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monosaccharide
/mon'euh sak"euh ruyd', -euhr id/, n. Chem. a carbohydrate that does not hydrolyze, as glucose, fructose, or ribose, occurring naturally or obtained by the hydrolysis of ...
monoscope
/mon"euh skohp'/, n. a cathode-ray tube that provides a signal of a fixed pattern for testing television equipment. [1935-40; MONO- + -SCOPE] * * *
monosepalous
/mon'euh sep"euh leuhs/, adj. Bot. 1. gamosepalous. 2. having only one sepal, as a calyx. [1820-30; MONO- + -SEPALOUS] * * *
monosodium
/mon'euh soh"dee euhm/, adj. Chem. containing one atom of sodium. [1855-60; MONO- + SODIUM] * * *
monosodium glutamate
Chem. a white, crystalline, water-soluble powder, C5H8NNaO4·H2O, used to intensify the flavor of foods. Also called MSG, sodium glutamate. Cf. glutamic acid. [1925-30] * * ...
monosodium glutamate (MSG)
White crystalline substance, a sodium salt of the amino acid glutamic acid. MSG is used to intensify the natural flavour of meats and vegetables. It elicits a unique taste, ...
monosodiumglutamate
mon·o·so·di·um glutamate (mŏn'ə-sōʹdē-əm) n. Abbr. MSG A white crystalline compound, COOH(CH2)2CH(NH2)COONa, used as a flavor enhancer in foods. * * *
monosome
/mon"euh sohm'/, n. Genetics. 1. a chromosome having no homologue, esp. an unpaired X chromosome. 2. a protein-synthetic complex involving the translation of a messenger RNA ...
monosomic
/mon'euh soh"mik/, adj. Genetics. having one less than the usual diploid number of chromosomes. [1925-30; MONOSOME + -IC] * * *
monosomy
See monosomic. * * *
monospermous
/mon'euh sperr"meuhs/, adj. Bot. having one seed. Also, monospermal. [1720-30; < NL monospermus. See MONO-, SPERMOUS] * * *
monospermy
—monospermic, adj. /mon"euh sperr'mee/, n. the fertilization of an ovum by only one spermatozoon. [1900-05; MONO- + -SPERM + -Y3] * * *
monostable
/mon'euh stay"beuhl/, adj. (of an electric or electronic circuit) having only one stable state. [MONO- + STABLE2] * * *
monostearate
/mon'euh stee"euh rayt', -stear"ayt/, n. Chem. a stearate containing one stearoyl group. [MONO- + STEARATE] * * *
monostele
monostele [män΄ō stē′lē, män′ōstēl΄] n. 〚 MONO- + STELE〛 a stem or root having a single vascular cylinder monostelic adj. * * *
monostich
—monostichic, adj. /mon"euh stik'/, n. 1. a poem or epigram consisting of a single metrical line. 2. a single line of poetry. [1570-80; < LL monostichum < Gk monóstichon, n. ...
monostome
/mon"euh stohm'/, adj. having a single mouth, pore, or stoma. Also, monostomous /meuh nos"teuh meuhs/. [1840-50; MONO- + -STOME] * * *
monostrophe
/meuh nos"treuh fee, mon"euh strohf'/, n. a poem in which all the strophes or stanzas are of the same metrical form. [1885-90; < Gk monóstrophos consisting of one strophe. See ...
monostrophic
/mon'euh strof"ik, -stroh"fik/, adj. 1. consisting of stanzas or strophes all having the same metrical structure. n. 2. monostrophics, monostrophic verses. [1665-75; < Gk ...
monostylous
/mon'euh stuy"leuhs/, adj. Bot. having only one style. [MONO- + -stylous; see -STYLE1, -OUS] * * *
monosubstituted
/mon'euh sub"sti tooh'tid, -tyooh'-/, adj. Chem. containing one substituent. [1885-90; MONO- + SUBSTITUTED] * * *
monosyllabic
—monosyllabically, adv. —monosyllabicity /mon'euh sil'euh bis"i tee/, n. /mon'euh si lab"ik/, adj. 1. having only one syllable, as the word no. 2. having a vocabulary ...
monosyllabically
See monosyllabic. * * *
monosyllabism
/mon'euh sil"euh biz'euhm/, n. 1. monosyllabic character. 2. the use of monosyllables. [1795-1805; < LL monosyllab(on) monosyllable + -ISM] * * *
monosyllable
/mon"euh sil'euh beuhl/, n. a word of one syllable, as yes or no. [1525-35; MONO- + SYLLABLE] * * *
monosymmetric
—monosymmetrically, adv. —monosymmetry /mon'euh sim"i tree/, n. /mon'euh si me"trik/, adj. Biol., Bot. zygomorphic. Also, monosymmetrical. [1875-80; MONO- + SYMMETRIC] * * *
monosynaptic
mon·o·syn·ap·tic (mŏn'ō-sə-năpʹtĭk) adj. Having one neural synapse.   mon'o·syn·apʹti·cal·ly adv. * * *
monosynaptically
See monosynaptic. * * *
monotechnic
/mon'euh tek"nik/, adj. of or offering instruction in a single scientific or technical subject. [1900-05; MONO- + (POLY)TECHNIC] * * *
monotheism
—monotheist, n., adj. —monotheistic, monotheistical, adj. —monotheistically, adv. /mon"euh thee iz'euhm/, n. the doctrine or belief that there is only one God. [1650-60; ...
monotheist
See monotheism. * * *
monotheistic
See monotheist. * * *
monotheistically
See monotheist. * * *
Monothelite
—Monothelitic /meuh noth'euh lit"ik/, adj. —Monothelitism /meuh noth"euh luy tiz'euhm/, Monothelism, n. /meuh noth"euh luyt'/, n. Theol. a person who maintains that Christ ...
monothematic
/mon'euh thee mat"ik/, adj. having a single theme. [1885-90; MONO- + THEMATIC] * * *
monotint
/mon"euh tint'/, n. monochrome. [1885-90; MONO- + TINT] * * *
monotocous
monotocous [mə nät′ə kəs] adj. UNIPAROUS (sense 2) * * *
monotonal
/mon'euh tohn"l/, adj. Print. having equal tone throughout, as sans-serif type. [MONOTONE + -AL1] * * *
monotone
/mon"euh tohn'/, n. 1. a vocal utterance or series of speech sounds in one unvaried tone. 2. a single tone without harmony or variation in pitch. 3. recitation or singing of ...
monotonic
—monotonically, adv. /mon'euh ton"ik/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or uttered in a monotone: a monotonic delivery of a lecture. 2. Math. a. (of a function or of a particular set ...
monotonically
See monotonic. * * *
monotonous
—monotonously, adv. —monotonousness, n. /meuh not"n euhs/, adj. 1. lacking in variety; tediously unvarying: the monotonous flat scenery. 2. characterizing a sound continuing ...
monotonously
See monotonous. * * *
monotonousness
See monotonously. * * *
monotony
/meuh not"n ee/, n. 1. wearisome uniformity or lack of variety, as in occupation or scenery. 2. the continuance of an unvarying sound; monotone. 3. sameness of tone or pitch, as ...
monotrematous
/mon'euh trem"euh teuhs, -tree"meuh-/, adj. of or pertaining to a monotreme. [1825-35; < NL monotrematus lit., single-holed, equiv. to mono- MONO- + -trematus -holed, adj. use of ...
monotreme
/mon"euh treem'/, n. any animal of the Monotremata, the most primitive order of mammals, characterized by certain birdlike and reptilian features, as hatching young from eggs, ...
monotrichate
/meuh no"tri kit/, adj. (of bacteria) having a single flagellum at one pole. Also, monotrichous, monotrichic /mon'euh trik"ik/. [MONO- + trichate; see TRICH-, -ATE1] * * *
monotrichous
monotrichous [mə nä′tri kəs] adj. 〚 MONO- + TRICH(O)- + -OUS〛 having a single flagellum at one end, as some bacteria * * * mo·not·ri·chous (mə-nŏtʹrĭ-kəs) also ...
monotriglyph
—monotriglyphic, adj. /mon'euh truy"glif/, n. (in the Doric order) any intercolumniation having one whole triglyph. [1700-10; < LL monotriglyphus. See MONO-, TRIGLYPH] * * *
monotropy
—monotropic /mon'euh trop"ik, -troh"pik/, adj. —monotropically, adv. /meuh no"treuh pee/, n., pl. monotropies. Crystall. polymorphism that is irreversible. Cf. ...
monotype
/mon"euh tuyp'/, n. 1. the only print made from a metal or glass plate on which a picture is painted in oil color, printing ink, or the like. 2. the method of producing such a ...
Monotype
/mon"euh tuyp'/, Print., Trademark. a brand of machine for setting and casting type, consisting of a separate keyboard for producing a paper tape containing holes in a coded ...
monotypic
/mon'euh tip"ik/, adj. 1. having only one type. 2. of the nature of a monotype. 3. Biol. having only one representative, as a genus with a single species. [1875-80; MONO- + ...
monounsaturate
/mon'oh un sach"euhr it/, n. a monounsaturated fat or fatty acid, as olive oil. [MONO- + UNSATURATE] * * *
monounsaturated
/mon'oh un sach"euh ray'tid/, adj. Nutrition. of or noting a class of fats that lack a hydrogen bond at one point on the carbon chain and that are associated with a low ...
monovalence
See monovalent. * * *
monovalency
See monovalence. * * *
monovalent
—monovalence, monovalency, n. /mon'euh vay"leuhnt/, adj. 1. Chem. univalent. 2. Immunol. a. containing only one kind of antibody. b. pertaining to an antibody fragment with one ...
monovision
/mon"euh vizh'euhn/, n. the condition of seeing with one eye. [MONO- + VISION] * * *
monovision lenses
Ophthalm. contact lenses that adjust one eye for farsightedness and the other for nearsightedness, used as an alternative to bifocal lenses. * * *
monozygotic
—monozygote /mon'euh zuy"goht/, n. /mon'euh zuy got"ik/, adj. developed from a single fertilized ovum, as identical twins. Also, monozygous /mon'euh zuy"geuhs/. [1915-20; MONO- ...
Monrad, Ditlev Gothard
▪ Danish politician born Nov. 24, 1811, Copenhagen died March 28, 1887, Nyköping, Den.       clergyman, politician, a leader of the mid-19th-century Danish political ...
Monrad, Marcus Jakob
▪ Norwegian philosopher born Jan. 19, 1816, Nøtterøy, Nor. died Dec. 31, 1897, Kristiania       19th-century Norway's foremost philosopher, who was also a ...
Monreale
▪ Italy  town and archiepiscopal see, northwestern Sicily, Italy, on the slope of Monte (mount) Caputo overlooking the valley of the Conca d'Oro (Golden Shell), just inland ...
Monro family
Family of Scottish physicians. Three generations of the family made the University of Edinburgh an international centre of medical teaching, holding the chair of anatomy for 126 ...
Monro, Alexander, primus
▪ Scottish physician and professor of anatomy born Sept. 8, 1697, London died July 10, 1767, Edinburgh       physician, first professor of anatomy and surgery at the ...
Monro, Alexander, secundus
▪ Scottish physician, anatomist, and educator born March 10, 1733, Edinburgh died Oct. 2, 1817, Edinburgh       physician who, with his father, Alexander primus ...
Monroe
/meuhn roh"/, n. 1. Harriet, 1861?-1936, U.S. editor and poet. 2. James, 1758-1831, 5th president of the U.S. 1817-25. 3. Marilyn (Norma Jean Baker or Mortenson), 1926-62, U.S. ...
Monroe Doctrine
U.S. Hist. the policy, as stated by President Monroe in 1823, that the U.S. opposed further European colonization of and interference with independent nations in the Western ...
Monroe, Bill
orig. William Smith Monroe born Sept. 13, 1911, Rosine, Ky., U.S. died Sept. 9, 1996, Springfield, near Nashville, Tenn. U.S. singer, songwriter, and mandolin player, inventor ...
Monroe, Elizabeth
▪ American first lady née  Elizabeth Kortright  born June 30, 1768, New York, New York [U.S.] died September 23, 1830, Oak Hill, Virginia, U.S.       American first ...
Monroe, Harriet
born Dec. 23, 1860, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 26, 1936, Arequipa, Peru U.S. editor. She worked on various newspapers in the city as an art and drama critic while privately ...
Monroe, James
born April 28, 1758, Westmoreland county, Va. died July 4, 1831, New York, N.Y., U.S. Fifth president of the U.S. (1817–25). After serving in the American Revolution, he ...
Monroe, Marilyn
orig. Norma Jean Mortenson born June 1, 1926, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died Aug. 5, 1962, Los Angeles U.S. film actress. She endured a loveless childhood and a brief teenage ...
Monroe, William Smith
▪ 1997       ("BILL"), U.S. musician (b. Sept. 13, 1911, Rosine, Ky.—d. Sept. 9, 1996, Springfield, Tenn.), originated the bluegrass style of popular music in the ...
Monroe,Harriet
Monroe, Harriet. 1860-1936. American poet who founded and edited (1912-1936) Poetry, an influential magazine in which works of Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos ...
Monroe,James
Monroe, James. 1758-1831. The fifth President of the United States (1817-1825), whose administration was marked by the acquisition of Florida (1819), the Missouri Compromise ...
Monroe,Marilyn
Monroe, Marilyn. Originally Norma Jean Baker. 1926-1962. American actress noted for her roles in movies such as Some Like It Hot (1959) and The Misfits (1961) and for her tragic ...
Monroe,William Smith
Monroe, William Smith. Known as “Bill.” 1911-1996. American guitarist, singer, and songwriter widely regarded as the father of bluegrass. * * *
Monroeville
/meuhn roh"vil/, n. a city in SW Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. 30,977. * * * ▪ Pennsylvania, United States       borough (municipality), Allegheny county, southwestern ...
Monrovia
/meuhn roh"vee euh/, n. 1. a seaport in and the capital of Liberia, in W Africa. 204,000. 2. a city in SW California. 30,531. * * * Port city (pop., 1999 est.: metro. area, ...
mons
/monz/, n., pl. montes /mon"teez/. Anat. 1. an area of the body that is higher than neighboring areas. 2. See mons pubis. 3. See mons veneris. [1615-25; < NL; L mons mountain, ...
Mons
/mawonns/, n. a city in Belgium. 61,732. * * * ▪ Belgium Flemish  Bergen        municipality, Walloon Region, southwestern Belgium, set on a knoll between the ...
Mons Lactarius, Battle of
▪ Italian history       (553), decisive engagement fought near Naples, Italy, in which the Byzantine general Narses defeated the Goths. This battle ended the threat of ...
mons pubis
/monz" pyooh"bis/, pl. montes pubis /mon"teez pyooh"bis/. Anat. a rounded prominence of fatty tissue over the pubic symphysis, covered with hair after puberty. Also called ...
mons veneris
/monz" ven"euhr is/, pl. montes veneris /mon"teez ven"euhr is/, Anat. the mons pubis of the human female. Also called mons. [1615-25; < NL: lit., Venus's mount] * * *
Mons.
Monsieur. * * *
Monsanto Company
▪ American company formerly (1933–64)  Monsanto Chemical Company  and  (1901–33)  Monsanto Chemical Works         leading American producer of chemical, ...
Monsarrat
/mon'seuh rat"/, n. Nicholas, 1910-79, English novelist in Canada. * * *
Monsarrat, Nicholas
▪ British author in full  Nicholas John Turney Monsarrat   born March 22, 1910, Liverpool, Eng. died Aug. 8, 1979, London       popular English novelist whose ...
Monsarrat, Nicholas (John Turney)
born March 22, 1910, Liverpool, Eng. died Aug. 8, 1979, London British novelist. Trained in law, he served with the Royal Navy (1940–46), chiefly on dangerous Atlantic convoy ...
Monseigneur
/mawonn se nyuerdd"/, n., pl. Messeigneurs /may se nyuerdd"/. 1. a French title of honor given to princes, bishops, and other persons of eminence. 2. a person bearing this ...
monsieur
/meuhs yerr"/; Fr. /meuh syue"/, n., pl. messieurs /mays yerrz", mes"euhrz/; Fr. /me syue"/. the conventional French title of respect and term of address for a man, corresponding ...
Monsig
Monsig abbrev. 1. Monseigneur 2. Monsignor * * *
Monsignor
—monsignorial /mon'seen yawr"ee euhl, -yohr"-/, adj. /mon see"nyeuhr/; It. /mawn'see nyawrdd"/, n., pl. Monsignors, It. Monsignori /mawn'see nyaw"rddee/. Rom. Cath. Ch. 1. a ...
Monsignorial
See Monsignor. * * *
Monson, Sir William
▪ English naval officer born 1568, Lincolnshire, Eng. died February 1643, Kinnersley, Surrey       English naval officer best-known for his Naval ...
Monson, Thomas Spencer
▪ 2009 born Aug. 21, 1927, Salt Lake City, Utah  On Feb. 3, 2008, 80-year-old Thomas Spencer Monson was confirmed as the 16th president of the Church of Jesus Christ of ...
monsoon
—monsoonal, adj. /mon soohn"/, n. 1. the seasonal wind of the Indian Ocean and southern Asia, blowing from the southwest in summer and from the northeast in winter. 2. (in ...
Monsoon Current
▪ ocean current also called  Monsoon Drift         surface current of the northern Indian Ocean. Unlike the Atlantic and Pacific, both of which have strong currents ...
monsoon forest
▪ ecology also called  dry forest  or  tropical deciduous forest   open woodland in tropical areas that have a long dry season followed by a season of heavy rainfall. The ...
monsoon low
the seasonal low found over most continents in summer and, to a lesser extent, over adjacent ocean areas in winter. * * *
monsoonal
See monsoon. * * *
monspubis
mons pubis n. pl. montes pubis A rounded fleshy protuberance situated over the pubic bones that becomes covered with hair during puberty.   [New Latin mōns pūbis: Latin ...
monster
—monsterlike, adj. /mon"steuhr/, n. 1. a legendary animal combining features of animal and human form or having the forms of various animals in combination, as a centaur, ...
Monster of Florence
▪ Italian serial killers Italian  Il Mostro di Firenze        Italian serial killer or killers who murdered at least 16 people in the hills outside Florence between ...
monstera
/mon"steuhr euh/, n. any of various tropical American climbing plants belonging to the genus Monstera, of the arum family, esp. M. deliciosa, having split or perforated leaves ...
monstrance
/mon"streuhns/, n. Rom. Cath. Ch. a receptacle in which the consecrated Host is exposed for adoration. Also called ostensorium, ostensory. [1250-1300; ME < ML monstrantia, equiv. ...
monstre sacré
monstre sacré [mō̂n strə sȧ krā′] n. pl. monstres sacrés 〚Fr, lit., sacred monster〛 a venerable or popular public figure who is considered above criticism or attack ...
Monstrelet, Enguerrand de
▪ French historian born c. 1390 died July 1453       member of a noble family of Picardy, remembered for his chronicle of the final stages of the Hundred Years' War. ...
monstrosity
/mon stros"i tee/, n., pl. monstrosities. 1. the state or character of being monstrous. 2. a monster or something monstrous. [1545-55; < LL monstrositas, equiv. to L monstros(us) ...
monstrous
—monstrously, adv. —monstrousness, n. /mon"streuhs/, adj. 1. frightful or hideous, esp. in appearance; extremely ugly. 2. shocking or revolting; outrageous: monstrous ...
monstrously
See monstrous. * * *
monstrousness
See monstrously. * * *
monsveneris
mons ve·ne·ris (vĕnʹər-ĭs) n. pl. montes veneris The female mons pubis.   [New Latin mōns Veneris: Latin mōns, mount + Latin Veneris, genitive of Venus, Venus.] * * *
Mont
Mont abbrev. Montana * * * (as used in expressions) Mont Cervin Blanc Mont Cenis Mont Du Mont Allen Balcom Mont Saint Michel * * * ▪ Egyptian god also spelled  Montu, ...
Mont Blanc
/mawonn blahonn"/ a mountain in SE France, near the Italian border: highest peak of the Alps, 15,781 ft. (4810 m). Italian, Monte Bianco. * * *
Mont Blanc Tunnel
▪ tunnel, France-Italy       major Alpine automotive tunnel connecting France and Italy. It is 7.3 miles (11.7 km) long and is driven under the highest mountain in ...
Mont Cervin
/mawonn serdd vaonn"/ French name of Matterhorn. * * *
Mont Sainte-Anne
▪ provincial park, Quebec, Canada       provincial park, Quebec, Canada, located 25 miles (40 km) east of Quebec overlooking the northern shore of the St. Lawrence ...
Mont-aux-Sources
▪ mountain, South Africa-Lesotho       mountain plateau and plateau summit, in the Drakensberg range, at the juncture of KwaZulu/Natal and Free State provinces in South ...
Mont-de-Marsan
/mawonndeu mannrdd sahonn"/, n. a city in and the capital of Landes in SW France. 30,171. * * * ▪ France       town, capital of Landes département, Aquitaine région, ...
mont-de-piété
/mawonndeu pyay tay"/, n., pl. monts-de-piété /mawonndeu pyay tay"/. French. a public pawnbroking establishment that lends money on reasonable terms, esp. to the poor. * * *
Mont-Royal
Fr. /mawonn rwann yannl"/, n. a town in S Quebec, in E Canada: suburb of Montreal. 19,247. * * *
Mont-Saint-Michel
/mawonn saonn mee shel"/, n. a rocky islet near the coast of NW France, in an inlet of the Gulf of St. Malo: famous abbey and fortress. Also, Mont Saint Michel. * * * Rocky, ...
Mont-St-Michel
Mont-St-Michel [mōn san mē shel′] islet just off the NW coast of France, noted for its fortified abbey * * *
Mont.
Montana. * * *
Montadale
/mon"teuh dayl'/, n. one of a breed of white-faced, hornless sheep developed in the U.S. by crossing Cheviot rams and Columbia ewes, noted for their meat and heavy ...
Montafon Valley
▪ valley, Austria German  Montafontal,         upper valley of the Ill River, western Austria, extending about 15 miles (25 km) southeast from Bludenz between the ...
montage
/mon tahzh"/; Fr. /mawonn tannzh"/, n., pl. montages /-tah"zhiz/; Fr. /-tannzh"/, v., montaged /-tahzhd/, taging /-tah"zhing/. n. 1. the technique of combining in a single ...
Montagna, Bartolomeo
▪ Italian painter born c. 1450, Brescia or Vicenza, Republic of Venice [Italy] died Oct. 11, 1523, Vicenza  early Renaissance Italian painter, the most eminent master of the ...
Montagnais
/mon'teuhn yay", mawonn'-/, n., pl. Montagnais /-teuhn yay", -yayz"/ for 1. 1. a member of an American Indian people of Quebec and Labrador. 2. the Algonquian language of the ...
Montagnais and Naskapi
Two related North American Indian peoples living in Quebec and Labrador, Can. They speak almost identical Algonquian dialects. The Montagnais, whose name is French, meaning ...
Montagnana
▪ Italy       town, Veneto regione, northern Italy, located about 45 miles (72 km) north of Bologna and about 23 miles (37 km) southwest of ...
Montagnana, Antonio
▪ Italian singer flourished 1730–50       Italian singer noted for his powerful bass voice and for his roles in many of George Frideric Handel's ...
Montagnana, Domenico
▪ Italian musical instrument maker born c. 1687, Lendinara [Italy] died March 7, 1750, Venice       Italian instrument maker noted for his violins and especially for ...
Montagnard
/mon'teuhn yahrd", -yahr"/, n., pl. Montagnards, (esp. collectively) Montagnard. (sometimes l.c.) a member of a dark-skinned people of mixed ethnic origins inhabiting the ...
Montagnier, Luc
▪ French scientist born Aug. 18, 1932, Chabris, France       French research scientist who received, with Harald zur Hausen (zur Hausen, Harald) and Franƈoise ...
Montagu
/mon"teuh gyooh'/, n. 1. Ashley (Montague Francis Ashley Montagu), born 1905, U.S. anthropologist and writer, born in England. 2. Charles, 1st Earl of Halifax, 1661-1715, British ...
Montagu Family
▪ English family also spelled  Montague, or Montacute,         family name of the later medieval English earls of Salisbury, who were descended from Drogo of ...
Montagu, Ashley
▪ 2000 Israel Ehrenberg        British-American anthropologist, humanist, and writer (b. June 28, 1905, London, Eng.—d. Nov. 26, 1999, Princeton, N.J.), popularized ...
Montagu, Edwin Samuel
▪ British politician born Feb. 6, 1879, London, Eng. died Nov. 15, 1924, London       British politician who helped introduce the Government of India Act (Government of ...
Montagu, Elizabeth
▪ English intellectual née  Robinson   born Oct. 2, 1720, York, Eng. died Aug. 25, 1800, London  one of the first Bluestockings (q.v.), a group of English women who ...
Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley
orig. Lady Mary Pierrepont (baptized May 26, 1689, London, Eng. died Aug. 21, 1762, London) English writer, the most colourful Englishwoman of her time. A prolific letter ...
Montagu, Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of, Marquess of Monthermer
▪ English noble also called (1684–89)  3rd Baron Montagu of Boughton , or (1689–1705)  Earl of Montagu, Viscount Monthermer  baptized December 24, 1638, London, ...
Montagu, Richard
▪ English clergyman Montagu also spelled  Mountague   born , December? 1577, Dorney, Buckinghamshire, Eng. died April 13, 1641, Norwich, Norfolk       Anglican ...
Montagu,Ashley
Mon·ta·gu (mŏnʹtə-gyo͞o'), Ashley. 1905-1999. British-born American anthropologist whose books, such as The Natural Superiority of Women (1953), helped popularize ...
Montagu,Lady Mary Wortley
Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley. 1689-1762. English writer noted for her erudite and amusing letters, first published in Turkish Letters (1763). * * *
Montague
/mon"teuh gyooh'/, n. 1. (in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet) the family name of Romeo. Cf. Capulet. 2. William Pepperell /pep"euhr euhl/, 1873-1953, U.S. philosopher. 3. a male ...
Montaigne
/mon tayn"/; Fr. /mawonn ten"yeu/, n. Michel Eyquem /mee shel" e kem"/, Seigneur de, 1533-92, French essayist. * * *
Montaigne, Michel (Eyquem) de
born Feb. 28, 1533, Château de Montaigne, near Bordeaux, France died Sept. 23, 1592, Château de Montaigne French courtier and author. Born into the minor nobility, Montaigne ...
Montaigne, Michel de
▪ French writer and philosopher Introduction in full  Michel Eyquem de Montaigne  born Feb. 28, 1533, Château de Montaigne, near Bordeaux, France died Sept. 23, 1592, ...
Montaigne,Michel Eyquem de
Mon·taigne (mŏn-tānʹ, môn-tĕnʹyə), Michel Eyquem de. 1533-1592. French essayist whose discursive, lively personal essays are considered the highest expression of ...
Montale
/mawn tah"le/, n. Eugenio /e'ooh je"nyaw/, 1896-1981, Italian poet: Nobel prize 1975. * * *
Montale, Eugenio
born Oct. 12, 1896, Genoa, Italy died Sept. 12, 1981, Milan Italian poet, prose writer, editor, and translator. Montale began his literary activities after World War I, ...
Montale,Eugenio
Mon·ta·le (mōn-täʹlā, -lĕ), Eugenio. 1896-1981. Italian poet whose works, which greatly influenced 20th-century Italian literature, include Le Occasioni (1939) and Satura ...
Montalembert, Charles (-Forbes-René), count de
born April 15, 1810, London, Eng. died March 13, 1870, Paris, France French politician and historian. He began his political career as a journalist for several Catholic ...
Montalembert, Charles, Count de
▪ French politician and historian in full  Charles-forbes-rené, Count De Montalembert  born April 15, 1810, London, Eng. died March 13, 1870, Paris, ...
Montalembert, Marc-René, Marquis de
▪ French general born July 16, 1714, Angoulême, France died March 29, 1800, Paris       French general and military engineer who replaced the complex star-shaped ...
Montalvo
/mawn tahl"vaw/, n. Garci Ordóñez de /gahrdd thee" awrdd dhaw"nyeth dhe/, 15th-century Spanish writer. * * *
Montalvo, Juan
▪ Ecuadorian essayist born April 13, 1832, Ambato, Ecuador died January 17, 1889, Paris, France       Ecuadorean essayist, often called one of the finest writers of ...
montan wax
/mon"tan/ a dark-brown bituminous wax extracted from lignite and peat: used chiefly in polishes and waxes for furniture, shoes, etc. Also called lignite wax. [1905-10; < L ...
Montana
—Montanan, adj., n. /mon tan"euh/, n. a state in the NW United States. 786,690; 147,138 sq. mi. (381,085 sq. km). Cap.: Helena. Abbr.: MT (for use with zip code), Mont. * * ...
Montana State University
▪ university system, Montana, United States       public, coeducational university system whose main campus is in Bozeman, Montana, U.S. The university comprises four ...
Montana, flag of
▪ Flag History       U.S. state flag consisting of a dark blue field (background) with the name of the state in yellow above the state seal.       In 1865 the ...
Montana, Joe
in full Joseph Clifford Montana, Jr. born June 11, 1956, New Eagle, Pa., U.S. U.S. football quarterback. He played for the University of Notre Dame, leading his team to the ...
Montana, Joseph,Jr.
Montana, Joseph, Jr. Born 1956. American football player. A quarterback mainly with the San Francisco 49ers (1980-1992), he is among the National Football League's leaders in ...
Montana, Patsy
▪ 1997       (RUBYE BLEVINS), U.S. singer who was identified by her yodeling-cowgirl songs, especially "I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart," with which she became the ...
Montana, University of
▪ university, Missoula, Montana, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Missoula, Montana, U.S. It offers a variety of associate, ...
Montanan
Montanan [män tan′ən] adj. of Montana n. a person born or living in Montana * * * See Montana. * * *
Montand, Yves
orig. Ivo Livi born Oct. 13, 1921, Monsummano Alto, Italy died Nov. 9, 1991, Senlis, France Italian-born French actor and singer. Raised in Marseille, he was the protégé of ...
montane
/mon"tayn/, Ecol. adj. 1. pertaining to, growing in, or inhabiting mountainous regions. n. 2. the lower vegetation belt on mountains. [1860-65; < L montanus, equiv. to mont- (s. ...
Montañés, Juan (de) Martínez
born March 16, 1568, Alcalá la Real, Jaén, Spain died June 18, 1649, Sevilla Spanish sculptor. After studying in Granada, he established his studio in Sevilla (Seville) and ...
Montañés, Juan Martínez
▪ Spanish sculptor in full  Juan de Martínez Montañés   born March 16, 1568, Alcalá la Real, Jaén, Spain died June 18, 1649, Sevilla       Spanish sculptor who ...
montani semper liberi
/mohn tah"nee sem"perdd lee"be rddee/; Eng. /mon tay"nuy sem"peuhr lib"euh ruy'/, Latin. mountaineers (are) always free: motto of West Virginia. * * *
Montanism
Heretical Christian movement founded in AD 156 by Montanus. Having converted to Christianity, Montanus fell into a trance and began to prophesy. Others joined him, and the ...
Montanus
▪ religious leader flourished 2nd century       founder of Montanism, a schismatic movement of Christianity in Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and North Africa from the 2nd ...
montanwax
mon·tan wax (mŏnʹtən, -tăn') n. A hard white wax obtained from lignite and used in the manufacture of polishes, paints, and phonograph records.   [From Latin montānus, ...
Montauban
/mawonn toh bahonn"/, n. a city in and the capital of Tarn-et-Garonne, in S France, N of Toulouse. 50,420. * * * ▪ France       town, Tarn-et-Garonne département, ...
Montauk
Mon·tauk (mŏnʹtôk') n. pl. Montauk or Mon·tauks 1. a. A Native American people formerly inhabiting the eastern end of Long Island in New York. b. A member of this ...
Montauk Point
/mon"tawk/ the SE end of Long Island, in SE New York. * * *
MontaukPoint
Montauk Point The eastern extremity of Long Island, in southeast New York. It is a popular resort area. * * *
Montausier, Charles de Saint-Maure, duc de
▪ French military officer born Oct. 6, 1610 died Nov. 17, 1690, Paris       French army officer, man of letters and chief tutor of King Louis XIV's eldest son, the ...
Montbéliard
▪ France       town, Doubs département, Franche-Comté région, eastern France, between the Vosges and the Jura mountains, 11 miles (17 km) from the Swiss frontier. In ...
MontBlanc
Mont Blanc (mônt blăngk, môɴ bläɴʹ) See Blanc, Mont. * * *
Montcalm
/mont kahm"/; Fr. /mawonn kannlm"/, n. Louis Joseph /lwee zhaw zef"/, 1712-59, French general in Canada. * * *
Montcalm (de Saint-Véran), Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Grozon, marquis de
born Feb. 28, 1712, Château de Candiac, France died Sept. 14, 1759, Quebec French military leader. He joined the French army at age 12 and fought in several European ...
Montcalm de Saint-Veran,Marquis Louis Joseph de
Mont·calm de Saint-Ve·ran (mŏnt-kämʹ də săɴ'vā-räɴʹ, môɴ-kälmʹ), Marquis Louis Joseph de. 1712-1759. French commander in Canada during the French and Indian War. ...
Montcalm, Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Grozon, marquis de
▪ French general born Feb. 28, 1712, Château de Candiac, Fr. died Sept. 14, 1759, Quebec       general who served as commander in chief of French forces in Canada ...
Montclair
/mont klair"/, n. 1. a city in NE New Jersey. 38,321. 2. a city in SE California. 22,628. * * * ▪ New Jersey, United States       township (town), Essex county, New ...
Montclair State University
▪ university, Upper Montclair, New Jersey, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher education in Upper Montclair, New Jersey, U.S. It offers ...
Montdory
▪ French actor also spelled  Mondory , original name  Guillaume des Gilberts  born March 13, 1594, Thiers, Fr. died Nov. 10, 1653, Thiers       first outstanding ...
monte
/mon"tee/, n. Cards. 1. Also called monte bank. a gambling game played with a 40-card pack in which players bet that one of two layouts, each consisting of two cards drawn from ...
Monte
/mon"tee/, n. a male given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Monte Cervino Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo Monte Bianco Monte Cenisio Del Monte Foods Co. Monte Albán Monte Carlo ...
Monte Albán
/mawn"te ahl bahn"/ a major ceremonial center of the Zapotec culture, near the city of Oaxaca, Mexico, occupied from 600 B.C. to A.D. 700. * * * Ridgetop site of the ruins of ...
Monte Bello Islands
▪ islands, Western Australia, Australia       Australian coral islands in the Indian Ocean off the northwest coast of Western Australia, 60 mi (100 km) west of the ...
Monte Bianco
/mawn"te byahng"kaw/ Italian name of Mont Blanc. * * *
Monte Carlo
/mon"tee kahr"loh, -ti/; It. /mawn"te kahrdd"law/ 1. a town in Monaco principality, in SE France: gambling resort. 10,000. 2. Statistics. of, pertaining to, or using a Monte ...
Monte Carlo method
Statistics. a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a ...
Monte Cassino
/mawn"te kahs see"naw/ a monastery at Cassino, Italy: founded A.D. c530 by St. Benedict and destroyed by Allied bombings in 1944. * * * Principal monastery of the Benedictine ...
Monte Corno
/mawn"te kawrdd"naw/ a mountain in central Italy: highest peak in the Apennines, 9585 ft. (2922 m). * * *
Monte Cristi
▪ Dominican Republic in full  San Fernando de Monte Cristi        city, northwestern Dominican Republic, in the coastal lowlands near the mouth of the Yaque del ...
Monte Cristo
/mon"tee kris"toh/ a sandwich containing slices of ham, chicken, and Swiss cheese, dipped in beaten egg and fried until brown. * * *
Monte Rosa
▪ mountains, Europe       rounded, snow-covered massif of the Pennine Alps lying on the frontier between Switzerland and Italy, rising southeast of Zermatt, Switz. Ten ...
Monte Sant'Angelo
▪ Italy       town, Puglia (Apulia) region, east central Italy, on the southern slope of the Promontorio del Gargano, the “spur” of Italy, northeast of Foggia. The ...
Monte, Philippe de
▪ Dutch composer born 1521, Mechelen, Neth. died July 4, 1603, Prague       one of the most active composers of the Netherlandish, or Flemish, school that dominated ...
Monte-Carlo
Resort (pop., 1990: 14,702), one of the four quarters of Monaco. It is situated northeast of Nice on the French Riviera. In 1856 Charles III of Monaco granted a charter allowing ...
Monte-Carlo Rally
▪ Table Monte-Carlo Rally year car driver, navigator-codriver 1911 Turcat Méry Rougier 1912 Berliet Beutler 1913–23 no ...
Montebello
/mon'teuh bel"oh/, n. a city in SW California, SE of Los Angeles. 52,929. * * *
montebrasite
/mon'tee brah"zuyt/, n. a mineral, lithium aluminum hydroxyl phosphate, LiAlPO4(OH), isomorphous with amblygonite, used as an ore of lithium. [1870-75; after Montebras, locale in ...
MonteCarlo
I. Mon·te Car·lo1 (mŏnʹtē kärʹlō) A town of Monaco on the Mediterranean Sea and the French Riviera. It is a noted resort famed for its casino and luxurious hotels. ...
Montecatini Terme
▪ Italy       town and mineral spa, Toscana ( Tuscany) region, north central Italy, in the Valdinievole, at an altitude of 89 ft (27 m), just southwest of Pistoia. Known ...
Montéclair, Michel de
▪ French composer in full  Michel Pinolet de Montéclair   baptized Dec. 4, 1667, Andelot, Fr. died Sept. 22, 1737, Aumont, near Paris       French composer of ...
Montecorvino, Giovanni da
▪ Franciscan missionary born 1247, Montecorvino, Sicily died 1328, Peking       Italian Franciscan missionary (mission) who founded the earliest Roman Catholic missions ...
Montecristo Island
▪ island, Italy Italian  Isola Di Montecristo,  Latin  Oglasa,         member of the Arcipelago Toscano, in the Tyrrhenian Sea, between the Italian mainland and ...
Montecuccoli, Raimondo
▪ Austrian field marshal born Feb. 21, 1609, Castle Montecuccolo, near Modena, Duchy of Modena died Oct. 16, 1680, Linz, Austria  field marshal and military reformer, a ...
Montefeltro Family
▪ Italian family       noble family of Urbino, a city in the Italian Marches, southeast of Florence, that rose to become a ruling dynasty and produced several ...
Montefiascone
/mawn'te fyahs kaw"ne/, n. a town in central Italy: wine-growing area. 12,214. * * *
Montefiore, Claude Joseph Goldsmid
▪ British theologian born , June 6, 1858, London died July 9, 1938, London       Jewish theologian and Reform leader; the first modern Jew to write an important ...
Montefiore, Sir Moses, Baronet
▪ British philanthropist born Oct. 24, 1784, Livorno, Italy died July 28, 1885, near Ramsgate, Kent, Eng.       outstanding Jewish philanthropist.       Scion of ...
Montego Bay
/mon tee"goh/ a city in NW Jamaica: seaside resort. 50,000. * * * Seaport (pop., 2000 est.: 89,859), northwestern Jamaica, located northwest of Kingston. It lies on the site of ...
MontegoBay
Mon·te·go Bay (mŏn-tēʹgō) A town of northwest Jamaica on the Caribbean Sea. Visited by Columbus in 1494, it is today a port and popular resort area. Population: 70,285. * ...
Monteiro Lobato, José Bento
▪ Brazilian writer born April 18, 1882, Taubaté, Braz. died July 4, 1948, São Paulo       writer and publisher, forerunner of the Modernist movement in Brazilian ...
monteith
/mon teeth"/, n. 1. a large punch bowl, usually of silver, having a notched rim for suspending punch cups. 2. Also called bonnet glass. a small stemless glass of the 18th ...
Montélimar
▪ France       town, Drôme département, Rhône-Alpes région, southeastern France, near the confluence of the Roubion and Rhône rivers, southwest of Valence. It ...
Montelius, Oscar
▪ Swedish archaeologist in full  Gustav Oscar Augustin Montelius   born Sept. 9, 1843, Stockholm, Sweden died Nov. 4, 1921, Stockholm       Swedish archaeologist who ...
montelukast
mon·te·lu·kast (mŏn'tə-lo͞oʹkăst) n. A drug that reduces the inflammatory response by acting as a leukotriene receptor antagonist, and is used to treat the signs and ...
Montemayor, Jorge de
▪ Portuguese writer Montemayor also spelled  Montemor   born c. 1520, Montemor-o-Velho, Coimbra, Port. died Feb. 26, 1561, Turin, duchy of Savoy ...
Montemezzi, Italo
▪ Italian composer born May 31, 1875, Vigasio, Italy died May 15, 1952, Vigasio       Italian opera and symphonic composer whose masterpiece was the opera L'amore dei ...
Montenegrin
See Montenegro. * * *
Montenegro
—Montenegrin /mon'teuh nee"grin, -neg"rin/, adj., n. /mon'teuh nee"groh, -neg"roh/, n. a constituent republic of Yugoslavia, in the SW part: an independent kingdom 1878-1918. ...
Montenegro, Fernanda
▪ 2000       In 1999, one year after winning the Berlin International Film Festival's award for best actress for her performance in Central do Brasil (1998; Central ...
Montenegro, flag of
▪ Flag History       Yellow-fimbriated (bordered) red national flag with, at its centre, a yellow double-headed eagle bearing the national coat of arms. The ...
Monteregian Hills
▪ mountains, Quebec, Canada French  Collines Montérégiennes        series of eight butte-type mountains in the St. Lawrence River valley, in Montréal, ...
Monterey
/mon'teuh ray"/, n. 1. a city in W California, on Monterey Bay: the capital of California until 1847. 27,558. 2. See Monterey Jack. * * * ▪ California, United ...
Monterey Bay
an inlet of the Pacific in W California. 26 mi. (42 km) long. * * *
Monterey Canyon
▪ canyon, Pacific Ocean       largest and deepest submarine canyon off the Pacific (Pacific Ocean) coast of North America. The canyon has three tributaries at its upper ...
Monterey cypress
a tree, Cupressus macrocarpa, of southern California, being pyramid-shaped in youth, but spreading in age: occurs naturally in only two groves on the coast of Monterey County, ...
Monterey Jack
a mild, moist cheddar, made from whole, skimmed, or partially skimmed milk: first made in Monterey County, California. Also called jack cheese. [1945-50, Amer.] * * * ▪ ...
Monterey Park
a city in SW California, E of Los Angeles. 54,338. * * *
Monterey pine
a pine tree, Pinus radiata, native to coastal California, having cones that open to germinate only in the heat of a forest fire, used for reforestation and as a timber ...
Montereyjack
Monterey jack n. A pale semisoft cheese with a high moisture content and a mild flavor.   [After Monterey + jack cheese.] * * *
MontereyPark
Monterey Park A city of southern California, a residential suburb of Los Angeles. Population: 60,738. * * *
Montería
/mawn'teuh rddee"ah/, n. a city in N Colombia. 123,600. * * * ▪ Colombia       city, northwestern Colombia, and an inland port on the Sinú River. In 1744 a Spanish ...
montero
/mon tair"oh/; Sp. /mawn te"rddaw/, n., pl. monteros /-tair"ohz/; Sp. /-te"rddaws/. a Spanish hunter's cap, round in shape and having an earflap. [1615-25; < Sp, special use of ...
Monterrey
/mon'teuh ray"/; Sp. /mawn'terdd rdday"/, n. a city in and the capital of Nuevo León, in NE Mexico: battle 1846. 1,500,000. * * * City (pop., 2000: 1,110,997), capital of Nuevo ...
montes
montes [män′tēz΄] n. pl. of MONS * * * mon·tes (mŏnʹtēz) n. Plural of mons. * * *
Montes Apenninus
/mon"teuhs ap'euh nuy"neuhs/ a mountain range in the first and second quadrants of the visible face of the moon, forming the SE border of Mare Imbrium: about 600 miles (970 km) ...
Montes Claros
/mawonn"tis klah"rddoos/ a city in E Brazil. 121,428. * * * ▪ Brazil       city, northern Minas Gerais estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It is located near the ...
montes pubis
montes pubis n. pl. of MONS PUBIS * * *
Montes Riphaeus
/mon"teez rif"ee euhs/ a mountain range in the third quadrant of the visible face of the moon. * * *
montes veneris
montes veneris [ven′ər is] n. pl. of MONS VENERIS * * *
MontesClaros
Mon·tes Cla·ros (môɴʹtĭs kläʹro͝os) A city of east-central Brazil north of Belo Horizonte. It is a trade and shipping center in an agricultural region. Population: ...
Montespan
/mon"teuh span'/; Fr. /mawonn tes pahonn"/, n. Marquise de (Françoise Athénaïs de Rochechouart), 1641-1707, mistress of Louis XIV of France. * * *
Montespan, Françoise-Athénaïs de Rochechouart, marquise de
▪ French mistress born Oct. 5, 1641, Tonnay-Charente, France died May 27/28, 1707, Bourbon-l'Archambault       mistress of Louis XIV of France for 13 ...
Montesquieu
/mon"teuh skyooh'/; Fr. /mawonn tes kyue"/, n. (Charles Louis de Secondat, Baron de la Brède et de Montesquieu) 1689-1755, French philosophical writer. * * *
Montesquieu, Charles-Louis de Secondat, baron de (La Brède et de)
born Jan. 18, 1689, Château La Brède, near Bordeaux, France died Feb. 10, 1755, Paris French philosophe and satirist. Born into a noble family, he held public office in ...
Montesquieu, Charles-Louis de Secondat, baron de La Brède et de
▪ French political philosopher Introduction born January 18, 1689, Château La Brède, near Bordeaux, France died February 10, 1755, Paris       French political ...
Montessori
/mon'teuh sawr"ee, -sohr"ee/; It. /mawn'tes saw"rddee/, n. Maria /meuh ree"euh/; It. /mah rddee"ah/, 1870-1952, Italian educator. * * *
Montessori method
—Montessorian, adj. a system for teaching young children, in which the fundamental aim is self-motivated education by the children themselves, as they are encouraged to move ...
Montessori, Maria
born Aug. 31, 1870, Chiaravalle, near Ancona, Italy died May 6, 1952, Noordwijk aan Zee, Neth. Italian educator. Montessori took a degree in medicine (1894) and worked in a ...
Montessori,Maria
Mon·tes·so·ri (mŏn'tĭ-sôrʹē, -sōrʹē), Maria. 1870-1952. Italian physician and educator who proposed a method of teaching young children that stresses the development ...
Montessorian
Mon·tes·so·ri·an (mŏn'tĭ-sôrʹē-ən, -sōrʹ-) adj. Of or relating to the Montessori method. * * *


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