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Macleod, J.J.R.
▪ Scottish physiologist in full  John James Rickard Macleod   born Sept. 6, 1876, Cluny, near Dunkeld, Perth, Scot. died March 16, 1935, Aberdeen  Scottish physiologist ...
Macleod, Mary
▪ Scottish poet Gaelic Màiri Nighean Alasdair Ruaidh born 1569, Rowdil, Harris, Inverness, Scot. died 1674, Dunvegan, Skye       Scottish-Gaelic poet who is a major ...
Macleod, Norman
▪ Scottish minister born June 3, 1812, Campbeltown, Argyllshire, Scot. died June 16, 1872, Glasgow  influential liberal Presbyterian minister of the Church of Scotland ...
Macleod,John James Rickard
Mac·leod (mə-kloudʹ), John James Rickard. 1876-1935. British physiologist. He shared a 1923 Nobel Prize for the discovery of insulin. * * *
MacLiammóir, Micheál
▪ actor, scenic designer, and playwright original name  Alfred Lee Willmore  born Oct. 25, 1899, London, Eng. died March 6, 1978, Dublin, Ire.       English-born ...
Maclise, Daniel
▪ Irish painter born Jan. 25, 1806, Cork, County Cork, Ire. died April 25, 1870, London       Irish historical painter whose fame rests chiefly on a series of ...
Maclurites
▪ paleontology       extinct genus of Ordovician gastropods (snails) found as fossils and useful for stratigraphic correlations (the Ordovician Period lasted from 505 to ...
MacMahon
/mannk mann awonn"/, n. Marie Edmé Patrice Maurice /mann rddee" ed"may pann trddees" moh rddees"/, Count de (Duke of Magenta),1808-93, president of France 1873-79. * * *
MacManus
/meuhk man"euhs/, n. Seumas /shay"meuhs/, 1869-1960, Irish poet and short-story writer. * * *
Macmillan
/meuhk mil"euhn/, n. Harold, 1894-1986, British statesman: prime minister 1957-63. * * * (as used in expressions) Macmillan Daniel and Alexander MacMillan Sir Kenneth Macmillan ...
MacMillan
/meuhk mil"euhn/, n. Donald Baxter /bak"steuhr/, 1874-1970, U.S. arctic explorer. * * * (as used in expressions) Macmillan Daniel and Alexander MacMillan Sir Kenneth Macmillan ...
Macmillan Publishers Ltd.
▪ British publishing house formerly  Macmillan & Co.        British publishing house that is one of the largest in the world, producing textbooks, works of science ...
Macmillan, (Maurice)Harold
Mac·mil·lan (mĭk-mĭlʹən), (Maurice) Harold. 1894-1986. British politician who joined Churchill in the 1930s in condemning Great Britain's appeasement of Hitler. As prime ...
Macmillan, Daniel and Alexander
born Sept. 13, 1813, Isle of Arran, Buteshire, Scot. died June 27, 1857, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Eng. born Oct. 3, 1818, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scot. died Jan. 26, 1896, ...
Macmillan, Harold
in full Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st earl of Stockton, Viscount Macmillan of Ovenden born Feb. 10, 1894, London, Eng. died Dec. 29, 1986, Birch Grove, Sussex British prime ...
MacMillan, Sir Kenneth
born Dec. 11, 1929, Dunfermline, Fife, Scot. died Oct. 29, 1992, London, Eng. British dancer and choreographer. After studies at the Sadler's Wells ballet school, he danced ...
MacMonnies
/meuhk mun"eez/, n. Frederick William, 1863-1937, U.S. sculptor. * * *
MacMurray, Fred
▪ American actor original name  Frederick Martin MacMurray  born Aug. 30, 1908, Kankakee, Ill., U.S. died Nov. 5, 1991, Santa Monica, Calif.       American film and ...
Macnaghten, Sir William Hay, Baronet
▪ British diplomat born August 1793 died Dec. 23, 1841, Kābul, Afg.       British interventionist agent in Afghanistan during the First Anglo-Afghan War (Anglo-Afghan ...
MacNeice
/meuhk nees"/, n. Louis, 1907-63, British poet, born in Northern Ireland. * * *
MacNeice, (Frederick)Louis
Mac·Neice (mĭk-nēsʹ), (Frederick) Louis. 1907-1963. Irish-born British poet whose works, published in Blind Fireworks (1929) and other collections, treat social issues in a ...
MacNeice, Louis
born Sept. 12, 1907, Belfast, Ire. died Sept. 3, 1963, London, Eng. British poet and playwright. He published his first book of poetry, Blind Fireworks (1929), while studying ...
MacNeish, Richard Stockton
▪ 2002 “Scotty”        American agricultural archaeologist (b. April 29, 1918, New York, N.Y.—d. Jan. 16, Belize City, Belize), conducted fieldwork investigating ...
MacNelly, Jeffrey Kenneth
▪ 2001 “Jeff”        American cartoonist (b. Sept. 17, 1947, New York, N.Y.—d. June 8, 2000, Baltimore, Md.), won three Pulitzer Prizes for his editorial cartoons ...
maco
/mah"koh/, n. an Egyptian cotton, used esp. in the manufacture of hosiery and undergarments. [after Mako Bey, 19th-century Egyptian officer] * * *
Macocha Gorge
▪ gorge, Czech Republic also called  Macocha Abyss        gorge in Jihomoravský kraj (region), Czech Republic. It is the best-known and most frequently visited ...
macoma
/meuh koh"meuh/, n. any marine bivalve mollusk of the genus Macoma, having a glossy, thin, usually white shell. [ < NL] * * *
Macomb
/meuh kohm"/, n. a city in NW Illinois. 19,632. * * * ▪ Illinois, United States       city, seat (1830) of McDonough county, western Illinois, U.S. It lies along the ...
Macomber, Mary Lizzie
▪ American artist born August 21, 1861, Fall River, Massachusetts, U.S. died February 4, 1916, Boston       American artist remembered for her highly symbolic, ...
Macon
/may"keuhn/, n. 1. Nathaniel, 1758-1837, U.S. politician: Speaker of the House 1801-07. 2. a city in central Georgia. 116,860. * * * I City (pop., 2000: 97,255), central ...
Mâcon
/mah kawonn"/, n. 1. a city in and the capital of Saône-et-Loire, in E central France. 40,490. 2. a Burgundy wine, usually white and dry, from the area around Mâcon. * * ...
Macon, Dave
orig. David Harrison Macon born Oct. 7, 1870, Smart Station, Warren county, Tenn., U.S. died March 22, 1952, Readyville, Tenn. U.S. country music singer and banjo player. He ...
Macon, Nathaniel
born Dec. 17, 1758, Edgecombe, N.C. died June 29, 1837, Warren county, N.C., U.S. U.S. politician. He fought in the American Revolution and served in the North Carolina ...
Macoun
/meuh koohn"/, n. a juicy, late-ripening variety of apple that originated in Canada. * * *
Macphail, Agnes Campbell
born March 24, 1890, Grey county, Ont., Can. died Feb. 13, 1954, Toronto Canadian politician. Originally a schoolteacher, she entered politics to represent the farmers in her ...
Macpherson
/meuhk ferr"seuhn/, n. James, 1736-96, Scottish author and translator. * * *
MacPherson strut
an automobile suspension-system component that consists of a strut combined with a spring and shock absorber and connects the wheel to the frame of the vehicle. * * *
Macpherson, James
▪ Scottish poet born October 27, 1736, Ruthven, Inverness, Scotland died February 17, 1796, Belville, Inverness       Scottish poet whose initiation of the Ossianic ...
Macpherson, Jay
▪ Canadian poet in full  Jean Jay Macpherson   born June 13, 1931, London, Eng.       Canadian lyric poet, member of “the mythopoeic school of poetry,” who ...
Macpherson, Sir David
▪ Canadian politician and railroad builder in full  Sir David Lewis Macpherson  born September 12, 1818, Castle Leathers, near Inverness, Scotland died August 16, 1896, at ...
MacPherson, Stewart Myles
▪ 1996       Canadian-born British broadcaster and commentator who became one of the best-known voices on British radio during World War II (b. Oct. 29, 1908—d. April ...
Macpherson,James
Mac·pher·son (mək-fûrʹsən), James. 1736-1796. Scottish poet who claimed to have translated the works of Ossian, a third-century Gaelic poet and warrior. Although based on ...
Macquarie
/meuh kwawr"ee, -kwor"ee/, n. a river in SE Australia, in New South Wales, flowing NW to the Darling River. 750 mi. (1210 km) long. * * *
Macquarie Harbour
Inlet of the Indian Ocean, western Tasmania, Australia. It is 20 mi (32 km) long and 5 mi (8 km) wide. Visited in 1815 by Capt. James Kelly, it was named after Lachlan ...
Macquarie Island
▪ island, Tasmania, Australia       island lying about 900 miles (1,450 km) southeast of Tasmania, Australia. It forms, with associated islets, a sub-Antarctic part of ...
Macquarie, Lachlan
born Jan. 31, 1761, Ulva, Argyllshire, Scot. died July 1, 1824, London, Eng. British soldier and colonial governor. He served with the British army in North America, Europe, ...
Macquarie, Lake
▪ lagoon, New South Wales, Australia       seaboard lagoon, New South Wales, Australia. It lies 60 miles (97 km) northeast of Sydney. Measuring 15 miles long and 5 miles ...
Macquarrie, the Rev. John
▪ 2008       British theologian born June 27, 1919, Renfrew, Scot. died May 28, 2007, Oxford, Eng. melded existential philosophy with orthodox Christian thought to ...
macr-
macr- pref. Variant of macro-. * * *
macramé
/mak"reuh may'/, n., v.t., macraméd or macraméed, macraméing. n. 1. an elaborately patterned lacelike webbing made of hand-knotted cord, yarn, or the like, and used for wall ...
Macready
/meuhk ree"dee, meuh kree"-/, n. William Charles, 1793-1873, English actor. * * *
Macready, William (Charles)
born March 3, 1793, London, Eng. died April 27, 1873, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire English actor-manager. He made his debut in 1810, and by 1820 he was famous for his ...
Macready, William Charles
▪ English actor born March 3, 1793, London, Eng. died April 27, 1873, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire  English actor, manager, and diarist, a leading figure in the development of ...
Macrinus
▪ Roman emperor in full  Caesar Marcus Opellius Severus Macrinus Augustus,  original name  Marcus Opellius Macrinus  born c. 164, Caesarea, Mauretania [now Cherchell, ...
macro
/mak"roh/, adj., n., pl. macros. adj. 1. very large in scale, scope, or capability. 2. of or pertaining to macroeconomics. n. 3. anything very large in scale, scope, or ...
macro lens
/mak"roh/, Photog. a lens used to bring into focus objects very close to the camera. [1960-65] * * *
macro-
a combining form meaning "large," "long," "great," "excessive," used in the formation of compound words, contrasting with micro-: macrocosm; macrofossil; macrograph; ...
Macro-Algonquian languages
also spelled  Macro-Algonkian        major group (phylum or superstock) of North American Indian languages; it is composed of nine families and a total of 24 languages ...
Macro-Siouan languages
      major grouping (phylum or superstock) of North American Indian languages; it is made up of 26 languages, grouped into 5 families: Siouan, with 12 languages; Catawba, ...
macrobiosis
/mak'roh buy oh"sis/, n. Med. long life. [MACRO- + BIOSIS] * * *
macrobiotic
—macrobiotically, adv. /mak'roh buy ot"ik/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to macrobiotics or its dietary practices. 2. of, pertaining to, or serving macrobiotic food: a macrobiotic ...
macrobiotics
/mak'roh buy ot"iks/, n. (used with a sing. v.) a philosophically oriented program incorporating elements from several ancient cultures and emphasizing harmony with nature, esp. ...
Macrobius, Ambrosius Theodosius
▪ Roman scholar flourished AD 400       Latin grammarian and philosopher whose most important work is the Saturnalia, the last known example of the long series of ...
macrocarpous
/mak'roh kahr"peuhs/, adj. having large fruit. [MACRO- + -CARPOUS] * * *
macrocephalic
—macrocephaly, n. /mak'roh seuh fal"ik/, adj. 1. Cephalom. being or having a head with a large cranial capacity. 2. Craniom. being or having a skull with a large cranial ...
macrocephalous
See macrocephalic. * * *
macrocephaly
macrocephaly [mak΄rō sef′ə lē] n. 〚 MACRO- + -CEPHALY〛 a condition in which the head or cranial capacity is abnormally large: opposed to ...
macroclimate
—macroclimatic /mak'roh kluy mat"ik/, adj. —macroclimatically, adv. /mak"reuh kluy'mit/, n. the general climate of a large area, as of a continent or country. Cf. ...
macroclimatic
See macroclimate. * * *
macroclimatology
/mak'roh kluy'meuh tol"euh jee/, n. the study of the climatic conditions of a large area. Cf. macrometeorology, microclimatology. [MACRO- + CLIMATOLOGY] * * *
macrocode
mac·ro·code (măkʹrə-kōd') n. Computer Science 1. A coding system in which single codes generate several sets of instructions. 2. A single code that represents a set of ...
macrocosm
—macrocosmic, adj. —macrocosmically, adv. /mak"reuh koz'euhm/, n. 1. the great world or universe; the universe considered as a whole (opposed to microcosm). 2. the total or ...
macrocosmic
See macrocosm. * * *
macrocosmically
See macrocosmic. * * *
macrocyclic
/mak'roh suy"klik, -sik"lik/, adj. Chem. having a ring structure consisting of more than 12 atoms. [1945-50; MACRO- + CYCLIC] * * *
macrocyst
/mak"reuh sist'/, n. Mycol. a large cyst or spore case, esp. the encysted, resting plasmodium of a slime mold. [MACRO- + CYST] * * *
Macrocystis
      genus of brown algae, like Laminaria (but larger), commonly known as kelp (q.v.). * * *
macrocyte
—macrocytic /mak'reuh sit"ik/, adj. /mak"reuh suyt'/, n. Pathol. an abnormally large red blood cell. [1885-90; MACRO- + -CYTE] * * *
macrocytic
See macrocyte. * * *
macrocytosis
mac·ro·cy·to·sis (măk'rō-sī-tōʹsĭs) n. pl. mac·ro·cy·to·ses (-sēz) The presence of macrocytes in the blood.   mac'ro·cy·totʹic (-tŏtʹĭk) adj. * * *
macrocytotic
See macrocytosis. * * *
macrodome
/mak"reuh dohm'/, n. Crystall. a dome the faces of which are parallel to the greater lateral axis. Cf. brachydome. [1880-85; MACRO- + DOME] * * *
macrodont
macrodont [mak′rōdänt΄, mak′rədänt΄] adj. having large teeth * * *
macrodontia
—macrodont, macrodontic, adj. /mak'reuh don"sheuh, -shee euh/, n. the condition of having abnormally large teeth. Also, macrodontism /mak"reuh don tiz'euhm/. Also called ...
macroeconomic
See macroeconomics. * * *
macroeconomics
—macroeconomic, adj. —macroeconomist /mak'roh i kon"euh mist/, n. /mak'roh ek'euh nom"iks, -ee'keuh-/, n. (used with a sing. v.) the branch of economics dealing with the ...
macroeconomist
See macroeconomic. * * *
macroetch
/mak"roh ech'/, v.t. to etch deeply into the surface of (a metal). [MACRO- + ETCH] * * *
macroevolution
—macroevolutionary, adj. /mak'roh ev'euh looh"sheuhn/ or, esp. Brit., /-ee'veuh-/, n. Biol. major evolutionary transition from one type of organism to another occurring at the ...
macroevolutionary
See macroevolution. * * *
macrofauna
▪ biology       in soil science, animals that are one centimetre or more long but smaller than an earthworm. Potworms, myriapods, centipedes, millipedes, slugs, snails, ...
macroform
/mak"reuh fawrm'/, n. an image or reproduction, as of a document, in a size that permits reading or viewing with the naked eye. [1965-70; MACRO- + FORM, on the model of ...
macrofossil
/mak'reuh fos"il/, n. a fossil large enough to be studied and identified without the use of a microscope. Cf. microfossil. [1935-40; MACRO- + FOSSIL] * * *
macrogamete
/mak'roh gam"eet, -geuh meet"/, n. Cell Biol. (in heterogamous reproduction) the larger and usually female of a pair of conjugating gametes. [1895-1900; MACRO- + GAMETE] * * *
macroglobulin
mac·ro·glob·u·lin (măk'rō-glŏbʹyə-lĭn) n. A plasma globulin of high molecular weight. * * *
macroglobulinemia
mac·ro·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a (măk'rō-glŏb'yə-lə-nēʹmē-ə) n. A condition marked by an abnormally high concentration of macroglobulins in the blood serum. * * *
macroglossia
▪ pathology       enlargement of the tongue, due to overdevelopment of the muscle or the accumulation of material within the tongue. Muscular hypertrophy may be ...
macrograph
/mak"reuh graf', -grahf'/, n. a representation of an object that is of the same size as or larger than the object. [MACRO- + -GRAPH] * * *
macrography
—macrographic /mak'reuh graf"ik/, adj. /meuh krog"reuh fee/, n. 1. examination or study of an object with the naked eye (opposed to micrography). 2. markedly or excessively ...
macroinstruction
/mak"roh in struk'sheuhn/, n. Computers. macro (def. 5). [1955-60; MACRO- + INSTRUCTION] * * *
macrolecithal
/mak'roh les"euh theuhl/, adj. Embryol. megalecithal. [MACRO- + LECITHAL] * * *
macrolinguistics
—macrolinguistic, adj. /mak'roh ling gwis"tiks/, n. (used with a sing. v.) a field of study concerned with language in its broadest sense and including cultural and behavioral ...
macrolith
/mak"reuh lith'/, n. Archaeol. a stone tool about 1 ft. (30 cm) long. Cf. microlith, tranchet. [MACRO- + -LITH] * * *
macromere
/mak"reuh mear'/, n. Embryol. one of the large blastomeres that form toward the vegetal pole in embryos undergoing unequal cleavage. [1875-80; MACRO- + -MERE] * * *
macrometeorology
—macrometeorological /mak'roh mee'tee euhr euh loj"i keuhl/, adj. /mak'roh mee'tee euh rol"euh jee/, n. the study of large-scale atmospheric phenomena, as the general ...
macromineral
/mak'roh min"euhr euhl/, n. Nutrition. any mineral required in the diet in relatively large amounts, esp. calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc. [MACRO- + ...
macromolecular
See macromolecule. * * *
macromolecule
—macromolecular /mak'roh meuh lek"yeuh leuhr/, adj. /mak'reuh mol"euh kyoohl'/, n. Chem. a very large molecule, as a colloidal particle, protein, or esp. a polymer, composed of ...
macromutant
/mak'roh myooht"nt/, adj. 1. undergoing macromutation. 2. resulting from macromutation. n. 3. a new type of organism resulting from macromutation. [MACRO- + MUTANT] * * *
macromutation
/mak'roh myooh tay"sheuhn/, n. Genetics. a mutation that has a profound effect on the resulting organism, as a change in a regulatory gene that controls the expression of many ...
macron
/may"kron, mak"ron/, n. a horizontal line used as a diacritic over a vowel to indicate that it has a long sound or other specified pronunciation, as /ay/ in fate ...
macronuclear
See macronucleus. * * *
macronucleate
/mak'roh nooh"klee it, -ayt', -nyooh"-/, adj. having a macronucleus. [MACRONUCLE(US) + -ATE1] * * *
macronucleus
—macronuclear, adj. /mak'roh nooh"klee euhs, -nyooh"-/, n. Biol. the larger of the two types of nuclei occurring in ciliate protozoans, having a multiple set of chromosomes and ...
macronutrient
/mak'roh nooh"tree euhnt, -nyooh"-/, n. 1. Nutrition. any of the nutritional components of the diet that are required in relatively large amounts: protein, carbohydrate, fat, and ...
macroorganism
/mak'roh awr"geuh niz'euhm/, n. an organism that can be seen with the naked eye. [MACRO- + ORGANISM] * * *
macrophage
—macrophagic /mak'reuh faj"ik/, adj. /mak"reuh fayj'/, n. Cell Biol. a large white blood cell, occurring principally in connective tissue and in the bloodstream, that ingests ...
macrophagic
See macrophage. * * *
macrophysics
/mak'reuh fiz"iks/, n. (used with a sing. v.) the branch of physics that deals with physical objects large enough to be observed and treated directly. [1905-10; MACRO- + ...
macrophyte
/mak"reuh fuyt'/, n. Bot. a plant, esp. a marine plant, large enough to be visible to the naked eye. [1905-10; MACRO- + -PHYTE] * * *
macrophytic
See macrophyte. * * *
macroplankton
—macroplanktonic /mak'roh plangk ton"ik/, adj. /mak'roh plangk"teuhn/, n. planktonic organisms of about 1 mm in length. [MACRO- + PLANKTON] * * *
macropodous
/meuh krop"euh deuhs/, adj. Bot. 1. (of a leaf) having a long stalk. 2. (of an embryo) having an enlarged hypocotyl. [1850-55; MACRO- + -PODOUS] * * *
macropsia
/meuh krop"see euh/, n. Ophthalm. a defect of vision in which objects appear to be larger than their actual size. Also, macropia /meuh kroh"pee euh/, macropsy /mak"rop see/. Also ...
macropterous
macropterous [ma kräp′tər əs] adj. 〚 MACRO- + -PTEROUS〛 having unusually large wings or fins * * * ma·crop·ter·ous (mə-krŏpʹtər-əs) adj. Having very large fins ...
macroscopic
—macroscopically, adv. /mak'reuh skop"ik/, adj. 1. visible to the naked eye. Cf. microscopic (def. 1). 2. pertaining to large units; comprehensive. Also, ...
macroscopically
See macroscopic. * * *
macroscopicanatomy
macroscopic anatomy n. See gross anatomy. * * *
macrosegment
/mak"roh seg'meuhnt/, n. a stretch of speech preceded and followed but not interrupted by a pause. Cf. microsegment. [1955-60; MACRO- + SEGMENT] * * *
macrosociology
/mak'roh soh'see ol"euh jee, -soh'shee-/, n. the sociological study of large-scale social systems and long-term patterns and processes. Cf. microsociology. [MACRO- + SOCIOLOGY] * ...
macrosporangium
/mak'roh speuh ran"jee euhm/, n., pl. macrosporangia /-jee euh/. Bot. megasporangium. [1870-75; MACRO- + SPORANGIUM] * * *
macrospore
—macrosporic /mak'reuh spawr"ik, -spor"-/, adj. /mak"reuh spawr', -spohr'/, n. Bot. megaspore. [1855-60; MACRO- + -SPORE] * * *
macrostructure
/mak"roh struk'cheuhr/, n. 1. the gross structure of a metal, as made visible to the naked eye by deep etching. 2. an overall organizational scheme, as of a complex piece of ...
Macrozamia
▪ plant genus       genus of about 40 species of palmlike cycads (plants of the family Zamiaceae), native to Australia and grown elsewhere as ornamental and conservatory ...
macruran
/meuh kroor"euhn/, adj. 1. belonging or pertaining to the suborder Macrura, comprising the lobsters, crayfishes, shrimps, and prawns. n. 2. a macruran crustacean. [1835-45; < NL ...
macrurous
/meuh kroor"euhs/, adj. Zool. long-tailed, as a lobster (opposed to brachyurous). [1820-30; < NL Macrur(a) (see MACRURAN) + -OUS] * * *
MacStiofain, Sean
▪ 2002 John Edward Drayton Stephenson        British-born Irish militant (b. Feb. 17, 1928, London, Eng.—d. May 17, 2001, Navan, County Meath, Ire.), was the first ...
Mactan Island
▪ island, Philippines       coral island, central Philippines, located in the Bohol Strait off the eastern shore of the island of Cebu. Rectangular in shape, the ...
macula
—macular, adj. /mak"yeuh leuh/, n., pl. maculae /-lee'/. 1. a spot or blotch, esp. on one's skin; macule. 2. Ophthalm. a. an opaque spot on the cornea. b. Also called macula ...
macula lutea
/mak"yeuh leuh looh"tee euh/, pl. maculae luteae /mak"yeuh lee' looh"tee ee', mak"yeuh luy' looh"tee uy'/. macula (def. 2b). [1840-50; < NL: lit., yellow macula; see MACULA, ...
maculalutea
macula lu·te·a (lo͞oʹtē-ə) n. pl. maculae lu·te·ae (lo͞oʹtē-ē') A minute yellowish area containing the forea centralis located near the center of the retina of the ...
macular
See macula. * * *
macular degeneration
Ophthalm. degeneration of the central portion of the retina, resulting in a loss of sharp vision. * * * Degeneration of the macula (central part of the retina), with ...
maculardegeneration
macular degeneration n. A condition in which the cells of the macula lutea degenerate, resulting in blurred vision and ultimately blindness. * * *
maculate
adj. /mak"yeuh lit/; v. /mak"yeuh layt'/, adj., v., maculated, maculating. adj. 1. spotted; stained. 2. Archaic. defiled; impure. v.t. Archaic. 3. to mark with a spot or spots; ...
maculation
/mak'yeuh lay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of spotting. 2. a spotted condition. 3. a marking of spots, as on an animal. 4. a disfiguring spot or stain. [1425-75 for earlier sense ...
macule
/mak"yoohl/, n., v., maculed, maculing. n. 1. mackle. 2. macula. v.t., v.i. 3. mackle. [1475-85; < L macula spot, blemish; cf. MACULA] * * *
macumba
/meuh koom"beuh/, n. a Brazilian cult incorporating the use of fetishes and sorcery and deriving largely from African practices. [1935-40; < Pg] * * * Afro-Brazilian religion ...
macushla
/meuh koosh"leuh/, n. Irish Eng. darling. [1885-90; < Ir mo chuisle lit., my pulse] * * *
Macy
/may"see/, n. R(owland) H(ussey) /roh"leuhnd hus"ee/, 1823-77, U.S. retail merchant. * * *
Macy & Co.
in full R.H. Macy & Co., Inc. Major U.S. department-store chain. Its main outlet, the 11-story store that occupies a city block in New York City's Herald Square, was for many ...
Macy's
▪ American retailer formerly  R.H. Macy and Company, Inc.        major American department store chain. Its principal outlet, the 11-story department store that ...
Macy, Anne Sullivan
▪ American educator née  Joanna Sullivan , also called  Annie Sullivan  born April 14, 1866, Feeding Hills, near Springfield, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 20, 1936, Forest ...
Macy’s
a famous shop in New York City which calls itself ‘the world’s largest store’ and has branches in many other US cities. Each Thanksgiving, it presents a colourful parade ...
mad
/mad/, adj., madder, maddest, n., v., madded, madding. adj. 1. mentally disturbed; deranged; insane; demented. 2. enraged; greatly provoked or irritated; angry. 3. (of ...
MAD
/mad/, n. See Mutual Assured Destruction. * * * (as used in expressions) Charles the Mad Mad King Ludwig mad cow disease * * *
mad cow disease
mad cow disease n. a progressive, degenerative brain disease of adult cows, thought to be caused by an infectious agent in their food: cf. BSE * * * ➡ BSE * * * or bovine ...
mad cow disease.
See bovine spongiform encephalopathy. [1990-95] * * *
Mad Hatter
a character in Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. The Mad Hatter, who wears a tall hat, holds a tea party with Alice, the March Hare and the Dormouse. The expression ‘as mad ...
MAD Magazine
➡ MAD * * *
mad money
Informal. 1. a small sum of money carried or kept in reserve for minor expenses, emergencies, or impulse purchases. 2. a small sum of money carried by a woman on a date to enable ...
mad-dog
v.t., mad-dogged, mad-dogging. Slang. to glare at threateningly. [1985-90, Amer.] * * *
mad-dog skullcap
/mad"dawg', -dog'/, Bot. a North American skullcap, Scutellaria lateriflora, having underground stems and one-sided clusters of blue to white flowers. [1815-25, Amer.; so called ...
mad-dogskullcap
mad-dog skullcap n. A North American perennial plant (Scutellaria lateriflora) having one-sided clusters of two-lipped blue or white flowers.   [So called from its use as an ...
mad.
madam. * * *
Madabā
▪ Jordan also spelled  Medeba        town, west-central Jordan. It is situated on a highland plain more than 2,500 feet (760 metres) above sea level. The town lies ...
Madách, Imre
▪ Hungarian poet born , Jan. 21, 1823, Alsósztregova, Hung. died Oct. 5, 1864, Alsósztregova       Hungarian poet whose reputation rests on his ambitious poetic drama ...
Madag.
Madagascar. * * *
Madagascan
See Madagascar. * * *
Madagascar
—Madagascan, n., adj. /mad'euh gas"keuhr/, n. an island republic in the Indian Ocean, about 240 mi. (385 km) off the SE coast of Africa: formerly a French colony; gained ...
Madagascar jasmine
a Madagascan twining, woody vine, Stephanotis floribunda, of the milkweed family, having waxy-white, fragrant flowers. Also called wax flower. * * *
Madagascar periwinkle
a plant, Catharanthus roseus (or Vinca rosea), cultivated for its glossy foliage and pink or white flowers. [1815-25] * * *
Madagascar, flag of
▪ Flag History       national flag consisting of a horizontal red stripe over a green stripe, with a vertical white stripe at the hoist. The flag's width-to-length ...
Madagascarperiwinkle
Madagascar periwinkle n. A perennial plant (Catharanthus roseus) native to Madagascar and India, having pink or white flowers with a salverform corolla and opposite leaves. It is ...
Madalyn
/mad"l in/, n. a female given name, form of Magdalen. Also, Madalynne. * * *
madam
/mad"euhm/, n., pl. mesdames /may dam", -dahm"/ for 1; madams for 2, 3. 1. (often cap.) a polite term of address to a woman, originally used only to a woman of rank or authority: ...
madame
/meuh dam", -dahm", ma-; mad"euhm/; Fr. /mann dannm"/, n., pl. mesdames /may dam", -dahm"/; Fr. /may dannm"/. (often cap.) 1. a French title of respect equivalent to "Mrs.", used ...
Madame Bovary
/boh"veuh ree/ a novel (1857) by Gustave Flaubert. * * *
Madame Butterfly
an opera (1904) by Giacomo Puccini. Also, Madama Butterfly /meuh dam"euh, -dah"meuh/, Madam Butterfly. * * *
Madame Tussaud’s
a museum in London, England, started in 1835 by a Frenchwoman, Madame Marie Tussaud (1761–1850). It contains wax figures of famous people from past and present, and the Chamber ...
Madang
/mah"dahng/, n. a seaport on the N coast of New Guinea, in Papua New Guinea. 6609. * * * ▪ Papua New Guinea       port on the northeastern coast of the island of New ...
Madani, Abbasi al-
born 1931, Sīdī ʽUqbah, Alg. Cofounder, with Ali Belhadj, of the Algerian Islamic Salvation Front (FIS). After earning a doctorate in London, he returned to Algeria to teach ...
Madariaga
/mah'dhah rddyah"gah/, n. Salvador de /sahl'vah dhawrdd" dhe/, (Salvador de Madariaga y Rojo),1886-1978, Spanish diplomat, historian, and writer in England. * * *
Madariaga y Rojo, Salvador de
born July 23, 1886, La Coruña, Spain died Dec. 14, 1978, Locarno, Switz. Spanish writer, diplomat, and historian. Abandoning an engineering career for journalism, he joined ...
madcap
/mad"kap'/, adj. 1. wildly or heedlessly impulsive; reckless; rash: a madcap scheme. n. 2. a madcap person. [1580-90; MAD + CAP1] * * *
madcow disease
mad cow disease n. See bovine spongiform encephalopathy. * * *
MADD
/mad/, n. Mothers Against Drunk Driving. * * *
Maddalena Island
▪ Italy Italian  Isola Maddalena,         island. It lies in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean) off the northeast coast of Sardinia. It has an area of 8 ...
Maddalena Pass
▪ mountain pass, Europe also called  Larche Pass , Italian  Colle della Maddalena , or  dell'Argentera , French  Col de Larche , or  de ...
madden
/mad"n/, v.t. 1. to anger or infuriate: The delays maddened her. 2. to make insane. v.i. 3. to become mad; act as if mad; rage. [1725-35; MAD + -EN1] Syn. 1. provoke, enrage, ...
Madden NFL
▪ video game series       video game sports-simulation series created by EA Sports, a division of the American company Electronic Arts, and based on the National ...
maddening
—maddeningly, adv. —maddeningness, n. /mad"n ing/, adj. 1. driving to madness or frenzy: a maddening thirst. 2. infuriating or exasperating: his maddening indifference to my ...
maddeningly
See maddening. * * *
madder
madder1 /mad"euhr/, n. 1. any plant of the genus Rubia, esp. the climbing R. tinctorum, of Europe, having open clusters of small, yellowish flowers. Cf. madder family. 2. the ...
madder family
the large plant family Rubiaceae, characterized by herbaceous plants, trees, and shrubs having simple, opposite, or whorled leaves, usually four- or five-lobed flowers, and fruit ...
madder lake
1. a strong purple-red color. 2. a pigment of this color formerly obtained from the madder root, characterized chiefly by lack of permanence. Cf. rose madder, ...
Madderakka
Among the Sami, the goddess of childbirth. She was assisted by three of her daughters Sarakka, the cleaving woman; Uksakka, the door woman; and Juksakka, the bow woman who ...
maddest
/mad"ist/, adj. superlative of mad. * * *
madding
/mad"ing/, adj. 1. acting madly or senselessly; insane; frenzied: a quiet place far from the madding crowd. 2. making mad: a madding grief. [1300-50; ME. See MAD (v.), -ING2] * * ...
maddish
/mad"ish/, adj. somewhat mad. [1565-75; MAD + -ISH1] * * *
Maddox, Lester Garfield
▪ 2004       American businessman and politician (b. Sept. 30, 1915, Atlanta, Ga.—d. June 25, 2003, Atlanta), served as governor of Georgia (1967–71) after having ...
Maddux, Greg
in full Gregory Alan Maddux born April 14, 1966, San Angelo, Texas, U.S. U.S. baseball player. Maddux was a star pitcher in high school and was drafted and brought up to the ...
Maddux, Gregory Alan
▪ 1996       Greg Maddux of the Atlanta Braves established himself in 1995 as the best pitcher of his day and one of the greatest in baseball history. Maddux won the ...
Maddux,Gregory Alan
Mad·dux (mădʹəks), Gregory Alan. Known as “Greg.” Born 1966. American baseball player. A right-handed pitcher with the Chicago Cubs (1986-1992) and the Atlanta Braves ...
made
/mayd/, v. 1. pt. and pp. of make. adj. 2. produced by making, preparing, etc., in a particular way (often used in combination): well-made garments. 3. artificially produced: ...
made mast
Naut. a wooden mast formed of several shaped, longitudinal pieces joined together. Also called built-up mast. [1620-30] * * *
made-down bed
/mayd"down'/, South Midland and Southern U.S. a makeshift bed, as a pallet, placed on the floor for sleeping. * * *
made-to-measure
/mayd"teuh mezh"euhr/, adj. (of a garment, shoes, etc.) made in accordance with a specific individual's measurements. Cf. ready-to-wear. [1925-30] * * *
made-to-order
/mayd"tooh awr"deuhr, -teuh-/, adj. 1. made in accordance with an individual's specifications or requirements: a made-to-order suit. Cf. ready-to-wear. 2. perfectly ...
made-up
/mayd"up"/, adj. 1. concocted; falsely fabricated or invented: a made-up story. 2. being in makeup; wearing facial cosmetics. 3. put together; finished. [1600-10] * * *
Madeira
/meuh dear"euh, -dair"euh/; for 1, 2, 5 also Port. /mah de"rddeuh/, n. 1. a group of eight islands off the NW coast of Africa, part of Portugal. 270,000; 308 sq. mi. (798 sq. ...
Madeira embroidery.
See broderie anglaise. [after the island of MADEIRA, where such embroidery is made in convents] * * *
Madeira Islands
Island group (pop., 2001 prelim.: 242,603) and autonomous region of Portugal, in the North Atlantic Ocean. Madeira, the largest of the Madeira Islands, is the site of the ...
Madeira River
River, western Brazil. A major tributary of the Amazon River, it is formed by the junction of the Mamoré and Beni rivers in Bolivia and flows north along the border between ...
Madeira topaz
citrine (def. 2). * * *
MadeiraIslands
Madeira Islands An archipelago of Portugal in the northeast Atlantic Ocean west of Morocco. Only two of the volcanic islands are inhabited. The island of Madeira is a tourist ...
Madeiran
See Madeira Islands. * * *
Madeiravine
Madeira vine n. A tropical South American ornamental vine (Anredera cordifolia) having small white fragrant flowers. * * *
madeleine
/mad"l in, mad'l ayn"/; Fr. /manndeu len"/, n., pl. madeleines /mad"l inz, mad'l aynz"/; Fr. /manndeu len"/. French Cookery. 1. a small shell-shaped cake made of flour, eggs, ...
Madeleine
/mad"l in, -luyn'/; Fr. /manndeu len"/, n. a female given name, form of Magdalen. Also, Madelaine, Madelene /mad"l in/, Madeline, Madelyn. * * * (as used in expressions) L'Engle ...
Madeleine Albright
➡ Albright * * *
Madeline
Madeline [mad′'l in, mad′'līn΄] n. a feminine name: var. Madelyn: see MAGDALENE * * *
mademoiselle
/mad'euh meuh zel", mad'mweuh-, mam zel"/; Fr. /mannd mwann zel"/, n., pl. mademoiselles /mad'euh meuh zelz", mad'mweuh-, mam zelz"/, mesdemoiselles /may'deuh meuh zel", ...
Madera
/meuh dair"euh/, n. a city in central California. 21,732. * * *
Madera Volcano
▪ volcanic cone, Nicaragua       one of two volcanic cones (the other is Concepción) forming Ometepe Island in Lake Nicaragua, southwestern Nicaragua. It rises to ...
maderize
maderize [mad′ər īz΄] vi. maderized, maderizing to turn brown usually from improper storage: said of white wine maderization n. * * *
Maderna, Bruno
▪ Italian composer born April 21, 1920, Venice, Italy died Nov. 13, 1973, Darmstadt, W.Ger.       Italian composer of avant-garde and electronic music and a noted ...
Maderno
/mah derdd"naw/, n. Carlo /kahrdd"law/, 1556-1629, Italian architect. * * *
Maderno, Carlo
▪ Italian architect born 1556, Bissone, Milan died Jan. 30, 1629, Rome  leading Roman architect of the early 17th century, who determined the style of early Baroque ...
Madero
/mah dhe"rddaw/, n. Francisco Indalecio /frddahn sees"kaw een'dah le"syaw/, 1873-1913, Mexican revolutionary and political leader: president 1911-13. * * *
Madero, Francisco
▪ president of Mexico born , Oct. 30, 1873, Parras, Mex. died Feb. 22, 1913, Mexico City  Mexican revolutionary and president of Mexico (1911–13) who successfully ousted ...
Madero, Francisco (Indalécio)
born Oct. 30, 1873, Parras, Mex. died Feb. 22, 1913, Mexico City Mexican revolutionary and president (1911–13). Son of a wealthy landowner, in 1908 he called for honest, ...
Madero,Francisco Indalecio
Ma·de·ro (mə-dĕrʹō, mä-dĕʹrō), Francisco Indalecio. 1873-1913. Mexican revolutionary and politician who forced the resignation of Porfirio Díaz and assumed the ...
Madgaon
▪ India also called  Margao        town, west-central Goa state, western India. Madgaon is situated on the railway that extends from Marmagao port to Castle Rock in ...
Madge
/maj/, n. a female given name, form of Margaret. * * *
Mādhavācārya
▪ Hindu statesman and philosopher also called  Vidyāraṇya   born 1296? died , ?1386, Sringeri, Kashmir, India       Hindu statesman and philosopher. He lived at ...
madhouse
/mad"hows'/, n., pl. madhouses /-how'ziz/. 1. a hospital for the confinement and treatment of mentally disturbed persons. 2. a wild, confused, and often noisy place, set of ...
Madhubani
▪ India       town, north-central Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated 16 miles (26 km) northeast of Darbhanga. Madhubani derives its name from the ...
Madhubuti, Haki R.
▪ American author, publisher and educator original name  Don Luther Lee   born Feb. 23, 1942, Little Rock, Ark., U.S.       African-American author, publisher, and ...
Madhumati River
▪ river, Bangladesh       distributary of the upper Padma River (Ganges [Ganga] River (Ganges River)), flowing through southwestern Bangladesh. It leaves the Padma ...
Madhva
▪ Hindu philosopher also called  Ānandatīrtha, or Pūrṇaprajña   born c. 1199, , Kalyānpur, near Udipi, Karnataka, India died c. 1278, , Udipi       Hindu ...
Madhya Bharat
/mud"yeuh bah"rut, -reuht/ a former state of central India; now included in Madhya Pradesh. * * *
Madhya Bharat Plateau
▪ plateau, India Hindi  Madhya Bharat Pathar        plateau comprising the northern part of the Central Highlands, central India. Extending over about 22,000 square ...
Madhya Pradesh
/mud"yeuh preuh daysh", prah"desh/ a state in central India. 48,230,000; 171,201 sq. mi. (443,411 sq. km). Cap.: Bhopal. * * * State (pop., 2001 prelim.: 60,385,118), central ...
Madhyamika
/mahd yu"mi keuh/, n. Buddhism. a school of philosophy, of A.D. c200, that attempted a reconciliation with Hinayana from a Mahayana position. [ < Skt] * * * School in the ...
Madi
▪ people also spelled  Maʿdi  or  Maʿadi        group of more than 150,000 people who inhabit both banks of the Nile River in northwestern Uganda and in The ...
Madian
/may"dee euhn/, n. Douay Bible. Midian. * * *
Madikizela-Mandela, Winnie
▪ South African leader original name  Nomzamo Winifred Madikizela , original Xhosa name  Nkosikazi Nobandle Nomzamo Madikizela  born September 26, 1936, Bizana, Pondoland ...
Madilu System
▪ 2008 Jean Bialu Madilu        Congolese musician born May 28, 1950, Matadi, Belgian Congo died Aug. 11, 2007, Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of the Congo was a singer and a ...
Madīnah ʿĪsā
▪ Bahrain English  Isa Town        planned community in the state and emirate of Bahrain, north-central Bahrain island, in the Persian Gulf. Conceived and ...
Madīnat al-Shaʿb
▪ Yemen also called  Al-Ittiḥād        town, southern Yemen, former administrative capital of Yemen (Aden). The town is located on the Little Aden Peninsula on ...
Madīnat Habu
▪ archaeological site, Thebes, Egypt also spelled  Medinet Habu   the necropolis region of western Thebes in Upper Egypt that is enclosed by the outer walls of the ...
Madison
/mad"euh seuhn/, n. 1. Dolly or Dolley /dol"ee/, (Dorothea Payne), 1768-1849, wife of James Madison. 2. James, 1751-1836, 4th president of the U.S. 1809-17. 3. a city in and the ...
Madison Avenue
a street in New York City that is a center of the advertising and public relations industries and that has become a symbol of their attitudes, methods, and practices. * * *
Madison Heights
a city in SE Michigan: suburb of Detroit. 35,375. * * *
Madison River
▪ river, United States       river in southwestern Montana and northwestern Wyoming, U.S. The Madison River rises in the northwestern corner of Yellowstone National ...
Madison Square Garden
(also the Garden) a large building in New York City, opened in 1969, where major sports and cultural events are held. The main area has 20 000 seats. * * * ▪ arena, New York ...
Madison, Dolley
▪ American first lady née  Dolley Payne , also called (1790–93)  Dolley Todd , Dolley also spelled  Dolly  born May 20, 1768, Guilford county, North Carolina ...
Madison, Guy
▪ 1997       (ROBERT OZELL MOSELEY), U.S. film and television actor who starred as television's Wild Bill Hickok (1951-58) and in some 85 motion pictures, mostly ...
Madison, Helene
▪ American athlete born June 19, 1913, Madison, Wis., U.S. died Nov. 27, 1970, Seattle, Wash.       American swimmer, the outstanding performer in women's freestyle ...
Madison, James
born March 16, 1751, Port Conway, Va. died June 28, 1836, Montpelier, Va., U.S. Fourth president of the U.S. (1809–17). After graduating from the College of New Jersey (now ...
Madison,Dolley Payne Todd
Madison, Dolley Payne Todd. 1768-1849. First Lady of the United States (1809-1817) as the wife of President James Madison. She earlier served as White House hostess for the ...
Madison,James
Madison, James. 1751-1836. The fourth President of the United States (1809-1817). A member of the Continental Congress (1780-1783) and the Constitutional Convention (1787), he ...
MadisonAvenue
Madison Avenue n. The American advertising industry. adj. Of, relating to, or working in the American advertising industry.   [After Madison Avenue in New York City, the center ...
Madisonian
See Madison, James. * * *

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