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Слова на букву oil-pius (15990)

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outright
—outrightness, n. adj. /owt"ruyt'/; adv. /owt"ruyt", -ruyt'/, adj. 1. complete or total: an outright loss. 2. downright or unqualified: an outright refusal. 3. without further ...
outrightly
See outright. * * *
outrightness
See outrightly. * * *
outring
/owt'ring"/, v., outrang, outrung, outringing. v.t. 1. to outdo in ringing; ring louder than. v.i. 2. to ring out: church bells outringing over the countryside. [1325-75; ME ...
outrival
v.t., outrivaled, outrivaling or (esp. Brit.) outrivalled, outrivalling. * * *
outroar
v.t. * * *
outrode
out·rode (out-rōdʹ) v. Past tense of outride. * * *
outrogue
v.t., outrogued, outroguing. * * *
outromance
v.t., outromanced, outromancing. * * *
outroot
v.t. * * *
outrove
v.t., outroved, outroving. * * *
outrow
/owt'roh"/, v.t. to surpass in rowing; row faster than. [1520-30; OUT- + ROW2] * * *
outrun
/owt'run"/, v.t., outran, outrun, outrunning. 1. to run faster or farther than. 2. to escape by or as if by running: They managed to outrun the police. 3. to exceed; excel; ...
outrunner
/owt"run'euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that runs ahead or outside. 2. an attendant who runs before or beside a carriage. 3. the leader of a team of dogs. 4. a ...
outrush
/owt"rush'/, n. a rapid or intense outflow: an outrush of water from a bursting pipe. [1870-75; OUT- + RUSH1] * * *
outs
➡ baseball * * *
outsail
/owt'sayl"/, v.t. to outdo in sailing; sail farther, more skillfully, or faster than. [1610-20; OUT- + SAIL] * * *
outsaint
v.t. * * *
outsally
v.t., outsallied, outsallying. * * *
outsang
/owt'sang"/, v. pt. of outsing. * * *
outsat
/owt'sat"/, v. pt. and pp. of outsit. * * *
outsatisfy
v.t., outsatisfied, outsatisfying. * * *
outsavor
v.t. * * *
outsay
v.t., outsaid, outsaying. * * *
outscent
v.t. * * *
outscheme
v.t., outschemed, outscheming. * * *
outscold
v.t. * * *
outscoop
v.t. * * *
outscore
v.t., outscored, outscoring. * * *
outscorn
v.t. * * *
outscream
v.t. * * *
outsearch
v.t. * * *
outsee
v.t., outsaw, outseen, outseeing. * * *
outseek
v.t., outsought, outseeking. * * *
outsell
/owt'sel"/, v.t., outsold, outselling. 1. to exceed in volume of sales; sell more than: He outsells all our other salespeople. 2. to exceed in value or number of sales: a soap ...
outsert
/owt"serrt'/, n. Bookbinding. an additional folded signature or sheet into which another is bound. Also called outset, wraparound. [OUT- + (IN)SERT] * * *
outset
/owt"set'/, n. 1. the beginning or start: I wanted to explain the situation at the outset. 2. outsert. [1530-40; OUT- + SET] * * *
outsettlement
/owt"set'l meuhnt/, n. a distant or remote settlement. [1730-40, Amer.; OUT- + SETTLEMENT] * * *
outsettler
/owt"set'leuhr/, n. a person who inhabits a remote settlement or area. [1750-60, Amer.; OUT- + SETTLER] * * *
outshame
v.t., outshamed, outshaming. * * *
outshape
v.t., outshaped, outshaping. * * *
outshine
/owt'shuyn"/, v., outshone or shined, outshining. v.t. 1. to surpass in shining; shine more brightly than. 2. to surpass in splendor, ability, achievement, excellence, etc.: a ...
outshoot
v. /owt'shooht"/; n. /owt"shooht'/, v., outshot, outshooting, n. v.t. 1. to surpass in shooting, as in accuracy or in number of shots made. 2. to shoot beyond. 3. to shoot ...
outshoulder
v.t. * * *
outshout
/owt'showt"/, v.t. 1. to surpass (someone) in shouting; shout louder than. 2. to outdo in advocacy, as of one's position or point of view: He outshouted all critics of his ...
outshove
v.t., outshoved, outshoving. * * *
outshow
v.t., outshowed, outshown or outshowed, outshowing. * * *
outshower
v.t. * * *
outshriek
v.t. * * *
outshrill
v.t. * * *
outside
n. /owt"suyd", -suyd'/; adj. /owt'suyd", owt"-/; adv. /owt'suyd"/; prep. /owt'suyd", owt"suyd'/, n. 1. the outer side, surface, or part; exterior: The outside of the house needs ...
outside caliper
a caliper whose legs turn inward so that it can measure outside dimensions, as the diameter of a rod. See illus. under caliper. [1870-75] * * *
outside forward
Soccer. one of two attacking players who usually play on the far side of the field; wing. [1895-1900] * * *
outside loop
Aeron. a loop during which the back of the airplane is on the outer side of the curve described by the course of flight. Cf. inside loop. * * *
outsideof
outside of prep. Outside; aside from. * * *
outsider
/owt'suy"deuhr/, n. 1. a person not belonging to a particular group, set, party, etc.: Society often regards the artist as an outsider. 2. a person unconnected or unacquainted ...
Outsider Art Moves In
▪ 1999       Works of art produced by amateurs unconnected to the conventional art world were long considered unworthy of serious attention, but in recent years these ...
Outsider Art: Moving in from the Margins
▪ 2008 Colin Rhodes One of the most talked-about exhibitions of 2007 showcased the work of Mexican-born Martín Ramírez (1895–1963), who worked entirely within the confines ...
outsiderness
See outsider. * * *
outsift
v.t. * * *
outsigh
v.t. * * *
outsight
/owt"suyt'/, n. the ability to see and understand external things clearly. Cf. insight. [1590-1600; OUT- + SIGHT, on the model of INSIGHT] * * *
outsin
v.t., outsinned, outsinning. * * *
outsing
/owt'sing"/, v.t., outsang, outsung, outsinging. 1. to sing better than. 2. to sing louder than. [1595-1605; OUT- + SING] * * *
outsit
/owt'sit"/, v.t., outsat, outsitting. 1. to sit longer than; outwait: He was determined to outsit his rival. 2. to sit beyond the time of: We realized we were outsitting our ...
outsize
/owt"suyz'/, n. 1. an uncommon or irregular size, esp. one larger than average. 2. a garment of such a size. adj. 3. Also, outsized. being unusually or abnormally large, heavy, ...
outskate
v.t., outskated, outskating. * * *
outskill
v.t. * * *
outskip
v.t., outskipped, outskipping. * * *
outskirmish
v.t. * * *
outskirt
/owt"skerrt'/, n. 1. Often, outskirts. the outlying district or region, as of a city, metropolitan area, or the like: to live on the outskirts of town; a sparsely populated ...
outskirts
outskirts [out′skʉrts΄] pl.n. 1. districts remote from the center or midst, as of a city; outlying regions sometimes, esp. formerly, used in sing. [much construction in the ...
outslander
v.t. * * *
outslang
v.t. * * *
outsleep
/owt'sleep"/, v.t., outslept, outsleeping. 1. to sleep through or later than (a specified time). 2. to sleep until the end of: to outsleep a thunderstorm. [1580-90; OUT- + ...
outslide
v.t., outslid, outslid or outslidden, outsliding. * * *
outslink
v.t., outslunk, outslinking. * * *
outsmart
/owt'smahrt"/, v.t. 1. to get the better of (someone); outwit. 2. outsmart oneself, to defeat oneself unintentionally by overly elaborate intrigue, scheming, or the like: This ...
outsmell
v.t., outsmelled or outsmelt, outsmelling. * * *
outsmile
v.t., outsmiled, outsmiling. * * *
outsnatch
v.t. * * *
outsnore
v.t., outsnored, outsnoring. * * *
outsoar
/owt'sawr", -sohr"/, v.t. to soar beyond. [1665-75; OUT- + SOAR] * * *
outsold
/owt'sohld"/, v. pt. and pp. of outsell. * * *
outsole
/owt"sohl'/, n. the outer sole of a shoe. [1880-85; OUT- + SOLE2] * * *
outsonnet
v.t. * * *
outsophisticate
v.t., outsophisticated, outsophisticating. * * *
outsound
v.t. * * *
outsource
/owt"sawrs', -sohrs'/, v.t., outsourced, outsourcing. to purchase (goods) or subcontract (services) from an outside company. [1980] * * *
outsourcing
/owt'sawr"sing, -sohr"-/, n. Econ. the buying of parts of a product to be assembled elsewhere, as in purchasing cheap foreign parts rather than manufacturing them at home. [OUT- ...
Outsourcing War-The Surge in Private Military Firms
▪ 2007 Introduction by Peter Saracino The conflict in Iraq focused renewed attention on the role played by private military firms (PMFs) in modern war. In 2006 more than 60 ...
outspan
v. /owt'span"/; n. /owt"span'/, v., outspanned, outspanning, n. South African Eng. v.t. 1. to unyoke or unhitch, as oxen from a wagon. v.i. 2. to remove the yoke, harness, etc., ...
outsparkle
v.t., outsparkled, outsparkling. * * *
outspeak
/owt'speek"/, v., outspoke, outspoken, outspeaking. v.t. 1. to outdo or excel in speaking. 2. to utter frankly or boldly: to outspeak one's grievances. v.i. 3. to speak out: to ...
outspeed
v.t., outsped or outspeeded, outspeeding. * * *
outspell
v.t., outspelled or outspelt, spelling. * * *
outspend
/owt'spend"/, v.t., outspent, spending. 1. to outdo in spending; spend more than: They seemed determined to outspend their neighbors. 2. to exceed (one's resources) in spending: ...
outspent
/owt'spent"/, adj. worn-out; exhausted. [1645-55; OUT- + SPENT] * * *
outspill
v.t., outspilled or outspilt, outspilling. * * *
outspin
v.t., outspun, outspinning. * * *
outspirit
v.t. * * *
outspit
v.t., outspit, or spat, outspitting. * * *
outsplendor
v.t. * * *
outspoke
out·spoke (out-spōkʹ) v. Past tense of outspeak. * * *
outspoken
—outspokenly, adv. —outspokenness, n. /owt"spoh"keuhn/, adj. 1. uttered or expressed with frankness or without reserve: outspoken criticism. 2. free or unreserved in ...
outspokenly
See outspoken. * * *
outspokenness
See outspokenly. * * *
outsport
v.t. * * *
outspread
v. /owt'spred"/; adj. /owt"spred"/; n. /owt"spred'/, v., outspread, outspreading, adj., n. v.t., v.i. 1. to spread out; extend: an eagle outspreading its wings. adj. 2. spread ...
outspring
v.t., outsprang or, often, outsprung; outsprung; outspringing. * * *
outsprint
v.t. * * *
outsprue
v.t., outsprued, outspruing. * * *
outspurn
v.t. * * *
outspurt
v.t. * * *
outspy
v.t., outspied, outspying. * * *
outstagger
v.t. * * *
outstand
/owt'stand"/, v., outstood, outstanding. v.i. 1. to be prominent. v.t. 2. to stay or remain beyond: to outstand the hour. [1565-75; OUT- + STAND] * * *
outstanding
—outstandingly, adv. —outstandingness, n. /owt'stan"ding/, adj. 1. prominent; conspicuous; striking: an outstanding example of courage. 2. marked by superiority or ...
outstandingly
See outstanding. * * *
outstare
/owt'stair"/, v.t., outstared, outstaring. 1. to outdo in staring; stare down. 2. to cause (someone) discomfort or embarrassment. [1590-1600; OUT- + STARE] * * *
outstartle
v.t., outstartled, outstartling. * * *
outstate
v.t., outstated, outstating. * * *
outstation
/owt"stay'sheuhn/, n. a post, station, or settlement in a remote or outlying area. [1835-45; OUT- + STATION] * * *
outstay
/owt'stay"/, v.t. 1. to stay longer than. 2. to stay beyond the time or duration of; overstay: to outstay one's welcome. [1590-1600; OUT- + STAY1] * * *
outsteal
v.t., outstole, outstolen, outstealing. * * *
outsteam
v.t. * * *
outstep
v.t., outstepped, outstepping. * * *
outsting
v.t., outstung, outstinging. * * *
outstink
v.t., outstank or, often, outstunk; outstunk; outstinking. * * *
outstood
out·stood (out-sto͝odʹ) v. Past tense and past participle of outstand. * * *
outstorm
v.t. * * *
outstrain
v.t. * * *
outstream
v.t. * * *
outstretch
—outstretcher, n. /owt'strech"/, v.t. 1. to stretch forth; extend: to outstretch one's hand in welcome. 2. to stretch out; expand: The rising population has outstretched the ...
outstride
v.t., outstrode, outstridden, outstriding. * * *
outstrike
v.t., outstruck, outstruck or outstricken, outstriking. * * *
outstrip
/owt'strip"/, v.t., outstripped, outstripping. 1. to outdo; surpass; excel. 2. to outdo or pass in running or swift travel: A car can outstrip the local train. 3. to get ahead of ...
outstrive
v.t., outstrove, outstriven, outstriving. * * *
outstroke
/owt"strohk'/, n. 1. a stroke in an outward direction. 2. (in an engine) the stroke during which the piston rod moves outward from the cylinder. [1850-55; OUT- + STROKE1] * * *
outstrut
v.t., outstrutted, outstrutting. * * *
outstudy
v.t., outstudied, outstudying. * * *
outstunt
v.t. * * *
outsuck
v.t. * * *
outsuffer
v.t. * * *
outsulk
v.t. * * *
outsum
v.t., outsummed, outsumming. * * *
outsung
/owt'sung"/, v. pp. of outsing. * * *
outswagger
v.t. * * *
outswarm
v.t. * * *
outswear
/owt'swair"/, v.t., outswore or (Archaic) outsware; outsworn; outswearing. to outdo in swearing. [1580-90; OUT- + SWEAR] * * *
outsweep
v.t., outswept, outsweeping. * * *
outsweeten
v.t. * * *
outswim
v., outswam, outswum, outswimming. * * *
outswindle
v.t., outswindled, outswindling. * * *
outswing
v.t., outswung, outswinging. * * *
outswinger
/owt"swing'euhr/, n. Cricket. a ball that when bowled veers from leg side to off side. Cf. inswinger. [1915-20; OUT- + SWINGER] * * *
outswirl
v.t. * * *
outtake
/owt"tayk'/, n. 1. a segment of film or videotape edited out of the final version, as because of a technical error. 2. a recording of a song not included in the final release of ...
outtalk
/owt'tawk"/, v.t. to outdo or overcome in talking. [1590-1600; OUT- + TALK] * * *
outtear
v.t., outtore, outtorn, outtearing. * * *
outtease
v.t., outteased, outteasing. * * *
outtell
/owt'tel"/, v.t., outtold, outtelling. 1. to outdo in telling; surpass in effect: so ridiculous as to outtell any comment. 2. to tell to the end; say completely: He outtold the ...
outthieve
v.t., outthieved, outthieving. * * *
outthink
/owt'thingk"/, v.t., outthought, outthinking. 1. to excel in thinking; think faster, more accurately, or more perceptively than: outthinking most of her contemporaries in the ...
outthreaten
v.t. * * *
outthrob
v.t., outthrobbed, outthrobbing. * * *
outthrow
/owt'throh"/, v.t., outthrew, outthrown, outthrowing. 1. to throw out or extend: His arms were outthrown in greeting. 2. to surpass in throwing; throw farther or more accurately ...
outthrust
v., adj. /owt'thrust"/; n. /owt"thrust'/, v., outthrust, outthrusting, adj., n. v.t., v.i. 1. to thrust out or extend. adj. 2. thrust or extended outward: a friendly, outthrust ...
outthunder
v.t. * * *
outthwack
v.t. * * *
outtinkle
v.t., outtinkled, outtinkling. * * *
outtire
v.t., outtired, outtiring. * * *
outtoil
v.t. * * *
outtongue
v.t., outtongued, outtonguing. * * *
outtough
/owt'tuf"/, v.t. to get the better of (a competitor) by showing more determination. [OUT- + TOUGH] * * *
outtower
v.t. * * *
outtrade
/owt'trayd"/, v.t., outtraded, outtrading. to outdo in trading; get the better of in a trade. [1670-80; OUT- + TRADE] * * *
outtravel
v.t., outtraveled, outtraveling or (esp. Brit.) outtravelled, outtravelling. * * *
outtrick
v.t. * * *
outtrot
v.t., outtrotted, outtrotting. * * *
outtrump
v.t. * * *
outturn
/owt"terrn'/, n. 1. a quantity produced; output. 2. the quality or condition of something produced or manufactured. [1790-1800; n. use of v. phrase turn out] * * *
outtyrannize
v.t., outtyrannized, outtyrannizing. * * *
outvalue
v.t., outvalued, outvaluing. * * *
outvanish
v.t. * * *
outvaunt
v.t. * * *
outvenom
v.t. * * *
outvie
v.t., outvied, outvying. * * *
outvociferate
v.t., outvociferated, outvociferating. * * *
outvoice
v.t., outvoiced, outvoicing. * * *
outvote
/owt'voht"/, v.t., outvoted, outvoting. to outdo or defeat in voting: The rural districts outvoted the urban districts. The measure was outvoted by the farmers. [1640-50; OUT- + ...
outvoyage
v.t., outvoyaged, outvoyaging. * * *
outwait
/owt'wayt"/, v.t. 1. to surpass in waiting or expecting; wait longer than. 2. Archaic. to lie in ambush longer than. [1600-10; OUT- + WAIT] * * *
outwalk
/owt'wawk"/, v.t. 1. to outdo in walking; walk faster or farther than. 2. to walk beyond: to outwalk the lights of the city. [1620-30; OUT- + WALK] * * *
outwallop
v.t. * * *
outwander
v.t. * * *
outwar
v.t., outwarred, outwarring. * * *
outwarble
v.t., outwarbled, outwarbling. * * *
outward
—outwardness, n. /owt"weuhrd/, adj. 1. proceeding or directed toward the outside or exterior, or away from a central point: the outward flow of gold; the outward part of a ...
Outward Bound
a play (1923) by Sutton Vane. * * *
Outward Bound{™} Trust
(also Outward Bound) an international organization with its base in Britain which arranges outdoor adventure training for young people. Its activities include sailing and rock ...
outward-bound
/owt"weuhrd bownd"/, adj. headed in an outward direction, as toward foreign ports: We passed an outward-bound ship as we came into the harbor. [1595-1605] * * *
outwardly
/owt"weuhrd lee/, adv. 1. as regards appearance or outward manifestation: outwardly charming; outwardly considerate. 2. on the outside or outer surface; externally: Outwardly, ...
outwardness
See outward. * * *
outwards
outwards [out′wərdz] adv. OUTWARD * * *
outwash
/owt"wosh', -wawsh'/, n. Geol. the material, chiefly sand or gravel, deposited by meltwater streams in front of a glacier. [1890-95; OUT- + WASH] * * * Deposit of sand and ...
outwash plain
Geol. a broad, sloping landform built of coalesced deposits of outwash. [1930-35] * * *
outwaste
v.t., outwasted, outwasting. * * *
outwatch
/owt'woch"/, v.t. 1. to outdo or surpass in watching. 2. to watch, or maintain a vigil, until the end of: The mourners had outwatched the night. [1620-30; OUT- + WATCH] * * *
outwater
v.t. * * *
outwave
v.t., outwaved, outwaving. * * *
outweaponed
adj. * * *
outwear
/owt'wair"/, v.t., outwore, outworn, outwearing. 1. to wear or last longer than; outlast: a well-made product that outwears its competition. 2. to exhaust in strength or ...
outweary
v.t., outwearied, outwearying. * * *
outweave
v.t., outwove, outwoven, or outwove, outweaving. * * *
outweed
v.t. * * *
outweep
v.t., outwept, outweeping. * * *
outweigh
/owt'way"/, v.t. 1. to exceed in value, importance, influence, etc.: The advantages of the plan outweighed its defects. 2. to exceed in weight: The champion will probably ...
outwell
v.t. * * *
outwent
/owt'went"/, v. pt. of outgo. * * *
outwhirl
v.t. * * *
outwiggle
v.t., outwiggled, outwiggling. * * *
outwile
v.t., outwiled, outwiling. * * *
outwill
v.t. * * *
outwing
v.t. * * *
outwish
v.t. * * *
outwit
/owt'wit"/, v.t., outwitted, outwitting. 1. to get the better of by superior ingenuity or cleverness; outsmart: to outwit a dangerous opponent. 2. Archaic. to surpass in wisdom ...
outword
v.t. * * *
outwore
out·wore (out-wôrʹ, -wōrʹ) v. Past tense of outwear. * * *
outwork
—outworker, n. v. /owt'werrk"/; n. /owt"werrk'/, v.t., outworked or outwrought, outworking, n. v.t. 1. to work harder, better, or faster than. 2. to work out or carry on to a ...
outworn
/owt"wawrn", -wohrn"/, adj. 1. out-of-date, outmoded, or obsolete: outworn ideas; outworn methods. 2. worn-out, as clothes. 3. exhausted in strength or endurance, as ...
outwrangle
v.t., outwrangled, outwrangling. * * *
outwrench
v.t. * * *
outwrestle
v.t., outwrestled, outwrestling. * * *
outwriggle
v.t., outwriggled, outwriggling. * * *
outwring
v.t., outwrung, outwringing. * * *
outwrite
/owt'ruyt"/, v.t., outwrote or (Archaic) outwrit; outwritten or (Archaic) outwrit; outwriting. to write more or better than. [1635-45; OUT- + WRITE] * * *
outwrought
out·wrought (out-rôtʹ) v. A past tense and a past participle of outwork. * * *
outyear
out·year (outʹyîr') n. A fiscal year after the year covered in a budget. Often used in the plural: The state budget assumes reduced expenditures on welfare in outyears. * * *
outyell
v.t. * * *
outyelp
v.t. * * *
outyield
v.t. * * *
Ouvéa Island
▪ island, New Caledonia Ouvéa also called  Urea  or  Uea         northernmost of the Loyalty Islands, an island group within the French overseas country of New ...
Ouyang Xiu
or Ou-yang Hsiu born 1007, Mianyang, Sichuan province, China died 1072, Yingzhou, Anhui province Chinese poet, historian, and statesman. He served in various official ...
ouzel
/ooh"zeuhl/, n. dipper (def. 4). Also, ousel. [bef. 900; ME osel merle, blackbird, OE osle, c. G Amsel; akin to L merula; see MERLE1] * * * or ousel Species (Turdus torquatus) ...
ouzo
/ooh"zoh/; Gk. /ooh"zaw/, n. an anise-flavored, colorless liqueur of Greece. [1895-1900; < ModGk oûzo(n); etym. uncert.] * * *
OV language
/oh"vee"/, Ling. a type of language that has direct objects preceding the verb and that tends to have typological traits such as postpositions, suffixes, noun modifiers preceding ...
ov-
ov- combining form OVI-: used before a vowel * * * ov- pref. Variant of ovi-. * * *
ova
/oh"veuh/, n. pl. of ovum. * * *
oval
—ovally, adv. —ovalness, n. /oh"veuhl/, adj. 1. having the general form, shape, or outline of an egg; egg-shaped. 2. ellipsoidal or elliptical. n. 3. an object of oval ...
oval kumquat
a spineless shrub or small citrus tree, Fortunella margarita, of China, having oval-shaped, orange-yellow fruit with sweet and acid flesh. Also called nagami kumquat. * * *
oval of Cassini
Geom. the locus of a point such that the product of the distances from the point to two fixed points is constant. [after Italian geometer and astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini ...
oval window
Anat. an oval opening at the head of the cochlea, connecting the middle and inner ear, through which sound vibrations of the stapes are transmitted. [1675-85] * * *
ovalbumin
/ov'al byooh"min, oh'val-/, n. Biochem. the principal protein of egg white. [1825-35; contr. and respelling of LL ovi albumen (L ovi album) egg white; see OVUM, ALBUMEN] * * *
ovality
/oh val"i tee/, n., pl. ovalities. 1. the quality or state of being oval. 2. Metalworking. distortion in section of drawn wire or the like. [1935-40; OVAL + -ITY] * * *
Ovalle
/aw vah"yeuh/, n. a city in central Chile. 29,377. * * *
ovally
See oval. * * *
ovalness
See ovally. * * *
Ovaltine{™}
n [U, C] a hot drink made from a sweet brown powder mixed with water and milk, or the name of the powder itself, which contains dried milk, dried egg and malt (= grain that has ...
ovalwindow
oval window n. The oval opening in the middle ear to which the base of the stapes is connected and through which the ossicles of the ear transmit sound vibrations to the ...
Ovando, Nicolás de
▪ Spanish military leader born c. 1451, Brozas, Castile [Spain] died c. 1511       Spanish military leader and first royal governor of the West Indies. He was the first ...
ovarian
/oh vair"ee euhn/, adj. of or pertaining to an ovary. Also, ovarial. [1830-40; OVARY + -AN] * * *
ovarian cancer
Malignant tumour of the ovaries. Risk factors include early age of first menstruation (before age 12), late onset of menopause (after age 52), absence of pregnancy, presence of ...

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