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Maykop
▪ Russia also spelled  Maikop        city and capital of the republic of Adygea, Krasnodar kray (territory), Russia, on the right bank of the Belaya River. Maykop ...
Maymyo
▪ Myanmar       town, central Myanmar (Burma). It lies at the head of a shallow valley, at an elevation of about 3,450 feet (1,050 m). The town, named for Colonel (later ...
mayn't
/may"euhnt, maynt/ contraction of may not. * * *
Maynard
/may"neuhrd/, n. a male given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Blackett of Chelsea Patrick Maynard Stuart Baron Ferguson Maynard Hutchins Robert Maynard Keynes John Maynard ...
Maynard Smith, John
▪ 2005       British evolutionary biologist (b. Jan. 6, 1920, London, Eng.—d. April 19, 2004, Lewes, East Sussex, Eng.), was renowned for explaining evolutionary ...
Maynard, François
▪ French poet Maynard also spelled  Mainard   born 1582/83, Toulouse, Fr. died Dec. 28, 1646       French poet, leading disciple of François de Malherbe (Malherbe, ...
Maynard, Robert Clyve
▪ 1994       U.S. journalist and newspaper publisher (b. June 17, 1937, New York, N.Y.—d. Aug. 17, 1993, Oakland, Calif.), inspired and was mentor to hundreds of ...
Mayne, Cuthbert
▪ English martyr born 1544, near Barnstaple, Devon, Eng. died Nov. 30, 1577, Launceston, Cornwall       Roman Catholic martyr executed during the persecution of Roman ...
Mayne, Thom
▪ 2006  Iconoclastic American architect Thom Mayne received the Pritzker Architecture Prize in May 2005. He was the first American in 14 years to win the award, which honoured ...
Maynooth
▪ Ireland       village, County Kildare, Ireland, situated 15 miles (24 km) west of Dublin. Historic remains in the locality include those of a castle built by Gerald ...
mayo
/may"oh/, n. Informal. mayonnaise. [by shortening; cf. -O] * * * ▪ county, Ireland Irish  Maigh Eo (“Plain of the Yew Trees”)   county in the province of Connaught, ...
Mayo
/may"oh/, n. 1. Charles Horace, 1865-1939, and his brother William James, 1861-1939, U.S. surgeons. 2. a county in NW Connaught province, in the NW Republic of Ireland. 114,548; ...
Mayo Clinic
one of the largest medical centres in the world. It is in Rochester, Minnesota, and was established in 1889 by William James Mayo (1861–1939) and his brother Charles Horace ...
Mayo family
Family of U.S. physicians. William Worrall Mayo (b. May 31, 1819, near Manchester, Eng. d. March 6, 1911, Rochester, Minn., U.S.) came to the U.S. in 1845. He opened a surgical ...
Mayo, Elton
▪ American psychologist in full  George Elton Mayo   born Dec. 26, 1880, Adelaide, Australia died Sept. 7, 1949, Polesden Lacey, Surrey, Eng.       Australian-born ...
Mayo, Mary Anne Bryant
▪ American farm organizer née  Mary Anne Bryant   born May 24, 1845, near Battle Creek, Mich., U.S. died April 21, 1903, probably Michigan       American farm ...
Mayo, Richard Southwell Bourke, 6th earl of, Viscount Mayo of Monycrower, Baron Naas of Naas
▪ viceroy of India also called (1849–67)  Lord Naas  born Feb. 21, 1822, Dublin, Ire. died Feb. 8, 1872, Port Blair, Andaman Islands       Irish politician and ...
Mayo, Virginia
▪ 2006 Virginia Clara Jones        American actress (b. Nov. 30, 1920, St. Louis, Mo.—d. Jan. 17, 2005, Thousand Oaks, Calif.), appeared in more than 40 movies, many ...
Mayo,William James
Ma·yo (māʹō), William James. 1861-1939. American surgeon who with his brother Charles Horace Mayo (1865-1939) founded the Mayo Clinic, a renowned private medical center in ...
Mayon
/mah yawn"/, n. an active volcano in the Philippines, on SE Luzon Island. 7926 ft. (2415 m). * * *
Mayon Volcano
or Mount Mayon Active volcano, southeastern Luzon, Philippines. One of the world's most perfect volcanic cones, it has a base 80 mi (130 km) in circumference and rises to 7,943 ...
Mayon,Mount
Ma·yon (mä-yōnʹ), Mount An active volcano, 2,461.4 m (8,070 ft) high, of southeast Luzon, Philippines. It is considered one of the world's most perfect cones. * * *
mayonnaise
/may'euh nayz", may"euh nayz'/, n. a thick dressing of egg yolks, vinegar or lemon juice, oil, and seasonings, used for salads, sandwiches, vegetable dishes, etc. [1835-45; < F, ...
mayor
—mayoral, adj. —mayorship, n. /may"euhr, mair/, n. 1. the chief executive official, usually elected, of a city, village, or town. 2. the chief magistrate of a city or ...
mayor and council system
▪ municipal government       municipal government in which a locally elected council is headed by a mayor, either popularly elected or elected by the council from among ...
Mayor of Casterbridge, The
/kas"teuhr brij'/ a novel (1886) by Thomas Hardy. * * *
Mayor of London
the head of the local government of London, elected by the people of London every four years. The role of the Mayor of London is more like that of a US mayor than a traditional ...
mayor of the palace
one of a line of hereditary administrative lieutenants to the Merovingian kings who eventually took over royal function and title in the Frankish kingdoms; a palatine. [1520-30; ...
mayor's court
a city court presided over by a mayor. [1800-10] * * *
mayoral
See mayor. * * *
mayoralty
/may"euhr euhl tee, mair"euhl-/, n., pl. mayoralties. the office or tenure of a mayor. [1350-1400; MAYOR + -AL1 + -TY2; r. ME mairaltee < MF mairalte] * * *
mayoress
/may"euhr is, mair"is/, n. 1. a woman who is the chief executive official of a city, village, or town. 2. the wife of a mayor. [1400-50; MAYOR + -ESS; r. late ME meyresse] Usage. ...
mayorship
See mayoral. * * *
Mayotte
Fr. /mann yawt"/, n. one of the Comoro Islands, in the Indian Ocean, NW of Madagascar: an overseas department of France. 52,000; 144 sq. mi. (373 sq. km). * * * Mayotte ...
Mayow, John
▪ English chemist and physiologist born May 24, 1640, London, Eng. died October 1679, London  English chemist and physiologist who, about a hundred years before Joseph ...
Maypole
/may"pohl'/, n. (often l.c.) a tall pole, decorated with flowers and ribbons, around which people dance or engage in sports during May Day celebrations. [1545-55; MAY + POLE1] * ...
Maypole dance
  ceremonial folk dance performed around a tall pole garlanded with greenery or flowers and often hung with ribbons that are woven into complex patterns by the dancers. Such ...
maypop
/may"pop'/, n. 1. the edible fruit of the passionflower, Passiflora incarnata, of the southern U.S. 2. the plant itself. 3. South Midland and Southern U.S. May apple. [1850-55, ...
Mayr, Ernst
▪ American biologist in full  Ernst Walter Mayr  born July 5, 1904, Kempten, Germany died February 3, 2005, Bedford, Massachusetts, U.S.       German-born American ...
Mayr, Ernst (Walter)
born July 5, 1904, Kempten, Ger. German-born U.S. biologist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Berlin and immigrated to the U.S. in 1932. While curator of the ...
Mayr, Ernst Walter
▪ 2006       German-born American biologist (b. July 5, 1904, Kempten, Ger.—d. Feb. 3, 2005, Bedford, Mass.), did work in avian taxonomy that provided insights into ...
Mayr, Simon
▪ Italian composer also spelled  Giovanni Simone Mayr   born June 14, 1763, Mendorf, Bavaria [Germany] died Dec. 2, 1845, Bergamo, Lombardy, Austrian Empire [now in ...
Mayr,Ernst
Mayr (mīʹər), Ernst. Born 1904. German-born American biologist best known for his research into genetic variation in new populations. * * *
Mays
/mayz/, n. Willie (Howard), born 1931, U.S. baseball player. * * *
Mays, Willie
▪ American baseball player in full  Willie Howard Mays , byname  the “Say Hey Kid”  born May 6, 1931, Westfield, Alabama, U.S.    American professional baseball ...
Mays, Willie (Howard)
born May 6, 1931, Westfield, Ala., U.S. U.S. baseball player. Mays played for the Birmingham Black Barons in the National Negro League when he was only 16. The "Say Hey Kid" ...
Mays, Willie Howard,Jr.
Mays (māz), Willie Howard, Jr. Known as “the Say Hey Kid.” Born 1931. American baseball player. An exciting outfielder, base runner, and hitter primarily for the New York ...
Maysles, Al(bert) and David
born Nov. 26, 1926, Brookline, Mass., U.S.(born Jan. 10, 1932, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Jan. 3, 1987, New York, N.Y.) U.S. documentary filmmakers. Albert made his first ...
mayst
/mayst/, v. Archaic. 2nd pers. sing. pres. indic. of may1. * * *
Maysville
▪ Kentucky, United States       city, seat (1848) of Mason county, northeastern Kentucky, U.S. It lies at the confluence of Limestone Creek and the Ohio River, there ...
mayten
/muy ten"/, n. a tree, Maytenus boaria, native to Chile, having narrow leaves and drooping branches, planted as a street tree in Florida and southern California. [ < AmerSp ...
Maytime
/may"tuym'/, n. the month of May. Also called Maytide /may"tuyd'/. [1795-1805; MAY + TIME] * * *
maytree
may tree n. Chiefly British The hawthorn. * * *
Mayumba
▪ Gabon       town and Atlantic seaport of southwestern Gabon, at the tip of a spit of land sheltering the long, narrow Mbanio Lagoon. The port handles lumber exports ...
Mayuzumi, Toshiro
▪ 1998       Japanese composer (b. Feb. 20, 1929, Yokohama, Japan—d. April 10, 1997, Kawasaki, Japan), combined avant-garde Western instrumentation and techniques with ...
Mayweather, Floyd
▪ 2008 born Feb. 24, 1977, Grand Rapids, Mich.       At the beginning of 2007, boxer Floyd Mayweather, Jr., was already widely considered the best fighter, ...
mayweed
/may"weed'/, n. a composite plant, Anthemis cotula, native to Europe and Asia but naturalized in North America, having pungent, rank-smelling foliage and flower heads with a ...
Maywine
May wine n. 1. A still white wine with woodruff flavoring, often containing orange or pineapple slices. 2. A punch of champagne, claret, and Moselle or Rhine wine, flavored with ...
Maywood
/may"wood'/, n. 1. a city in NE Illinois, near Chicago. 27,998. 2. a city in SW California, near Los Angeles. 21,810. * * *
Maywood, Augusta
▪ American ballerina original name  Augusta Williams  born 1825, probably New York, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 3, 1876, Lwów, Pol., Austrian Empire [now Lviv, ...
mazaedium
ma·zae·di·um (mə-zēʹdē-əm) n. pl. ma·zae·di·a (-dē-ə) A fruiting body of some lichens in which the spores lie freely in a powdery mass that is enclosed in a ...
mazal tov
/mah"zeuhl tawv', tawf', tohv'/. See mazel tov. * * *
mazaltov
ma·zal tov (mäʹzəl tôf', tôv', tōv') interj. Variant of mazel tov. * * *
Mazama Ash
▪ paleontology       volcanic ash deposit widely distributed in the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. The ash was released by the eruption of Mount ...
Māzandarān
▪ historical region, Iran also spelled  Mazanderan,    historic region of northern Iran, bordering the Caspian Sea on the north.       An early Iranian civilization ...
Mazar, Benjamin
▪ 1996       (BINYAMIN MAISLER), Israeli biblical archaeologist (b. June 28, 1906, Ciechanowiec, Poland, Russian Empire—d. Sept. 9, 1995, Jerusalem, Israel), excavated ...
Mazār-e Sharīf
▪ Afghanistan  city, northern Afghanistan, 35 miles (56 km) south of the border with Uzbekistan, at an elevation of 1,250 feet (380 metres). The town derives its name ...
Mazar-i-Sharif
/mah zahr"ee shah reef"/, n. a city in N Afghanistan. 40,000. * * *
Mazara del Vallo
▪ Italy Mazara also spelled  Mazzara,  Latin  Mazara         town and episcopal see, Trapani provincia, western Sicily, Italy, at the mouth of the Mazaro River ...
mazard
/maz"euhrd/, n. 1. Archaic. a. head. b. face. 2. Obs. a mazer. [1595-1605; MAZ(ER) + -ARD] * * *
Mazarin
/maz"euh rin, maz'euh reen"/; Fr. /mann zann rddaonn"/, n. Jules /joohlz/; Fr. /zhyuul/, (Giulio Mazarini), 1602-61, French cardinal and statesman, born in Italy: chief minister ...
Mazarin, Jules Cardinal
orig. Giulio Raimondo Mazarini born July 14, 1602, Pescina, Abruzzi, Kingdom of Naples died March 9, 1661, Vincennes, France Italian-French cardinal and statesman. A member of ...
Mazarin, Jules, Cardinal
▪ French cardinal and statesman Introduction original Italian in full  Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino, or Mazarini  born July 14, 1602, Pescina, Abruzzi, Kingdom of Naples [now ...
Mazarin,Jules
Maz·a·rin (măz'ə-răɴʹ), Jules. 1602-1661. Italian-born French cardinal who exercised great political influence as the tutor and chief minister to Louis XIV. * * *
mazarine
/maz'euh reen", maz"euh reen', -rin/, n. 1. a deep, rich blue. 2. a silver strainer fitting over a meat dish and used for draining the water from boiled fish. [1665-75; < F, ...
Mazaruni River
▪ river, Guyana       river in north central Guyana. Its headstreams arise in the Pakaraima Mountains of western Guyana and flow generally northward. Descending from the ...
Mazatec
—Mazatecan, adj. /maz"euh tek'/, n., pl. Mazatecs, (esp. collectively) Mazatec for 1. 1. a member of an American Indian people of northern Oaxaca, in Mexico. 2. the ...
Mazatenango
▪ Guatemala       town, southwestern Guatemala. It lies along the southward-flowing Sis River, on the southern piedmont of the central highlands, at an elevation of ...
Mazatlán
/mah'sah tlahn"/, n. a seaport in S Sinaloa, in W Mexico. 169,500. * * * Port city (pop., 2000: 327,989), southwestern Sinaloa state, north-central Mexico. It occupies a ...
Mazda
/maz"deuh/, n. Zoroastrianism. See Ahura Mazda. * * *
Mazda Motor Corp.
Japanese automotive manufacturer. Founded in 1920 as a cork plant, the firm was called Toyo Kogyo Co. from 1927 until 1984, when it adopted the name Mazda Motor Corp. It began ...
Mazda Motor Corporation
▪ Japanese corporation formerly  (1927–84) Tōyō Kōgyō Company,         Japanese automotive manufacturer, maker of Mazda passenger cars, trucks, and buses. The ...
Mazdaism
/maz"deuh iz'euhm/, n. Zoroastrianism. [1870-75; MAZDA + -ISM] * * *
Mazdakism
Dualistic religion that arose in Iran in the late 5th cent AD. Its origins are uncertain, and no Mazdakite scriptures survive. It is named for Mazdak, its main Persian proponent ...
maze
—mazedly /mayzd"lee, may"zid-/, adv. —mazedness, n. —mazelike, adj. /mayz/, n., v., mazed, mazing. n. 1. a confusing network of intercommunicating paths or passages; ...
Mazeikiai
▪ Lithuania  town, northwestern Lithuania. It lies along the Virvyčia River. The first oil refinery in the Baltic states began operation in 1980 about 12 miles (20 km) ...
mazel tov
/mah"zeuhl tawv', tawf', tohv'/ an expression of congratulations and best wishes, used chiefly by Jews on an occasion of success or good fortune. Also, mazal tov. [1860-65; < ...
mazeltov
ma·zel tov also ma·zal tov (mäʹzəl tôf', tôv', tōv') interj. Used to express congratulations or best wishes.   [Mishnaic Hebrew mazzāl ṭôb, good luck : mazzāl, ...
Mazepa, Ivan
▪ Ukrainian Cossack leader in full  Ivan Stepanovych Mazepa , Mazepa also spelled  Mazeppa  born about 1639, Mazepyntsi, near Bila Tserkva, Pol. [now Ukraine] died Sept. 8 ...
mazer
/may"zeuhr/, n. a large metal drinking bowl or cup, formerly of wood. [1150-1200; ME: kind of wood (prob. maple), OE maeser- (in adj. maeseren, equiv. to maeser maple + -en ...
Mazia, Daniel
born Dec. 18, 1912, Scranton, Pa., U.S. died June 9, 1996, Monterey, Calif. U.S. cell biologist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His research focused ...
mazily
See mazy. * * *
maziness
See mazily. * * *
mazopathia
/may'zoh path"ee euh/, n. Pathol. any disease of the placenta. Also, mazopathy. [1855-60; < NL maz(a) placenta ( < Gk mâza lump, MASS) + -O- + -pathia -PATHY] * * *
mazopathy
/may zop"euh thee/, n. Pathol. 1. mazopathia. 2. mastopathy. * * *
Mazorca
▪ Argentine political group       (Spanish: “ear of corn”), political group that supported Juan Manuel de Rosas (Rosas, Juan Manuel de), the governor of Buenos Aires ...
Mazovia
▪ region, Poland also spelled  Masovia , Polish  Mazowsze        lowland territory in east-central Poland, located west of Podlasia in the basin of the middle ...
Mazovian Lowland
▪ valley, Poland Polish  Nizina Mazowiecka        valley district, east-central Poland. Located in the eastern part of the central lowlands, it is directly south of ...
Mazowiecki, Tadeusz
born April 18, 1927, Płock, Pol. Polish politician. After studying law, he cofounded and edited the independent Catholic monthly Wiȩź (1958–81). A principal adviser to ...
Mazowieckie
▪ province, Poland Introduction Polish  Województwo Mazowieckie        województwo (province), east-central Poland. It is bounded by the provinces of ...
Mazu
Chin. /mah"zyuu"/, n. Pinyin. Matsu. * * *
mazuma
/meuh zooh"meuh/, n. Slang. money. [1875-80; < Yiddish mezumen < Heb mezuman set, fixed] * * *
Mazumdar-Shaw, Kiran
▪ 2006  By 2005 Indian businesswoman Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw had completed a remarkable rise from struggling entrepreneur to leader of India's premier biotechnology firm and ...
mazurka
/meuh zerr"keuh, -zoor"-/, n. 1. a lively Polish dance in moderately quick triple meter. 2. music for, or in the rhythm of, this dance. Also, mazourka. [1810-20; < Pol, equiv. to ...
mazy
—mazily, adv. —maziness, n. /may"zee/, adj., mazier, maziest. full of confusing turns, passages, etc.; like a maze; labyrinthine. [1500-10; MAZE + -Y1] * * *
Mazyadid Dynasty
▪ Muslim Arab dynasty       Muslim Arab dynasty that ruled central Iraq from its capital at al-Ḥillah in the period from about 961 to 1150. The Mazyad family, which ...
mazzard
/maz"euhrd/, n. a wild sweet cherry, Prunus avium, used as a rootstock for cultivated varieties of cherries. [1570-80; earlier mazer; cf. obs. mazers spots, MEASLES; see -ARD] * ...
Mazzei, Philip
▪ Italian physician, merchant, and author born December 25, 1730, Poggio a Caiano, Tuscany [Italy] died March 19, 1816, Pisa, Italy       Italian physician, merchant, ...
Mazzini
—Mazzinian /mat see"nee euhn, mad zee"-/, adj., n. /maht tsee"nee, mahd dzee"-/; Eng. /mat see"nee, mad zee"-/, n. Giuseppe /jooh zep"pe/, 1805-72, Italian patriot and ...
Mazzini, Giuseppe
born June 22, 1805, Genoa died March 10, 1872, Pisa, Italy Italian patriot and a major figure in the making of modern Italy. A lawyer, he joined the secret independence group ...
Mazzini,Giuseppe
Maz·zi·ni (mät-sēʹnē), Giuseppe. 1805-1872. Italian patriot who spurred the movement for an independent, unified Italy with his political writings and machinations, ...
Ma{ʽ}at
In ancient Egyptian religion, the personification of truth, justice, and the cosmic order. Maʽat was the daughter of Re, the sun god, and she stood at the head of his bark as ...
Małachowski, Stanisław
▪ Polish statesman born Aug. 24, 1736, Końskie, Pol. died Dec. 29, 1809, Warsaw, Duchy of Warsaw [now in Poland]  Polish statesman who presided over Poland's historic Four ...
Małopolskie
▪ province, Poland Introduction Polish  Województwo Małopolskie        województwo (province), southern Poland. It is bounded by the provinces of Świętokrzyskie ...
Maʾmūn, al-
born 786, Baghdad, Iraq died August 833, Tarsus, Cilicia Seventh caliph (r. 813–833) of the Abbāsid dynasty. He was the son of the celebrated Hārūn al-Rashīd and after ...
Maʾrib
Ancient city ruins, north-central Yemen. The ancient fortified city of Maʾrib was the centre of the pre-Islamic state of Sabaʾ (950–115 BC). It was located on one of the ...
Maʿādī, Al-
▪ ancient site, Egypt       predynastic Egyptian (Egypt, ancient) site located just south of present-day Cairo in Lower Egypt. The settlement at Al-Maʿādī was ...
maʿamadot
▪ Judaism       (Hebrew: “stands,” or “posts”), 24 groups of Jewish laymen that witnessed, by turns of one week each, the daily sacrifice in the Second Temple of ...
Maʿān
▪ Jordan       town, southern Jordan. It is a regional trade centre for the sparsely settled southern part of the country, which is inhabited mainly by the Ḥuwayṭat ...
Maʿarrī, al-
▪ Arab poet in full  Abū al-ʿAlāʾ Aḥmad ibn ʿAbd Allāh al-Maʿarrī   born December 973, Maʿarrat al-Nuʿmān, near Aleppo, Syria died May 1057, Maʿarrat ...
Maʿīn
▪ ancient kingdom, Yemen       ancient South Arabian kingdom that flourished in the 4th–2nd century BC in what is now northern Yemen. The Minaeans were a peaceful ...
Maʿlula
▪ Syria also spelled  Maalula,         village in southern Syria about 30 mi (50 km) north of Damascus. The houses are built on the slopes of a huge cirque of rocks ...
MB
1. Manitoba, Canada (approved for postal use). 2. Computers. megabyte; megabytes. * * *
Mb
Computers. megabit; megabits. * * *
mb
Physics. 1. millibar; millibars. 2. millibarn; millibarns. * * *
MBA
MBA or M.B.A. abbrev. Master of Business Administration * * * MBA abbr. Master of Business Administration. * * *
Mbabane
/bah bahn", -bah"nee, euhm bah-/, n. a city in and the capital of Swaziland, in the NW part. 24,000. * * * Capital and largest town (pop., 1998 est.: 60,000) of ...
Mbale
▪ Uganda       town located in southeastern Uganda. It lies at the western foot of the extinct volcano Mount Elgon (Elgon, Mount) (14,178 feet [4,321 metres]), 75 miles ...
Mbalmayo
▪ Cameroon       town located in south-central Cameroon. It lies along the Nyong River south of Yaoundé. Located within the forest zone, it has a major plywood ...
Mbandaka
/bahn"dah kah', euhm bahn"-/, n. a city in the W Democratic Republic of the Congo. 134,495. Formerly, Coquilhatville. * * * ▪ Democratic Republic of the Congo formerly (until ...
mbaqanga
mbaqanga [m bə käŋ′gə] n. a South African urban dance music with a heavy beat * * *
Mbarara
▪ Uganda       town located in southwestern Uganda. It is situated 167 miles (270 km) southwest of Kampala at an elevation of about 4,850 feet (1,480 metres) and is ...
Mbari Mbayo Club
▪ African arts club       club established for African writers (African literature), artists, and musicians at Ibadan and Oshogbo in Nigeria. The first Mbari Club was ...
Mbayá
▪ people also called  Caduveo, or Guaycurú,         South American Indians of the Argentine, Paraguayan, and Brazilian Chaco, speakers of a Guaycuruan language. At ...
mbd
(of oil) million barrels per day. * * *
MBE
Multistate Bar Examination. * * *
Mbeki
Mbeki [m bek′ē] Thabo [tä′bō] 1942- ; president of South Africa (1999- ) * * *
Mbeki, Govan Archibald Mvuyelwa
▪ 2002       South African nationalist (b. July 9, 1910, Nqamakwe, S.Af.—d. Aug. 30, 2001, Port Elizabeth, S.Af.), as a teacher, writer, labour organizer, and editor ...
Mbeki, Thabo
born June 18, 1942, Idutywa, Transkei President of South Africa (from 1999). The son of an anti-apartheid activist, he studied economics at Sussex University in Britain, then ...
Mbeki,Thabo
Mbe·ki (əm-bāʹkē), Thabo. Born 1942. South African economist and politician who served as deputy president under Nelson Mandela (1994-1999). Mbeki was elected to succeed ...
Mbembe
▪ people       group of peoples living along the middle Cross River in Nigeria. Numbering about 100,000 in the late 20th century, they speak a language of the ...
mbira
/euhm bear"euh/, n. a musical instrument of Africa usually made out of a gourd that serves as a resonating box, to which vibrating metal or wooden strips are attached for ...
Mbm
one thousand feet, board measure. * * *
MBO
management by objectives. * * *
Mbomu
/boh"mooh, euhm boh"-/, n. Bomu. * * *
Mboya
/euhm boy"euh/, n. Tom (Thomas Joseph Mboya), 1930-69, African political leader in Kenya. * * *
Mboya, Tom
orig. Thomas Joseph Mboya born Aug. 15, 1930, Kilima Mbogo, near Nairobi, Kenya died July 5, 1969, Nairobi Kenyan political leader. During the Mau Mau rebellion (1952–56) ...
Mbps
Mbps abbr. megabits per second. * * *
Mbuji-Mayi
/booh"jee muy", -mah"yee, euhm booh"-/, n. a city in the S central Democratic Republic of the Congo. 336,654. Formerly, Bakwanga. * * * ▪ Democratic Republic of the ...
MbujiMayi
Mbu·ji Ma·yi (əm-bo͞oʹjē mäʹyē) A city of south-central Congo (formerly Zaire) east of Kinshasa. It is a commercial center in a diamond-mining region. Population: ...
mbulu-ngulu
▪ African art       tomb figure of carved wood covered with a sheet of copper or brass, created by the Kota tribe of Gabon, Africa, to protect the dead. Its traditional ...
Mbundu
/euhm boon"dooh/, n., pl. Mbundus, (esp. collectively) Mbundu for 1. 1. Also called Ovimbundu. a Bantu-speaking people of southern Angola. 2. Also called Umbundu. the Bantu ...
MC
1. Marine Corps. 2. master of ceremonies. 3. Medical Corps. 4. Member of Congress. * * *
Mc
1. megacurie; megacuries. 2. megacycle. * * *
mC
millicoulomb; millicoulombs. * * *
mc
1. megacycle. 2. meter-candle. 3. millicurie; millicuries. * * *
Mc-
Mc-1 a combining form, used esp. to form nonce words, with the meaning "generic; homogenized": McSchools that offer no individual attention; reading McNews instead of a serious ...
MC5, the
▪ American rock group       American rock group, one of the most controversial and ultimately influential bands of the late 1960s. The principal members were Rob Tyner ...
MCA
in full Music Corporation of America Entertainment conglomerate. It was founded in Chicago in 1924 by Jules Stein as a talent agency. In the 1960s it bought Decca Records and ...
McAdam, John (Loudon)
born Sept. 21, 1756, Ayr, Ayrshire, Scot. died Nov. 26, 1836, Moffat, Dumfriesshire Scottish inventor of the macadam road surface. He made an early fortune in his uncle's New ...
McAdam, John Loudon
▪ British inventor born Sept. 21, 1756, Ayr, Ayrshire, Scot. died Nov. 26, 1836, Moffat, Dumfriesshire  Scottish inventor of the macadam road (roads and highways) ...
McAdoo
/mak"euh dooh'/, n. William Gibbs, 1863-1941, U.S. lawyer and statesman: Secretary of the Treasury 1913-18. * * *
McAdoo, William G
▪ American politician born Oct. 31, 1863, near Marietta, Ga., U.S. died Feb. 1, 1941, Washington, D.C.  U.S. secretary of the treasury (1913–18), a founder and chairman ...
McAdoo, William G(ibbs)
born Oct. 31, 1863, near Marietta, Ga., U.S. died Feb. 1, 1941, Washington, D.C. U.S. public official. In 1892 he moved to New York, where he organized the Hudson and Manhattan ...
McAleese, Mary
▪ president of Ireland née  Mary Patricia Leneghan  born June 27, 1951, Belfast, Northern Ireland    president of Ireland from 1997.       Raised on the edge of ...
McAlester
/meuh kal"i steuhr/, n. a city in E Oklahoma. 17,255. * * * ▪ Oklahoma, United States       city, seat (1907) of Pittsburg county, southeastern Oklahoma, U.S., south ...
McAliskey
(1947– ) a Northern Ireland politician, called Bernadette Devlin before her marriage. She was a leader of the Roman Catholic civil rights movement in the late 1960s and became ...
McAllen
/meuh kal"euhn/, n. a city in S Texas, on the Rio Grande. 67,042. * * * ▪ Texas, United States       city, Hidalgo county, southern Texas, U.S., in the irrigated lower ...
McAllister, (Samuel) Ward
▪ American lawyer born December 1827, Savannah, Ga., U.S. died Jan. 31, 1895, New York City  U.S. lawyer and social leader who originated the phrase “the Four Hundred” to ...
McAlmon, Robert
▪ American author in full  Robert Menzies McAlmon  born March 9, 1896, Clifton, Kan., U.S. died Feb. 2, 1956, Desert Hot Springs, Calif.       American author and ...
McArdle's disease
▪ pathology also called  Glycogenosis Type V,         rare hereditary deficiency of the enzyme glycogen phosphorylase in muscle cells. In the absence of this enzyme, ...
McArthur River
▪ river, Northern Territory, Australia       river in northeastern Northern Territory, Australia, rising about 45 miles (70 km) south of Anthony Lagoon, along the scarp ...
MCAT
Medical College Admission Test. * * *
McAuley, Catherine Elizabeth
▪ Roman Catholic nun born Sept. 29, 1787, County Dublin, Ire. died Nov. 11, 1841, Dublin       founder of the Religious Sisters of Mercy (Mercy, Sisters of) (R.S.M.), a ...
McAuley, James Phillip
▪ Australian poet born Oct. 12, 1917, Lakemba, N.S.W., Australia died Oct. 15, 1976, Hobart, Tasmania       Australian poet noted for his classical approach, great ...
McAuliffe
/meuh kaw"lif/, n. Anthony Clement, 1898-1975, U.S. Army general. * * *
McAuliffe, Anthony C(lement)
▪ United States general born July 2, 1898, Washington, D.C. died Aug. 11, 1975, Washington  U.S. Army general who commanded the force defending Bastogne, Belgium, in the ...
McAuliffe, Christa Corrigan
▪ American educator née  Sharon Christa Corrigan  born Sept. 2, 1948, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Jan. 28, 1986, in-flight, off Cape Canaveral, Fla.  American teacher who was ...
McBain, Ed
▪ 2006       see Hunter, Evan. * * *
McBrayer, Staley Thomas
▪ 2003       American newspaper publisher (b. June 22, 1909, Saltillo, Texas—d. April 14, 2002, Fort Worth, Texas), led a team of colleagues in adapting the offset ...
McBride, Mary Margaret
▪ American journalist and broadcaster born Nov. 16, 1899, Paris, Mo., U.S. died April 7, 1976, West Shokan, N.Y.       American journalist and broadcaster, perhaps best ...
McBride, Patricia
▪ American dancer born Aug. 23, 1942, Teaneck, N.J., U.S.       American ballerina, best known for her performances with the New York City Ballet.       McBride ...
McBride, Sir Richard
▪ Canadian statesman born Dec. 15, 1870, New Westminster, B.C., Can. died Aug. 6, 1917, London, Eng.       statesman who was premier of British Columbia from 1903 to ...
MCC
➡ Marylebone Cricket Club. * * *
McCain, Cindy
▪ American businesswoman and humanitarian née  Cindy Lou Hensley  born May 20, 1954, Phoenix, Ariz., U.S.    American businesswoman and humanitarian and the wife of U.S. ...
McCain, Harrison
▪ 2005       Canadian entrepreneur (b. Nov. 3, 1927, Florenceville, N.B.—d. March 18, 2004, Boston, Mass.), launched (1956) McCain Foods Ltd. (with his brother ...
McCain, John
▪ 2009 born Aug. 29, 1936, Panama Canal Zone       U.S. Sen. John McCain of Arizona was the Republican Party's nominee for president in 2008. On November 4 he was ...
McCall Smith
(1948– ) a writer who was born in Zimbabwe and moved to Scotland. He has written a series of humorous books about a female detective in Botswana who solves people’s everyday ...
McCall Smith, Alexander
▪ 2009 Sandy McCall Smith  born Aug. 24, 1948, Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia [now Zimbabwe]       On March 23, 2008, BBC television broadcast an adaptation of Alexander ...
McCalla, Val
▪ British publisher in full  Val Irvine McCalla  born October 3, 1943, Kingston, Jamaica died August 22, 2002, Seaford, East Sussex, England       Jamaican-born ...
McCalla, Val Irvine
▪ 2003       Jamaican-born British publisher (b. Oct. 3, 1943, Kingston, Jam.—d. Aug. 22, 2002, Seaford, East Sussex, Eng.), founded The Voice, a highly successful ...
McCambridge, Mercedes
▪ 2005       American actress (b. March 17, 1916, Joliet, Ill.—d. March 2, 2004, La Jolla, Calif.), had a long career in radio, film, and television and on the stage ...
McCampbell, David
▪ 1997       U.S. naval pilot and World War II captain who commanded the fearsome Air Group 15 in the Philippines in 1944 and personally destroyed 34 enemy Japanese ...
McCandless
/meuh kand"lis/, n. a town in SW Pennsylvania. 26,250. * * *
McCardle, Ex Parte
▪ law case       (1869), refusal of the U.S. Supreme Court to hear a case involving the Reconstruction Acts. The court's refusal marked the apogee of Radical Republican ...
McCarey, Leo
▪ American director in full  Thomas Leo McCarey  born October 3, 1898, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died July 5, 1969, Santa Monica, Calif.       American movie ...
McCarran-Walter Act
/meuh kar"euhn wawl"teuhr/ the Immigration and Nationality Act enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1952 that removed racial barriers to immigration and empowered the Department of ...
McCarthy
/meuh kahr"thee/, n. 1. Cormac, /kawr"mak, -meuhk/, born 1933, U.S. novelist. 2. Joseph R(aymond), 1909-57, U.S. politician. 3. Joseph Vincent, 1887-1978, U.S. baseball ...
McCarthy, Cormac
orig. Charles McCarthy, Jr. born July 20, 1933, Providence, R.I., U.S. U.S. novelist. He grew up in Tennessee and dropped out of the University of Tennessee to join the Air ...
McCarthy, Eugene J(oseph)
born March 29, 1916, Watkins, Minn., U.S. U.S. politician. He taught at the College of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives ...
McCarthy, Eugene J.
▪ United States senator in full  Eugene Joseph McCarthy  born March 29, 1916, Watkins, Minnesota, U.S. died December 10, 2005, Washington, D.C.  U.S. senator, whose entry ...
McCarthy, Eugene Joseph
▪ 2006  American politician (b. March 29, 1916, Watkins, Minn.—d. Dec. 10, 2005, Washington, D.C.), left an indelible mark on U.S. history by prompting fellow Democrat ...
McCarthy, John
born Sept. 4, 1927, Boston, Mass., U.S. U.S. computer scientist. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University. A pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence, he created ...
McCarthy, Joseph R(aymond)
born Nov. 14, 1908, near Appleton, Wis., U.S. died May 2, 1957, Bethesda, Md. U.S. politician. He was a Wisconsin circuit judge (1940–42) before enlisting in the Marine Corps ...
McCarthy, Joseph R.
▪ United States senator in full  Joseph Raymond McCarthy  born Nov. 14, 1908, near Appleton, Wis., U.S. died May 2, 1957, Bethesda, Md.  U.S. senator who dominated the ...
McCarthy, Mary
▪ American novelist and critic in full  Mary Therese McCarthy  born June 21, 1912, Seattle, Wash., U.S. died Oct. 25, 1989, New York, N.Y.       American critic and ...
McCarthy, Mary (Therese)
born June 21, 1912, Seattle, Wash., U.S. died Oct. 25, 1989, New York, N.Y. U.S. novelist and critic. She served on the editorial staff of the Partisan Review from 1937 to ...
McCarthy,Joseph Raymond
Mc·Car·thy (mə-kärʹthē), Joseph Raymond. 1908-1957. American politician. A U.S. senator from Wisconsin (1947-1957), he presided over the permanent subcommittee on ...
McCarthy,Mary Therese
McCarthy, Mary Therese. 1912-1989. American writer noted for her sharp literary criticism and satirical fiction, including the novels The Groves of Academe (1952) and The Group ...
McCarthyism
—McCarthyite, n., adj. /meuh kahr"thee iz'euhm/, n. 1. the practice of making accusations of disloyalty, esp. of pro-Communist activity, in many instances unsupported by proof ...
McCarthyist
See McCarthyism. * * *
McCartney
(1942– ) an English musician and writer of songs who was a member of the Beatles. In the 1960s, together with John Lennon, he wrote and recorded some of the best-known pop ...
McCartney, Linda Louise Eastman
▪ 1999       American-born British photographer and entrepreneur who overcame initial public skepticism and the pressures of a high-profile marriage to British ...
McCartney, Sir (James) Paul
born June 18, 1942, Liverpool, Eng. British singer and songwriter. Born to a working-class family, he learned piano but switched to guitar after hearing American rock-and-roll ...
McCartney, Sir (James)Paul
Mc·Cart·ney (mə-kärtʹnē), Sir (James) Paul. Born 1942. British musician who as a member of the Beatles, a popular music group (1960-1971), wrote many notable songs with ...
McCartney, Sir Paul
▪ British musician byname of  James Paul McCartney  born June 18, 1942, Liverpool, Eng.    British vocalist, songwriter, composer, bass player, poet, and painter whose ...
McCartney, Stella
▪ 2002       When Stella McCartney was asked by a London fashion critic why the clothes she designed for French fashion label Chloé held so much appeal for young women, ...
McCarty, Maclyn
born June 9, 1911, South Bend, Ind., U.S. died Jan. 2, 2005, New York, N.Y. U.S. biologist. He received an M.D. (1937) at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. With Oswald Avery ...
McCauley
/meuh kaw"lee/, n. Mary Ludwig Hays, real name of Molly Pitcher. * * *
McCauley,Mary Ludwig Hays
Mc·Cau·ley (mə-kôʹlē), Mary Ludwig Hays. Known as Molly Pitch·er (pĭchʹər) 1754-1832. American Revolutionary heroine who carried water to soldiers during the Battle of ...
McCay
Mc·Cay (mə-kāʹ), Winsor. 1871-1934. American cartoonist credited with creating the first American animated film, The Sinking of the Lusitania (1918). He also created the ...
McCay, Winsor
▪ American animator born September 26, 1867? [see Researcher's Note], , Ontario, Canada? died July 26, 1934, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.       American newspaper ...
McClellan
/meuh klel"euhn/, n. George Brinton /brin"tn/, 1826-85, Union general in the American Civil War. * * *
McClellan, George B
▪ United States general born Dec. 3, 1826, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 29, 1885, Orange, N.J.  general who skillfully reorganized Union forces in the first year of the ...
McClellan, George B(rinton)
born Dec. 3, 1826, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 29, 1885, Orange, N.J. U.S. Army officer. After graduating from West Point, he served in the Mexican War and then returned ...
McClellan,George Brinton
Mc·Clel·lan (mə-klĕlʹən), George Brinton. 1826-1885. American general and commander of the Union Army (1861-1862). His overcautious tactics prompted President Abraham ...
McClelland, Jack
▪ 2005 John Gordon McClelland        Canadian book publisher (b. July 30, 1922, Toronto, Ont.—d. June 14, 2004, Toronto), invigorated the world of Canadian literature ...
McClendon, Sarah Newcomb
▪ 2004       American journalist (b. July 8, 1910, Tyler, Texas—d. Jan. 8, 2003, Washington, D.C.), became a Washington institution during her more than 50 years of ...
McClintock, Barbara
born June 16, 1902, Hartford, Conn., U.S. died Sept. 2, 1992, Huntington, N.Y. U.S. geneticist. She received her doctorate from Cornell University. In the 1940s and '50s, her ...
McClintock, Sir Francis Leopold
▪ Irish polar explorer born July 8, 1819, Dundalk, County Louth, Ire. died Nov. 17, 1907, London, Eng.       British naval officer and explorer who discovered the ...
McClintock,Barbara
Mc·Clin·tock (mə-klĭnʹtək, -tŏk'), Barbara. 1902-1992. American genetic botanist. She won a 1983 Nobel Prize for discovering that genes are mobile within the chromosomes ...
McCloskey
/meuh klos"kee/, n. John, 1810-85, U.S. Roman Catholic clergyman: first U.S. cardinal 1875. * * *
McCloskey, John
▪ American archbishop born March 10, 1810, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 10, 1885, New York, N.Y.  second archbishop of New York, who was the first American churchman to be ...
McCloskey, Robert
▪ 2004       American writer and illustrator (b. Sept. 14, 1914, Hamilton, Ohio—d. June 30, 2003, Deer Isle, Maine), delighted children with a series of books noted ...
McCloskey,John
Mc·Clos·key (mə-klŏs-kē), John. 1810-1885. American religious leader who became the first American Roman Catholic cardinal (1875). * * *
McCloy
/meuh kloy"/, n. John Jay, 1895-1989, U.S. lawyer, banker, and government official. * * *
McCloy, John J(ay)
▪ American diplomat born March 31, 1895, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died March 11, 1989, Stamford, Conn.  American diplomat and lawyer. He was an adviser to every U.S. president ...
McClung, Clarence E
▪ American zoologist born April 6, 1870, Clayton, Calif., U.S. died Jan. 17, 1946, Swarthmore, Pa.       American zoologist whose study of the mechanisms of heredity ...
McClung, Clarence E(rwin)
born April 6, 1870, Clayton, Calif., U.S. died Jan. 17, 1946, Swarthmore, Pa. U.S. zoologist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. His study of the mechanisms ...
McClung, Nellie
orig. Nellie Mooney born Oct. 20, 1873, Chatsworth, Ont., Can. died Sept. 1, 1951, Victoria, B.C. Canadian writer and reformer. After marrying in 1896, she became prominent in ...
McClure
/meuh kloor"/, n. Samuel Sidney, 1857-1949, U.S. editor and publisher, born in Ireland. * * *
McClure, Doug
▪ 1996       U.S. actor (b. May 11, 1935, Glendale, Calif.—d. Feb. 5, 1995, Sherman Oaks, Calif.), was a onetime broncobuster whose engaging looks and winning smile ...
McClure, Sir Robert John Le Mesurier
▪ Irish explorer born Jan. 28, 1807, Wexford, County Wexford, Ire. died Oct. 17, 1873, London  Irish naval officer who discovered a waterway, known as the Northwest Passage, ...
McClure,Samuel Sidney
Mc·Clure (mə-klo͝orʹ), Samuel Sidney. 1857-1949. Irish-born American editor and publisher who founded McClure's Magazine (1893), an influential muckraking periodical. * * *
McClureStrait
McClure Strait An arm of the Beaufort Sea in northern Northwest Territories, Canada, between Banks Island and Melville Island. Icebreakers cut through the strait for the first ...
McCluskie, Samuel Joseph
▪ 1996       British trade unionist who wielded great power as general secretary of the National Union of Seamen, 1986-90; executive officer of the Rail, Maritime and ...
McColgan
(1964– ) a Scottish runner in long distance races. She won the gold medal for the 10 000 metres at the Commonwealth Games in 1986 and 1990 and at the World Championships in ...
McComb
/meuh kohm"/, n. a town in S Mississippi. 12,331. * * *
McConnell
(1960– ) a Scottish Labour politician. He was elected a Member of the Scottish Parliament in 1999 and was its Finance Minister and then its Education Minister before becoming ...
McConnell, Francis John
▪ American clergyman born Aug. 18, 1871, Trinway, Ohio, U.S. died Aug. 18, 1953, Lucasville, Ohio       American Methodist bishop, college president, and social ...
McCook
▪ Nebraska, United States       city, seat (1896) of Red Willow county, southwestern Nebraska, U.S., on the Republican River, about 70 miles (115 km) south of North ...
McCool, William C.
▪ 2004       American astronaut (b. Sept. 23, 1961, San Diego, Calif.—d. Feb. 1, 2003, over Texas), was pilot of the space shuttle Columbia. McCool was educated at the ...
McCorkle, Susannah
▪ 2002       American jazz singer (b. Jan. 4, 1946, Berkeley, Calif.—d. May 19, 2001, New York, N.Y.), brought fresh meaning to popular songs through subtle ...
McCormack
/meuh kawr"mik/, n. 1. John, 1884-1945, U.S. tenor, born in Ireland. 2. John William, 1891-1980, U.S. politician: Speaker of the House 1962-70. * * *
McCormack, John
born June 14, 1884, Athlone, County Westmeath, Ire. died Sept. 16, 1945, near Dublin Irish-U.S. tenor. He toured with Dublin's cathedral choir as a boy, studied voice in Milan, ...
McCormack, John W
▪ American politician born Dec. 21, 1891, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1980, Dedham, Mass.       American politician who served as speaker of the U.S. House of ...
McCormack, Mark Hume
▪ 2004       American sports marketing entrepreneur (b. Nov. 6, 1930, Chicago, Ill.—d. May 16, 2003, New York, N.Y.), began in 1960 with a handshake agreement to ...
McCormack,John
Mc·Cor·mack (mə-kôrʹmək, -mĭk), John. 1884-1945. Irish-born American operatic tenor whose notable roles included Rodolpho in La Bohème and Lieutenant Pinkerton in Madame ...
McCormick
/meuh kawr"mik/, n. 1. Cyrus Hall, 1809-84, U.S. inventor, esp. of harvesting machinery. 2. Robert Rutherford, 1880-1955, U.S. newspaper publisher. * * * (as used in ...
McCormick, Anne Elizabeth O'Hare
▪ American journalist born May 16, 1882, Wakefield, Yorkshire, Eng. died May 29, 1954, New York, N.Y., U.S.       English-born American journalist who gained a ...
McCormick, Cyrus Hall
born Feb. 15, 1809, Rockbridge county, Va., U.S. died May 13, 1884, Chicago, Ill. U.S. industrialist and inventor. He is generally credited with the development (from 1831) of ...
McCormick, Kenneth Dale
▪ 1998       American editor who served as editor in chief at Doubleday and Co., Inc., from 1942 to 1971 and then as senior consulting editor until 1987; during that ...
McCormick, Pat
▪ American athlete née  Patricia Joan Keller  born May 12, 1930, Seal Beach, California, U.S.    American diver who was the first athlete to win gold medals in both the ...
McCormick, Robert R
▪ American publisher born July 30, 1880, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died April 1, 1955, Wheaton, Ill.       American newspaper editor and publisher, popularly known as Colonel ...
McCormick, Robert R(utherford)
known as Colonel McCormick born July 30, 1880, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died April 1, 1955, Wheaton, Ill. U.S. newspaper editor and publisher. He was a grandnephew of Cyrus H. ...


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