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Moore, Marianne
▪ American poet in full  Marianne Craig Moore  born Nov. 15, 1887, St. Louis, Mo., U.S. died Feb. 5, 1972, New York, N.Y.       American poet whose work distilled ...
Moore, Marianne (Craig)
born Nov. 15, 1887, St. Louis, Mo., U.S. died Feb. 5, 1972, New York City, N.Y. U.S. poet. She attended Bryn Mawr College and later settled in Brooklyn, N.Y., with her mother. ...
Moore, Mary Tyler
born Dec. 29, 1936, Brooklyn, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. television and film actress. She studied dance and appeared in commercials and in minor roles on television before ...
Moore, Michael
▪ 2004       In his acceptance speech for the 2003 Academy Award for best documentary for Bowling for Columbine (2002), filmmaker and author Michael Moore expressed his ...
Moore, Mike
▪ prime minister of New Zealand byname of  Michael Kenneth Moore   born Jan. 28, 1949, Whakatane, N.Z.       leader of the New Zealand Labour Party who was prime ...
Moore, Nicholas
▪ British poet born Nov. 16, 1918, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Eng. died 1986       one of the “New Apocalypse” English poets of the 1940s who reacted against the ...
Moore, Raymond Cecil
▪ American paleontologist born Feb. 20, 1892, Roslyn, Wash., U.S. died April 16, 1974, Lawrence, Kan.       American paleontologist known for his work on Paleozoic ...
Moore, Robert Frederick Chelsea
▪ 1994       ("BOBBY"), British footballer (b. April 12, 1941, Barking, Essex, England—d. Feb. 24, 1993, London, England), was the "golden boy of English soccer" and ...
Moore, Sir John
▪ British lieutenant general born Nov. 13, 1761, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scot. died Jan. 16, 1809, La Coruña, Spain       British lieutenant general who led a famous ...
Moore, Stanford
born Sept. 4, 1913, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Aug. 23, 1982, New York, N.Y. U.S. biochemist. He shared a 1972 Nobel Prize with Christian Anfinsen (1916–95) and William Stein ...
Moore, Thomas
born May 28, 1779, Dublin, Ire. died Feb. 25, 1852, Wiltshire, Eng. Irish poet, satirist, composer, and singer. Moore graduated from Trinity College and studied law in London, ...
Moore,Clement Clarke
Moore, Clement Clarke. 1779-1863. American scholar and poet who wrote the Christmas poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (1823). * * *
Moore,George
Moore, George. 1852-1933. Irish writer whose works include poetry, drama, criticism, and novels, such as Esther Waters (1894). * * *
Moore,George Edward
Moore, George Edward. 1873-1958. British philosopher whose theories, presented in Principia Ethica (1903) and other works, influenced 20th-century epistemology and linguistic ...
Moore,Henry
Moore, Henry. 1898-1986. British sculptor whose works, mostly semiabstract human figures, are characterized by smooth organic forms. * * *
Moore,Marianne Craig
Moore, Marianne Craig. 1887-1972. American poet whose descriptive works, published in Poems (1921), Complete Poems (1967), and other collections, are characterized by wit, irony, ...
Moore,Thomas
Moore, Thomas. 1779-1852. Irish romantic poet. Many of his nostalgic and patriotic lyrics, such as “The Minstrel Boy,” were set to traditional Irish tunes. * * *
Moorea
▪ island, French Polynesia  volcanic island, second largest of the Îles du Vent (Windward Islands) in the Society Islands of French Polynesia, central South Pacific ...
Moorehead, Agnes
▪ American actress in full  Agnes Robertson Moorehead  born Dec. 6, 1906, Clinton, Mass., U.S. died April 30, 1974, Rochester, Minn.       versatile American actress ...
Moorer, Thomas Hinman
▪ 2005       U.S. Navy admiral (b. Feb. 9, 1912, Mount Willing, Ala.—d. Feb. 5, 2004, Bethesda, Md.), was chief of naval operations (1967–70) and chairman of the ...
Moores, Frank Duff
▪ 2006       Canadian politician (b. Feb. 18, 1933, Carbonear, Nfd.—d. July 10, 2005, Perth, Ont.), ended in 1972 the 23-year tenure of Joseph Smallwood as provincial ...
Moores, Sir John
▪ 1994       British entrepreneur (b. Jan. 25, 1896, Eccles, Lancashire, England—d. Sept. 25, 1993, Freshfield, Merseyside, England), parlayed a small football pools ...
Moorfields
a hospital in central London, England, which specializes in eye treatment. It opened in 1805. * * *
moorfowl
/moor"fowl'/, n., pl. moorfowls, (esp. collectively) moorfowl. Chiefly Brit. the red grouse. Also called moorbird. [1500-10; MOOR1 + FOWL] * * *
Moorhead
/moohr"hed', mawr"-, mohr"-/, n. a city in W Minnesota. 29,998. * * * ▪ Minnesota, United States       city, seat (1872) of Clay county, western Minnesota, U.S. It ...
moorhen
/moor"hen'/, n. 1. Also called water hen. a common species of gallinule, Gallinule chloropus, of nearly worldwide distribution. 2. any of several related gallinules. 3. Chiefly ...
mooring
/moor"ing/, n. 1. the act of a person or thing that moors. 2. Usually, moorings. the means by which a ship, boat, or aircraft is moored. 3. moorings, a place where a ship, boat, ...
mooring buoy
Naut. a buoy to which ships or boats can be moored. [1800-10] * * *
mooring mast
the mast or tower to which a dirigible is moored. Also called mooring tower. [1915-20] * * *
mooring rack
Naut. a row of piles, connected at the tops, to which ships or boats can be moored. * * *
mooring screw
Naut. a broad, augerlike anchor used for securing buoys in soft-bottomed lakes, rivers, etc. Also called screw anchor, screw mooring. * * *
Moorish
/moor"ish/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to the Moors. 2. in the style of the Moors, as architecture or decoration. [1400-50; late ME morys. See MOOR, -ISH1] * * *
Moorish arch.
See horseshoe arch. * * *
Moorish idol
a black, white, and yellow fish, Zanclus cornutus (or canescens), inhabiting the tropical Indian and Pacific oceans, having a long snout and an elongated dorsal fin. * * * ▪ ...
Moorish Science Temple of America
▪ religious sect       religious sect founded by Timothy Drew in Newark, N.J., in 1913. He was believed by his followers to have been ordained Prophet Noble Drew Ali by ...
moorland
/moor"leuhnd, -land'/, n. Chiefly Brit. an area of moors, esp. country abounding in heather. [bef. 950; ME more lond, OE morlond. See MOOR1, -LAND] * * *
Moors murders
the name given to one of the most famous and terrible crimes in Britain in the 20th century. In the early 1960s Ian Brady and Myra Hindley tortured and murdered several children, ...
moose
/moohs/, n., pl. moose. 1. a large, long-headed mammal, Alces alces, of the deer family, having circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the male of which has ...
Moose Factory
▪ unincorporated area, Ontario, Canada       unincorporated locality, Cochrane district, northeastern Ontario, Canada. It is located on Moose Factory Island, in the ...
Moose Jaw
a city in S Saskatchewan, in SW Canada. 32,581. * * * ▪ Saskatchewan, Canada       city, south-central Saskatchewan, Canada. It lies along the Moose Jaw River (a ...
Moose River
River, northeastern Ontario, Canada. It flows northeast for more than 60 mi (100 km) to empty into James Bay. A wide stream, it is actually the estuary for several rivers, ...
moosebird
moosebird [mo͞os′bʉrd΄] n. Cdn. CANADA JAY * * * moose·bird (mo͞osʹbûrd') n. See gray jay. * * *
Moosehead Lake
/moohs"hed'/ a lake in central Maine. 42 mi. (68 km) long; 300 sq. mi. (780 sq. km). * * * ▪ lake, Maine, United States       lake, located in west-central Maine, U.S. ...
MooseheadLake
Moose·head Lake (mo͞osʹhĕd') A lake of west-central Maine north of Augusta. It is the center of a popular resort area. * * *
MooseJaw
Moose Jaw (mo͞os) A city of south-central Saskatchewan, Canada, west of Regina. Founded in 1882, it is a processing center for an agricultural and oil-producing area. ...
moosemilk
/moohs"milk'/, n. Canadian. 1. homemade or bootleg whiskey. 2. a cocktail of whiskey or rum and milk. [1915-20; MOOSE + MILK] * * *
MooseRiver
Moose River A river, about 547 km (340 mi) long, of northeast Ontario, Canada, flowing northeast to James Bay as the estuary of the Abitibi, Mattagami, and other rivers. * * *
moosewood
/moohs"wood'/, n. 1. See striped maple. 2. leatherwood. [1770-80, Amer.; MOOSE + WOOD1] * * *
Moosonee
▪ unincorporated locality, Ontario, Canada       unincorporated locality, Cochrane district, northeastern Ontario, Canada. It is located on the left bank of the Moose ...
moot
moot1 —mooter, n. —mootness, n. /mooht/, adj. 1. open to discussion or debate; debatable; doubtful: a moot point. 2. of little or no practical value or meaning; purely ...
moot court
a mock court for the conduct of hypothetical legal cases, as for students of law. [1780-90] * * *
moot hall
a building in some English villages where moots were once held; town hall. [1350-1400; ME] * * *
mootcourt
moot court n. A mock court where hypothetical cases are tried for the training of law students. * * *
mootness
See moot. * * *
mop
mop1 /mop/, n., v., mopped, mopping. n. 1. a bundle of coarse yarn, a sponge, or other absorbent material, fastened at the end of a stick or handle for washing floors, dishes, ...
mop-up
/mop"up'/, n. the act, process, or an instance of mopping up; completion of an operation or action. [1895-1900; n. use of v. phrase mop up] * * *
mopboard
/mop"bawrd', -bohrd'/, n. baseboard (def. 1). [1850-55, Amer.; MOP1 + BOARD, so called because it adjoins the floor surface, which is cleaned by a mop] * * *
mope
—moper, n. —mopingly, adv. /mohp/, v., moped, moping, n. v.i. 1. to be sunk in dejection or listless apathy; sulk; brood. v.t. 2. to make dejected, listless, or ...
moped
/moh"ped'/, n. a motorized bicycle that has pedals in addition to a low-powered gasoline engine designed for low-speed operation. [1955-60; < G, ult. < Sw (trampcykel med) mo(tor ...
moper
See mope. * * *
mopery
/moh"peuh ree/, n. 1. mopish behavior. 2. Slang. a violation of a minor or imaginary law or rule. [MOPE + -ERY] * * *
mopey
—mopiness, n. /moh"pee/, adj., mopier, mopiest. languishing, listless, droopy, or glum. Also, mopy. [1820-30; MOPE + -Y1] * * *
mopish
—mopishly, adv. —mopishness, n. /moh"pish/, adj. given to moping; listless, apathetic, or dejected. [1615-25; MOPE + -ISH1] * * *
mopishly
See moper. * * *
mopoke
also called  Morepork,         in Australia, two bird species known elsewhere as the tawny frogmouth (see frogmouth); the Australian boobook owl is also sometimes ...
mopper
See mop. * * *
mopper-up
/mop"euhr up"/, n., pl. moppers-up. a person or thing that mops up. [1930-35; v. phrase mop up + -ER1] * * *
moppet
/mop"it/, n. a young child. [1900-05; obs. mop rag doll, baby (see MOP1) + -ET] * * *
mopping-up
/mop"ing up"/, adj. 1. serving to complete or put the finishing touches to a phase of a particular action. 2. serving to complete a military campaign by killing or capturing any ...
Mopti
▪ Mali       town, eastern Mali, located at the confluence of the Niger and Bani rivers. Originally a small fishing village, Mopti has become an important commercial ...
mopy
/moh"pee/, adj., mopier, mopiest. mopey. * * *
Moquegua
▪ Peru       city, southern Peru. It lies along the Moquegua River at 4,626 feet (1,410 m) above sea level. Founded in 1626 as Villa de Santa Catalina del Guadalcázar ...
moquette
/moh ket"/, n. a type of fabric with a thick, velvety pile, used for carpets and in upholstering. [1755-65; < F, equiv. to moc(ade) imitation velvet + -ette -ETTE] * * *
Moqui
/moh"kee/, n., pl. Moquis, (esp. collectively) Moqui. Moki. * * *
MOR
middle-of-the-road (defs. 2, 3). * * *
mor.
morocco. * * *
mora
/mawr"euh, mohr"euh/, n., pl. morae /mawr"ee, mohr"ee/, moras. Pros. the unit of time equivalent to the ordinary or normal short sound or syllable. [1560-70; < L: delay, hence, ...
Moraceae
▪ plant family       the mulberry family of the rose order (Rosales), with about 40 genera and some 1,000 species of deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs, distributed ...
moraceous
/maw ray"sheuhs, moh-/, adj. belonging to the Moraceae, the mulberry family of plants. Cf. mulberry family. [ < NL, Morace(ae) (Mor(us) the type genus (L morus black mulberry ...
Moradabad
/mawr'euh deuh bad", mohr'-, meuh rah"deuh bahd'/, n. a city in N Uttar Pradesh, in N India. 272,355. * * * ▪ India       city, northern Uttar Pradesh state, northern ...
moraea
/meuh ree"euh/, n. any of various plants belonging to the genera Moraea and Dietes, of the iris family, native to tropical Africa. [ < NL (1758), irreg. after Robert More ...
Moraes, Dom
▪ 2005 Dominic Francis Moraes        Indian writer (b. July 19, 1938, Bombay [now Mumbai], India—d. June 2, 2004, Mumbai), produced poetry and prose that revealed his ...
Moraga
/meuh rah"geuh/, n. a city in W California. 15,014. * * *
morainal
See moraine. * * *
moraine
—morainal, morainic, adj. /meuh rayn"/, n. 1. a ridge, mound, or irregular mass of unstratified glacial drift, chiefly boulders, gravel, sand, and clay. 2. a deposit of such ...
morainic
See morainal. * * *
Morais, Vinícius de
▪ Brazilian poet and lyricist Morais also spelled  Moraes   born Oct. 19, 1913, Rio de Janeiro died July 9, 1980, Rio de Janeiro       Brazilian poet and lyricist ...
moral
—moralless, adj. /mawr"euhl, mor"-/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or concerned with the principles or rules of right conduct or the distinction between right and wrong; ethical: ...
moral hazard
Insurance. an insurance company's risk as to the insured's trustworthiness and honesty. [1915-20] * * *
Moral Majority
—Moral Majoritarian. a political action group formed mainly of Protestant fundamentalists to further strict conservative aims, as strong antiabortion laws, the restoration of ...
Moral Maze
a weekly radio programme on BBC Radio 4 presented by Michael Buerk. In each programme, a different moral issue is discussed and a regular panel (= small group of people) ask ...
moral philosophy
philosophy dealing with the principles of morality; ethics. [1600-10] * * *
moral psychology
In psychology, study of the development of the moral sense i. e., of the capacity for forming judgments about what is morally right or wrong, good or bad. The U.S. psychologist ...
Moral Re-Armament
/ree ahr"meuh meuhnt/ a worldwide movement initiated by Frank Buchman in 1938 as a successor to the Oxford Group, and maintaining that the practice of high morality in public and ...
moral sense
the ability to determine the rightness or wrongness of actions. [1690-1700] * * *
moral theology
the branch of theology dealing with principles of moral conduct. [1900-05] * * * also called  Christian ethics        Christian theological discipline concerned with ...
moral turpitude
1. conduct that is regarded as immoral. 2. an instance of such conduct. [1875-80] * * *
morale
/meuh ral"/, n. emotional or mental condition with respect to cheerfulness, confidence, zeal, etc., esp. in the face of opposition, hardship, etc.: the morale of the ...
Morales Bermúdez, Francisco
▪ president of Peru born Oct. 4, 1921, Lima, Peru       general and politician who was president of Peru in 1975–80.       Morales, the grandson of a former ...
Morales, Cristóbal de
▪ Spanish composer born 1500?, Sevilla, Spain died between September 4 and October 7, 1553, Marchena?  composer who, together with Tomás Luis de Victoria and Francisco ...
Morales, Evo
▪ 2007       After his inauguration as president of Bolivia on Jan. 22, 2006, populist labour leader Evo Morales—a member of the Aymara indigenous group and Bolivia's ...
Morales, Luis de
born с 1509, Badajoz, Spain died May 9, 1586, Badajoz Spanish painter. He lived all his life in Badajoz, leaving only for occasional commissions. He is considered Spain's ...
moralhazard
moral hazard n. A risk to an insurance company resulting from uncertainty about the honesty of the insured. * * *
moralism
/mawr"euh liz'euhm, mor"-/, n. 1. the habit of moralizing. 2. a moral maxim. 3. emphasis, esp. undue emphasis, on morality. 4. the practice of morality, as distinct from ...
moralist
—moralistic, adj. —moralistically, adv. /mawr"euh list, mor"-/, n. 1. a person who teaches or inculcates morality. 2. a philosopher concerned with the principles of ...
moralistic
moralistic [môr΄əl is′tik, mär΄əl is′tik] adj. 1. moralizing 2. of moralism or moralists moralistically adv. * * * mor·al·is·tic (môr'ə-lĭsʹtĭk, ...
moralistically
See moralistic. * * *
morality
/meuh ral"i tee, maw-/, n., pl. moralities for 4-6. 1. conformity to the rules of right conduct; moral or virtuous conduct. 2. moral quality or character. 3. virtue in sexual ...
morality play
an allegorical form of the drama current from the 14th to 16th centuries and employing such personified abstractions as Virtue, Vice, Greed, Gluttony, etc. Cf. miracle play, ...
moralityplay
morality play n. 1. A drama in the 15th and 16th centuries using allegorical characters to portray the soul's struggle to achieve salvation. 2. Something viewed as exhibiting a ...
moralization
See moralize. * * *
moralize
—moralization, n. —moralizer, n. —moralizingly, adv. /mawr"euh luyz', mor"-/, v., moralized, moralizing. v.i. 1. to reflect on or express opinions about something in terms ...
moralizer
See moralization. * * *
morally
/mawr"euh lee, mor"-/, adv. 1. in a moral manner. 2. from a moral point of view: morally reprehensible. 3. virtuously. 4. virtually; practically. [1350-1400; ME; see MORAL, ...
moralphilosophy
moral philosophy n. Ethics. * * *
Moran, George
▪ American gangster byname  Bugs Moran   born 1893, Minnesota, U.S. died Feb. 25, 1957, U.S. Penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kan.       Chicago gangster and bootlegger of ...
Moranbah
▪ Queensland, Australia       new town, east-central Queensland, Australia. It lies about 120 miles (190 km) southwest of Mackay and 490 miles (790 km) northwest of the ...
Morand, Paul
▪ French author and diplomat born March 13, 1888, Paris, France died July 24, 1976, Paris       French diplomat and novelist whose early fiction captured the feverish ...
Morandi
/maw rddahn"dee/, n. Giorgio /jawrdd"jaw/, 1890-1964, Italian painter. * * *
Morandi, Giorgio
born July 20, 1890, Bologna, Italy died June 18, 1964, Bologna Italian painter and etcher. He first exhibited his paintings with the Futurists and was closely associated with ...
Morant Bay
▪ Jamaica       town, southeastern Jamaica, at the mouth of the Morant River, east-southeast of Kingston. It is a resort and a shipping point for bananas, coffee, ...
Morant, Sir Robert Laurie
▪ British civil servant born April 7, 1863, London, England died March 13, 1920, London       British civil servant, closely associated with the development of ...
Morante, Elsa
▪ Italian author born Aug. 18, 1912, Rome, Italy died Nov. 25, 1985, Rome  Italian novelist, short-story writer, and poet known for the epic and mythical quality of her ...
morass
/meuh ras"/, n. 1. a tract of low, soft, wet ground. 2. a marsh or bog. 3. marshy ground. 4. any confusing or troublesome situation, esp. one from which it is difficult to free ...
Morat, Battle of
▪ Switzerland [1476]       (June 22, 1476), battle in Switzerland that constituted a major victory for the Swiss Confederation in its war of 1474–76 against Burgundy. ...
moratorium
/mawr'euh tawr"ee euhm, -tohr"-, mor'-/, n., pl. moratoria /-tawr"ee euh, -tohr"-/, moratoriums. 1. a suspension of activity: a moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. 2. a ...
moratory
/mawr"euh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee, mor"-/, adj. authorizing delay of payment: a moratory law. [1890-95; < LL moratorius dilatory, equiv. to mora(ri) to delay; see MORA + -torius ...
Moratuwa
/maw rah"too weuh/, n. a city in W Sri Lanka. 86,000. * * *
Morava
Czech., Serbo-Croatian. /maw"rddah vah/, n. 1. German, March. a river in central Europe, flowing S from NE Czech Republic, along part of the border between the Czech Republic and ...
Morava River
I River, Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. Formed by the confluence of the South (Južna) Morava and West (Zapadna) Morava rivers, it flows north to enter the Danube River, after a ...
Moravia
/maw ray"vee euh, -rah"-, moh-/; for 1 also It. /maw rddah"vyah/, n. 1. Alberto /ahl berdd"taw/, (Alberto Pincherle), 1907-90, Italian writer. 2. Czech, Morava. German, Mähren. ...
Moravia, Alberto
orig. Alberto Pincherle born Nov. 28, 1907, Rome, Italy died Sept. 26, 1990, Rome Italian journalist, novelist, and short-story writer. He worked as a journalist in Turin and ...
Moravia,Alberto
Mo·ra·vi·a (mō-räʹvē-ə, -vyä), Alberto. Pen name of Alberto Pincherle. 1907-1990. Italian writer best known for his novels, such as Time of Desecration (1978), which ...
Moravian
—Moravianism, n. /maw ray"vee euhn, moh-/, adj. 1. pertaining to Moravia or its inhabitants. 2. of or pertaining to the religious denomination of Moravians. n. 3. a native or ...
Moravian Brethren
the Moravian Church. * * *
Moravian Church
Protestant denomination founded in the 18th century. It traces its origins to the Unity of Brethren, a 15th-century Hussite movement in Bohemia and Moravia. The original ...
Moravian Gate
a mountain pass between the Sudeten Mountains and the Tatra range of the Carpathians, leading from S Poland into N Moravia in the NE Czech Republic. * * *
Moravian Karst
▪ karst, Czech Republic Czech  Moravský Kras        karst in Jihomoravský kraj (region), eastern Czech Republic. It is a limestone area containing a labyrinth of ...
MoravianGate
Moravian Gate or Moravian Gap A mountain pass of central Europe between the Sudetes and the western Carpathian Mountains. It was long a strategic trade and communications ...
Moravská Ostrava
/maw"rddahf skah aws"trddah vah/ former name of Ostrava. German, Mährisch-Ostrau. * * *
Moraxella
/mawr'euhk sel"euh/, n. Bacteriol. a genus of rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria, certain species of which, as M. lacunata, are parasitic and pathogenic for humans and other ...
moray
/mawr"ay, mohr"ay; maw ray", moh-/, n., pl. morays. any of numerous chiefly tropical eels of the family Muraenidae, having porelike gill openings and no pectoral fins. Also ...
Moray
/merr"ee/, n. a historic county in NE Scotland, on Moray Firth. Formerly, Elgin. * * * Any of about 80 species (family Muraenidae) of shallow-water eels inhabiting all tropical ...
Moray Firth
an arm of the North Sea projecting into the NE coast of Scotland. Inland portion ab. 30 mi. (48 km) long. * * * Inlet of the North Sea, northeastern Scotland. It extends inland ...
Moray, James Stewart, 1st Earl of, Earl Of Mar, Lord Abernethy
▪ Scottish regent born c. 1531 died January 21, 1570, Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland       half brother of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, who became regent of ...
Moray, James Stewart, 2nd Earl of, Lord Doune
▪ Scottish noble byname  The Bonny Earl Of Moray   died Feb. 7, 1592, Fife, Scot.       son-in-law of the regent James Stewart, the 1st earl. He became earl in 1580 ...
Moray, Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of
▪ Scottish noble died July 20, 1332, Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scot.       nephew of King Robert I the Bruce of Scotland and a leading military commander in Robert's ...
MorayFirth
Mor·ay Firth (mûrʹē) An inlet of the North Sea on the northeast coast of Scotland. It is the northern outlet of the Caledonian Canal system. * * *
Morazán
/maw rddah sahn"/, n. Francisco /frddahn sees"kaw/, 1799-1842, Central American statesman and soldier, born in Honduras. * * *
Morazán, Francisco
▪ Central American politician born October 3, 1792, Tegucigalpa, Honduras died September 15, 1842, San José, Costa Rica  president of the United Provinces of Central America ...
morbid
—morbidly, adv. —morbidness, n. /mawr"bid/, adj. 1. suggesting an unhealthy mental state or attitude; unwholesomely gloomy, sensitive, extreme, etc.: a morbid interest in ...
morbidezza
/mawr'bi det"seuh/; It. /mawrdd bee det"tsah/, n. Fine Arts. the effect of extreme softness and delicacy in pictorial and sculptural representations. [1615-25; < It, equiv. to ...
morbidity
/mawr bid"i tee/, n. 1. a morbid state or quality. 2. the proportion of sickness or of a specific disease in a geographical locality. [1715-25; MORBID + -ITY] * * *
morbidly
See morbid. * * *
morbidness
See morbidly. * * *
morbific
—morbifically, adv. /mawr bif"ik/, adj. causing disease. Also, morbifical. [1645-55; < NL morbificus, equiv. to morb(us) sickness + -i- -I- + -ficus -FIC] * * *
Morbihan
/mawrdd bee ahonn"/, n. a department in W France. 563,588; 2738 sq. mi. (7090 sq. km). Cap.: Vannes. * * *
morbilli
/mawr bil"uy/, n. (used with a sing. v.) Pathol. measles (def. 1). [1685-95; < ML, pl. of morbillus pustule, equiv. to L morb(us) sickness + -illus dim. suffix] * * *
morceau
/mawrdd soh"/, n., pl. morceaux /-soh"/. French. 1. piece; morsel. 2. an excerpt or passage of poetry or music. * * *
Morceli, Noureddine
▪ 1995       "I am gifted by God," Noureddine Morceli was frequently heard to say. By the end of 1994 the Algerian track star's accomplishments had reached proportions ...
mordacious
—mordaciously, adv. —mordacity /mawr das"i tee/, n. /mawr day"sheuhs/, adj. 1. biting or given to biting. 2. sharp or caustic in style, tone, etc. [1640-50; < L mordaci- (s. ...
mordaciously
See mordacious. * * *
mordacity
See mordaciously. * * *
mordancy
/mawr"dn see/, n. the quality of being mordant; sharpness. [1650-60; MORD(ANT) + -ANCY] * * *
mordant
—mordantly, adv. /mawr"dnt/, adj. 1. sharply caustic or sarcastic, as wit or a speaker; biting. 2. burning; corrosive. 3. having the property of fixing colors, as in ...
mordant dye
▪ chemical compound       colorant that can be bound to a material for which it otherwise has little or no affinity by the addition of a mordant, a chemical that ...
mordant rouge
a solution of aluminum acetate in acetic acid, used in dyeing and calico printing. Also called red liquor. * * *
mordantly
See mordancy. * * *
Mordecai
/mawr"di kuy', mawr'di kay"uy/, n. 1. the cousin and guardian of Esther who delivered the Jews from the destruction planned by Haman. Esther 2-8. 2. a male given name. * * * In ...
mordenite
▪ mineral       hydrated sodium, potassium, and calcium aluminosilicate mineral (Na2,K2,Ca) Al2Si10O24·7H2O, in the zeolite family. It is one of the most abundant ...
mordent
/mawr"dnt/, n. Music. 1. a melodic embellishment consisting of a rapid alternation of a principal tone with the tone a half or a whole step below it, called single or short when ...
mordida
/mawrdd dhee"dhah/, n., pl. mordidas /-dhahs/. Mexican Spanish. a bribe or kickback. [lit., bite] * * *
Mordovian Autonomous Republic
/mawr doh"vee euhn/, n. an autonomous republic in the Russian Federation in Europe. 964,000; 9843 sq. mi. (25,493 sq. km). Cap.: Saransk. Also, Mordvinian Autonomous Republic. * ...
Mordoviya
▪ republic, Russia also spelled  Mordovia,  or  Mordvinia        republic in Russia, situated in the middle Volga River basin. The capital is ...
Mordred
/mawr"dred/, n. Modred. * * *
Mordvin
/mawrd"vin/, n. 1. a member of a Uralic people living in scattered communities in the middle Volga basin, esp. between Nizhni Novgorod and Saratov. 2. the Finnic language of the ...
Mordvin language
      member of the Finno-Ugric group of the Uralic language family, spoken in Mordvinia and neighbouring areas. The third largest Uralic language in number of speakers, ...
Mordvinia
Mord·vin·i·a (môrd-vĭnʹē-ə) also Mor·do·vi·a (môr-dōʹvē-ə) An autonomous republic of west-central Russia. Settled by a Finno-Ugric people first mentioned in the ...
Mordvinian Autonomous Republic.
See Mordovian Autonomous Republic. * * *
Mordyukova, Nonna
▪ 2009 Noyabrina Viktorovna Mordyukova        Soviet actress born Nov. 25, 1925, Konstantinovskaya, Ukraine, U.S.S.R. [now in Russia] died July 6, 2008, Moscow, ...
more
—moreness, n. /mawr, mohr/, adj., compar. of much or many with most as superl. 1. in greater quantity, amount, measure, degree, or number: I need more money. 2. additional or ...
More
/mawr, mohr/, n. 1. Hannah, 1745-1833, English writer on religious subjects. 2. Paul Elmer, 1864-1937, U.S. essayist, critic, and editor. 3. Sir Thomas, 1478-1535, English ...
Moré
/meuh ray"/, n. Mossi (def. 2). * * *
more dict.
(in prescriptions) in the manner directed. Also, mor. dict. [ < L more dictu] * * *
more sol.
(in prescriptions) in the usual manner. Also, mor. sol. [ < L more solito] * * *
More, Hannah
▪ English writer born Feb. 2, 1745, Stapleton, Gloucestershire, Eng. died Sept. 7, 1833, Bristol, Gloucestershire       English religious writer, best known as a ...
More, Henry
▪ British poet and philosopher born 1614, Grantham, Lincolnshire, Eng. died Sept. 1, 1687, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire  English poet and philosopher of religion who was perhaps ...
More, Paul Elmer
▪ American scholar born Dec. 12, 1864, St. Louis, Mo., U.S. died March 9, 1937, Princeton, N.J.       American scholar and conservative critic, one of the leading ...
More, Saint Thomas
born Feb. 7, 1477, London, Eng. died July 6, 1535, London; canonized May 19, 1935; feast day June 22 English statesman and humanist. He studied at Oxford and was successful as ...
More, Sir Anthony
▪ Dutch painter original name  Antoon, or Anthonius, Mor , also called  Antonio Moro  born c. 1520, , Utrecht, bishopric of Utrecht [now in The Netherlands] died , ...
More, Sir Thomas
▪ English humanist and statesman Introduction also called  Saint Thomas More   born February 7, 1478, London, England died July 6, 1535, London; canonized May 19, 1935; ...
More,Sir Thomas
More (môr, mōr), Sir Thomas. 1478-1535. English politician, humanist scholar, and writer who refused to comply with the Act of Supremacy, by which English subjects were ...
Morea
/maw ree"euh, moh-/, n. Peloponnesus. * * *
Morea, Despotate of
▪ historical principality, Greece       autonomous Byzantine principality located on the Greek Peloponnese (Morea). It was established in the mid-14th century by the ...
Moréas, Jean
▪ French poet pseudonym of  Yánnis Papadiamantópoulos   born April 15, 1856, Athens, Greece died March 31, 1910, Paris, France  Greek-born poet who played a leading part ...
Moreau
/maw roh"/; Fr. /maw rddoh"/, n. 1. Gustave /gyuus tannv"/, 1826-98, French painter. 2. Jeanne /zhahn/, born 1928, French film actress. 3. Jean Victor /zhahonn veek tawrdd"/, ...
Moreau River
▪ river, South Dakota, United States       river formed by the confluence of the North Fork Moreau and South Fork Moreau rivers in Perkins county, northwestern South ...
Moreau, Gustave
born April 6, 1826, Paris, France died April 18, 1898, Paris French painter. He developed a distinctive style in the Symbolist mode, becoming known for his erotic paintings of ...
Moreau, Jeanne
born Jan. 23, 1928, Paris, France French film actress. At age 20 she became the youngest member of the Comédie-Française. She made her screen debut in The Last Love (1949) ...
Moreau, Victor
▪ French general in full  Jean-Victor-Marie Moreau  born Feb. 14, 1763, Morlaix, Fr. died Sept. 2, 1813, Lahn, Bohemia  leading French general of the French Revolutionary ...
MoreauRiver
Mo·reau River (môrʹō, mōrʹō) A river of northwest South Dakota flowing about 402 km (250 mi) eastward to the Missouri River. * * *
Morecambe and Wise
Eric Morecambe (1926–84) and Ernie Wise (1925–99), a pair of English television comedians who were very popular in the 1960s and 1970s. Their shows attracted extremely large ...
Morecambe Bay
▪ bay, England, United Kingdom       bay of the Irish Sea deeply indenting the northwest coast of England between the port of Barrow-in-Furness to the north and the ...
Moree
▪ New South Wales, Australia       town, northern New South Wales, Australia, on the Gwydir River, in the Western Slopes district. Originating in 1848 as a livestock ...
moreen
/meuh reen"/, n. a heavy fabric of wool, or wool and cotton, with a ribbed face and a moiré finish, used for curtains, petticoats, etc. [1685-95; mor- (perh. var. of MOIRE) + ...
Morehead City
▪ North Carolina, United States       town, seaport resort, Carteret county, eastern North Carolina, U.S. It lies on Bogue Sound (there receiving the Newport River) and ...
Morehead State University
▪ university, Morehead, Kentucky, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Morehead, Kentucky, U.S., in the foothills of Daniel Boone ...
Morehouse College
Private, historically black, men's liberal arts college in Atlanta, Ga. It was founded as the Augusta Institute, a seminary, in 1867 and renamed in 1913 in honour of Henry L. ...
Morehouse, Comet
▪ astronomy       very bright comet in a retrograde, quasi-parabolic orbit, remarkable for variations in the form and structure of its tail. It was named after Daniel ...
morel
morel1 /meuh rel"/, n. any edible mushroom of the genus Morchella, esp. M. esculenta. [1665-75; < F, MF morille, perh. < VL *mauricula, deriv. of ML maurus brown, dark-colored; ...
Morel
/maw rel"/; Fr. /maw rddel"/, n. Jean /zhahonn/, 1903-75, French orchestra conductor. * * * Any of various species of edible mushrooms in the genera Morchella and Verpa. Morels ...
Morel, Benedict Augustin
▪ French psychologist born Nov. 22, 1809, Vienna died March 30, 1873, Saint-Yon, Fr.       Austrian-born French psychologist who introduced the term dementia praecox ...
Morelia
/maw rdde"lyah/, n. a city in and the capital of Michoacán, in central Mexico. 209,014. * * * City (pop., 2000: 549,996), capital of Michoacán state, west-central Mexico. It ...
Morellet, André
▪ French economist born March 7, 1727, Lyon died Jan. 12, 1819, Paris       French economist and miscellaneous writer, an associate of the Philosophes and a contributor ...
Morelli, Giovanni
▪ Italian art critic original name  Nicolas Schäffer  born February 25, 1816, Verona, Kingdom of Lombardy and Venetia [now in Italy] died February 28, 1891, ...
morello
/meuh rel"oh/, n., pl. morellos. 1. a variety of sour cherry having dark-colored skin and juice. 2. the tree bearing this fruit. [1640-50; perh. < It amarello AMARELLE, confused ...
Morelly
▪ French philosopher flourished 18th century       French philosopher whose writings influenced Communist doctrine. His works, which frequently delineate a utopian ...
Morelos
/maw rdde"laws/, n. a state in S central Mexico. 866,000; 1916 sq. mi. (4960 sq. km). Cap.: Cuernavaca. * * * State (pop., 2000: 1,555,296), central Mexico. It covers 1,911 sq ...
Morelos y Pavón
/maw rdde"laws ee pah vawn"/ José María /haw se" mah rddee"ah/, 1765-1815, Mexican priest and revolutionary leader. * * *
Morelos, José María
▪ Mexican revolutionary and priest born Sept. 30, 1765, Valladolid, Mex. died Dec. 22, 1815, San Cristóbal       revolutionary priest who assumed leadership of the ...
Morena
▪ India also called  Pech Morena        city, northern Madhya Pradesh state, north-central India. An agricultural trade centre, it is connected by rail and national ...
Morena, Sierra
▪ mountains, Spain       mountain range, south-central Spain, forming the southern edge of the Meseta Central and stretching for about 200 miles (320 km) from the ...
Moreno
▪ county, Argentina       partido (county) on the western periphery of Gran (Greater) Buenos Aires, Argentina. The settlement of Moreno was founded by Amancio Alcorta ...
Moreno Valley
Moreno Valley [mə rē′nō] city in S Calif.: pop. 142,000 * * *
Moreno, José Manuel
▪ Argentine athlete born August 3, 1916, Buenos Aires, Argentina died August 26, 1978       Argentine football (soccer) player who starred with the club River Plate ...
Moreno, Mariano
▪ Argentine patriot born Sept. 3, 1778, Buenos Aires, viceroyalty of the Rió de la Plata [now in Argentina] died 1811, at sea  patriot who was the intellectual and political ...
moreover
/mawr oh"veuhr, mohr-, mawr"oh'veuhr, mohr"-/, adv. in addition to what has been said; further; besides. [1325-75; ME more over. See MORE, OVER] Syn. See besides. * * *
Morera's theorem
/maw rair"euhz/, Math. the theorem that a function is analytic in a simply connected domain if its integral is zero around every simple closed curve of finite length in the ...
mores
/mawr"ayz, -eez, mohr"-/, n.pl. Sociol. folkways of central importance accepted without question and embodying the fundamental moral views of a group. [1905-10; < L mores, pl. of ...
Moresque
/meuh resk"/, adj. Moorish. [1605-15; < MF < It moresco, equiv. to Mor(o) MOOR + -esco -ESQUE] * * *
Moreto, Agustín
▪ Spanish dramatist baptized April 9, 1618, Madrid, Spain died Oct. 26/27, 1669, Toledo       Spanish dramatist whose plays were extremely popular in his time and who ...
Moreton Bay
Inlet of the Pacific Ocean, southeastern coast of Queensland, Australia. It is 65 mi (105 km) long and 20 mi (32 km) wide, and it serves as the gateway to Brisbane. In 1770 ...
Moreton Bay pine
▪ plant also called  Hoop Pine, or Colonial Pine        (species Araucaria cunninghamii), a large evergreen timber conifer of the family Araucariaceae, native to the ...
Moreton Island
▪ island, Queensland, Australia       island lying across Moreton Bay from Brisbane, off the southeast coast of Queensland, Australia. It is about 25 miles (40 km) long ...
Moretti, Marino
▪ Italian poet born July 18, 1885, Cesenatico, Italy died July 6, 1979, Cesenatico       Italian poet and prose writer whose nostalgic, elegant verse established him as ...
Morgagni
/mawrdd gah"nyee/, n. Giovanni Battista /jaw vahn"nee baht tees"tah/, 1682-1771, Italian anatomist. * * *
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
▪ Italian anatomist and pathologist born Feb. 25, 1682, Forlì, Italy died Dec. 5, 1771, Padua  Italian anatomist and pathologist whose works helped make pathological ...
Morgain le Fay
/mawr"gayn leuh fay", mawr"geuhn/. See Morgan le Fay. * * *
Morgan
/mawr"geuhn/, n. one of a breed of light carriage and saddle horses descended from the stallion Justin Morgan. [1865-70; named after the original sire owned by Justin Morgan ...
Morgan City
a city in S Louisiana: headquarters for offshore oil drilling and base for shrimp fleet. 16,114. * * * ▪ Louisiana, United States       port on the Gulf Intracoastal ...
Morgan Hill
a town in W California. 17,060. * * *
Morgan le Fay
/mawr"geuhn leuh fay"/, Celtic and Arthurian Legend. the fairy sister of King Arthur. Also, Morgain le Fay. * * * ("Morgan the Fairy") Enchantress in Arthurian legend. Skilled ...
Morgan Library and Museum
▪ museum and library, New York City, New York, United States       museum and library located in New York City that displays and collects artistic, literary, and ...
Morgan State University
▪ university, Baltimore, Maryland, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher education in Baltimore, Md., U.S. It is a historically black ...
Morgan, Anne Tracy
▪ American philanthropist born July 25, 1873, Highland Falls, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 29, 1952, Mount Kisco, N.Y.       American philanthropist, remembered most for her ...
Morgan, C Lloyd
▪ British zoologist and psychologist born Feb. 6, 1852, London died March 6, 1936, Hastings, Sussex, Eng.       British zoologist and psychologist, sometimes called the ...
Morgan, Charles Langbridge
▪ British author and critic born Jan. 22, 1894, Bromley, Kent, Eng. died Feb. 6, 1958, London       English novelist, playwright, and critic, a distinguished writer of ...
Morgan, Cliff
▪ British rugby player born April 7, 1930, Trebanog, Wales       Welsh rugby union football player who was one of the sport's greatest fly halves and was noted for his ...
Morgan, Daniel
born 1736, Hunterdon county, N.J. died July 6, 1802, Winchester, Va., U.S. American Revolutionary army officer. He was commissioned a captain of the Virginia riflemen and ...
Morgan, Dermot
▪ 1999       Irish comedian, actor, and writer who was a stand-up comic and satirist for many years in Ireland before finding international fame as the title character ...
Morgan, Frank
▪ 2008       American jazz musician born Dec. 23, 1933, Minneapolis, Minn. died Dec. 14, 2007, Minneapolis played bebop alto saxophone with a vivid tone, a lyrical ...
Morgan, Frederick
▪ 2005       American man of letters (b. April 25, 1922, New York, N.Y.—d. Feb. 20, 2004, New York City), founded in 1947 The Hudson Review, a quarterly that published ...
Morgan, Frederick Edgeworth
▪ British officer born February 5, 1894, Paddock Wood, Kent, England died March 19, 1967, Northwood, Middlesex  British army officer who was the original planner of Operation ...
Morgan, Helen
▪ American actress and singer original name  Helen Riggins  born Aug. 2, 1900, Danville, Ill., U.S. died Oct. 8, 1941, Chicago, Ill.       American actress and singer ...
Morgan, Henry
▪ 1995       (HENRY LERNER VON OST), U.S. radio announcer and television personality (b. March 31, 1915, New York, N.Y.—d. May 19, 1994, New York), singed the airwaves ...
Morgan, J(ohn) P(ierpont)
born April 17, 1837, Hartford, Conn., U.S. died March 31, 1913, Rome, Italy U.S. financier. The son of a financier, he began his career as an accountant in 1857 and became an ...
Morgan, J(ohn) P(ierpont), Jr.
born Sept. 7, 1867, Irvington, N.Y., U.S. died March 13, 1943, Boca Grande, Fla. U.S. banker and financier. He joined J.P. Morgan and Co. in 1892 and took control of it in 1913 ...
Morgan, Joe
in full Joseph Leonard Morgan born Sept. 19, 1943, Bonham, Texas, U.S. U.S. baseball player. Morgan was named Rookie of the Year in 1965, his first full season with the ...
Morgan, John
born June 10, 1735, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 15, 1789, Philadelphia U.S. medical educator. He studied medicine in Europe before returning to the American colonies to ...
Morgan, John Hunt
▪ Confederate general born June 1, 1825, Huntsville, Ala., U.S. died Sept. 4, 1864, Greenville, Tenn.  Confederate guerrilla leader of “Morgan's Raiders,” best-known for ...
Morgan, John Pierpont
▪ American financier byname  J.p. Morgan   born April 17, 1837, Hartford, Conn., U.S. died March 31, 1913, Rome  American financier and industrial organizer, one of the ...
Morgan, John Pierpont, Jr.
▪ American financier born Sept. 7, 1867, Irvington, N.Y., U.S. died March 13, 1943, Boca Grande, Fla.       American banker and financier, the head of the Morgan ...
Morgan, Julia
born Jan. 20, 1872, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Feb. 2, 1957, San Francisco U.S. architect. She received an engineering degree from the University of California at ...
Morgan, Karl
▪ 2000       American physicist who worked as a senior scientist on the Manhattan Project in 1943 and served as director of health physics at the Oak Ridge (Tenn.) ...
Morgan, Lee
▪ American musician born July 10, 1938, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 19, 1972, New York, N.Y.  black American jazz improviser-songwriter, a lyric artist, who was the ...


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