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MadisonRiver
Madison River A river of southwest Montana flowing about 294 km (183 mi) generally northward to join the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers and form the Missouri River. * * *
Madisonville
/mad"euh seuhn vil'/, n. a city in W Kentucky. 16,979. * * *
Madiun
/mah'dee oohn"/, n. a city on E central Java, in Indonesia. 36,147. * * * ▪ regency and city, Indonesia also spelled  Madioen         kotamadya (municipality) in ...
Madiun Affair
▪ Indonesian history       communist rebellion against the Hatta-Sukarno government of Indonesia, which originated in Madiun, a town in eastern Java, in September 1948. ...
Mädler, Johann Heinrich von
▪ German astronomer born May 29, 1794, Berlin, Prussia [Germany] died March 14, 1874, Hanover, Ger.       German astronomer who (with Wilhelm Beer) published the most ...
madly
/mad"lee/, adv. 1. insanely or wildly: The old witch cackled madly. 2. with desperate haste or intensity; furiously: They worked madly to repair the bridge. 3. foolishly: They ...
Madlyn
/mad"lin/, n. a female given name, form of Magdalen. Also, Madlynne. * * *
madm.
madam. * * *
madman
/mad"man', -meuhn/, n., pl. madmen /-men', -meuhn/. a person who is or behaves as if insane; lunatic; maniac. [1300-50; ME madd man. See MAD, MAN1] * * *
madmoney
mad money n. Slang A small sum of money kept for unlikely contingencies. * * *
madness
/mad"nis/, n. 1. the state of being mad; insanity. 2. senseless folly: It is sheer madness to speak as you do. 3. frenzy; rage. 4. intense excitement or enthusiasm. [1350-1400; ...
Madoera
/mah dooh"rddah/, n. Madura. * * *
Madog Ab Owain Gwynedd
▪ Welsh legendary figure Madog also spelled  Madoc   flourished 1170       legendary voyager to America, a son (if he existed at all) of Owain Gwynedd (d. 1170), ...
Madonie, Le
▪ mountains, Italy also called  Monti Madonie,         mountain range in Palermo provincia, northwest-central Sicily. The range extends for 30 miles (48 km) between ...
Madonna
/meuh don"euh/, n. 1. the Virgin Mary (usually prec. by the). 2. a picture or statue representing the Virgin Mary. 3. (l.c.) Archaic. an Italian title of formal address to a ...
Madonna and Child
Fine Arts. a representation of the Virgin Mary holding the infant Jesus. * * *
Madonna lily
a lily, Lilium candidum, having clusters of pure white, bell-shaped flowers. Also called Annunciation lily. [1875-80] * * *
Madonnalily
Madonna lily n. An eastern Mediterranean plant (Lilium candidum) having white, bell-shaped flowers that yield an essential oil used in perfumery.   [From its frequent appearance ...
Madox, Thomas
▪ British historian born 1666, England died Jan. 13, 1726/27       English legal antiquary and historian whose critical studies of medieval English documents establish ...
madras
/mad"reuhs, meuh dras", -drahs"/, n. 1. a light cotton fabric of various weaves, esp. one in multicolored plaid or stripes, used for shirts, dresses, jackets, etc. 2. a thin ...
Madras
/meuh dras", -drahs"/, n. 1. a seaport in and the capital of Tamil Nadu state, in SE India, on the Bay of Bengal. 3,169,930. 2. former name of Tamil Nadu. * * * ▪ India Tamil ...
Madras hemp
sunn. * * *
Madras States
a former agency of British India, including the Native States of Cochin, Travancore, and Pudukottai. * * *
Madras, University of
▪ university, Madras, India       state-controlled institution of higher learning located in Madras, India. One of three affiliating universities founded by the British ...
madrasah
/meuh dras"euh/, n. Islam. a school or college, esp. a school attached to a mosque where young men study theology. Also, madrasa. [ < Ar] * * * (Arabic: "school") Islamic ...
madrassah
ma·dras·sah also ma·dra·sa (mə-dräʹsə) or me·dre·se (-drĕsʹə) n. Islam A building or group of buildings used for teaching Islamic theology and religious law, ...
madre
/mah"dhrdde/; Eng. /mah"dray/, n., pl. madres /-dhrddes/; Eng. /-drayz/. Spanish. mother. * * * (as used in expressions) Madre de Dios River Madre Laguna Sierra Madre * * *
Madre de Dios
/mah"dhrdde dhe dyaws"/ a river in Peru and Bolivia, flowing E to the Beni River. 900 mi. (1450 km) long. * * *
Madre de Dios River
River, southeastern Peru and northwestern Bolivia. It rises in the easternmost range of the Andes Mountains, in Peru, and flows east to the Bolivian border. There it turns ...
Madre, Laguna
Long narrow inlet of the Gulf of Mexico along the shore of southern Texas, U.S., and northeastern Mexico. Sheltered from the gulf by barrier islands, including Padre Island, it ...
Madrede Dios
Ma·dre de Di·os (mä'drā dā dē-ōsʹ, mä'drĕ dĕ dyōsʹ) A river, about 1,126 km (700 mi) long, of southeast Peru and northwest Bolivia flowing northeast from the Andes ...
madrepore
—madreporic /mad'reuh pawr"ik, -por"-/, madreporian /mad'reuh pawr"ee euhn, -pohr"-/, adj. /mad"reuh pawr', -pohr'/, n. any true or stony coral of the order Madreporaria, ...
madreporian
See madrepore. * * *
madreporic
See madreporian. * * *
madreporite
/mad"reuh pawr'uyt, -pohr'-, meuh drep"euh ruyt'/, n. a sievelike plate in certain echinoderms, through which water passes into the vascular system. [1795-1805; MADREPORE + ...
Madrid
—Madrilenian /mah'dreuh lee"nee euhn, -leen"yeuhn/, adj., n. /meuh drid"/; Sp. /mah dhrddeedh"/, n. a city in and the capital of Spain, in the central part. 3,500,000. * * ...
Madrid Codex
▪ Mayan literature Latin  Codex Tro-cortesianus,    together with the Paris and Dresden codices, one of several richly illustrated glyphic texts of the pre-Conquest Mayan ...
Madrid, Complutensian University of
▪ university, Madrid, Spain original name  University Of Alcalá De Henares,  Spanish  Universidad Complutense De Madrid, or Universidad De Alcalá De Henares, ...
Madrid, Miguel de la
▪ president of Mexico in full  Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado  born Dec. 12, 1934, Colima, Mex.       president of Mexico from 1982 to 1988.       Miguel de la ...
Madrid, Treaty of
▪ European history [1526]       (Jan. 14, 1526), treaty between the Habsburg emperor Charles V (Charles I of Spain) and his prisoner Francis I, king of France, who had ...
madrigal
—madrigalesque, adj. —madrigalian /mad'reuh gal"ee euhn, -gal"yeuhn, -gay"lee euhn/, adj. /mad"ri geuhl/, n. 1. a secular part song without instrumental accompaniment, ...
madrigal comedy
▪ musical genre       Italian musical genre of the late 16th century, a cycle of vocal pieces in the style of the madrigal and lighter Italian secular forms that are ...
madrigalist
/mad"ri geuh list/, n. a composer or singer of madrigals. [1780-90; MADRIGAL + -IST] * * *
madrilène
/mad"reuh len', -layn', mad'reuh len", -layn"/, n. a consommé flavored with tomato, frequently jelled and served cold. [1930-35; < F (consommé) madrilène lit., Madrid ...
Madrileño
/mad'reuh layn"yoh/; Sp. /mah'dhrddee le"nyaw/, n., pl. Madrilenos /-layn"yohz/; Sp. /-le"nyaws/. (sometimes l.c.) a native or inhabitant of Madrid, Spain. [1825-35; < Sp ...
madroña
ma·dro·ña (mə-drōʹnyə) also ma·dro·ño (-drōʹnyō) or ma·dro·ne (-drōʹnə) n. pl. ma·dro·ñas, also ma·dro·ños or ma·dro·nes An evergreen tree (Arbutus ...
madrone
/meuh droh"neuh/, n. 1. any of several evergreen trees belonging to the genus Arbutus, of the heath family, esp. A. menziesii (Pacific madrone) of western North America, having ...
madroño
☆ madroño [mə drō′nyō] n. pl. madroños 〚Sp < maduro: see MADURO〛 an evergreen tree (Arbutus menziesii) of the heath family, with smooth, red bark, leathery, oval ...
Madsen, Michael
▪ 2008       Haitian business executive and politician born Aug. 27, 1942, Port-au-Prince, Haiti died March 24, 2007, Kenscoff, Haiti became a powerful figure in Haiti ...
madtom
/mad"tom"/, n. any of several tadpolelike, freshwater catfishes of the genus Noturus, of the central and eastern U.S., having a poisonous pectoral spine: some are threatened or ...
Madura
/meuh door"euh/ for 1; /maj"euhr euh/ for 2, n. 1. Dutch, Madoera. an island in Indonesia, off the NE coast of Java. 76,100,000 with Java; 2112 sq. mi. (5470 sq. km). 2. Also, ...
Madura foot
▪ pathology also called  maduromycosis , or  mycetoma        fungus infection, usually localized in the foot but occurring occasionally elsewhere on the body, ...
Madurai
Madurai [mä də rī′] city in S India, in the state of Tamil Nadu: pop. 941,000 * * * Ma·du·rai (mä'də-rīʹ, mădʹyo͝o-rī') A city of southern India south-southwest ...
Madurese
/mad'oo reez", -rees"/, n. 1. a member of a people native to the island of Madura and also inhabiting the northeastern coast of Java. 2. the Austronesian language spoken by the ...
Madurese language
      an Austronesian language of the Indonesian subfamily, spoken on Madura Island, some smaller offshore islands, and the northern coast of Java, Indonesia. Dialects ...
maduro
/meuh door"oh/, adj. (of cigars) strong and darkly colored. [1885-90; < Sp < L maturus ripe] * * *
Madvig, Johan Nicolai
▪ Danish scholar born Aug. 7, 1804, Bornholm, Den. died Dec. 12, 1886, Copenhagen  classical scholar and Danish government official who published many works on Latin grammar ...
madwoman
/mad"woom'euhn/, n., pl. madwomen. a woman who is or behaves as if insane. [1400-50; late ME. See MAD, WOMAN] * * *
Madwoman of Chaillot, The
/shah yoh"/, (French, La Folle de Chaillot) a satirical comedy (1945) by Jean Giraudoux. * * *
madwort
/mad"werrt', -wawrt'/, n. a mat-forming plant, Aurinia saxatilis (or Alyssum saxatille), of the mustard family, having spatulate leaves and open clusters of pale yellow ...
mae
/may/, adj., n., adv. Scot. more. [bef. 900; ME (north and Scots), OE ma; c. G mehr, ON meir, Goth mais. See MORE] * * * (as used in expressions) Bailey Pearl Mae Jemison Mae ...
Mae
/may/, n. a female given name, form of Mary. * * * (as used in expressions) Bailey Pearl Mae Jemison Mae Carol West Mae * * *
Mae Hong Son
▪ Thailand  town, extreme northwestern Thailand, in the Daen Lao Range. Mae Hong Son has an airport with scheduled flights to Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Lampang, and ...
Mae West
an inflatable yellow or orange life jacket for emergency use, esp. by sailors or by airplane pilots in flights over water. [1935-40; after Mae WEST, full-bosomed U.S. comic ...
Maeander
/mee an"deuhr/, n. ancient name of the Menderes. * * *
Maebara Issei
▪ Japanese politician also called  Hikotarō, or Hachijūrō   born April 28, 1834, Hagi, Nagato province, Japan died Dec. 3, 1876, Hagi       Japanese ...
Maebashi
/mah"e bah"shee/, n. a city in the central part of Honshu, in central Japan. 265,171. * * * ▪ Japan       capital, Gumma ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, on the Kantō ...
Maebelle
/may bel", may"bel/, n. a female given name. * * *
Maecenas
/mee see"neuhs, muy-/, n. 1. Gaius Cilnius /sil"nee euhs/, c70-8 B.C., Roman statesman: friend and patron of Horace and Vergil. 2. a generous patron or supporter, esp. of art, ...
Maecenas, Gaius
▪ Roman diplomat and patron also called  Gaius Cilnius Maecenas  born c. 70 BC died 8 BC  Roman diplomat, counsellor to the Roman (ancient Rome) emperor Augustus, and ...
Maecenas, Gaius (Cilnius)
born с 70 died 8 BC Roman diplomat and literary patron. He claimed descent from Etruscan kings. Though highly influential in the state, he held no title, nor did he wish to be ...
Maecenas,Gaius
Mae·ce·nas (mē-sēʹnəs, mĭ-), Gaius. 70?-8B.C. Roman politician and patron of Horace and Virgil. * * *
MAEd
MAEd abbr. Master of Arts in Education. * * *
Maeda Family
▪ Japanese family       the daimyo, or lords, of Kaga Province (now part of Ishikawa Prefecture) in central Japan, whose domain was second only to that controlled by the ...
Maekawa Kunio
born May 14, 1905, Niigata-shi, Japan died June 27, 1986, Tokyo Japanese architect. Maekawa worked as a drafter for Le Corbusier in Paris and for Antonin Raymond in Tokyo. In ...
Mael
/mayl/, n. Irish Myth. a son of Ronan, unjustly killed by him. * * *
Maelius, Spurius
▪ Roman plebeian died 439 BC       wealthy Roman plebeian who allegedly tried to buy popular support with the aim of making himself king. During the severe famine of ...
maelstrom
/mayl"streuhm/, n. 1. a large, powerful, or violent whirlpool. 2. a restless, disordered, or tumultuous state of affairs: the maelstrom of early morning traffic. 3. (cap.) a ...
maenad
—maenadic, adj. —maenadism, n. /mee"nad/, n. 1. bacchante. 2. a frenzied or raging woman. [1570-80; < L Maenad- (s. of Maenas) < Gk Mainás a bacchante, special use of ...
maenads and bacchantes
Female followers of the Greek wine-god Dionysus. The word maenad comes from the Greek, meaning "mad" or "demented." During the orgiastic rites of Dionysus, maenads roamed the ...
Maera
/mear"euh/, n. Class. Myth. Hecuba, after being changed into a dog for blinding Polymestor. Also, Maira. * * *
Maerlant, Jacob van
▪ Dutch poet born 1225, Vrije van Brugge [Damme?] died 1291, Damme       pioneer of the didactic poetry that flourished in the Netherlands in the 14th ...
Maes, Nicolaes
born 1634, Dordrecht, Neth. died Nov. 24, 1693, Amsterdam Dutch painter. A native of Dordrecht, he went to Amsterdam с 1650 to study with Rembrandt, from whom he learned the ...
Maeshowe barrow
▪ mound, Mainland, Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom       prehistoric chambered mound located northeast of Stromness on Mainland (or Pomona) in the Orkney ...
maestoso
/muy stoh"soh/; It. /mah'es taw"saw/, adj., adv. with majesty; stately (used as a musical direction). [1715-25; < It: stately, majestic, equiv. to maest(à) ( < L majestas ...
Maestra, Sierra
▪ mountains, Cuba       mountain range, southeastern Cuba. The range extends eastward from Cape Cruz, at the southern shore of the Gulf of Guacanayabo, to the ...
Maestricht
Flemish. /mahs"trddikht/, n. Maastricht. * * *
maestro
/muy"stroh/, n., pl. maestros. 1. an eminent composer, teacher, or conductor of music: Toscanini and other great maestros. 2. (cap.) a title of respect used in addressing or ...
Maeterlinck
—Maeterlinckian, adj. /may"teuhr lingk'/; Fr. /mann terdd laonn"/; Flemish. /mah"terdd lingk'/, n. Comte Maurice Fr. /moh rddees"/, 1862-1947, Belgian poet, dramatist, and ...
Maeterlinck, Maurice
▪ Belgian author in full  Maurice Polydore-Marie-Bernard Maeterlinck,  also called (from 1932)  Comte Maeterlinck   born August 29, 1862, Ghent, Belgium died May 6, 1949, ...
Maeterlinck, Maurice (Polydore-Marie-Bernard)
later Comte Maeterlinck born Aug. 29, 1862, Ghent, Belg. died May 6, 1949, Nice, France Belgian playwright and poet. He studied law in Ghent but soon turned to writing poems ...
Maeterlinck,Count Maurice
Mae·ter·linck (māʹtər-lĭngk', mĕtʹər-, mä-tĕr-lăɴʹ), Count Maurice. 1862-1949. Belgian writer of poetry, a wide variety of essays, and symbolic dramas, including ...
Maetsuyker, Joan
▪ Dutch statesman born Oct. 14, 1606, Amsterdam, Neth. died Jan. 4, 1678, Batavia, Dutch East Indies [now Jakarta, Indonesia]       governor-general of the Dutch East ...
MaeWest
Mae West (māʹ wĕstʹ) n. An inflatable, vestlike life preserver.   [After West, Mae(from its resemblance to her curvaceous torso).] * * *
Maéwo
▪ island, Vanuatu also called  Aurora        island of Vanuatu, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, 65 miles (105 km) east of the island of Espiritu Santo. It is ...
Maeztu, Ramiro de
▪ Spanish journalist in full  Ramiro De Maeztu Y Whitney   born May 4, 1875, Vitoria, Spain died Oct. 29, 1936, Madrid       Spanish journalist and sociopolitical ...
Mafeking
/mah"fi king'/, n. a town in N Republic of South Africa: former administrative seat of Bechuanaland; besieged for 217 days by Boers 1899-1900. 6900. * * *
mafenide
/meuh fen"uyd/, Pharm. an antibacterial substance, C7H10N2O2S, prepared in cream form and used topically, along with other treatments, on second- to third-degree burns to reduce ...
Maffei I and II
Two galaxies relatively close to the Milky Way Galaxy, first detected in the late 1960s by the Italian astronomer Paolo Maffei. Maffei I is a large elliptical galaxy, while ...
Maffei, Francesco Scipione, Marchese di
▪ Italian dramatist (marquess of) born June 1, 1675, Verona, republic of Venice [now in Italy] died Feb. 11, 1755, Verona       Italian dramatist, archaeologist, and ...
maffick
—mafficker, n. /maf"ik/, v.i. Brit. to celebrate with extravagant public demonstrations. [1895-1900; back formation from MAFEKING, taken as v. + -ING1; the relief of the ...
Mafia
/mah"fee euh, maf"ee euh/, n. 1. a hierarchically structured secret organization allegedly engaged in smuggling, racketeering, trafficking in narcotics, and other criminal ...
Mafia Island
▪ island, Tanzania       island in the Indian Ocean off the eastern coast of Tanzania, eastern Africa. It lies 80 miles (130 km) southeast of Dar es-Salaam and opposite ...
mafic
/maf"ik/, adj. Geol. of or pertaining to rocks rich in dark, ferromagnesian minerals. Cf. basic (def. 4), ultramafic. [1910-15; MA(GNESIUM) + L f(errum) iron + -IC] * * *
mafic rock
In geology, any igneous rock dominated by the silicates pyroxene, amphibole, olivine, and mica. These minerals are high in magnesium and ferrous iron, and their presence gives ...
Mafikeng
Mafikeng [mäf′ə kiŋ] city in N South Africa, near the border of Botswana: scene of famous siege of British garrison by the Boers, lasting 217 days: pop. 6,500 * * * ▪ ...
Mafikeng, Siege of
Boer siege of a British military outpost in the South African War at the town of Mafikeng (until 1980 spelled Mafeking) in northwestern South Africa in 1899–1900. The ...
Mafinga Hills
▪ hills, Malawi–Zambia       hills located astride the Malawi (Malaŵi)- Zambia border southeast of Chitipa (Fort Hill), Malawi. The hills are composed of quartzites, ...
mafioso
/mah'fee oh"soh/, n., pl. mafiosi /-see/, mafiosos. (sometimes cap.) a member of a Mafia or of a mafia. [1870-75; < It, equiv. to Mafi(a) MAFIA + -oso < L -osus (see -OUS)] * * *
Mafra
▪ Portugal       town, west-central Portugal. It lies near the Atlantic Ocean, 18 miles (29 km) northwest of Lisbon. It is noted primarily for the National Palace (also ...
maftir
Seph. /mahf teerdd"/; Ashk. /mahf"teerdd/, n. Hebrew. 1. the concluding section of the portion of the Torah chanted or read in a Jewish service on the Sabbath and festivals. 2. ...
mag
mag1 /mag/, n. Informal. magazine. [shortened form] mag2 /mag/, n., v., magged, magging. Brit. Dial. n. 1. a magpie. 2. talk; chatter. v.i. 3. to talk idly; chatter. [shortened ...
Mag
/mag/, n. a female given name, form of Margaret. * * *
mag card
/mag/ 1. Computers. a plastic or paper card with a magnetizable layer on which data can be recorded and from which data can be read. 2. such a card used in access-control ...
MAG machine gun
▪ weapon also called  Fn Mag,         general-purpose machine gun used primarily as a tank- or vehicle-mounted weapon, although it is also made with a butt and bipod ...
mag tape
/mag/, Computers. a magnetic tape used for recording data. [mag, by shortening of MAGNETIC] * * *
mag wheel
Auto. a wheel containing magnesium or aluminum generally alloyed with steel, which makes it lighter in weight and shinier than an ordinary steel wheel: used esp. on racing cars ...
mag-
Also mak-. To knead, fashion, fit. Oldest forms *mag̑-, *mak̑-, becoming *mag-, *mak- in centum languages. Derivatives include make, mason, mingle, magma, and mass. 1. a. (i) ...
mag.
1. magazine. 2. magnetism. 3. magneto. 4. magnitude. 5. (in prescriptions) large. [ < L magnus] * * *
Magadan
/mah'geuh dahn"/; Russ. /meuh gu dahn"/, n. a city in the NE Russian Federation in Asia, on the Sea of Okhotsk. 138,000. * * * ▪ Russia       port and administrative ...
Magadha
Ma·ga·dha (mäʹgə-də) An ancient kingdom of northeast India. It was especially powerful from the fourth century B.C. to the fifth century A.D., particularly under the ...
Magadi, Lake
Lake, Great Rift Valley, southern Kenya, east of Lake Victoria. Occupying an area of 240 sq mi (622 sq km), it is 20 mi (32 km) long and 2 mi (3 km) wide. Its bed consists ...
Magalhaes, Antonio Carlos
▪ 2008 Antônio Carlos Peixoto de Magalhães        Brazilian politician born Sept. 4, 1927, Salvador, Bahia state, Braz. died July 20, 2007, São Paulo, Braz. was a ...
Magallanes
Sp. /mah'gah yah"nes/, n. See Punta Arenas. * * *
Magallanes y La Antarctica Chilena
▪ region, Chile       largest and southernmost región of Chile. Named for Ferdinand Magellan, the Portuguese navigator, it became a colonial territory in 1853 and a ...
Magangué
/mah'gahng ge"/, n. a city in NW Colombia. 73,868. * * * ▪ Colombia       city, Bolívar departamento, northern Colombia, on the Brazo de Loba (a branch of the ...
Magar
▪ people also spelled  Mangar,         people of Nepal and Sikkim state, India, living mainly on the western and southern flanks of the Dhaulāgiri mountain massif. ...
magatama
▪ jade ornament Korean  kogok        chiefly Japanese jade ornament shaped like a comma with a small perforation at the thick end; it was worn as a pendant, and its ...
magazine
—magazinish, magaziny, adj. /mag'euh zeen", mag"euh zeen'/, n. 1. a publication that is issued periodically, usually bound in a paper cover, and typically contains essays, ...
magazine section
a magazinelike section in the Sunday editions of many newspapers, containing articles rather than news items and often letters, reviews, stories, puzzles, etc. [1955-60] * * *
MAGAZINES: Ebony at 50
▪ 1996       It was 1945 and World War II had ended when the premiere issue of Ebony magazine hit the newsstands in November. The brainchild of Johnson Publishing Co. ...
magazinist
/mag'euh zee"nist/, n. a person who writes for or edits a magazine. [1815-25; MAGAZINE + -IST] * * *
Magburaka
▪ Sierra Leone       town, central Sierra Leone, on the Rokel River. Located on the government railway, it is a traditional trade centre (in rice, palm oil and kernels, ...
Magda
/mag"deuh/; Ger. /mahg"dah/, n. a female given name, German form of Magdalen. * * *
Magdala
/mag"deuh leuh/, n. an ancient town in Palestine, W of the Sea of Galilee: supposed home of Mary Magdalene. * * *
Magdalen Islands
French Îles de la Madeleine Island group of eastern Quebec, Canada. Located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence between Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland, the group comprises ...
Magdalena
/mag'deuh lay"neuh, -lee"-/; Sp. /mahg'dhah le"nah/, n. 1. a river in SW Colombia, flowing N to the Caribbean. 1060 mi. (1705 km) long. 2. a female given name. * * * (as used in ...
Magdalena Bay
a bay in NW Mexico, on the SW coast of Lower California. 17 mi. (27 km) long; 12 mi. (19 km) wide. * * *
Magdalena del Mar
▪ Peru also called  Magdalena Nueva        city in the Lima-Callao metropolitan area of Peru, southwest of central Lima. It is bounded on the south by cliffs ...
Magdalena River
River, south-central and northern Colombia. It rises on the eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in southern Colombia and flows northward for about 950 mi (1,530 km) to empty ...
Magdalene
/mag"deuh leen', -leuhn, mag'deuh lee"nee/, n. 1. the. See Mary Magdalene. 2. (l.c.) a reformed prostitute. 3. Also, Magdalen /mag"deuh leuhn/. a female given name: from a Hebrew ...
Magdalenian
/mag'deuh lee"nee euhn/, adj. of or pertaining to the final Paleolithic culture of much of western Europe, dating from c13,000-10,000 B.C. and notable for its artifacts of bone, ...
Magdalenian culture
Stone-tool industry and artistic tradition of Upper Paleolithic Europe. It was named after the type site, La Madeleine in southwestern France. The Magdalenians lived some ...
Magdeburg
/mag"deuh berrg'/; Ger. /mahg"deuh boorddk'/, n. the capital of Saxony-Anhalt, in central Germany. 290,579. * * * City (pop., 2002 est.: 229,755), capital of Saxony-Anhalt ...
Magdeburg hemisphere
Physics. one of a pair of hemispherical cups from which air can be evacuated when they are placed together: used to demonstrate the force of air pressure. [after MAGDEBURG, where ...
Magdoff, Harry
▪ 2007 Henry Samuel Magdoff        American economist (b. Aug. 21, 1913, New York, N.Y.—d. Jan. 1, 2006, Burlington, Vt.), after a career in government service, wrote ...
mage
/mayj/, n. Archaic. a magician. [1350-1400; ME < MF < L magus. See MAGUS] * * *
Magelang
/mah'geuh lahng"/, n. a city on central Java, in Indonesia. 422,428. * * * ▪ Indonesia       city, Jawa Tengah (Central Java) provinsi (province), Java, Indonesia. It ...
Magellan
—Magellanic /maj'euh lan"ik/, adj. /meuh jel"euhn/, n. 1. Ferdinand, c1480-1521, Portuguese navigator: discoverer of the Straits of Magellan 1520 and the Philippines 1521. 2. ...
Magellan barberry
an evergreen shrub, Berberis buxifolia, of southern Chile, having prickle-tipped leaves, dark-purple fruit, and orange-yellow flowers, rarely flowering in cultivation. * * *
Magellan, Ferdinand
Portuguese Fernão de Magalhães Spanish Fernando de Magallanes born с 1480, Sabrosa, or Porto?, Port. died April 27, 1521, Mactan, Phil. Portuguese navigator and ...
Magellan, Strait of
Spanish Estrecho de Magallanes Strait, linking the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean, between the southern tip of South America and Tierra del Fuego. It extends westward from ...
Magellan,Ferdinand
Ma·gel·lan (mə-jĕlʹən), Ferdinand. 1480?-1521. Portuguese navigator. While trying to find a western route to the Moluccas (1519), Magellan and his expedition were blown by ...
Magellan,Strait of
Magellan, Strait of A channel separating South America from Tierra del Fuego and other islands south of the continent and connecting the southern Atlantic and Pacific oceans. ...
Magellanic cloud
Astron. either of two irregular galactic clusters in the southern heavens that are the nearest independent star system to the Milky Way. [1675-85] * * * Either of two irregular ...
MagellanicClouds
Mag·el·lan·ic Clouds (măj'ə-lănʹĭk) pl.n. Two small, irregularly shaped galaxies that are the galaxies closest to the Milky Way and are faintly visible near the south ...
Magen David
/mah"geuhn day"vid/; Seph. Heb. /mah gen" dah veed"/; Ashk. Heb. /maw"geuhn daw"vid/, Judaism. See Star of David. [1900-05; < Heb maghen dawid lit., shield of David] * * *
MagenDavid
Ma·gen Da·vid also Mo·gen Da·vid (mŏʹgən dôʹvĭd, dāʹvĭd, mä-gĕnʹ dä-vēdʹ) PhotoDisc, Inc. n. A six-pointed star, a symbol of Judaism, that is formed by ...
Magendie
/mann zhahonn dee"/, n. François /frddahonn swann"/, 1783-1855, French physiologist. * * *
Magendie, François
▪ French physiologist born Oct. 6, 1783, Bordeaux, Fr. died Oct. 7, 1855, Sannois  French experimental physiologist who was the first to prove the functional difference of ...
magenta
/meuh jen"teuh/, n. 1. fuchsin. 2. a purplish red. [after MAGENTA, because the dye was discovered the year of the battle] * * * ▪ Italy       town, Lombardia ( ...
Magenta
/meuh jen"teuh/, n. a town in N Italy, W of Milan: the French and Sardinians defeated the Austrians here 1859. 23,690. * * * ▪ Italy       town, Lombardia ( Lombardy) ...
Magenta, Battle of
(June 4, 1859) Battle fought during the Franco-Piedmontese war against the Austrians (second War of Italian Independence) in Lombardy, northern Italy. The narrow French victory ...
magfilm
/mag"film'/, n. Motion Pictures. See under film (def. 7b). [MAG(NETIC) + FILM] * * *
maggid
Ashk. Heb., Eng. /mah"gid/; Seph. Hab. /mah geed"/, n., pl. maggidim Ashk. Heb. /mah gee"dim/; Seph. Heb. /mah gee deem"/, maggids. Judaism. (esp. in Poland and Russia) a ...
Maggie
/mag"ee/, n. a female given name, form of Margaret. * * *
Maggie Smith
➡ Smith (X) * * *
Maggio, Michael John
▪ 2001       American stage director (b. July 3, 1951, Chicago, Ill.—d. Aug. 19, 2000, Chicago), gained a national reputation as one of the most talented in his field. ...
Maggiore
/meuh jawr"ee, -johr"ee/; It. /mahd jaw"rdde/, n. Lake, a lake in N Italy and S Switzerland. 83 sq. mi. (215 sq. km). * * *
Maggiore, Lake
ancient Lacus Verbanus Lake, northern Italy and southern Switzerland, bordered on the north by the Swiss Alps. Occupying an area of 82 sq mi (212 sq km), it is Italy's second ...
Maggiore,Lake
Mag·gio·re (mə-jôrʹē, mäd-jōʹrĕ), Lake A lake of northern Italy and southern Switzerland. Nearly surrounded by peaks of the Lepontine Alps, it is a major resort ...
maggot
/mag"euht/, n. 1. a soft-bodied, legless larva of certain flies. 2. Archaic. an odd fancy; whim. [1425-75; late ME magot, magat, unexplained var. of maddock, ME mathek < ON ...
maggoty
/mag"euh tee/, adj. 1. infested with maggots, as food. 2. Archaic. having queer notions; full of whims. 3. Australian Slang. angry; bad-tempered. [1660-70; MAGGOT + -Y1] * * *
magh-
To be able, have power. Derivatives include dismay, might1, machine, and magic. 1. a. may1, from Old English magan, to be able; b. dismay, from Old French esmaier, to frighten. ...
Magha
▪ Indian Sanskrit poet flourished 8th century AD       Sanskrit poet whose only recorded work is Shishupalavadha (“The Slaying of King Shishupala”), an influential ...
maghemite
/mag hem"uyt, mag"euh muyt'/, n. Mineral. a strongly magnetic dimorph of hematite. [1925-30; b. MAGNETITE and HEMATITE] * * * ▪ mineral also called ...
Magherafelt
District (pop., 2001: 39,780), central Northern Ireland. It is bounded by the River Bann, Lake Neaghon, and the Sperrin Mountains. It was formerly part of County Londonderry but ...
Maghiāna
      one of the twin towns of Jhang Maghiāna (q.v.), Pakistan. * * *
Maghnia
▪ Algeria formerly  Marnia         town, northwestern Algeria, on the northern edge of the Hauts Plateaux, 8 miles (13 km) east of the Moroccan border. The modern ...
Maghreb
/mug"reuhb/, n. the Arabic name for the NW part of Africa, generally including Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and sometimes Libya. Also, Maghrib. * * *
Maghrebi
/mug"reuh bee/, n., pl. Maghrebis, Maghrebi for 1. 1. a native or inhabitant of the Maghreb. 2. any of the dialects of Arabic spoken in the Maghreb. adj. 3. of or pertaining to ...
Maghrib
or Maghreb Region of North Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea. It comprises the coastal plains of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and, often, Libya. In earlier times the term ...
maghribi script
▪ Arabic calligraphy maghribi also spelled  maghrebi        in calligraphy, Islamic cursive style of handwritten alphabet that developed directly from the early ...
maghu-
Young person of either sex. Suffixed form *magho-ti-. a. maid, maiden, from Old English mægden, virgin; b. matjes herring, from Dutch maagd, maid. Both a and b from Germanic ...
Maghut, Muhammad al-
▪ 2007       Syrian poet and playwright (b. 1934, Salamiyah, Syria—d. April 3, 2006, Damascus, Syria), was considered to be one of the greatest and most original ...
Magi
—Magian /may"jee euhn/, adj. /may"juy/, n. pl., sing. Magus /-geuhs/ 1. (sometimes l.c.) the wise men, generally assumed to be three in number, who paid homage to the infant ...
magian
See magus. * * *
magic
/maj"ik/, n. 1. the art of producing illusions as entertainment by the use of sleight of hand, deceptive devices, etc.; legerdemain; conjuring: to pull a rabbit out of a hat by ...
magic bullet
something that cures or remedies without causing harmful side effects: So far there is no magic bullet for economic woes. [1965-70] * * *
Magic Circle
a British association for professional magicians (= people who entertain others with magic tricks) established in 1905. Only the best magicians can join, and members are not ...
Magic Flute, The
(German, Die Zauberflöte) an opera (1791) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. * * *
magic lantern
a device having an enclosed lamp and a lenslike opening, formerly used for projecting and magnifying images mounted on slides or films. [1690-1700] * * *
Magic Marker
Trademark. a brand of felt-tip pen. * * *
Magic Mountain, The
(German, Der Zauberberg) a novel (1924) by Thomas Mann. * * *
magic mushroom
a mushroom, Psilocybe mexicana, of Mexico and the southwestern U.S., containing the hallucinogen psilocybin. [1965-70] * * *
magic number
Physics. the atomic number or neutron number of an exceptionally stable nuclide. [1945-50] * * * ▪ atomic structure       in physics, in the shell models of both atomic ...
magic realism
—magic realist. a style of painting and literature in which fantastic or imaginary and often unsettling images or events are depicted in a sharply detailed, realistic ...
Magic Roundabout
a British children’s television programme (1965–77). The characters were all toys, including a little girl called Florence and a dog called Dougal. Each programme lasted five ...
magic square
a square containing integers arranged in an equal number of rows and columns so that the sum of the integers in any row, column, or diagonal is the same. [1695-1705] * * * ▪ ...
magical
—magically, adv. /maj"i keuhl/, adj. 1. produced by or as if by magic: The change in the appearance of the room was magical. 2. mysteriously enchanting: a magical night. 3. of ...
magical thinking
a conviction that thinking is equivalent to doing, occurring in dreams, the thought patterns of children, and some types of mental disorders, esp. obsessive-compulsive ...
magically
See magical. * * *
magicalrealism
magical realism n. A chiefly literary style or genre originating in Latin America that combines fantastic or dreamlike elements with realism. * * *
magicbullet
magic bullet n. Slang Something regarded as a magical solution or cure: “There is no magic bullet against cancer” (Matt Clark). * * *
magician
/meuh jish"euhn/, n. 1. an entertainer who is skilled in producing illusion by sleight of hand, deceptive devices, etc.; conjurer. 2. a person who is skilled in magic; ...
magick
mag·ick (măjʹĭk) n. An action or effort undertaken because of a personal need to effect change, especially as associated with Wicca or Wiccan beliefs.   [Variant of ...
magickal
See magick. * * *
magiclantern
magic lantern n. An optical device formerly used to project an enlarged image of a picture. * * *
magicnumber
magic number n. 1. Any of the numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, or 126, that represent the number of neutrons or protons in strongly bound and exceptionally stable atomic nuclei. 2. ...
magicsquare
magic square top:the SATOR letter square bottom: the number square from Albrecht Dürer'sengraving Melencolia I Precision Graphics n. 1. A square that contains numbers arranged ...
Magindanao
/mah geen'dah nah"oh, meuh gin"deuh now', meuh gin'deuh now"/, n., pl. Magindanaos, (esp. collectively) Magindanao. 1. a member of a Moro people of Mindanao in the ...
Maginot line
/mazh"euh noh'/; Fr. /mann zhee noh"/ 1. a zone of heavy defensive fortifications erected by France along its eastern border in the years preceding World War II, but outflanked ...
Maginot, André
Ma·gi·not (măzhʹə-nō', măjʹ-, mä-zhē-nōʹ), André. 1877-1932. French politician who as minister of war (1922-1924 and 1929-1932) proposed a line of fortification, ...
Maginot, André (-Louis-René)
born Feb. 17, 1877, Paris, France died Jan. 7, 1932, Paris French politician. He was elected to the French Chamber of Deputies (1910) and fought in World War I, where he was ...
magisterial
—magisterially, adv. —magisterialness, n. /maj'euh stear"ee euhl/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or befitting a master; authoritative; weighty; of importance or consequence: a ...
magisterially
See magisterial. * * *
magisterium
/maj'euh stear"ee euhm/, n. Rom. Cath. Ch. the authority and power of the church to teach religious truth. [1585-95; < L: MAGISTERY] * * *
magistery
/maj"euh ster'ee, -steuh ree/, n., pl. magisteries. 1. an agency or substance, as in alchemy, to which faculties of healing, transformation, etc., are ascribed. 2. Obs. ...
magistracy
/maj"euh streuh see/, n., pl. magistracies. 1. the office or function of a magistrate. 2. a body of magistrates. 3. the district under a magistrate. Also, magistrature /maj"euh ...
magistral
—magistrality, n. —magistrally, magistratically /maj'euh strat"ik lee/, adv. /maj"euh streuhl/, adj. 1. Pharm. prescribed or prepared for a particular occasion, as a remedy. ...
magistral line
Fort. the line from which the position of the other lines of fieldworks is determined. [1850-55] * * *
magistrate
—magistrateship, n. /maj"euh strayt', -strit/, n. 1. a civil officer charged with the administration of the law. 2. a minor judicial officer, as a justice of the peace or the ...
magistrate's court
1. a court having limited jurisdiction over minor civil and criminal matters, as matters of contract not exceeding a particular amount of money. 2. See police court. [1865-70] * ...
magistrates' court
In England and Wales, any of the inferior courts with primarily criminal jurisdiction covering a wide range of offenses, from minor traffic violations and public-health nuisances ...
magistrates’ court
n a local court of law in England and Wales where magistrates judge minor criminal cases, and also decide whether more serious cases should be referred to a Crown Court. Most ...
magistrature
mag·is·tra·ture (măjʹĭ-strā'chər, -strə-cho͝or') n. Magistracy. * * *
Maglemosean
/mag'leuh moh"see euhn, -sheuhn, -zheuhn/, adj. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the first Mesolithic culture of the northern European plain, adapted to forest and ...
Maglemosian
Ma·gle·mo·si·an (mä'glə-mōʹzē-ən) adj. Archaeology Of or relating to a Mesolithic forest culture of northern Europe.   [After Maglemose, a Mesolithic site on the ...
Maglemosian industry
▪ prehistoric culture       a tool culture of northern Europe dating from the postglacial period, approximately 9000 to 5000 BC. The Maglemosian industry was named after ...
maglev
/mag"lev'/, n. See magnetic levitation. Also, Maglev. [1965-70; by shortening] * * *
Magloire, Paul
▪ 2002       Haitian military ruler (b. July 19, 1907, Cap-Haitien, Haiti—d. July 12, 2001, Port-au-Prince, Haiti), ruled Haiti from 1950 to 1956. The son of a ...
magma
—magmatic /mag mat"ik/, adj. —magmatism, n. /mag"meuh/, n., pl. magmas, magmata /-meuh teuh/. 1. Geol. molten material beneath or within the earth's crust, from which igneous ...
magmatic
See magma. * * *
magn-
var. of magni- before a vowel: magnanimous. * * *
Magna
/mag"neuh/, n. a town in N Utah. 13,138. * * * (as used in expressions) Leptis Magna Magna Carta Magna Graecia * * *
Magna Carta
/mag"neuh kahr"teuh/ 1. the "great charter" of English liberties, forced from King John by the English barons and sealed at Runnymede, June 15, 1215. 2. any fundamental ...
Magna Carta Source
▪ Primary Source [1215]       John, by the grace of God, king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou, to the archbishops, ...
magna cum laude
/mahg"neuh koom low"day, -deuh, -dee; mag"neuh kum law"dee/ with great praise: used in diplomas to grant the next-to-highest of three special honors for grades above the average. ...
magna est veritas, et praevalebit
/mahg"nah est we"rddi tahs', et prdduy'wah le"bit/; Eng. /mag"neuh est ver"i tas', et pree'veuh lee"bit/, Latin. truth is great and will prevail. * * *
Magna Graecia
/mag"neuh gree"shee euh/; Lat. /mahg"nah grdduy"ki ah'/ the ancient colonial cities and settlements of Greece in S Italy. * * * (Latin; "Great Greece") Group of ancient Greek ...
Magna Mater
/mahg"neuh mah"ter/, Rom. Relig. Cybele; Ops; Rhea. [ < L magna mater great mother] * * *
MagnaCarta
Mag·na Car·ta or Mag·na Char·ta (măgʹnə kärʹtə) n. 1. The charter of English political and civil liberties granted by King John at Runnymede in June 1215. 2. A ...
magnacum laude
mag·na cum lau·de (mägʹnə ko͝om louʹdə) adv. & adj. With high honors. Used to express high academic distinction: graduated magna cum laude; 25 magna cum laude ...
magnaflux
/mag"neuh fluks'/, v.t. to test (iron or steel) for defects using the Magnaflux method. [1935-40; see MAGNAFLUX] * * *
Magnaflux
/mag"neuh fluks'/, Trademark. a test of ferrous metals involving the dusting of a magnetized sample with magnetic powder, or the application of oil containing magnetic particles ...
MagnaGraecia
Magna Grae·cia (grēʹshə) The ancient Greek seaport colonies of southern Italy and Sicily from the eighth to the fourth century B.C. Cumae and Tarantum (modern Taranto) ...
magnalium
/mag nay"lee euhm/, n. an alloy of magnesium and aluminum, sometimes also containing copper, nickel, tin, and lead. [1895-1900; MAGN(ESIUM) + AL(UMINUM) + -IUM] * * *
Magnani, Anna
born March 7, 1908, Rome, Italy died Sept. 26, 1973, Rome Italian film actress. An illegitimate child brought up in poverty, she became a nightclub singer noted for her bawdy ...
magnanimity
/mag'neuh nim"i tee/, n., pl. magnanimities for 2. 1. the quality of being magnanimous. 2. a magnanimous act. [1300-50; ME magnanimite < L magnanimitas. See MAGNANIMOUS, -ITY] * ...
magnanimous
—magnanimously, adv. —magnanimousness, n. /mag nan"euh meuhs/, adj. 1. generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from petty resentfulness or vindictiveness: to be ...
magnanimously
See magnanimous. * * *
magnanimousness
See magnanimously. * * *
Magnasco, Alessandro
▪ Italian painter byname  Lissandrino  or  Il Lissandrino  born Feb. 4, 1667, Genoa [Italy] died March 12, 1749, Genoa  Italian painter of the late Baroque period ...
magnate
—magnateship, n. /mag"nayt, -nit/, n. 1. a person of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular enterprise, field of business, etc.: a railroad magnate. 2. a ...
Magnentius
▪ Roman emperor in full  Flavius Magnus Magnentius   died Aug. 11, 353, Gaul       usurping Roman emperor from Jan. 18, 350, to Aug. 11, 353. His career forms one ...
Magnes, Judah Leon
born July 5, 1877, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Oct. 27, 1948, New York, N.Y. U.S.-born Israeli educator and religious leader. Ordained as a rabbi in 1900, he earned a ...
magnesia
—magnesian, adj. /mag nee"zheuh, -sheuh/, n. a white, tasteless substance, magnesium oxide, MgO, used in medicine as an antacid and laxative. Cf. milk of magnesia. [1350-1400; ...
Magnesia
/mag nee"shee euh, -zhee euh/, n. ancient name of Manisa. * * *       white, highly infusible oxide of magnesium (q.v.). * * *
Magnesia ad Maeandrum
▪ ancient city, Turkey       ancient inland city of Ionia, situated on a small tributary of the Maeander (Büyükmenderes) River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. ...
Magnesia ad Sipylum
Ancient city, Lydia, near modern Manisa, Turkey. Dating to the 5th century BC, it was located near the regions associated with Niobe and Tantalus. It was the site of a famous ...
magnesian
See magnesia. * * *
magnesioferrite
      the mineral magnesium iron oxide, a member of the magnetite (q.v.) series of spinels. * * *
magnesioriebeckite
      magnesium-rich variety of the silicate mineral riebeckite (q.v.). * * *
magnesite
/mag"neuh suyt'/, n. a mineral, magnesium carbonate, MgCO3, having a characteristic conchoidal fracture and usually occurring in white masses. [1805-15; MAGNES(IA) + -ITE1; cf. F ...
magnesium
/mag nee"zee euhm, -zheuhm, -shee euhm/, n. Chem. a light, ductile, silver-white, metallic element that burns with a dazzling white light, used in lightweight alloys, flares, ...

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