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Слова на букву oil-pius (15990)

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Outer Mongolia
former name of Mongolian People's Republic. * * *
outer planet
Astron. any of the five planets with orbits outside the orbit of Mars: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. Cf. inner planet. [1940-45] * * *
outer product
Math. See cross product. [1925-30] * * *
outer space
1. space beyond the atmosphere of the earth. 2. See deep space. [1875-80] * * *
Outer Space Treaty
▪ 1967 formally  Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial ...
outercoat
/ow"teuhr koht'/, n. coat (def. 1). [1945-50; OUTER + COAT] * * *
outercourse
/ow"teuhr kawrs', -kohrs'/, n. sexual activity between two or more people that does not involve penetration. [1990-95; patterned on INTERCOURSE] * * *
outerear
outer ear n. See external ear. * * *
OuterHebrides
Out·er Hebrides (outʹər) See Hebrides. * * *
OuterMongolia
Outer Mongolia See Mongolia. * * *
outermost
/ow"teuhr mohst'/ or, esp. Brit., /-meuhst/, adj. farthest out; remotest from the interior or center: the outermost limits. [1350-1400; ME; see OUTER, -MOST] * * *
outerplanet
outer planet n. Any of the five planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, with orbits outside that of Mars. * * *
outersole
/ow"teuhr sohl'/, n. outsole. [OUTER + SOLE2] * * *
outerspace
outer space n. Any region of space beyond limits determined with reference to the boundaries of a celestial body or system, especially: a. The region of space immediately beyond ...
outerwear
/ow"teuhr wair'/, n. 1. garments, as raincoats or overcoats, worn over other clothing for warmth or protection outdoors; overclothes. 2. clothing, as dresses, sweaters, or suits, ...
outexecute
v.t., outexecuted, outexecuting. * * *
outfable
v.t., outfabled, outfabling. * * *
outface
/owt'fays"/, v.t., outfaced, outfacing. 1. to cause to submit by or as if by staring down; face or stare down. 2. to face or confront boldly; defy. [1520-30; OUT- + FACE] * * *
outfall
/owt"fawl'/, n. the outlet or place of discharge of a river, drain, sewer, etc. [1620-30; OUT- + FALL] * * *
outfame
v.t., outfamed, outfaming. * * *
outfast
v.t. * * *
outfawn
v.t. * * *
outfeast
v.t. * * *
outfeed
v.t., outfed, outfeeding. * * *
outfence
v.t., outfenced, outfencing. * * *
outferret
v.t. * * *
outfield
/owt"feeld'/, n. 1. Baseball. a. the part of the field beyond the diamond. b. the positions played by the right, center, and left fielders. c. the outfielders considered as a ...
outfielder
/owt"feel'deuhr/, n. Sports. one of the players, esp. in baseball, stationed in the outfield. [1855-60, Amer.; OUTFIELD + -ER1] * * *
outfight
v.t., outfought, outfighting. * * *
outfigure
v.t., outfigured, outfiguring. * * *
outfish
v.t. * * *
outfit
—outfitter, n. /owt"fit'/, n., v., outfitted, outfitting. n. 1. an assemblage of articles that equip a person for a particular task, role, trade, etc.: an explorer's outfit. 2. ...
outfit car
a railroad car used as a dormitory for construction and maintenance workers. Also called camp car. * * *
outfitter
outfitter [out′fit΄ər] n. 1. a person who furnishes, sells, or makes outfits 2. a business that provides equipment and supplies for fishing trips, hunting expeditions, etc. * ...
outflame
v.t., outflamed, outflaming. * * *
outflank
—outflanker, n. /owt'flangk"/, v.t. 1. to go or extend beyond the flank of (an opposing military unit); turn the flank of. 2. to outmaneuver or bypass. [1755-65; OUT- + ...
outflare
v.t., outflared, outflaring. * * *
outflash
v.t. * * *
outflatter
v.t. * * *
outflee
v.t., outfled, outfleeing. * * *
outfling
v.t., outflung, outflinging. * * *
outfloat
v.t. * * *
outflourish
v.t. * * *
outflow
/owt"floh'/, n. 1. the act of flowing out: We need flood control to stem the river's outflow. 2. something that flows out: to measure the outflow in gallons per minute. 3. any ...
outflux
/owt"fluks'/, n. 1. the act of flowing out; outflow (opposed to influx). 2. a place of flowing out; outlet. [1730-40; OUT- + FLUX] * * *
outfly
/owt'fluy"/, v., outflew, outflown, outflying. v.t. 1. to surpass in flying, esp. in speed or distance: to outfly the speed of sound. v.i. 2. Literary. to fly out or ...
outfool
v.t. * * *
outfoot
/owt'foot"/, v.t. 1. to surpass (another person) in running, walking, etc.; outstrip. 2. to outsail; excel (another boat) in speed. [1730-40; OUT- + FOOT] * * *
outfox
/owt'foks"/, v.t. to outwit; outsmart; outmaneuver: Politics is often the art of knowing how to outfox the opposition. [1960-65; OUT- + FOX] * * *
outfroth
v.t. * * *
outfrown
/owt'frown"/, v.t. to outdo in frowning; silence, abash, or subdue by frowning. [1595-1605; OUT- + FROWN] * * *
outfumble
v.t., outfumbled, outfumbling. * * *
outgabble
v.t., outgabbled, outgabbling. * * *
outgain
v.t. * * *
outgallop
v.t. * * *
outgamble
v.t., outgambled, outgambling. * * *
outgame
v.t., outgamed, outgaming. * * *
outgas
/owt"gas', owt'gas"/, v., outgassed, outgassing. Chem. v.t. 1. to remove (adsorbed or occluded gases), usually by heat or reduced pressure. v.i. 2. to lose gas. [1920-25; OUT- + ...
outgaze
v.t., outgazed, outgazing. * * *
outgeneral
/owt'jen"euhr euhl/, v.t., outgeneraled, outgeneraling or (esp. Brit.) outgeneralled, outgeneralling. to outdo or surpass in generalship. [1760-70; OUT- + GENERAL] * * *
outgiving
/owt"giv'ing/, adj. 1. friendly or responsive; outgoing. n. 2. Archaic. something given out, as a statement or proclamation. [1655-1665; OUT- + GIVE + -ING1, -ING2] * * *
outglare
v.t., outglared, outglaring. * * *
outgleam
v.t. * * *
outglitter
v.t. * * *
outgloom
v.t. * * *
outglow
v.t. * * *
outgnaw
v.t., outgnawed, outgnawed or outgnawn, outgnawing. * * *
outgo
/owt"goh'/, n., pl. outgoes, v., outwent, outgone, outgoing. n. 1. the act or process of going out: Her illness occasioned a tremendous outgo of affectionate concern. 2. money ...
outgoing
/owt"goh'ing/ or, for 5, /-goh"-/, adj. 1. going out; departing: outgoing trains. 2. leaving or retiring from a position or office: A farewell party was given for the outgoing ...
outgoingness
See outgoing. * * *
outgone
out·gone (out-gônʹ, -gŏnʹ) v. Past participle of outgo. * * *
outgreen
v.t. * * *
outgrew
out·grew (out-gro͞oʹ) v. Past tense of outgrow. * * *
outgrin
v.t., outgrinned, outgrinning. * * *
outgross
v.t. * * *
outgrow
/owt'groh"/, v., outgrew, outgrown, outgrowing. v.t. 1. to grow too large for: to outgrow one's clothes. 2. to leave behind or lose in the changes incident to development or the ...
outgrowth
/owt"grohth'/, n. 1. a natural development, product, or result: to consider truancy an outgrowth of parental neglect. 2. an additional, supplementary result. 3. a growing out or ...
outguess
/owt'ges"/, v.t. to anticipate correctly the actions or intentions of; outwit. [1910-15; OUT- + GUESS] * * *
outgun
/owt'gun"/, v.t., outgunned, outgunning. 1. to exceed in firepower. 2. to outdo or overwhelm, as by superior forces: Local manufacturers have been outgunned by the overseas ...
outgush
v.t. * * *
outhammer
v.t. * * *
outhandle
/owt'han"deuhl/, v.t., outhandled, outhandling. to handle or operate in a superior way to: That car outhandles all others in its class. [OUT- + HANDLE] * * *
outhasten
v.t. * * *
outhaul
/owt"hawl'/, n. Naut. a rope used for hauling out a sail on a boom, yard, etc. [1830-40; OUT- + HAUL] * * *
outhear
v.t., outheard, outhearing. * * *
outhire
v.t., outhired, outhiring. * * *
outhiss
v.t. * * *
outhit
v.t., outhit, outhitting. * * *
outhouse
/owt"hows'/, n., pl. outhouses /-how'ziz/. 1. an outbuilding with one or more seats and a pit serving as a toilet; privy. 2. any outbuilding. [1525-35; OUT- + HOUSE] * * *
outhowl
v.t. * * *
outhumor
v.t. * * *
outhunt
v.t. * * *
outhurl
v.t. * * *
outhustle
v.t., outhustled, outhustling. * * *
outhyperbolize
v.t., outhyperbolized, outhyperbolizing. * * *
outie
/ow"tee/, n. Informal. 1. a protruding navel. 2. a person having such a navel. [OUT + -IE] * * *
outinfluence
v.t., outinfluenced, outinfluencing. * * *
outing
/ow"ting/, n. 1. a pleasure trip, excursion, picnic, or the like: the annual outing for the senior class. 2. a public appearance, as by a participant in an athletic contest or ...
outing flannel
a light cotton flannel with a short, dense nap. [1885-90, Amer.] * * *
outingflannel
outing flannel n. A soft, lightweight cotton fabric, usually with a short nap on both sides. * * *
outintrigue
v.t., outintrigued, outintriguing. * * *
outinvent
v.t. * * *
outissue
v.t., outissued, outissuing. * * *
outjest
v.t. * * *
outjet
v.t., outjetted, outjetting. * * *
outjinx
v.t. * * *
Outjo
▪ Namibia       town, northwestern Namibia. The town is situated on a cluster of low hills at an elevation of 4,135 feet (1,260 metres). It lies within an arid region ...
outjockey
/owt'jok"ee/, v.t., outjockeyed, outjockeying. to outmaneuver: We outjockeyed the competition and got our bid in first. [1705-15; OUT- + JOCKEY] * * *
outjourney
v.t., outjourneyed, outjourneying. * * *
outjuggle
v.t., outjuggled, outjuggling. * * *
outjump
v.t. * * *
outjut
v.t., outjutted, outjutting. * * *
OutKast
▪ 2005       Rap duo OutKast, which helped put Atlanta, Ga., on the hip-hop map in the 1990s, topped the charts in fall 2003 with the double album Speakerboxxx /The Love ...
outkick
v.t. * * *
outkill
v.t. * * *
outking
v.t. * * *
outkiss
v.t. * * *
outkitchen
n. * * *
outlabor
v.t. * * *
outlaid
/owt'layd"/, v. pt. and pp. of outlay. * * *
outlance
v.t., outlanced, outlancing. * * *
outland
n. /owt"land'/; adj. /owt"land', -leuhnd/, n. 1. Usually, outlands. the outlying districts or remote regions of a country; provinces: a name unknown in the outlands. 2. ...
outlander
/owt"lan'deuhr/, n. 1. a foreigner; alien. 2. an outsider; stranger. [1590-1600; OUTLAND + -ER1] * * *
outlandish
—outlandishly, adv. —outlandishness, n. /owt lan"dish/, adj. 1. freakishly or grotesquely strange or odd, as appearance, dress, objects, ideas, or practices; bizarre: ...
outlandishly
See outlandish. * * *
outlandishness
See outlandishly. * * *
outlash
v.t. * * *
outlast
/owt'last", -lahst"/, v.t. 1. to endure or last longer than: The pyramids outlasted the civilization that built them. 2. to live longer than; outlive. [1565-75; OUT- + LAST2] * * ...
outlaugh
v.t. * * *
outlaunch
v.t. * * *
outlaw
/owt"law'/, n. 1. a lawless person or habitual criminal, esp. one who is a fugitive from the law. 2. a person, group, or thing excluded from the benefits and protection of the ...
outlaw music
▪ music       movement of American country (country music) music in the 1970s spearheaded by Willie Nelson (Nelson, Willie) and Waylon Jennings (b. June 15, 1937, ...
outlaw strike.
See wildcat strike. [1915-20] * * *
outlawry
/owt"law'ree/, n., pl. outlawries. 1. the act or process of outlawing. 2. the state of being outlawed. 3. disregard or defiance of the law: a man whose outlawry had made him a ...
outlay
n. /owt"lay'/; v. /owt'lay"/, n., v., outlaid, outlaying. n. 1. an expending or spending, as of money. 2. an amount expended; expenditure. v.t. 3. to expend, as money. [1545-55; ...
outlead
v.t., outled, outleading. * * *
outleap
/owt'leep"/, v., outleaped or outleapt, outleaping. v.t. 1. to leap ahead of or over. 2. to surpass in leaping. v.i. 3. to leap forth. [1590-1600; OUT- + LEAP] * * *
outlearn
v.t., outlearned or outlearnt, outlearning. * * *
outlengthen
v.t. * * *
outlet
/owt"let, -lit/, n. 1. an opening or passage by which anything is let out; vent; exit. 2. Elect. a. a point on a wiring system at which current is taken to supply electric ...
outlier
/owt"luy'euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that lies outside. 2. a person residing outside the place of his or her business, duty, etc. 3. Geol. a part of a formation left detached ...
outlighten
v.t. * * *
outlimn
v.t. * * *
outline
/owt"luyn'/, n., v., outlined, outlining. n. 1. the line by which a figure or object is defined or bounded; contour. 2. a drawing or sketch restricted to line without shading or ...
outlinefont
outline font n. A computer font in which each character to be displayed or printed is represented as a series of curves and lines. Outline fonts are smoothed and scaled more ...
Outlines of an Emerging World
▪ 1996 by Sir John Kenneth Galbraith       Looking back on 1995, I am led to reflect, first of all, on the larger currents of history that have a controlling influence in ...
outlinger
v.t. * * *
outlip
v.t., outlipped, outlipping. * * *
outlive
—outliver, n. /owt'liv"/, v.t., outlived, outliving. 1. to live longer than; survive (a person, period, etc.): She outlived her husband by many years. 2. to outlast; live or ...
outlook
/owt"look'/, n. 1. the view or prospect from a particular place. 2. mental attitude or view; point of view: one's outlook on life. 3. prospect of the future: the political ...
outloud
out loud adv. Loud enough to be audible; aloud: read the poem out loud. * * *
outlove
v.t., outloved, outloving. * * *
outluster
v.t. * * *
outlying
/owt"luy'ing/, adj. 1. lying at a distance from the center or the main body; remote; out-of-the-way: outlying military posts. 2. lying outside the boundary or limit. [1655-65; ...
outmalaprop
v.t., outmalapropped, outmalapropping. * * *
outman
/owt'man"/, v.t., outmanned, outmanning. to surpass in manpower. [1685-95; OUT- + MAN1] * * *
outmaneuver
/owt'meuh nooh"veuhr/, v.t. 1. to outwit, defeat, or frustrate by maneuvering. 2. to outdo or surpass in maneuvering or maneuverability. [1790-1800; OUT- + MANEUVER] * * *
outmanipulate
v.t., outmanipulated, outmanipulating. * * *
outmanoeuvre
/owt'meuh nooh"veuhr/, v.t., outmanoeuvred, outmanoeuvring. Brit. outmaneuver. * * *
outmarch
/owt'mahrch"/, v.t. to march faster or farther than. [1640-50; OUT- + MARCH1] * * *
outmarry
v.t., outmarried, outmarrying. * * *
outmaster
v.t. * * *
outmatch
/owt'mach"/, v.t. to be superior to; surpass; outdo: The home team seems to have been completely outmatched by the visitors. [1595-1605; OUT- + MATCH2] * * *
outmate
v.t., outmated, outmating. * * *
outmeasure
v.t., outmeasured, outmeasuring. * * *
outmerchant
n. * * *
outmode
/owt'mohd"/, v., outmoded, outmoding. v.t. 1. to cause (something) to go out of style or become obsolete. v.i. 2. to go out of style or become obsolete. [1900-05; perh. from the ...
outmoded
/owt'moh"did/, adj. 1. gone out of style; no longer fashionable: outmoded styles. 2. not acceptable by present standards; no longer usable; obsolete: outmoded dwellings; outmoded ...
outmost
/owt"mohst'/ or, esp. Brit., /-meuhst/, adj. farthest out; outermost. [1300-50; ME; see OUT-, -MOST] * * *
outmount
v.t. * * *
outmouth
v.t. * * *
outmove
v.t., outmoved, outmoving. * * *
outmuscle
/owt'mus"euhl/, v.t., outmuscled, outmuscling. to get the better of or dominate by virtue of superior strength or force. [OUT- + MUSCLE] * * *
outnumber
/owt'num"beuhr/, v.t. to exceed in number. [1660-70; OUT- + NUMBER] * * *
outof
out of prep. 1. a. From within to the outside of: got out of the car. b. From a given condition: came out of her trance. c. From an origin, source, or cause: made out of wood; ...
outof pocket
out of pocket adv. 1. Without funds or assets: a traveler who was caught out of pocket. 2. In a state of having experienced a loss, especially a financial one. * * *
outorganize
v.t., outorganized, outorganizing. * * *
outpace
/owt'pays"/, v.t., outpaced, outpacing. to surpass or exceed, as in speed, development, or performance: a company that has consistently outpaced the competition in ...
outpaint
v.t. * * *
outparish
/owt"par'ish/, n. a parish located outside the boundaries of or at a distance from a town or city; an outlying parish. [1570-80; OUT- + PARISH] * * *
outpass
v.t. * * *
outpath
n. * * *
outpatient
/owt"pay'sheuhnt/, n. a patient who receives treatment at a hospital, as in an emergency room or clinic, but is not hospitalized. Also, out-patient. [1705-15; OUT- + PATIENT] * * ...
outpeep
v.t. * * *
outpeople
v.t., outpeopled, outpeopling. * * *
outperform
/owt'peuhr fawrm"/, v.t. to surpass in excellence of performance; do better than: a new engine that outperforms the competition; a stock that outperformed all others. [1955-60; ...
outpick
v.t. * * *
outpipe
v.t., outpiped, outpiping. * * *
outpitch
v.t. * * *
outpity
v.t., outpitied, outpitying. * * *
outplace
/owt'plays"/, v.t., outplaced, outplacing. 1. to provide outplacement for. 2. to displace; supplant: Suburban shopping malls outplaced urban department stores in many ...
outplaced
See outplace. * * *
outplacement
/owt"plays'meuhnt/, n. 1. counseling and assistance in finding a new job, provided by a company for an employee who has been or is about to be dismissed. 2. an act or instance of ...
outplan
v.t., outplanned, outplanning. * * *
outplay
/owt'play"/, v.t. to play better than. [1640-50; OUT- + PLAY] * * *
outplease
v.t., outpleased, outpleasing. * * *
outplod
v.t., outplodded, outplodding. * * *
outplot
v.t., outplotted, outplotting. * * *
outpoint
/owt'poynt"/, v.t. 1. to excel in number of points, as in a competition or contest. 2. Naut. to sail closer to the wind than (another ship). [1585-95; OUT- + POINT] * * *
outpoison
v.t. * * *
outpolitick
v.t. * * *
outpoll
v.t. * * *
outpop
v.t., outpopped, outpopping. * * *
outpopulate
v.t., outpopulated, outpopulating. * * *
outport
/owt"pawrt', -pohrt'/, n. 1. a secondary seaport close to a larger one but beyond its corporate limits or jurisdiction. 2. Canadian. an isolated fishing village, esp. on the ...
outpost
/owt"pohst'/, n. 1. a station established at a distance from the main body of an army to protect it from surprise attack: We keep only a small garrison of men at our desert ...
outpour
—outpourer, n. n. /owt"pawr', -pohr'/; v. /owt'pawr", -pohr"/, n. 1. outpouring. v.t. 2. to pour out. [1665-75; OUT- + POUR] * * *
outpourer
See outpour. * * *
outpouring
/owt"pawr'ing, -pohr'-/, n. something that pours out or is poured out; an outflow, overflow, or effusion: an outpouring of sympathy from her friends. [1750-60; OUT- + POURING] * ...
outpractice
v.t., outpracticed, outpracticing. * * *
outpraise
v.t., outpraised, outpraising. * * *
outpray
v.t. * * *
outpreach
v.t. * * *
outpreen
v.t. * * *
outproduce
v.t., outproduced, outproducing. * * *
outpromise
v.t., outpromised, outpromising. * * *
outpry
v.t., outpried, outprying. * * *
outpull
/owt'pool"/, v.t. to exceed in ability to attract an audience, attention, etc.; outdraw: a film that is outpulling every other movie in town. [1925-30; OUT- + PULL] * * *
outpunch
v.t. * * *
outpupil
n. * * *
outpurl
v.t. * * *
outpursue
v.t., outpursued, outpursuing. * * *
outpush
v.t. * * *
output
/owt"poot'/, n., v., outputted or output, outputting. n. 1. the act of turning out; production: the factory's output of cars; artistic output. 2. the quantity or amount produced, ...
outputdevice
output device n. A device, such as a printer, video display, or speaker, that presents data from a computer to a user. * * *
outquaff
v.t. * * *
outquarters
n. * * *
outquery
v.t., outqueried, outquerying. * * *
outquestion
v.t. * * *
outquibble
v.t., outquibbled, outquibbling. * * *
outquote
v.t., outquoted, outquoting. * * *
outrace
/owt'rays"/, v.t., outraced, outracing. to race or run faster than: The deer outraced its pursuers. [1650-60; OUT- + RACE1] * * *
outrage
/owt"rayj/, n., v., outraged, outraging. n. 1. an act of wanton cruelty or violence; any gross violation of law or decency. 2. anything that strongly offends, insults, or ...
OutRage!
a British organization that works for the rights of homosexual men and women (= people sexually attracted to others of their own sex) and to encourage public discussion of the ...
outrageous
—outrageously, adv. —outrageousness, n. /owt ray"jeuhs/, adj. 1. of the nature of or involving gross injury or wrong: an outrageous slander. 2. grossly offensive to the sense ...
outrageously
See outrageous. * * *
outrageousness
See outrageously. * * *
outrail
v.t. * * *
Outram, Sir James, 1st Baronet
▪ British general born Jan. 29, 1803, near Butterley, Derbyshire, Eng. died March 11, 1863, Pau, France  English general and Indian political officer known, because of his ...
outran
/owt'ran"/, v. pt. of outrun. * * *
outrance
/ooh trddahonns"/, n. French. the utmost extremity. * * *
outrang
/owt'rang"/, v. pt. of outring. * * *
outrange
/owt'raynj"/, v.t., outranged, outranging. 1. to have a longer or greater range than. 2. to sail out of the range of (a gun or guns). [1855-60; OUT- + RANGE] * * *
outrank
/owt'rangk"/, v.t. to have a higher rank than: A major outranks a captain in the army. [1835-45, Amer.; OUT- + RANK1] * * *
outrant
v.t. * * *
outrap
v.t., outrapped, outrapping. * * *
outrate
v.t., outrated, outrating. * * *
outrave
v.t., outraved, outraving. * * *
outré
/ooh tray"/, adj. passing the bounds of what is usual or considered proper; unconventional; bizarre. [1715-25; < F, ptp. of outrer to push beyond bounds (see OUTRAGE)] * * *
outreach
v. /owt'reech"/; n., adj. /owt"reech'/, v.t. 1. to reach beyond; exceed: The demand has outreached our supply. 2. Archaic. to reach out; extend. v.i. 3. to reach out. n. 4. an ...
outread
v.t., outread, outreading. * * *
outreason
v.t. * * *
outreckon
v.t. * * *
outredden
v.t. * * *
outreign
v.t. * * *
Outremeuse, Jean d'
▪ medieval French author born 1338? died 1399?       French author of two romanticized historical works, La Geste de Liège and Ly Myreur des histors.       La ...
Outremont
/ooh"treuh mont'/; Fr. /ooh trddeuh mawonn"/, n. a city in S Quebec, in E Canada: suburb of Montreal. 24,338. * * *
outrhyme
v.t., outrhymed, outrhyming. * * *
outrib
v.t., outribbed, outribbing. * * *
outrick
v.t. * * *
outride
v. /owt'ruyd"/; n. /owt"ruyd'/, v., outrode, outridden, outriding, n. v.t. 1. to outdo or outstrip in riding. 2. (of a ship) to come safely through (a storm) by lying to. v.i. 3. ...
outrider
/owt"ruy'deuhr/, n. 1. a mounted attendant riding before or beside a carriage. 2. (at a racetrack) a mounted rider who accompanies or leads a racehorse to the post. 3. a person ...
outrig
v.t., outrigged, outrigging. * * *
outrigger
/owt"rig'euhr/, n. 1. a framework extended outboard from the side of a boat, esp., as in South Pacific canoes, supporting a float that gives stability. 2. a bracket extending ...

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