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Слова на букву lowe-moth (15990)

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MacDiarmid, Alan Graham
▪ 2008       New Zealand-born American chemist born April 14, 1927 , Masterton, N.Z. died Feb. 7, 2007 , Drexel Hill, Pa. was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in ...
MacDiarmid, Hugh
orig. Christopher Murray Grieve born Aug. 11, 1892, Langholm, Dumfriesshire, Scot. died Sept. 9, 1978, Edinburgh Scottish poet. In 1922 he founded the monthly Scottish ...
MacDiarmid,Hugh
Mac·Diar·mid (mək-dûrʹmĭd), Hugh. Pen name of Christopher Murray Grieve. 1892-1978. Scottish poet whose works, many written in Scots, reflect his support for political ...
MacDonagh, Donagh
▪ Irish author born 1912 died Jan. 1, 1968, Dublin       poet, playwright, and balladeer, prominent representative of lively Irish entertainment in the mid-20th ...
Macdonald
/meuhk don"euhld/, n. 1. George, 1824-1905, Scottish novelist and poet. 2. Sir John Alexander, 1815-91, Canadian statesman, born in Scotland: first prime minister 1867-73, ...
MacDonald
/meuhk don"euhld/, n. James Ramsay, 1866-1937, British statesman and labor leader: prime minister 1924, 1929-35. * * * (as used in expressions) Fraser George MacDonald Macdonald ...
MacDonald, (James) Ramsay
born Oct. 12, 1866, Lossiemouth, Moray, Scot. died Nov. 9, 1937, at sea en route to South America British politician, first Labour Party prime minister of Britain (1924, ...
MacDonald, (James)Ramsay
Mac·Don·ald (mĭk-dŏnʹəld), (James) Ramsay. 1866-1937. British politician who served as prime minister (1924 and 1929-1935). * * *
Macdonald, Cynthia
▪ American poet born Feb. 2, 1928, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American poet who employed a sardonic, often flippant tone and used grotesque imagery to comment on the ...
Macdonald, Dwight
born March 24, 1906, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 19, 1982, New York City U.S. writer and film critic. He graduated from Yale University. During World War II he founded the ...
Macdonald, Flora
▪ Scottish Jacobite born 1722, Milton, South Uist, Outer Hebrides, Scot. died March 5, 1790, Kingsburgh House, Skye, Inner Hebrides  Scottish Jacobite heroine who helped ...
Macdonald, George
▪ British author born Dec. 10, 1824, Huntly, Aberdeen, Scot. died Sept. 18, 1905, Ashtead, Surrey, Eng.  novelist of Scottish life, poet, and writer of Christian allegories ...
Macdonald, Jacques, duc de Tarente
▪ French general in full  Macdonald, Jacques-Étienne-Joseph-Alexandre, duc de Tarente  born November 17, 1765, Sedan, France died September 25, 1840, Courcelles  French ...
MacDonald, John D.
▪ American writer in full  John Dann MacDonald  born July 24, 1916, Sharon, Pa., U.S. died Dec. 28, 1986, Milwaukee, Wis.       American fiction writer whose mystery ...
Macdonald, John Sandfield
▪ premier of Ontario born Dec. 12, 1812, St. Raphael, Upper Canada died June 1, 1872, Cornwall, Ont., Can.  prime minister of the Province of Canada (1862–64) and first ...
MacDonald, Ramsay
▪ prime minister of United Kingdom born Oct. 12, 1866, Lossiemouth, Moray, Scot. died Nov. 9, 1937, at sea en route to South America  first Labour Party prime minister of ...
Macdonald, Ross
▪ American author pseudonym of  Kenneth Millar,  also called  John Macdonald  or  John Ross Macdonald   born Dec. 13, 1915, Los Gatos, Calif., U.S. died July 11, 1983, ...
Macdonald, Sir Hector
▪ British soldier in full Sir Hector Archibald Macdonald  born April 13, 1853, Rootfield, Urquhart, Moray, Scot. died March 25, 1903, Paris       British soldier who ...
Macdonald, Sir James Ronald Leslie
▪ British soldier, engineer, and explorer born Feb. 8, 1862, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scot. died June 27, 1927, Bournemouth, Hampshire, Eng.       British soldier, ...
Macdonald, Sir John
▪ prime minister of Canada born Jan. 11, 1815, Glasgow died June 6, 1891, Ottawa  the first prime minister of the Dominion of Canada (1867–73, 1878–91), who led Canada ...
Macdonald, Sir John (Alexander)
born Jan. 11, 1815, Glasgow, Scot. died June 6, 1891, Ottawa, Ont., Can. Canadian politician, first prime minister of the Dominion of Canada (1867–73, 1878–91). He ...
Macdonald,Sir John Alexander
Mac·don·ald (mĭk-dŏnʹəld), Sir John Alexander. 1815-1891. Canadian politician and the first prime minister of the Dominion of Canada (1867-1873 and 1878-1891). He is ...
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton
▪ American painter and educator born July 8, 1890, Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. died August 22, 1973, Pacific Palisades, California       painter and teacher who, ...
Macdonnell Ranges
Mountain system, south-central Northern Territory, Australia. Extending east and west of the town of Alice Springs for some 250 mi (400 km), its highest peak is Mount Ziel ...
MacDonnell, Sorley Boy
▪ Scotch-Irish chieftain Irish Somhairle Buidhe MacDonnell born c. 1505, , probably Dunluce Castle, near Ballycastle, County Antrim, Ire. died 1590, Dunanynie Castle, County ...
Macdonough
/meuhk don"euh/, n. Thomas, 1783-1825, U.S. naval officer: defeated British on Lake Champlain 1814. * * *
Macdonough, Thomas
born Dec. 31, 1783, The Trap, Del., U.S. died Nov. 10, 1825, at sea en route from the Mediterranean Sea to New York City U.S. naval officer. He joined the navy in 1800 and ...
MacDowell
/meuhk dow"euhl/, n. Edward Alexander, 1861-1908, U.S. composer and pianist. * * *
MacDowell Colony
▪ retreat, Peterborough, New Hampshire, United States  retreat for artists, the oldest and among the largest artist colonies in the United States. It was founded in 1907 by ...
MacDowell, Edward (Alexander)
orig. Edward Alexander McDowell born Dec. 18, 1860, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 23, 1908, New York City U.S. composer. He started piano lessons at age eight. While in ...
MacDowell,Edward Alexander
Mac·Dow·ell (mĭk-douʹəl), Edward Alexander. 1861-1908. American composer whose works include the piano sonatas Woodland Sketches (1896) and Sea Pieces (1898). He is ...
mace
mace1 /mays/, n. 1. a clublike armor-breaking weapon of war, often with a flanged or spiked metal head, used chiefly in the Middle Ages. 2. a ceremonial staff carried before or ...
Mace
/mays/, Trademark. a nonlethal spray containing purified tear gas and chemical solvents that temporarily incapacitate a person mainly by causing eye and skin irritations: used ...
Mace, James
▪ British boxer byname  Jem Mace   born April 8, 1831, Beeston, Norfolk, Eng. died Nov. 30, 1910, Jarrow, Durham  professional boxer and English heavyweight champion who is ...
macebearer
/mays"bair'euhr/, n. an official, as of a city or legislative body, who carries a ceremonial mace before dignitaries. [1545-55; MACE1 + BEARER] * * *
Maced.
Macedonia. * * *
Macedo, José Agostinho de
▪ Portuguese writer born Sept. 11, 1761, Beja, Port. died Oct. 2, 1831, Pedrouços       Portuguese didactic poet, critic, and pamphleteer notable for his ...
macédoine
/mas'i dwahn"/, n. 1. a mixture of fruits or vegetables, often served as a salad. 2. a medley. [1810-20; < F, after Macédoine MACEDONIA, prob. an allusion to the variety of ...
Macedon
Macedon [mas′ə dän΄] ancient Macedonia * * * Ma·ce·don (măsʹĭ-dən, -dŏn') also Ma·ce·do·nia (măs'ĭ-dōʹnē-ə, -dōnʹyə) An ancient kingdom of northern ...
Macedonia
/mas'i doh"nee euh, -dohn"yeuh/, n. 1. Also, Macedon /mas"i don'/. an ancient kingdom in the Balkan Peninsula, in S Europe: now a region in N Greece, SW Bulgaria, and the ...
Macedonia, flag of
▪ Flag History       national flag consisting of a red field with a golden central disk and golden rays extending to the flag edges. It has a width-to-length ratio of ...
Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic Of
Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Introduction Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of - Background: International recognition of ...
Macedonian
/mas'i doh"nee euhn/, n. 1. a native or inhabitant of Macedonia. 2. a Slavic language of modern Macedonia. 3. an extinct language of ancient Macedonia, an Indo-European language ...
Macedonian language
Macedonian  Makedonski Jazik        South Slavic language that is most closely related to Bulgarian and is written in the Cyrillic alphabet. Macedonian (Macedonia) is ...
Macedonian literature
      literature written in the South Slavic Macedonian language.       The earliest Macedonian literature, in the medieval period, was religious and Orthodox ...
Macedonian question
▪ Balkan history       a dispute that occurred during the 19th and 20th centuries among the Balkan powers over possession of the territory of Macedonia. An attempt by ...
Macedonian Wars
Three wars fought by Philip V of Macedonia and his successor, Perseus, against Rome (215–205 BC, 200–197, 171–167). The first war, fought by Rome in the context of the ...
Macedonianism
▪ religious history also called  Pneumatomachian heresy        a 4th-century Christian heresy that denied the full personality and divinity of the Holy Spirit. ...
Macedonius
▪ Greek bishop [flourished 4th century] flourished 4th century       Greek bishop of Constantinople (Istanbul) and a leading moderate Arian theologian in the ...
Maceió
/mah'say aw"/, n. a seaport in and the capital of Alagoas, in E Brazil. 409,191. * * * ▪ Brazil       capital, Alagoas estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It is ...
Maček, Vladimir
▪ Croatian leader born July 20, 1879, Jastrebarsko, near Zagreb, Croatia died May 15, 1964, Washington, D.C., U.S.       nationalist and leader of the Croatian Peasant ...
Macenta
▪ Guinea       town, southeastern Guinea. It is located in the Guinea Highlands (at 2,033 feet [620 m]) on the road from Nzérékoré to Guéckédou and is the chief ...
macer
/may"seuhr/, n. 1. macebearer. 2. (in Scotland) an officer who attends the Court of Session and carries out its orders. [1300-50; ME < AF; MF massier. See MACE1, -ER2] * * *
maceral
▪ organic compound        Petrologic components in coal and their groupings Petrologic components in coal and their groupingsany of the numerous microscopically ...
Macerata
▪ Italy       city, Marche regione, central Italy. It is situated on a hill between the Potenza and Chienti rivers, south of Ancona. The town was built in the 10th and ...
macerate
—macerater, macerator, n. —macerative, adj. /mas"euh rayt'/, v., macerated, macerating. v.t. 1. to soften or separate into parts by steeping in a liquid. 2. to soften or ...
macerater
See maceration. * * *
maceration
/mas'euh ray"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of macerating. 2. a process in winemaking in which the crushed grape skins are left in the juice until they have imparted the ...
macerator
See maceration. * * *
Macfadden, Bernarr
orig. Bernard Adolphus McFadden born Aug. 16, 1868, Mill Spring, Mo., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1955, Jersey City, N.J. U.S. publisher and champion of physical health. A sickly ...
macfarlane
/meuhk fahr"lin/, n. an overcoat with an attached cape and two slits in front near the waist. Also, Macfarlane, MacFarlane. [special use of surname MacFarlane] * * *
Macfarquhar, Colin
▪ Scottish printer born 1745? died April 2, 1793, Edinburgh?, Scot.       Scottish printer, who, with Andrew Bell (Bell, Andrew), founded the Encyclopædia Britannica ...
Macgillicuddy'sReeks
Mac·gil·li·cud·dy's Reeks (mə-gĭlʹĭ-kŭd'ēz rēksʹ) A mountain range of extreme southwest Ireland. It rises to 1,041.3 m (3,414 ft) at Carrantuohill, which is the ...
Macgillycuddy's Reeks
▪ mountain range, Ireland   (Irish: “ridge” or “crests”), mountain range on the Iveragh peninsula in County Kerry, southwestern Ireland. Its geological basis is a ...
MacGregor, Sir Ian
▪ 1999       British industrialist (b. Sept. 21, 1912, Kinlochleven, Scot.—d. April 13, 1998, Taunton, Eng.), gained a reputation for having a ruthless, no-nonsense ...
mach
/mahk/, n. a number indicating the ratio of the speed of an object to the speed of sound in the medium through which the object is moving. Abbr.: M Also, Mach. Also called mach ...
Mach
/mahk/; Ger. /mahkh/, n. Ernst /erddnst/, 1838-1916, Austrian physicist, psychologist, and philosopher. * * *
mach number
mach. Also, Mach number. [1935-40] * * * ▪ physics       in fluid mechanics, ratio of the velocity of a fluid to the velocity of sound in that fluid, named after Ernst ...
Mach scale
/mak/, Psychol. a scale that measures how much deceit and manipulation one will approve or condone in order to achieve some end. [1965-70; short for MACHIAVELLI, perh. with play ...
Mach's principle
Physics. the proposition that there is no absolute space and that the inertia and acceleration of a body are determined by all of the matter of the universe. [after E. MACH] * * ...
Mach, Ernst
born Feb. 18, 1838, Chirlitz-Turas, Moravia died Feb. 19, 1916, Haar, Ger. Austrian physicist and philosopher. After earning a doctorate in physics in 1860, he taught at the ...
Mach,Ernst
Mach (mäk, mäKH), Ernst. 1838-1916. Austrian physicist and philosopher who played a central role in the development of logical positivism. His works include the influential ...
mach.
1. machine. 2. machinery. 3. machinist. * * *
Macha
▪ Celtic war goddess       in Celtic religion, one of three war goddesses; it is also a collective name for the three, who were also referred to as the three Morrígan. ...
Mácha, Karel Hynek
▪ Czech poet born Nov. 16, 1810, Prague, Bohemia, Austrian Empire [now in Czech Republic] died Nov. 5, 1836, Litoměřice       literary artist who is considered the ...
Machabees
/mak"euh beez'/, n. (used with a sing. v.) Douay Bible. Maccabees (def. 2). * * *
Machado de Assis, Joachim María
Ma·cha·do de As·sis (mä-shäʹdo͝o dĭ ä-sēsʹ), Joachim María. 1839-1908. Brazilian writer whose novels, including Dom Casmurro (1900), reveal his wit and pessimistic ...
Machado de Assis, Joaquim Maria
born June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro, Braz. died Sept. 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro Brazilian poet, novelist, and short-story writer. Machado began to write in his spare time while ...
Machado de Assiz
/mah shah"doo di ah sees"/ Joaquim Maria /zhaw"ah kim mah rddee"ah/, 1839-1908, Brazilian writer. * * *
Machado y Morales
/mah chah"dhaw ee maw rddah"les/ Gerardo /he rddahrdd"dhaw/, 1871-1939, president of Cuba 1925-33. * * *
Machado y Morales, Gerardo
▪ Cuban dictator born Sept. 29, 1871, Camajuaní, Cuba died March 29, 1939, Miami Beach  hero in the Cuban War of Independence (1895–98) who was later elected president by ...
Machado y Ruiz
/mah chah"dhaw ee rddooh eeth"/ Antonio /ahn taw"nyaw/, 1875-1939, Spanish writer. * * *
Machado, Antonio
▪ Spanish author in full  Antonio Machado y Ruiz  born July 26, 1875, Sevilla, Spain died February 22, 1939, Collioure, France       outstanding Spanish poet and ...
Machado, Bernardino Luís
▪ president of Portugal born March 28, 1851, Rio de Janeiro died April 29, 1944, Porto, Port.       Brazilian-born political leader who was twice president of Portugal ...
Machado, Manuel
▪ Spanish author in full  Manuel Machado y Ruiz  born August 29, 1874, Sevilla, Spain died January 19, 1947, Madrid       Spanish poet and playwright, brother of ...
Machala
Ma·cha·la (mä-chäʹlä) A city of southwest Ecuador south of Guayaquil. It is a commercial center. Population: 144,197. * * * ▪ Ecuador       city, southwestern ...
Machaon
/meuh kay"on/, n. (in the Iliad) a son of Asclepius who was famed as a healer and who served as physician of the Greeks in the Trojan War. * * *
Machatý, Gustav
▪ Czech director born May 9, 1901, Prague, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary [now in Czech Republic] died Dec. 14, 1963, Munich, Ger.       Czech motion-picture director whose ...
Machaut
Fr. /mann shoh"/, n. Guillaume de Fr. /gee yohm" deuh/. See Guillaume de Machaut. Also, Machault. * * *
Machaut, Guillaume de
or Guillaume de Machault born с 1300, Machault, France died 1377, Reims French poet and composer. After possibly receiving a university education and taking holy orders, he ...
Machaut,Guillaume de
Ma·chaut (mä-shōʹ), Guillaume de. 1300?-1377. French poet and composer influential in establishing polyphonic song in France. * * *
mache
/mahsh/, n. See corn salad. Also, mâche. [1820-30; < F mâche, perh. by apheresis (or by assoc. with mâcher to chew) from dial. pomache, with same sense, perh. < VL *pomasca, ...
Machel
/meuh shel"/, n. Samora Moisés /seuh mawr"euh moy zes"/, 1933-86, Mozambique political leader: president 1975-86. * * *
Machel, Samora
▪ president of Mozambique born September 29, 1933, Chilembene, Mozambique died October 19, 1986, Mbuzini, South Africa       Mozambican politician, who was the first ...
Machen
/mak"euhn/, n. Arthur, 1863-1947, Welsh novelist and essayist. * * *
Machen, Arthur
▪ Welsh writer pseudonym of  Arthur Llewellyn Jones   born March 3, 1863, Caerleon, Monmouthshire, Eng. died Dec. 15, 1947, Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire       Welsh ...
Machen, John Gresham
▪ American theologian born July 28, 1881, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. died January 1, 1937, Bismarck, North Dakota       American Presbyterian theologian and ...
macher
macher [mä′khər] n. 〚Ger (chiefly via Yiddish) < machen, to make, do〛 Slang 1. a person who gets things done, makes things happen, etc. 2. a person with power and ...
machete
/meuh shet"ee, -chet"ee/, n. 1. a large heavy knife used esp. in Latin-American countries in cutting sugarcane and clearing underbrush and as a weapon. 2. a tarpon, Elops ...
Machias
▪ Maine, United States       town, seat (1790) of Washington county, eastern Maine, U.S., near the mouth of the Machias River, at the head of Machias Bay, 84 miles (135 ...
Machiavelli
/mak'ee euh vel"ee/; It. /mah'kyah vel"lee/, n. Niccolò di Bernardo /neek'kaw law" dee berdd nahrdd"daw/, 1469-1527, Italian statesman, political philosopher, and author. * * *
Machiavelli, Niccolò
Ma·chi·a·vel·li (măk'ē-ə-vĕlʹē, mä'kyä-), Niccolò. 1469-1527. Italian political theorist whose book The Prince (1513) describes the achievement and maintenance of ...
Machiavellian
—Machiavellianism, Machiavellism, n. —Machiavellianly, adv. /mak'ee euh vel"ee euhn/, adj. 1. of, like, or befitting Machiavelli. 2. being or acting in accordance with the ...
Machiavellianism
Ma·chi·a·vel·li·an·ism (măk'ē-ə-vĕlʹē-ə-nĭz'əm) also Ma·chi·a·vel·lism (-vĕlʹĭz'əm) n. The political doctrine of Machiavelli, which denies the relevance ...
Machiavellist
See Machiavellian. * * *
machicolate
/meuh chik"euh layt'/, v.t., machicolated, machicolating. to provide with machicolations. [1765-75; < ML machecoll(um), a Latinization of MF *machecol lit., (it) breaks (the) ...
machicolation
/meuh chik'euh lay"sheuhn/, n. Archit. 1. an opening in the floor between the corbels of a projecting gallery or parapet, as on a wall or in the vault of a passage, through which ...
Machida
Machida [mä chē′dä, mä′chē΄dä΄] city in SE Honshu, Japan, near Tokyo: pop. 356,000 * * * Ma·chi·da (mə-chēʹdə, mä-chēʹdä) A city of east-central Honshu, ...
machilid
/mak"euh lid, meuh kuy"-/, n. See jumping bristletail. [ < NL Machilidae family name, equiv. to Machilid-, s. of Machilis a genus + -idae -ID2] * * *
Machin, John
▪ English mathematician born 1680 died 1751       English mathematician, notable for studies in finding the area of a circle. In 1706 he was the first to compute the ...
machinable
—machinability, n. /meuh shee"neuh beuhl/, adj. 1. (of a material) capable of being cut or shaped with machine tools. Cf. free-machining. 2. (of a letter or package) capable of ...
machinate
—machinator, n. /mak"euh nayt'/, v.i., v.t., machinated, machinating. to contrive or plot, esp. artfully or with evil purpose: to machinate the overthrow of the ...
machination
/mak'euh nay"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of machinating. 2. Usually, machinations. crafty schemes; plots; intrigues. [1375-1425; late ME machinacion < L machination- (s. of ...
machinator
See machinate. * * *
machine
—machineless, adj. /meuh sheen"/, n., v., machined, machining. n. 1. an apparatus consisting of interrelated parts with separate functions, used in the performance of some kind ...
machine bolt
a threaded fastener, used with a nut for connecting metal parts, having a thread diameter of about 1/4 in. (6.4 mm) or more and a square or hexagonal head for tightening by a ...
machine gun
a small arm operated by a mechanism, able to deliver a rapid and continuous fire of bullets as long as the trigger is pressed. [1865-70] * * * Automatic weapon capable of rapid, ...
machine language
Computers. a coding system built into the hardware of a computer, requiring no translation before being run. * * * or machine code Elemental language of computers, consisting ...
machine pistol
a fully automatic pistol; submachine gun. Also called burp gun. [1935-40] * * *
machine rifle.
See automatic rifle. * * *
machine screw
a threaded fastener, either used with a nut or driven into a tapped hole, usually having a diameter of about 1/4 in. (6.4 mm) or less and a slotted head for tightening by a ...
machine shop
a workshop in which metal and other substances are cut, shaped, etc., by machine tools. [1820-30, Amer.] * * *
machine tool
—machine-tooled, adj. a power-operated machine, as a lathe, used for general cutting and shaping of metal and other substances. [1860-65] * * * Stationary, power-driven ...
machine vision
Computers. See computer vision. * * *
machine word
Computers. word (def. 9). * * *
machine-gun
—machine gunner. /meuh sheen"gun'/, v.t., machine-gunned, machine-gunning. to shoot at with a machine gun. [1880-85] * * *
machine-readable
/meuh sheen"ree"deuh beuhl/, adj. Computers. of or pertaining to data encoded on an appropriate medium and in a form suitable for processing by computer. [1960-65] * * *
machine-stitch
/meuh sheen"stich'/, v.t. to sew on a sewing machine. [1895-1900] * * *
machine-tooled
See machine tool. * * *
machine-tractor station
▪ Soviet institution Russian  mashinno-traktornaya stantsiya (MTS)        in the Soviet Union, state-owned institution that rented heavy agricultural machinery (e.g., ...
machine-wash
—machine-washable, adj. /meuh sheen"wosh", -wawsh"/, v.t., v.i. to launder by washing machine rather than by hand. [1955-60] * * *
machinebolt
machine bolt n. A bolt with a square or hexagonal head. * * *
machinecode
machine code n. See machine language. * * *
machinefinish
machine finish n. See mill finish. * * *
machinegun
machine gun n. A gun that fires rapidly and repeatedly. * * *
machinegunner
See machine-gun. * * *
machinelanguage
machine language n. A set of instructions for a specific central processing unit, designed to be usable by a computer without being translated. Also called machine code. * * *
machineless
See machinable. * * *
machinelike
/meuh sheen"luyk'/, adj. like a machine, as in regular movement or uniform pattern of operation: to conduct business with machinelike efficiency. [1690-1700; MACHINE + -LIKE] * * ...
machinepistol
machine pistol n. A lightweight automatic submachine gun designed to be fired when held by one or two hands. * * *
machinery
/meuh shee"neuh ree/, n., pl. machineries. 1. an assemblage of machines or mechanical apparatuses: the machinery of a factory. 2. the parts of a machine, collectively: the ...
machinery steel
low-carbon steel that can be easily machined. Also called machine steel. * * *
machinescrew
machine screw n. A screw with a thread along the entire length of the shaft. * * *
machineshop
machine shop n. A workshop where power-driven tools are used for making, finishing, or repairing machines or machine parts. * * *
machinetool
machine tool n. A power-driven tool, such as a lathe, used for machining.   ma·chineʹ-tooled' (mə-shēnʹto͞old') adj. * * *
machinetranslation
machine translation n. Automatic translation, as by computer, from one natural language to another. * * *
machinist
/meuh shee"nist/, n. 1. a person who operates machinery, esp. a skilled operator of machine tools. 2. a person who makes or repairs machines. 3. U.S. Navy. a warrant officer ...
machinist's mate
☆ machinist's mate n. U.S. Navy a petty officer trained to operate, repair, etc. ships' engines * * *
machismo
/mah cheez"moh, -chiz"-, meuh-/, n. 1. a strong or exaggerated sense of manliness; an assumptive attitude that virility, courage, strength, and entitlement to dominate are ...
machmeter
/mahk"mee'teuhr, mak"-/, n. Aeron. a device that indicates airspeed relative to the speed of sound. [MACH + -METER] * * *
Machnumber
Mach number also mach number (mäk) n. Abbr. M The ratio of the speed of an object to the speed of sound in the surrounding medium. For example, an aircraft moving twice as fast ...
macho
/mah"choh/, adj., n., pl. machos. adj. 1. having or characterized by qualities considered manly, esp. when manifested in an assertive, self-conscious, or dominating way. 2. ...
machoism
See macho. * * *
Machpelah
/mak pee"lah/, n. the site of a cave, probably in the ancient city of Hebron, where Abraham, Sarah, Rebekah, Isaac, Jacob, and Leah were buried. Gen. 23:19; 25:9; 49:30; 50:13. * ...
Machray, Robert
▪ Scottish archbishop born May 17, 1831, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scot. died March 9, 1904, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can.       Scottish-born archbishop of Rupert's Land in ...
machree
/meuh kree", meuh khrddee"/, n. Irish Eng. my dear. [1820-30; < Ir mo chroidhe lit., my heart] * * *
Machu Picchu
/mah"chooh peek"chooh, pee"chooh/ the site of an ancient Incan and pre-Incan city, about 7000 ft. (2130 m) above sea level in the Andes, in S central Peru. * * * Ancient ...
MachuPicchu
Ma·chu Pic·chu (mäʹcho͞o pēkʹcho͞o, pēʹ-) PhotoDisc, Inc. An ancient Inca fortress city in the Andes northwest of Cuzco, Peru. Its extensive ruins, including ...
machzor
Seph. /mahkh zohrdd"/; Ashk. /mahkh"zohrdd, -zawrdd, -zeuhrdd/, n., pl. machzorim Seph. /mahkh zaw rddeem"/; Ashk. /mahkh zoh"rddim/, Eng. machzors. Hebrew. mahzor. * * *
Macià, Francesc
▪ Catalan politician born October 21, 1859, Villanueva y Geltrú, Spain died December 25, 1933, Barcelona       Catalan leader and founder of the nationalist party ...
Macías Nguema Biyogo
/meuh see"euhs euhng gway"meuh bee yoh"goh/ a former name of Bioko. Also called Macías Nguema. * * *
Maciel Degollado, the Rev. Marcial
▪ 2009       Mexican Roman Catholic priest born March 10, 1920, Cotija de la Paz, Mex. died Jan. 30, 2008, Houston, Texas founded (1941) the Roman Catholic religious ...
Macina
▪ region, Africa also spelled  Masina,         region, the middle course of the Niger River in Mali, between Ségou and Timbuktu (Tombouctou), where its braided ...
MacInnes, Helen Clark
▪ American author born Oct. 7, 1907, Glasgow, Scot. died Sept. 20, 1985, New York, N.Y., U.S.       Scottish-born American novelist, known for her taut, realistic ...
MacInnes, Tom
▪ Canadian writer byname of  Thomas Robert Edward McInnes  born Oct. 29, 1867, Dresden, Ont., Can. died Feb. 11, 1951, Vancouver, B.C.       Canadian writer whose ...
macintosh
/mak"in tosh'/, n. mackintosh. * * *
Macintosh
/mak"in tosh'/, n. Charles, 1766-1843, Scottish chemist, inventor, and manufacturer. * * *
Macintosh, Charles
▪ Scottish chemist born Dec. 29, 1766, Glasgow died July 25, 1843, near Glasgow       Scottish chemist, best known for his invention in 1823 of a method for making ...
MacIver
/meuhk uy"veuhr, meuh kuy"-, meuh kee"-/, n. 1. Loren, born 1909, U.S. painter. 2. Robert Morrison, 1882-1970, U.S. sociologist, born in Scotland. * * *
MacIver, Robert M(orrison)
born April 17, 1882, Stornoway, Outer Hebrides, Scot. died June 15, 1970, New York, N.Y., U.S. Scottish-born U.S. sociologist and political scientist. He taught at the ...
MacIver, Robert Morrison
▪ American sociologist born April 17, 1882, Stornoway, Outer Hebrides, Scot. died June 15, 1970, New York City       Scottish-born sociologist, political scientist, and ...
mack
mack1 /mak/, n. Slang. a pimp. [1885-90; by shortening of mackerel pimp < MF; see MACKEREL] mack2 /mak/, n. Informal. mac2. * * * (as used in expressions) Gable Daniel Mack Mack ...
Mack
/mak/, n. 1. Connie /kon"ee/, (Cornelius McGillicuddy), 1862-1956, U.S. baseball player and manager. 2. a male given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Gable Daniel Mack Mack ...
Mack Sennett
➡ Sennett * * *
Mack von Leiberich, Karl, Freiherr
▪ Austrian general (Baron) born Aug. 25, 1752, Nenslingen, Bavaria died Oct. 22, 1828, Sankt Pölten, Austria       Austrian soldier, commander of the defeated forces ...
Mack, Connie
orig. Cornelius (Alexander) McGillicuddy born Dec. 22/23, 1862, East Brookfield, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 8, 1956, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. baseball manager and team ...
Mack, John
▪ 2007       American oboist and teacher (b. Oct. 30, 1927, Somerville, N.J.—d. July 23, 2006, Cleveland, Ohio), occupied the first-oboe chair at the Cleveland ...
Mack,Connie
Mack (măk), Connie. 1862-1956. American baseball player and manager (1901-1951) of the Philadelphia Athletics, which he led to nine American League pennants and five World ...
Mackay
/meuh kuy"/, n. a seaport in E Australia. 35,361. * * * ▪ Queensland, Australia       city, eastern coast of Queensland, Australia, at the mouth of the Pioneer River. ...
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford
▪ American philanthropist born April 17, 1874, San Francisco died Nov. 12, 1938, New York City  U.S. communications executive and philanthropist who supervised the completion ...
MacKaye, Percy
▪ American writer born March 16, 1875, New York City died Aug. 31, 1956, Cornish, N.H., U.S.       U.S. poet and playwright whose use of historical and contemporary ...
MacKaye, Steele
▪ American playwright born June 6, 1842, Buffalo died February 25, 1894, Timpas, Colo., U.S.       U.S. playwright, actor, theatre manager, and inventor who has been ...
Macke
/mah"keuh/, n. August /ow"goost/, 1887-1914, German painter. * * *
Macke, August
▪ French artist born January 3, 1887, Meschede, Germany died September 26, 1914, Perthes-les-Hurlus, France       German painter who was a leader of Der Blaue Reiter ...
Macke,August
Ma·cke (mäʹkə), August. 1887-1914. German painter whose works, such as Lady in a Green Jacket (1913), display brilliant use of color. He helped form the Blaue Reiter group ...
Macken, Walter
▪ Irish author born 1915, Galway, Ire. died April 22, 1967, Galway       Irish novelist and dramatist whose tales combine an honest and often harsh reflection of the ...
Mackensen
/mah"keuhn zeuhn/, n. August von /ow"goost feuhn/, 1849-1945, German field marshal. * * *
Mackensen, August von
▪ German military officer born Dec. 6, 1849, Haus Leipnitz, Saxony [Germany] died Nov. 8, 1945, Celle, Ger.  German field marshal and one of the most successful commanders in ...
Mackenzie
/meuh ken"zee/, n. 1. Sir Alexander, 1764-1820, Scottish explorer in Canada. 2. Alexander, 1822-92, Canadian statesman, born in Scotland: prime minister 1873-78. 3. William Lyon, ...
Mackenzie Mountains
a mountain range in the E Yukon and W Northwest Territories, in NW Canada. Highest peak, Keele Peak, 9750 ft. (2971 m). * * * ▪ mountains, Canada       northern ...
Mackenzie River
River system, Northwest Territories, Canada. It flows northward from Great Slave Lake into the Beaufort Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Its basin, with an area of 697,000 sq mi ...
Mackenzie, Alexander
born Jan. 28, 1822, Logierait, Perth, Scot. died April 17, 1892, Toronto, Ont., Can. Scottish-born Canadian politician, first Liberal prime minister of Canada (1873–78). He ...
Mackenzie, Charles Frederick
▪ British clergyman born April 10, 1825, Portmore, Peebles, Scot. died Jan. 31, 1862, Malo Island, Portuguese East Africa       Scottish-born Anglican priest and the ...
Mackenzie, Compton
▪ Scottish writer born Jan. 17, 1883, West Hartlepool, Durham, Eng. died Nov. 30, 1972, Edinburgh  British novelist who suffered critical acclaim and neglect with equal ...
MacKenzie, Gisele
▪ 2004 Gisele Marie Louise Marguerite LaFleche        Canadian-born singer and actress (b. Jan. 10, 1927, Winnipeg, Man.—d. Sept. 5, 2003, Burbank, Calif.), became ...
Mackenzie, Henry
▪ Scottish author born , Aug. 26, 1745, Edinburgh died Jan. 14, 1831, Edinburgh  Scottish novelist, playwright, poet, and editor, whose most important novel, The Man of ...
Mackenzie, John
▪ British missionary born Aug. 30, 1835, Knockando, Moray County, Scot. died March 23, 1899, Kimberley, Cape Colony       British missionary who was a constant champion ...
MacKenzie, Lewis
▪ 1994       In 1993 Canadian Maj. Gen. Lewis MacKenzie published an account of his career, Peacekeeper: The Road to Sarajevo, in which he recounted his harrowing ...
Mackenzie, Sir (Edward Montague) Compton
born Jan. 17, 1883, West Hartlepool, Durham, Eng. died Nov. 30, 1972, Edinburgh, Scot. British novelist and playwright. Educated at Oxford University, he gave up legal studies ...
Mackenzie, Sir Alexander
born 1755?, Stornoway, Lewis and Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scot. died March 11, 1820, near Pitlochry, Perth Scottish-born Canadian explorer. Immigrating to Canada as a young man, ...
Mackenzie, Sir Alexander Campbell
▪ British composer born Aug. 22, 1847, Edinburgh died April 28, 1935, London       Scottish composer who, with Sir Hubert Parry and Sir Charles Stanford, was associated ...
Mackenzie, Sir George
▪ Scottish lawyer in full  Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh   born 1636, Dundee, Scotland died May 8, 1691, Westminster, London, England       Scottish lawyer who ...
Mackenzie, Sir James
born April 12, 1853, Scone, Perthshire, Scot. died Jan. 26, 1925, London, Eng. Scottish cardiologist. He received his M.D. from the University of Edinburgh and practiced ...
Mackenzie, Sir Morell
▪ English physician born July 7, 1837, Leytonstone, Essex, Eng. died Feb. 3, 1892, London  English physician who was at the centre of a bitter international controversy over ...
Mackenzie, Sir Thomas
▪ prime minister of New Zealand born , March 10, 1854, Edinburgh died Feb. 14, 1930, Dunedin, N.Z.       Scottish-born explorer, businessman, and politician who was for ...
Mackenzie, William Lyon
born March 12, 1795, Springfield, Angus, Scot. died Aug. 28, 1861, Toronto Scottish-born Canadian journalist and political agitator. He immigrated to Canada in 1820 and became ...
Mackenzie,Alexander
Mac·ken·zie (mə-kĕnʹzē), Alexander. 1822-1892. British-born Canadian politician who was the first Liberal prime minister of Canada (1873-1878). * * *
Mackenzie,William Lyon
Mackenzie, William Lyon. 1795-1861. British-born Canadian insurgent and member of Parliament (1828-1836 and 1851-1858) who led an armed insurrection in Toronto (1837) to protest ...
MackenzieMountains
Mackenzie Mountains A range of the northern Rocky Mountains in eastern Yukon Territory and western Northwest Territories, Canada, rising to 2,973.8 m (9,750 ft). * * *
MackenzieRiver
Mackenzie River A river of northwest Canada rising in Great Slave Lake in southern Northwest Territories and flowing about 1,802 km (1,120 mi) generally northwest to a vast ...
mackerel
/mak"euhr euhl, mak"reuhl/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) mackerel, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) mackerels. 1. a food fish, Scomber scombrus, of the North ...
mackerel gull
tern1. [1790-1800, Amer.] * * *
mackerel shark
any of several fierce sharks of the family Lamidae, including the great white shark and the mako. [1810-20] * * * Any of several temperate-water sharks (genus Lamna) in a family ...
mackerel sky
an extensive group of cirrocumulus or altocumulus clouds, esp. when well-marked in their arrangement: so called because of a resemblance to the scales on a mackerel. [1660-70] * ...
mackerelshark
mackerel shark n. Any of various sharks of the family Lamnidae, including the great white shark, mako, and porbeagle, having a pointed snout, a nearly symmetrical tail, and a ...
mackerelsky
mackerel sky n. Chiefly Northeastern U.S. A sky covered with many small cirrocumulus or altocumulus clouds, resembling the markings found on a mackerel. Also called buttermilk ...
Mackerras
(1925– ) an Australian conductor who was born in America and has lived in Britain since the late 1940s. He has worked for the English National Opera (1970–77), the Welsh ...
Mackinac
/mak"euh naw'/, n. 1. Straits of, a strait between the peninsulas of Upper Michigan and Lower Michigan, connecting lakes Huron and Michigan. 2. Also, Mackinac Island. an island ...
Mackinac Bridge
a suspension bridge over the Straits of Mackinac, connecting the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan: one of the longest suspension bridges in the world. 3800-ft. (1158-m) ...
Mackinac Island
Island in the Straits of Mackinac, southeastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan, U.S. It is 3 mi (5 km) long. It was an ancient Indian burial ground called Michilimackinac when the ...
Mackinac, Straits of
Channel connecting Lake Michigan with Lake Huron. Forming an important waterway between the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan, U.S., the straits are 30 mi (48 km) long and ...
MackinacIsland
Mack·i·nac Island (măkʹə-nô') An island of northern Michigan in the Straits of Mackinac, a passage connecting Lakes Huron and Michigan between the Upper and Lower ...
mackinaw
—mackinawed, adj. /mak"euh naw'/, n. a short double-breasted coat of a thick woolen material, commonly plaid. Also called Mackinaw coat, mackinaw coat. [1755-65; sp. var. of ...
Mackinaw blanket
a thick woolen blanket, often woven with bars of color, formerly used in the northern and western U.S. by Indians, loggers, etc. [1815-25, Amer.] * * *
Mackinaw boat
a flat-bottomed boat with sharp prow and square stern, propelled by oars and sometimes sails, formerly widely used on the upper Great Lakes. [1870-75, Amer.] * * *
Mackinaw City
▪ Michigan, United States       village, Cheboygan and Emmet counties, northern Michigan, U.S. It lies on the Straits of Mackinac (Mackinac, Straits of) opposite St. ...
Mackinaw coat
Mackinaw coat n. a short, double-breasted coat made of heavy woolen cloth, usually plaid * * *
Mackinaw trout.
See lake trout. [1830-40, Amer.] * * *
Mackinawblanket
Mack·i·naw blanket (măkʹə-nô') n. A thick woolen blanket in solid colors or stripes, formerly used in northern and western North America by traders, trappers, and Native ...
Mackinawtrout
Mackinaw trout n. See lake trout. * * *
Mackinder, Sir Halford John
▪ British political geographer born Feb. 15, 1861, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, Eng. died March 6, 1947, Parkstone, Dorset  British political geographer noted for his work as ...
MacKinnon, Catharine A.
▪ American feminist and law professor in full  Catharine Alice MacKinnon  born Oct. 7, 1946, Minneapolis, Minn., U.S.       American feminist and professor of law, a ...
MacKinnon, Roderick
▪ American doctor born February 19, 1956, Burlington, Massachusetts, U.S.       American doctor, corecipient of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2003 for his pioneering ...
mackintosh
—mackintoshed, adj. /mak"in tosh'/, n. 1. a raincoat made of rubberized cloth. 2. such cloth. 3. Chiefly Brit. any raincoat. Also, macintosh. [1830-40; after Charles Macintosh ...
Mackintosh
/mak"in tosh'/, n. Charles Rennie /ren"ee/, 1868-1928, Scottish architect and designer. * * * ▪ clothing       waterproof outercoat or raincoat, named after a Scottish ...
Mackintosh, Charles Rennie
born June 7, 1868, Glasgow, Scot. died Dec. 10, 1928, London, Eng. Scottish architect, furniture designer, and artist. A giant of the Arts and Crafts Movement, he is especially ...
Mackintosh,Charles Rennie
Mack·in·tosh (măkʹĭn-tŏsh'), Charles Rennie. 1868-1928. Scottish architect whose influential art nouveau designs emphasized elegant, clearly articulated, and rational ...
mackle
/mak"euhl/, n., v., mackled, mackling. n. 1. a blur in printing, as from a double impression. v.t., v.i. 2. to blur, as from a double impression in printing. Also, ...
Macklin, Charles
▪ Irish actor and playwright original name  Charles McLaughlin  born 1690/99, Ireland died July 11, 1797, London, Eng.  Irish actor and playwright whose distinguished ...
Mackmurdo, Arthur Heygate
▪ British architect born Dec. 12, 1851, Edmonton, Middlesex [now in London], Eng. died March 15, 1942, Wickham Bishops, Essex       English architect, designer, and a ...
MacLaine
(1934– ) a US film actor who began her career as a dancer on Broadway. MacLaine won an Oscar for Terms of Endearment (1983), and her other films include The Apartment (1960), ...
MacLaine, Shirley
orig. Shirley McLean Beaty born April 24, 1934, Richmond, Va., U.S. U.S. film actress. She worked as a dancer on Broadway. After replacing the injured star in The Pajama Game ...
Maclaren
/meuhk lar"euhn, meuh klar"-/, n. Ian /ee"euhn, uy"euhn/. See Watson, John. * * *
Maclaren, Charles
▪ Scottish journalist and editor born Oct. 7, 1782, Ormiston, Haddington, Scot. died Sept. 10, 1866, near Edinburgh       Scottish journalist, editor of the 6th edition ...
Maclaurin
/meuhk lawr"in, meuh klawr"-/, n. Colin, 1698-1746, Scottish mathematician. * * *
Maclaurin series
Math. a Taylor series in which the reference point is zero. [1905-10; after C. MACLAURIN] * * *
Maclaurin, Colin
▪ Scottish mathematician born February 1698, Kilmodan, Argyllshire, Scotland died June 14, 1746, Edinburgh  Scottish mathematician who developed and extended Sir Isaac Newton ...
macle
/mak"euhl/, n. Mineral. 1. chiastolite. 2. a twinned crystal. [1720-30; < F < L macula. See MACULA] * * *
Maclean
I. Alistair Maclean (1922–87) a Scottish author of adventure novels. They include The Guns of Navarone (1957), Ice Station Zebra (1963) and Where Eagles Dare (1967), which have ...
Maclean's
Weekly newsmagazine published in Toronto, the leading Canadian magazine. It provides coverage of Canadian affairs and world news from a Canadian perspective. Founded by John ...
Maclean, Donald
▪ British diplomat and spy born May 25, 1913, London, Eng. died March 11, 1983, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R.       British diplomat who spied for the Soviet Union in World ...
Maclean, George
▪ president of Cape Coast born February 24, 1801, Keith, Banffshire, Scot. died May 22, 1847, Cape Coast, Gold Coast [now in Ghana]       Scottish-born council ...
Maclean, Sorley
▪ 1997       (SOMHAIRLE MACGILL-EAIN), Scottish poet who was regarded as the 20th century's greatest Gaelic poet; with such works as the collection Dain Do Eimhir (1943; ...
MacLeary, Donald
▪ Scottish dancer born Aug. 22, 1937, Glasgow       Scottish premier danseur noted for his strong finesse and natural romanticism.       He was trained at the ...
MacLehose of Beoch, Crawford Murray MacLehose, Baron
▪ 2001       British diplomat (b. Oct. 16, 1917, Glasgow, Scot.—d. May 27, 2000, Ayrshire, Scot.), as the 25th governor of Hong Kong (1971–82), presided over the ...
MacLeish
/mak leesh", meuh kleesh"/, n. Archibald, 1892-1982, U.S. poet and dramatist. * * *
MacLeish, Archibald
born May 7, 1892, Glencoe, Ill., U.S. died April 20, 1982, Boston, Mass. U.S. poet, playwright, teacher, and public official. He practiced law before leaving for France in 1923 ...
MacLeish,Archibald
Mac·Leish (mĭk-lēshʹ), Archibald. 1892-1982. American poet who served as Librarian of Congress (1939-1944) and assistant secretary of state (1944-1945). He won a Pulitzer ...
MacLennan
/meuh klen"euhn/, n. (John) Hugh, 1907-90, Canadian novelist and essayist. * * *
MacLennan, (John) Hugh
born March 20, 1907, Glace Bay, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Can. died Nov. 7, 1990, Montreal, Que. Canadian novelist and essayist. He was a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University ...
MacLennan, Hugh
▪ Canadian author born March 20, 1907, Glace Bay, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Can. died Nov. 7, 1990, Montreal, Que.       Canadian novelist and essayist whose books ...
MacLennan,Hugh
Mac·Len·nan (mə-klĕnʹən), Hugh. 1907-1990. Canadian writer whose novels, such as Two Solitudes (1945) and Return of the Sphinx (1967), are literary treatments of Canadian ...
Macleod
/meuh klowd"/, n. 1. Fiona. See Sharp, William. 2. John James Rickard /rik"euhrd/, 1876-1935, Scottish physiologist: one of the discoverers of insulin; Nobel prize for medicine ...
MacLeod, Alistair
▪ 2002       For his long-awaited first novel, No Great Mischief (2000), Canadian author Alistair MacLeod won the 2001 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award; a ...
Macleod, J(ohn) J(ames) R(ickard)
born Sept. 6, 1876, Cluny, near Dunkeld, Perth, Scot. died March 16, 1935, Aberdeen Scottish physiologist. He taught in U.S., Canadian, and Scottish universities, becoming ...

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