. 2. One ...
masterkey
master key n. A key that opens every one of a given set of locks. Also called passkey. * * *
masterliness
See masterly. * * *
masterly
—masterliness, n. /mas"teuhr lee, mah"steuhr-/, adj. 1. like or befitting a master, as in skill or art; worthy of a master; very skillful: a masterly presentation of the ...
mastermariner
master mariner n. See master. * * *
mastermason
master mason n. 1. An expert mason. 2. Master Mason The third degree of Freemasonry. * * *
mastermind
/mas"teuhr muynd', mah"steuhr-/, v.t. 1. to plan and direct (a usually complex project or activity), esp. skillfully: Two colonels had masterminded the revolt. n. 2. a person who ...
masterof ceremonies
master of ceremonies n. pl. masters of ceremonies 1. A person who acts as host at a formal event, making the welcoming speech and introducing other speakers. 2. A performer who ...
masterpiece
/mas"teuhr pees', mah"steuhr-/, n. 1. a person's greatest piece of work, as in an art. 2. anything done with masterly skill: a masterpiece of improvisation. 3. a consummate ...
Masterpiece Theater
a US television series on PBS which shows many of the best British programmes. It began in 1971 and was presented by Alistair Cooke until 1994. The programmes have included ...
masterplan
master plan n. A plan giving comprehensive guidance or instruction. * * *
masterrace
master race n. A people who consider themselves to be superior to other races and therefore suited to rule over them. * * *
Masters
/mas"teuhrz, mah"steuhrz/, n. 1. Edgar Lee, 1869-1950, U.S. poet and novelist. 2. William Howell, born 1915, U.S. physician: researcher on human sexual behavior (husband of ...
Masters and Johnson
William Masters (1915–2001) and Virginia Johnson (1925– ), two US doctors who became well known for their study of human sexual behaviour. They discovered that women can ...
Masters Tournament
(also the Masters, the US Masters, the US Masters Tournament) a major international golf contest held each year in Augusta, Georgia. It was established in 1934 by Bobby Jones and ...
Masters Tournament winners
▪ Table Masters Tournament winners year winner* 1934 H. Smith 1935 G. Sarazen 1936 H. Smith 1937 B. Nelson 1938 H. Picard 1939 R. Guldahl 1940 J. Demaret 1941 C. ...
Masters, Edgar Lee
born Aug. 23, 1869, Garnett, Kan., U.S. died March 5, 1950, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. poet and novelist. He grew up on his grandfather's farm and became a lawyer in Chicago. He ...
Masters, William H(owell); and Johnson, Virginia E(shelman)
born Dec. 27, 1915, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. died Feb. 16, 2001, Tucson, Ariz. born Feb. 11, 1925, Springfield, Missouri, U.S. U.S. human-sexuality research team. Together (as ...
Masters, William Howell
▪ 2002       American gynecologist (b. Dec. 27, 1915, Cleveland, Ohio—d. Feb. 16, 2001, Tucson, Ariz.), was a pioneer in the field of human sexuality research and ...
Masters,Edgar Lee
Mas·ters (măsʹtərz), Edgar Lee. 1869-1950. American poet known for his Spoon River Anthology (1915), a collection of free-verse epitaphs of the citizens of a small ...
masters-at-arms
mas·ters-at-arms (măsʹtərz-ət-ärmzʹ) n. Plural of master-at-arms. * * *
mastersergeant
master sergeant n. 1. a. Abbr. MSG A noncommissioned rank in the U.S. Army that is above sergeant first class and below the position of sergeant major. b. Abbr. MSgt A ...
mastership
/mas"teuhr ship', mah"steuhr-/, n. 1. the office, function, or authority of a master. 2. control; command: to have mastership over one's desires. 3. mastery, as of a subject. 4. ...
mastersinger
/mas"teuhr sing'euhr, mah"steuhr-/, n. Meistersinger (def. 1). [1800-10] * * *
Masterson
/mas"teuhr seuhn, mah"steuhr-/, n. William Barclay ("Bat"), 1853-1921, U.S. frontier law officer. * * *
Masterson, Bat
orig. Bartholomew Masterson born Nov. 27, 1853, Henryville, Canada East died October 25, 1921, New York, N.Y., U.S. Canadian-born U.S. lawman and gambler. He grew up on ...
Masterson,William Barclay
Mas·ter·son (măsʹtər-sən), William Barclay. Known as “Bat.” 1853-1921. American frontier marshal and journalist. Famed for his exploits as an army scout, gambler, and ...
masterstroke
/mas"teuhr strohk', mah"steuhr-/, n. a masterly action or achievement; an extremely skillful or effective action: War was avoided by a masterstroke of diplomacy. Also, master ...
Masterton
▪ New Zealand       town (“district”), southern North Island, New Zealand, on the Ruamahanga River (a tributary of the Wairarapa), 55 miles (89 km) northeast of ...
masterwork
/mas"teuhr werrk', mah"steuhr-/, n. masterpiece. [1600-10; MASTER + WORK] * * *
masterwort
/mas"teuhr werrt', -wawrt', mah"steuhr-/, n. a European plant, Astrantia major, of the parsley family, having pinkish-rose or white flower clusters with purplish bracts ...
mastery
/mas"teuh ree, mah"steuh-/, n., pl. masteries for 1-4. 1. command or grasp, as of a subject: a mastery of Italian. 2. superiority or victory: mastery over one's enemies. 3. the ...
master’s
➡ master’s degree * * *
master’s degree
(also master’s) n a higher degree in British and US universities, usually requiring one year of study. It is between a bachelor’s degree and doctorate. Master’s degrees ...
master’s degree (MA)
➡ higher education * * *
masthead
/mast"hed', mahst"-/, n. 1. Also called flag. a statement printed in all issues of a newspaper, magazine, or the like, usually on the editorial page, giving the publication's ...
mastic
/mas"tik/, n. 1. Also called lentisk. a small Mediterranean tree, Pistacia lentiscus, of the cashew family, that is the source of an aromatic resin used in making varnish and ...
masticate
—masticable /mas"ti keuh beuhl/, adj. —mastication, n. —masticator, n. /mas"ti kayt'/, v.t., v.i., masticated, masticating. 1. to chew. 2. to reduce to a pulp by crushing ...
mastication
See masticate. * * *
masticator
See mastication. * * *
masticatory
/mas"ti keuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj., n., pl. masticatories. adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or used in or for mastication. n. 2. Pharm. a medicinal substance to be chewed, as to ...
mastictree
mastic tree n. A small evergreen shrub (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Mediterranean region, cultivated for its resin. Also called lentisk. * * *
mastiff
/mas"tif, mah"stif/, n. one of a breed of large, powerful, short-haired dogs having an apricot, fawn, or brindled coat. [1300-50; ME mastif, perh. extracted from AF masti(n)s ...
mastiff bat
any insectivorous bat of the family Molossidae, found in warm areas throughout the world, having a naked tail, folded ears, and small wings and most often seen running along the ...
mastiffbat
mastiff bat n. Any of various snub-nosed bats of the family Molossidae, found in warm regions of most parts of the world and having narrow wings and brown, gray, or black fur. * ...
mastigium
/ma stij"ee euhm/, n., pl. mastigia /ma stij"ee euh/. an extensible, lashlike, anal organ in certain caterpillars. [1895-1900; < NL < Gk mastigion, dim. of mástix whip] * * *
Mastigophora
/mas'ti gof"euhr euh/, n. a phylum of protozoans comprising nonphotosynthetic, chiefly free-living flagellates: some species are important pathogens of humans and other ...
mastigophoran
/mas'ti gof"euhr euhn/, n. 1. Also, mastigophore /mas"ti geuh fawr', -fohr'/. a protozoan of the phylum Mastigophora. adj. 2. belonging or pertaining to the ...
masting
/mas"ting, mah"sting/, n. Naut. 1. the masts of a ship, taken as a whole. 2. the technique, act, or process of placing masts in sailing ships. [1620-30; MAST1 + -ING1] * * *
mastitic
See mastitis. * * *
mastitis
—mastitic /ma stit"ik/, adj. /ma stuy"tis/, n. 1. Pathol. inflammation of the breast. 2. Vet. Pathol. inflammation of the udder, esp. of cows; garget. [1835-45; MAST- + ...
masto-
a combining form meaning "breast," used in the formation of compound words: mastopathy. Also, esp. before a vowel, mast-. [comb. form repr. Gk mastós breast] * * *
mastocarcinoma
/mas'toh kahr'seuh noh"meuh/, n., pl. mastocarcinomas, mastocarcinomata /-meuh teuh/. Pathol. carcinoma of the breast. [MASTO- + CARCINOMA] * * *
mastocytosis
/mas'toh suy toh"sis/, n. Pathol. an overproduction of mast cells in body tissues. [MAST (CELL) + -O- + -CYTE + -OSIS] * * *
mastodon
—mastodonic, adj. /mas"teuh don'/, n. 1. a massive, elephantlike mammal of the genus Mammut (Mastodon), that flourished worldwide from the Miocene through the Pleistocene ...
mastodonic
See mastodon. * * *
mastodont
mas·to·dont (măsʹtə-dŏnt') adj. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a mastodon.   [From New Latin Mastodōn, genus name. See mastodon.] * * *
mastoid
/mas"toyd/, adj. Anat. 1. of or pertaining to the mastoid process. 2. resembling a breast or nipple. n. 3. the mastoid process. [1725-35; < NL mastoides < Gk mastoeidés. See ...
mastoid process
a large, bony prominence on the base of the skull behind the ear, containing air spaces that connect with the middle ear cavity. Also called mastoid, mastoid bone. See diag. ...
mastoidbone
mastoid bone n. See mastoid process. * * *
mastoidcell
mastoid cell n. Any of numerous air-filled spaces of various sizes in the mastoid process. * * *
mastoidectomy
/mas'toy dek"teuh mee/, n., pl. mastoidectomies. Surg. the removal of part of a mastoid process, usually for draining an infection. [1895-1900; MASTOID + -ECTOMY] * * *
mastoiditis
/mas'toy duy"tis/, n. Pathol. inflammation of the mastoid process. [1885-90; MASTOID + -ITIS] * * * Inflammation of the mastoid process, a bony projection just behind the ear, ...
mastoidprocess
mastoid process n. A conical protuberance of the posterior portion of the temporal bone that is situated behind the ear in humans and many other vertebrates and serves as a site ...
mastopathy
/ma stop"euh thee/, n., pl. mastopathies. Pathol. any disease of the breast. [1855-60; MASTO- + -PATHY] * * *
mastopexy
/mas"teuh pek'see/, n. Surg. fixation of a pendulous breast. [MASTO- + -PEXY] * * *
Mastroianni, Marcello
born Sept. 28, 1924, Fontana Liri, Italy died Dec. 19, 1996, Paris, France Italian film actor. He made his film debut in 1947 and was a well-known actor in Italy by the ...
Mastroianni, Umberto
▪ 1999       Italian sculptor who was celebrated especially for his large-scale abstract bronzes, notably a series of war monuments (b. Sept. 21. 1910, Fontana Liri, ...
Mastroianni,Marcello
Ma·stro·ian·ni (mä'stroi-äʹnē, -strō-yänʹnē), Marcello. 1924-1996. Italian actor whose film credits include La Dolce Vita (1960) and Divorce, Italian Style (1962). * ...
masturbate
—masturbator, n. /mas"teuhr bayt'/, v., masturbated, masturbating. v.i. 1. to engage in masturbation. v.t. 2. to practice masturbation upon. [1855-60; < L masturbatus, ptp. of ...
masturbation
—masturbational, adj. —masturbatory /mas"teuhr beuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj. /mas'teuhr bay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the stimulation or manipulation of one's own genitals, esp. to ...
masturbator
See masturbation. * * *
masturbatory
mas·tur·ba·to·ry (măsʹtər-bə-tôr'ē, -tōr'ē) adj. 1. Of or relating to masturbation. 2. Excessively self-indulgent or self-involved: “ [The play's] star... paces ...
Masuda
▪ Japan       city, Shimane ken (prefecture), western Honshu, Japan. It lies in the basin of the Takatsu River, near the Sea of Japan. The commercial hub of the ...
Masukagami
▪ Japanese historical epic       historical epic about the Kamakura period (1192–1333) and one of the four best-known kagami (records) of Japanese history. The ...
Masulipatam
▪ India formerly  Masulipatnam , also called  Machilipatnam  or  Bandar        city, eastern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. Masulipatam was the first ...
Masulipatam, Treaty of
▪ Great Britain-Hyderābād, India [1768]       (Feb. 23, 1768), agreement by which the state of Hyderābād, India, submitted to British control. The First Mysore War ...
Masur, Kurt
▪ 2000       In 1999 German-born conductor Kurt Masur agreed to become the principal conductor of the London Philharmonic Orchestra while continuing in the post of music ...
Masur,Kurt
Ma·sur (mä-zo͞orʹ), Kurt. Born 1927. German-born conductor widely admired for his interpretations of Beethoven and Bruckner. In 1991 he joined the New York Philharmonic as ...
Masuria
/meuh zoor"ee euh/, n. a region in NE Poland, formerly in East Prussia, Germany: German defeat of Russians 1914-15. German, Masuren /mah zooh"rddeuhn/. * * *
Masurian
See Masuria. * * *
Masurian Lakeland
Lake district, northeastern Poland, containing more than 2,000 lakes. It extends 180 mi (290 km) eastward from the lower Vistula River to the Poland-Belarus border and occupies ...
masurium
masurium [mə soor′ē əm, məsyoor′ē əm] n. 〚ModL < Ger Masuren, Masuria, where ore thought to contain the element was found + -IUM〛 former name for TECHNETIUM * * *
Masvingo
/mahz ving"goh/, n. a city in S central Zimbabwe. 35,000. Formerly, Fort Victoria, Nyanda. * * * ▪ Zimbabwe formerly  Fort Victoria,    town, south-central Zimbabwe. It ...
Masʿūdī, al-
▪ Arab historian in full  Abū Al-ḥusayn ʿalī Ibn Al-ḥusayn Al-masʿūdī   born 9th century, , Baghdad, Iraq died 957, al-Fusṭāṭ, Egypt       historian ...
mat
mat1 —matless, adj. /mat/, n., v., matted, matting. n. 1. a piece of fabric made of plaited or woven rushes, straw, hemp, or similar fiber, or of some other pliant material, as ...
mat.
1. matins. 2. maturity. * * *
Mat.E.
Materials Engineer. * * *
Mata Hari
/mah"teuh hahr"ee, mat"euh har"ee/, (Gertrud Margarete Zelle) 1876-1917, Dutch dancer in France: executed as a spy by the French. * * * orig. Margaretha Geertruida Zelle born ...
Mata, Eduardo
▪ 1996       Mexican conductor (b. Sept. 5, 1942, Mexico City, Mexico—d. Jan. 4, 1995, Cuernavaca, Mexico), as music director (1977-93) of the Dallas (Texas) Symphony ...
Matabele
/mat'euh bee"lee/, n., pl. Matabeles, (esp. collectively) Matabele. Ndebele (def. 1). [1815-25] * * *
Matabeleland
Mat·a·be·le·land (mä'tə-bĕlʹā-lănd', -tä-) A former province of Rhodesia, between the Limpopo and Zambezi rivers. Inhabited by the Ndebele after 1827, it came under ...
Matacil
/mat"euh sil/, Chem., Trademark. a brand of aminocarb. * * *
Matadi
/meuh tah"dee/, n. a seaport in the W Democratic Republic of the Congo, near the mouth of the Congo (Zaire) River. 142,808. * * * ▪ Democratic Republic of the ...
matador
/mat"euh dawr'/, n. 1. the principal bullfighter in a bullfight who passes the bull with a muleta and then, in many countries, kills it with a sword thrust; a torero. 2. one of ...
Matagalpa
/mat'euh gal"peuh/; Sp. /mah'tah gahl"pah/, n. a city in W central Nicaragua. 61,383. * * * ▪ Nicaragua       city, west-central Nicaragua, situated in a highland ...
MatagordaBay
Mat·a·gor·da Bay (măt'ə-gôrʹdə) An inlet of southeast Texas separated from the Gulf of Mexico by the Matagordo Peninsula, a narrow sand spit. * * *
MataHari
Ma·ta Ha·ri (mäʹtə härʹē, mătʹə hărʹē), Originally Margaretha Geertruida Zelle. 1876-1917. Dutch spy. A professional dancer in Paris after 1905, she apparently ...
Matale
▪ Sri Lanka       town, central Sri Lanka (Ceylon), 14 miles (23 km) north of Kandy. A Buddhist monastery and rock temple (Aluvihara) are near the town. Matale's ...
Matamba
Historic African kingdom of the Mbundu people, located northeast of Luanda, Angola. A strong state in the early 16th century, it came into conflict with the Portuguese colonists ...
Matamoros
/mat'euh mawr"euhs, -mohr"-/; Sp. /mah'tah maw"rddaws/, n. a seaport in NE Mexico, on the Rio Grande opposite Brownsville, Texas. 187,000. * * * City (pop., 2000: 376,279), ...
Matane
/meuh tan"/; Fr. /mann tannn"/, n. a city in E Quebec, in SE Canada, on the St. Lawrence River. 12,726. * * * ▪ Quebec, Canada       city, Bas-Saint-Laurent region, ...
Matanuska
/mat'euh nooh"skeuh/, n. 1. a river in S Alaska flowing SW to Cook Inlet. 90 mi. (145 km) long. 2. a village in the valley of this river, NE of Anchorage: site of federal ...
Matanzas
/meuh tan"zeuhs/; Sp. /mah tahn"sahs/, n. a seaport on the NW coast of Cuba. 160,097. * * * ▪ Cuba       city, west-central Cuba. Founded in 1693 on an excellent bay ...
Matapa
      a southern African empire ruled by a line of kings known as the Mwene Matapa (q.v.). * * *
Matapan
/mat"euh pan'/, n. Cape, a cape in S Greece, at the S tip of the Peloponnesus. * * *
Matapan,Cape
Mat·a·pan (măt'ə-pănʹ), Cape See Taínaron, Cape. * * *
Matapédia Valley
Valley of the Notre Dame Mountains, Gaspé Peninsula, eastern Quebec province, Canada. Extending for some 60 mi (100 km), it forms a direct lowland route through the mountains ...
Matara
▪ Sri Lanka       town, southern Sri Lanka. It lies at the mouth of the Nilwala River on the island's southern coast. Its name, meaning Great Ford, arose from its ...
Matara diamond
/mah"teuhr euh, mat"euhr euh/. See Matura diamond. * * *
Mataram
Historic kingdom, Java. Originally a vassal state of Pajang, it became powerful under Senapati, who became its first king in the late 16th century. Its territory expanded in the ...
Mataró
Ma·ta·ró (mä'tə-rōʹ, -tä-) A city of northeast Spain on the Mediterranean Sea northeast of Barcelona. It is a port and manufacturing center. Population: 101,510. * * ...
Mataura River
▪ river, New Zealand       river, South Island, New Zealand. It rises in the Eyre Mountains south of Wakatipu Lake and flows south past Gore and Mataura to enter the ...
match
match1 /mach/, n. 1. a slender piece of wood, cardboard, or other flammable material tipped with a chemical substance that produces fire when rubbed on a rough or chemically ...
Match of the Day
a British television programme that shows details of the most important football matches of a particular day (usually a Saturday). It first appeared in 1964, and its presenters ...
match plate
Metall. a plate on which patterns are set to be molded. [1870-75] * * *
match play
—match player. Golf. play in which the score is reckoned by counting the holes won by each side. Cf. medal play. [1885-90] * * *
match point
/mach" poynt"/ for 1; /mach" poynt'/ for 2 1. (in tennis, squash, handball, etc.) the point that if won would enable the scorer or the scorer's side to win the match. 2. ...
match-up
/mach"up'/, n. 1. a pairing or combining; linkage: a match-up of federal funds with state aid. 2. a direct contest or confrontation, as between two athletes or political ...
matchability
See matchable. * * *
matchable
match·a·ble (măchʹə-bəl) adj. That can be matched: matchable colors.   match'a·bilʹi·ty n. * * *
matchboard
/mach"bawrd', -bohrd'/, n. a board having a tongue formed on one edge and a groove of the same dimensions cut into the other, used with similar boards to compose floors, dados, ...
matchboarding
/mach"bawr'ding, -bohr'-/, n. 1. a construction of matchboards. 2. a quantity of matchboards. [1860-65; MATCHBOARD + -ING1] * * *
matchbook
/mach"book'/, n. a small cardboard folder into which several rows of paper matches are stapled or glued. [1810-15; MATCH1 + BOOK] * * *
matchbox
/mach"boks'/, n. a small box, usually of cardboard, for matches. [1780-90; MATCH1 + BOX1] * * *
matched order
Stock Exchange. an order placed with a broker to buy a specified stock at a price above the market price with the intention of immediately selling the stock through another ...
matcher
See match1. * * *
matchless
—matchlessly, adv. —matchlessness, n. /mach"lis/, adj. having no equal; peerless; unequaled; incomparable: matchless courage. [1520-30; MATCH2 + -LESS] * * *
matchlessly
See matchless. * * *
matchlist
/mach"list'/, n. a list of names, telephone numbers, and related information compiled to help people find others who are willing to share a resource or service, as a car ...
matchlock
/mach"lok'/, n. 1. an old form of gunlock in which the priming was ignited by a slow match. 2. a hand gun, usually a musket, with such a lock. [1630-40; MATCH1 + LOCK1] * * ...
matchmaker
matchmaker1 —matchmaking, n., adj. /mach"may'keuhr/, n. 1. a person who arranges or tries to arrange marriages by introducing possible mates. 2. a person who arranges matches ...
matchmaking
matchmaking [mach′māk΄iŋ] n. 1. the act or occupation of arranging marriages for others 2. the act or practice of bringing together unmarried people with the hope that they ...
matchmark
☆ matchmark [mach′märk΄ ] n. a mark put on parts, as of a machine, to serve as an aid in assembling them vt. to put such a mark on * * *
matchplay
match play n. A method of scoring golf games by counting only the number of holes won by each side rather than the number of strokes taken. * * * ➡ golf * * *
matchpoint
match point n. The final point needed to win a sports match, especially in tennis. * * *
matchstick
/mach"stik'/, n. 1. a short, slender piece of flammable wood used in making matches. 2. something that suggests a matchstick, as in thinness or fragility. [1785-95; MATCH1 + ...
matchup
matchup [mach′up΄] n. a putting together of two persons or things as for competition or comparison * * * match·up (măchʹŭp') n. The pairing of two people or things, as ...
matchwood
/mach"wood'/, n. 1. wood suitable for matches. 2. splinters. [1590-1600; MATCH1 + WOOD1] * * *
mate
mate1 —mateless, adj. /mayt/, n., v., mated, mating. n. 1. husband or wife; spouse. 2. one member of a pair of mated animals. 3. one of a pair: I can't find the mate to this ...
maté
/mah"tay, mat"ay, mah tay"/, n. 1. a tealike South American beverage made from the dried leaves of an evergreen tree. 2. a South American tree, Ilex paraguariensis, that is the ...
Matehuala
▪ Mexico       city, northern San Luis Potosí estado (state), northeastern Mexico. It is situated on the interior plateau, 5,955 feet (1,815 m) above sea level, in the ...
matelassé
/maht"leuh say'/; Fr. /mannteu lah say"/, n. an embossed, compound fabric woven on a dobby or Jacquard loom. Also, matelasse, matellasse. [1880-85; < F, ptp. of matelasser to ...
matelot
/mat"loh, mat"l oh'/, n. Brit. Slang. a sailor. Also, matelow. [1910-15; < F
matelote
/mat"l oht'/; Fr. /mannteu loht"/, n. a highly seasoned fish stew made with white or red wine. [1720-30; < F, deriv. of matelot MATELOT] * * *
mater
/may"teuhr/, n., pl. maters, matres /-treez/. 1. Brit. Informal. mother1. 2. the backing holding the movable parts of an astrolabe. [1585-95; < L mater] * * *
mater dolorosa
/mah"terdd doh'loh rddoh"sah/; Eng. /may"teuhr doh'leuh roh"seuh/, Latin. 1. the sorrowful mother. 2. (caps.) the mother of Christ sorrowing for her son. * * *
Mater Matuta
▪ Roman goddess       in Roman religion, goddess of the ripening of grain (although the Latin poet Lucretius made her a goddess of dawn). Her worship in Italy was ...
Mater Turrita
/too ree"teuh/, Rom. Relig. Cybele. * * *
māter-
Mother. Based ultimately on the baby-talk form mā-2, with the kinship term suffix *-ter-. Derivatives include mother1, matrix, and matter. 1. a. mother1, from Old English ...
Matera
▪ Italy       city, Basilicata regione, southern Italy. It lies above a deep ravine northwest of Taranto. Of obscure origin, the town formed part of the duchy of ...
materfamilias
/may'teuhr feuh mil"ee euhs/, n. the mother of a family. [1750-60; < L; cf. PATERFAMILIAS] * * *
materia medica
/meuh tear"ee euh med"i keuh/ 1. the remedial substances employed in medicine. 2. Also called pharmacognosy. the science dealing with the sources, physical characteristics, uses, ...
material
—materialness, n. /meuh tear"ee euhl/, n. 1. the substance or substances of which a thing is made or composed: Stone is a durable material. 2. anything that serves as crude or ...
material cause
Aristotelianism. See under cause (def. 8b). [1350-1400; ME] * * *
material culture
Sociol. the aggregate of physical objects or artifacts used by a society. Cf. nonmaterial culture. [1925-30] * * *
material equivalence
Logic. equivalence (def. 4b). * * *
material implication
Logic. equivalence (def. 4a). [1900-05] * * *
materialism
/meuh tear"ee euh liz'euhm/, n. 1. preoccupation with or emphasis on material objects, comforts, and considerations, with a disinterest in or rejection of spiritual, ...
materialist
—materialistic, adj. —materialistically, adv. /meuh tear"ee euh list/, n. 1. a person who is markedly more concerned with material things than with spiritual, intellectual, ...
materialistic
See materialist. * * *
materialistically
See materialist. * * *
materiality
/meuh tear'ee al"i tee/, n., pl. materialities for 2. 1. material nature or quality. 2. something material. [1520-30; < ML materialitas. See MATERIAL, -ITY] * * *
materialization
See materialize. * * *
materialize
—materialization, n. —materializer, n. /meuh tear"ee euh luyz'/, v., materialized, materializing. v.i. 1. to come into perceptible existence; appear; become actual or real; ...
materializer
See materialization. * * *
materially
/meuh tear"ee euh lee/, adv. 1. to an important degree; considerably: Their endorsement didn't help materially. 2. with reference to matter or material things and conditions; ...
materialness
See material. * * *
materials
(as used in expressions) materials salvage materials science strength of materials * * *
materials handling
the loading, unloading, and movement of goods, as within a factory or warehouse, esp. by the aid of mechanical devices. [1920-25] * * *       the movement of raw goods ...
materials processing
      the series of operations that transforms industrial materials from a raw-material state into finished parts or products. Industrial materials are defined as those ...
materials science
the study of the characteristics and uses of various materials, as glass, plastics, and metals. [1960-65] * * * Study of the properties of solid materials and how those ...
materials testing
Introduction       measurement of the characteristics and behaviour of such substances as metals, ceramics, or plastics under various conditions. The data thus obtained ...
materialsscience
ma·te·ri·als science (mə-tîrʹē-əlz) n. The study of the characteristics and uses of the various materials, such as metals, ceramics, and plastics, that are employed in ...
materiamedica
ma·te·ri·a med·i·ca (mə-tîrʹē-ə mĕdʹĭ-kə) n. 1. (used with a sing. verb) The scientific study of medicinal drugs and their sources, preparation, and use. 2. (used ...
matériel
/meuh tear'ee el"/, n. 1. the aggregate of things used or needed in any business, undertaking, or operation (distinguished from personnel). 2. Mil. arms, ammunition, and ...
maternal
—maternalism, n. —maternalistic, adj. —maternally, adv. /meuh terr"nl/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, having the qualities of, or befitting a mother: maternal instincts. 2. ...
maternal school
▪ education French  École Maternelle        a French (France) school for children between two and six years old. Private schools for young children were founded in ...
maternalism
See maternal. * * *
maternalize
/meuh terr"nl uyz'/, v.t., maternalized, maternalizing. to make maternal. Also, esp. Brit., maternalise. [1875-80; MATERNAL + -IZE] * * *
maternally
See maternalism. * * *
maternity
/meuh terr"ni tee/, n. 1. the state of being a mother; motherhood. 2. motherly quality; motherliness. 3. a section of a hospital devoted to the care of women at childbirth and of ...
maternity leave
a leave of absence for an expectant or new mother for the birth and care of the baby. [1965-70] * * *
maternityward
maternity ward n. The department of a hospital that provides care for women during pregnancy and childbirth as well as for newborn infants. * * *
mateship
/mayt"ship/, n. 1. the state of being a mate. 2. Australian. a mode of conduct among Australian men that stresses equality, friendship, and solidarity. [1585-95; MATE1 + -SHIP] * ...
matey
matey1 /may"tee/, n., pl. mateys. Chiefly Brit. Informal. comrade; chum; buddy. [1825-35; MATE1 + -Y2] matey2 —mateyness, matiness, n. /may"tee/, adj. Chiefly Brit. ...
math
math1 /math/, n. mathematics. [shortened form] math2 /math/, n. Brit. Dial. 1. a mowing. 2. the crop mowed. [1575-85; prob. back formation from AFTERMATH; cf. OE maeth; c. G ...
math.
1. mathematical. 2. mathematician. 3. mathematics. * * *
matha
▪ Hinduism       in Hinduism, any monastic establishment of world renouncers or sannyasis. The first mathas were founded by the great teacher Shankara (Śaṅkara) in ...
mathematical
—mathematically, adv. /math'euh mat"i keuhl/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or of the nature of mathematics: mathematical truth. 2. employed in the operations of mathematics: ...
mathematical expectation
1. Math. the product of the probability of the occurrence of an event and the value associated with the occurrence of a given event. 2. Statistics. the summation or integration, ...
mathematical induction
induction (def. 5). [1830-40] * * *
mathematical logic
mathematical logic n. SYMBOLIC LOGIC * * *
mathematical logic.
See symbolic logic. [1855-60] * * *
mathematical model
      either a physical representation of mathematical concepts or a mathematical representation of reality. Physical mathematical models include reproductions of plane ...
mathematical physics
Branch of mathematical analysis that emphasizes tools and techniques of particular use to physicists and engineers. It focuses on vector spaces, matrix algebra, differential ...
mathematical programming
Application of mathematical and computer programming techniques to the construction of deterministic models, principally for business and economics. For models that only require ...
mathematicalinduction
mathematical induction n. Induction. * * *
mathematicallogic
mathematical logic n. See symbolic logic. * * *
mathematically
See mathematical. * * *
mathematician
/math'euh meuh tish"euhn/, n. an expert or specialist in mathematics. [1400-50; late ME mathematicion. See MATHEMATICS, -IAN] * * *
mathematicism
      the effort to employ the formal structure and rigorous method of mathematics as a model for the conduct of philosophy. Mathematicism is manifested in Western ...
mathematics
/math'euh mat"iks/, n. 1. (used with a sing. v.) the systematic treatment of magnitude, relationships between figures and forms, and relations between quantities expressed ...
Mathematics and Physical Sciences
▪ 2003 Introduction Mathematics       Mathematics in 2002 was marked by two discoveries in number theory. The first may have practical implications; the second ...
mathematics, East Asian
Introduction       the discipline of mathematics as it developed in China and Japan.       When speaking of mathematics in East Asia, it is necessary to take into ...
mathematics, foundations of
Scientific inquiry into the nature of mathematical theories and the scope of mathematical methods. It began with Euclid's Elements as an inquiry into the logical and ...
mathematics, philosophy of
Branch of philosophy concerned with the epistemology and ontology of mathematics. Early in the 20th century, three main schools of thought called logicism, formalism, and ...
mathematics, South Asian
Introduction       the discipline of mathematics as it developed in the Indian (India) subcontinent.       The mathematics of classical Indian civilization is an ...
mathematization
See mathematize. * * *
mathematize
math·e·ma·tize (măthʹə-mə-tīz') tr.v. math·e·ma·tized, math·e·ma·tiz·ing, math·e·ma·tiz·es To reduce to or as if to mathematical ...
Mather
/madh"euhr, math"-/, n. 1. Cotton, 1663-1728, American clergyman and author. 2. his father, Increase /in"krees/, 1639-1723, American clergyman and author. * * * (as used in ...
Mather, Cotton
born Feb. 12, 1663, Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony died Feb. 13, 1728, Boston American Puritan leader. The son of Increase Mather, he earned a master's degree from Harvard ...
Mather, Increase
born June 21, 1639, Dorchester, Massachusetts Bay Colony died Aug. 23, 1723, Boston American Puritan leader. The son of a Puritan cleric, he was educated at Harvard College and ...
Mather, John C.
▪ American physicist born 1946, Roanoke, Va., U.S.    American physicist, who was corecipient, with George F. Smoot (Smoot, George F.), of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics ...
Mather, Richard
▪ Puritan clergyman born 1596, Lowton, Lancashire, Eng. died April 22, 1669, Dorchester, Massachusetts Bay Colony [U.S.]  English-born American Congregational minister, ...
Mather,Increase
Math·er (măthʹər), Increase. 1639-1723. American clergyman and writer. He and his son Cotton (1663-1728) exerted great theological and political influence on the colony of ...
Mathesius, Vilém
▪ Czech linguist born August 3, 1882, Pardubice, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary [now in Czech Republic] died April 12, 1945, Prague, Czech.       Czech linguist and scholar ...
Mathew, Theobald
▪ Irish priest born Oct. 10, 1790, Thomastown, County Tipperary, Ire. died Dec. 8, 1856, Cobh, County Cork       Irish priest and orator known as the “Apostle of ...
Mathews
Mathews [math′yo͞oz΄] Mitford M(cLeod) [mit′fərd] 1891-1985; U.S. lexicographer & educator * * *
Mathews, Charles
▪ British actor born June 28, 1776, London, Eng. died June 28, 1835, Plymouth, Devon  prominent English stage personality and theatre manager who, renowned for his genius at ...
Mathews, Charles James
▪ English writer and comedian born Dec. 26, 1803, Liverpool, Eng. died June 24, 1878, Manchester       English writer of comic sketches and one of the best high ...
Mathews, Edwin Lee
▪ 2002 “Eddie”        American professional baseball player (b. Oct. 13, 1931, Texarkana, Texas—d. Feb. 18, 2001, San Diego, Calif.), was one of major league ...
Mathews, Shailer
▪ American religious leader born May 26, 1863, Portland, Maine, U.S. died Oct. 23, 1941, Chicago       leader of the Social Gospel movement of the late 19th and early ...
Mathewson
/math"yoo seuhn/, n. Christopher ("Christy"), 1880-1925, U.S. baseball player. * * * (as used in expressions) Hood Raymond Mathewson Mathewson Christy Christopher Mathewson * * *
Mathewson, Christy
in full Christopher Mathewson born Aug. 12, 1880, Factoryville, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 7, 1925, Saranac Lake, N.Y. U.S. baseball pitcher. Mathewson played football and baseball ...
Mathewson,Christopher
Math·ew·son (măthʹyo͞o-sən), Christopher. Known as “Christy.” 1880-1925. American baseball player who won 373 games as a right-handed pitcher for the New York Giants ...
Mathias
/meuh thuy"euhs/, n. Robert Bruce (Bob), born 1930, U.S. track-and-field athlete. * * * (as used in expressions) Mathias Bob Robert Bruce Mathias Schleiden Mathias Jacob * * *
Mathias, Bob
in full Robert Bruce Mathias born Nov. 17, 1930, Tulare, Calif., U.S. U.S. decathlete. He suffered from anemia as a child and turned to athletics to gain strength. In 1948, at ...
Mathias,Robert Bruce
Ma·thi·as (mə-thīʹəs), Robert Bruce. Known as “Bob.” Born 1930. American athlete who won two consecutive Olympic gold medals in the decathlon (1948 and 1952). * * *
Mathiassen, Therkel
▪ Danish archaeologist and ethnographer born Sept. 5, 1892, Favrbo, Den. died 1967       Danish archaeologist and ethnographer whose excavations during 1921–23 to the ...
Mathieu, Claude-Louis
▪ French astronomer and mathematician born Nov. 25, 1783, Macon, Fr. died March 5, 1875, Paris       French astronomer and mathematician who worked particularly on the ...
Mathilde
/meuh til"deuh/; Fr. /mann teeld"/; Ger. /mah til"deuh/, n. a female given name, French or German form of Matilda. * * *
Mathilde, princess of Belgium
▪ princess of Belgium original name  Mathilde Marie Christine Ghislaine d'Udekem d'Acoz  born Jan. 21, 1973, Uccle, Belg.       consort of Philippe, prince of ...
Mathis, June
▪ American scriptwriter original name  June Beulah Hughes  born June 30, 1892?, Leadville, Colo., U.S. died June 26, 1927, New York, N.Y.       American scriptwriter, ...
Matholwch
/ma thoh"lookh/, n. a legendary king of Ireland and the husband of Branwen. * * *
Mathosa, Lebo
▪ 2007       South African singer (b. July 16, 1977, Daveyton township, near Johannesburg, S.Af.—d. Oct. 23, 2006, near Johannesburg), blended traditional music with ...
maths
/maths/, n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) Chiefly Brit. mathematics. [by shortening] * * *
Mathura
/mut"oo reuh/, n. a city in W Uttar Pradesh, in N India: Hindu shrine and holy city; reputed birthplace of Krishna. 140,468. Formerly, Muttra. * * * ▪ India formerly ...
Mathura art
Buddhist visual art that flourished in the trading and pilgrimage center of Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, India, from the 2nd century BC to the 12th century AD. Standing and seated ...
Mathusala
/meuh thooh"seuh leuh/, n. Douay Bible. Methuselah (def. 1). * * *
matilda
/meuh til"deuh/, n. Australian. swag2 (def. 2). [1890-95; special use of proper name Matilda] * * * I or Maud born 1102, London, Eng. died Sept. 10, 1167, near Rouen, ...
Matilda
/meuh til"deuh/; for 3 also It. /mah teel"dah/, n. 1. Also called Maud. 1102-67, empress of the Holy Roman Empire 1114-25; queen of England 1141 (daughter of Henry I of ...
Matilda of Canossa
Italian Matilde known as Matilda the Great Countess born 1046, Lucca, Tuscany died July 24, 1115, Bondeno, Romagna Countess of Tuscany. A close friend of Pope Gregory VII, she ...
Matilda Of Flanders
▪ queen consort of England French  Mathilde, or Mahault, De Flandre   died 1083       queen consort of William I the Conqueror, whom she married c. 1053. During ...
Matilija poppy
/meuh til"euh hah'/ a tree poppy, Romneya coulteri, of California and Mexico, having thin, paperlike leaves and large, solitary, white flowers. [1900-05, Amer.; after the ...
matilijapoppy
ma·til·i·ja poppy (mə-tĭlʹē-hä') n. A subshrub (Romneya coulteri) of California and Baja California, having large, solitary white flowers with yellow centers.   [After ...
matin
/mat"n/, n. 1. (often cap.) matins. Also, esp. Brit., mattins. (usually used with a sing. v.) Eccles. a. the first of the seven canonical hours. b. the service for it, properly ...
matinée
/mat'n ay"/; esp. Brit. /mat"n ay'/, n. an entertainment, esp. a dramatic or musical performance, held in the daytime, usually in the afternoon. Also, matinee. [1840-50; < F: ...
matinée idol
a male actor, usually a leading man, idolized esp. by female audiences. [1900-05] * * *
mating ball
a writhing mass of snakes, usually composed of a single female and 10 or more males attempting to mate with her. * * *
matins
mat·ins (mătʹnz) n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) 1. a. Ecclesiastical. The office that formerly constituted together with lauds the first of the seven canonical hours. b. ...
Matisse
/mann tees"/, n. Henri /ahonn rddee"/, 1869-1954, French painter. * * *
Matisse, Henri
▪ French artist Introduction in full  Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse  born December 31, 1869, Le Cateau, Picardy, France died November 3, 1954, Nice  artist often regarded as ...
Matisse, Henri (-Émile-Benoît)
born Dec. 31, 1869, Le Cateau, Picardy, Fr. died Nov. 2, 1954, Nice French painter, sculptor, and graphic artist. He was a law clerk when he became interested in art. After ...
Matisse,Henri
Ma·tisse (mə-tēsʹ, mä-), Henri. 1869-1954. French artist. A leading fauvist, he employed pure color, simple shapes, and an exquisite sense of design to produce paintings, ...
matjes herring
/maht"yeuhs/, n. young herring that have not spawned, often prepared with vinegar, sugar, salt, and spices. Also called matjes. [partial trans. of D maatjesharing; matjes-, ...
matjesherring
mat·jes herring (mätʹyĭs) n. Herring that have not spawned, filleted and prepared with salt, vinegar, sugar, and spices.   [Partial translation of Dutch maatjesharing: ...
Matlock
Town (pop., 1995 est.: 14,000), Derbyshire Dales district, administrative and historic county of Derbyshire, north-central England. It consists of a group of settlements built ...


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