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population pyramid
Sociol. a graph showing the distribution of a population by sex, age, etc. [1945-50] * * *
Population Trends
▪ 1999 Introduction Demography       At midyear 1998, world population stood at 5,926,000,000, according to estimates prepared by the Population Reference Bureau. ...
populationcontrol
population control n. A government program to limit or slow population growth, as by birth control education, the wide availability of contraceptives, and economic incentives. * ...
populationexplosion
population explosion n. The geometric expansion of a biological population, especially the unchecked growth in human population resulting from a decrease in infant mortality and ...
populationgenetics
population genetics n. (used with a sing. verb) The branch of science that deals with the statistical analysis of the inheritance and prevalence of genes in populations. * * *
Populations and Population Movements
▪ 1995 Introduction DEMOGRAPHY        World's 25 Most Populous Urban AreasAt midyear 1994, world population stood at 5,607,000,000, according to estimates prepared by ...
Populations I and II
Two broad classes of stars and stellar groupings, whose members differ primarily in age, chemical composition, and location in galaxies. They were distinguished and named by ...
Populism
/pop"yeuh liz'euhm/, n. 1. the political philosophy of the People's party. 2. (l.c.) any of various, often antiestablishment or anti-intellectual political movements or ...
Populist
/pop"yeuh list/, n. 1. a member of the People's party. 2. (l.c.) a supporter or adherent of populism. adj. 3. Also, Populistic. of or pertaining to the People's party. 4. Also, ...
Populist Movement
Coalition of U.S. agrarian reformers in the Midwest and South in the 1890s. The movement developed from farmers' alliances formed in the 1880s in reaction to falling crop prices ...
Populistic
Populistic [päp΄yə lis′tik] adj. [also p-] POPULIST * * *
PopulistParty
Populist Party n. A U.S. political party that sought to represent the interests of farmers and laborers in the 1890s, advocating increased currency issue, free coinage of gold ...
Populonia
▪ ancient city, Italy       ancient Roman city that had originally been Etruscan and named Pupluna or Fufluna after the Etruscan wine god, Fufluns. It was situated on ...
Populonium
ancient Pupluna. Ancient Roman city, western coast of central Italy. It was originally Etruscan. Silver and iron ores from the nearby island of Elba supplied its ...
populous
—populously, adv. —populousness, n. /pop"yeuh leuhs/, adj. 1. full of residents or inhabitants, as a region; heavily populated. 2. jammed or crowded with people: There's no ...
populously
See populous. * * *
populousness
See populously. * * *
Populuxe
Pop·u·luxe also pop·u·luxe (pŏpʹyə-lŭks') n. A futuristic design style of the late 1950s and early 1960s often using pastel colors, synthetic materials, and stainless ...
popwine
pop wine n. A sweet, often fruit-flavored, inexpensive wine. * * *
por favor
/pawrdd" fah vawrdd"/, Spanish. please; if you please. * * *
Porbandar
/pawr bun"deuhr/, n. a seaport in SW Gujarat, in W India. 96,756. * * * ▪ India       city, west-central Gujarat (Gujarāt) state, western India, on the Arabian Sea ...
porbeagle
/pawr"bee'geuhl/, n. a shark of the genus Lamna, esp. L. nasus, a large, voracious species of the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans. [1750-60; < Cornish porghbugel] * * ...
porcelain
—porcelaneous, porcellaneous /pawr'seuh lay"nee euhs, pohr'-/, adj. /pawr"seuh lin, pohr"-; pawrs"lin, pohrs"-/, n. 1. a strong, vitreous, translucent ceramic material, ...
porcelain enamel
a glass coating, made to adhere to a metal or another enamel by fusion. [1880-85] * * *
porcelain enamelling
▪ industrial process also called  Vitreous Enamelling,         process of fusing a thin layer of glass (glassware) to a metal object to prevent corrosion and enhance ...
porcelainenamel
porcelain enamel n. A glass coating fired on metal. Also called vitreous enamel. * * *
porcelainflower
porcelain flower n. See hoya. * * *
porcelainite
/pawr"seuh leuh nuyt', pohr"-, pawrs"leuh-, pohrs"-/, n. Mineral. mullite. [PORCELAIN + -ITE1] * * *
porcelainize
—porcelainization, n. /pawr"seuh leuh nuyz', pohr"-, pawrs"leuh-, pohrs"-/, v.t., porcelainized, porcelainizing. to make into or coat with porcelain or something resembling ...
porcelaneous
See porcelain. * * *
porcellanite
▪ rock also spelled  porcelanite        hard, dense rock that takes its name from its resemblance to unglazed porcelain. Frequently porcellanite is an impure variety ...
porch
—porchless, adj. —porchlike, adj. /pawrch, pohrch/, n. 1. an exterior appendage to a building, forming a covered approach or vestibule to a doorway. 2. a veranda. 3. the ...
porcine
/pawr"suyn, -sin/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to swine. 2. resembling swine; hoggish; piggish. [1650-60; < L porcinus; see PORK, -INE1] * * *
porcino
porcino [pôr chē′nō] n. pl. porcini [pôchēnē] a large, fleshy, edible boletus mushroom (Boletus edulis) with a brown cap and a thick, white stem; cèpe usually used in ...
porcupine
/pawr"kyeuh puyn'/, n. any of several rodents covered with stiff, sharp, erectile spines or quills, as Erethizon dorsatum of North America. [1375-1425; late ME porcupyne, var. of ...
porcupine anteater
an echidna or spiny anteater. [1865-70] * * *
porcupine fish
▪ fish       any of the spiny, shallow-water fishes of the family Diodontidae, found in seas around the world, especially the species Diodon hystrix. They are related to ...
Porcupine River
▪ river, North America       major tributary of the Yukon River, in northern Yukon Territory, Can., and northeastern Alaska, U.S. Discovered in 1842 by John Bell of the ...
porcupinefish
/pawr"kyeuh puyn'fish'/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) porcupinefish, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) porcupinefishes. any of several fishes of the family ...
PorcupineRiver
Por·cu·pine River (pôrʹkyə-pīn') A river, about 721 km (448 mi) long, rising in northwest Yukon Territory, Canada, and flowing north then west to the Yukon River in ...
Pordenone
▪ Italian painter original name  Giovanni Antonio De' Sacchis  born c. 1483, Pordenone, Republic of Venice died 1539, Ferrara, Duchy of Ferrara       High Renaissance ...
pore
pore1 /pawr, pohr/, v.i., pored, poring. 1. to read or study with steady attention or application: a scholar poring over a rare old manuscript. 2. to gaze earnestly or steadily: ...
pore fungus
n. any fungus of the families Boletacea and Polyporaceae, bearing spores in tubes or pores. [1920-25] * * *
porefungus
pore fungus n. Any of various basidiomycetous fungi of the families Boletaceae and Polyporaceae, whose basidia line the inside of tubes that lead to exterior pores. Also called ...
porgy
/pawr"gee/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) porgy, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) porgies. 1. a sparid food fish, Pagrus pagrus, found in the Mediterranean and off ...
Porgy and Bess
/pawr"gee euhn bes"/ an opera (1935) with music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin. * * *
Pori
/pawr"ee/; Fin. /paw"rddee/, n. a seaport in W Finland, on the Gulf of Bothnia. 80,242. * * * ▪ Finland Swedish  Björneborg,         city, southwestern Finland. It ...
Porifera
/paw rif"euhr euh, poh-, peuh-/, n. an animal phylum comprising the sponges. [1835-45; < NL equiv. to LL porus PORE2 + -i- -I- + -fera, neut. pl. of -ferus -FEROUS] * * *
poriferal
See poriferan. * * *
poriferan
/paw rif"euhr euhn, poh-, peuh-/, n. 1. any animal of the phylum Porifera, comprising the sponges. adj. 2. belonging or pertaining to the Porifera. [1860-65; PORIFER(A) + -AN] * ...
poriferous
/paw rif"euhr euhs, poh-, peuh-/, adj. bearing or having pores. [1860-65; < L por(us) PORE2 + -I- + -FEROUS] * * *
poriform
/pawr"euh fawrm', pohr"-/, adj. resembling a pore in form. [1840-50; < LL por(us) PORE2 + -I- + -FORM] * * *
porion
/pawr"ee on', pohr"-/, n., pl. poria /pawr"ee euh, pohr"-/, porions. Craniom. the most lateral point in the roof of the bony external auditory meatus. [1905-10; < NL < Gk ...
Porirua
▪ New Zealand       city, southern North Island, New Zealand. It is located about 13 miles (21 km) north of Wellington city, at the head of Porirua Harbour. The ...
porism
porism [pō′riz΄əm, pôr′iz΄əm] n. 〚ME porysme < ML porisma < Gr, lit., a thing brought < porizein, to bring < poros, passage: see PORE2〛 Ancient Math. a geometrical ...
pork
—porkish, porklike, adj. —porkless, adj. /pawrk, pohrk/, n. 1. the flesh of hogs used as food. 2. Informal. appropriations, appointments, etc., made by the government for ...
pork barrel
—pork-barrel, adj. —pork-barreling, adj., n. Informal. a government appropriation, bill, or policy that supplies funds for local improvements designed to ingratiate ...
pork belly
a side of fresh pork. [1945-50] * * *
pork-barrel politics
➡ budget * * *
pork-barreler
/pawrk"bar'euh leuhr, pohrk"-/, n. Informal. a politician, esp. a senator or member of Congress who is party to or benefits from a pork barrel. [PORK BARREL + -ER1] * * *
porkbarrel
pork barrel n. Slang A government project or appropriation that yields jobs or other benefits to a specific locale and patronage opportunities to its political ...
porkbelly
pork belly n. A side of fresh pork. * * *
porkchop
/pawrk"chop', pohrk"-/, n. 1. a chop of pork. 2. Journ., Print. thumbnail (def. 4). [1855-60; PORK + CHOP1] * * *
porkchopper
/pawrk"chop'euhr, pohrk"-/, n. Informal. 1. a labor official put on the union payroll as a reward for past loyalty or services. 2. any legislator, political appointee, official, ...
porker
/pawr"keuhr, pohr"-/, n. a pig, esp. one being fattened for its meat. [1635-45; PORK + -ER1] * * *
porkfish
/pawrk"fish', pohrk"-/, n., pl. porkfishes, (esp. collectively) porkfish. a black and gold grunt, Anisotremus virginicus, of West Indian waters. [1725-35, Amer.; PORK + FISH] * * ...
porkiness
See porky1. * * *
porko-
Young pig. Oldest form *pork̑o-, becoming *porko- in centum languages. 1. a. farrow1, from Old English fearh, little pig; b. aardvark, from Middle Dutch diminutive form varken, ...
porkpie
/pawrk"puy', pohrk"-/, n. a snap-brimmed hat with a round, flat crown, usually made of felt. [1725-35; PORK + PIE1] * * * ▪ clothing       round hat with a turned-up ...
porkpie (hat)
porkpie (hat) or porkpie [pôrk′pī΄] n. a man's soft hat with a round, flat crown * * *
porky
porky1 —porkiness, n. /pawr"kee, pohr"-/, adj., porkier, porkiest. 1. of, pertaining to, or resembling pork. 2. fat: a porky child. [1850-55; PORK + -Y1] porky2 /pawr"kee, ...
Porky Pig{™}
a US film cartoon character. He is a pig that stutters (= speaks with a fault so that he repeats the beginning of some words) and was created by Warner Brothers for the Looney ...
porn
/pawrn/, Informal. n. 1. pornography. adj. 2. Also, porny /pawr"nee/. pertaining to or dealing in pornography; pornographic: porn shops. Also, porno /pawr"noh/. [1960-65; by ...
pornographer
/pawr nog"reuh feuhr/, n. a person who writes or sells pornography. [1840-50; PORNOGRAPH(Y) + -ER1] * * *
pornographic
See pornographer. * * *
pornographically
See pornographer. * * *
pornography
—pornographic /pawr'neuh graf"ik/, adj. —pornographically, adv. /pawr nog"reuh fee/, n. obscene writings, drawings, photographs, or the like, esp. those having little or no ...
porny
See porn. * * *
poromeric
☆ poromeric [pôr΄ə mer′ik ] n. 〚arbitrary coinage, prob.
Póros
▪ island, Greece       island of the Saronic group, lying close to the Argolis peninsula of the Peloponnese, part of the nomós (department) of Attikí, Greece. It ...
porosity
/paw ros"i tee, poh-, peuh-/, n., pl. porosities for 2. 1. the state or quality of being porous. 2. Geol., Engin. the ratio, expressed as a percentage, of the volume of the pores ...
porous
—porously, adv. —porousness, n. /pawr"euhs, pohr"-/, adj. 1. full of pores. 2. permeable by water, air, etc. [1350-1400; ME, var. of porose < ML porosus. See PORE2, ...
porously
See porous. * * *
porousness
See porously. * * *
porphyratin
porphyratin [pôr fir′ə tin] n. 〚 PORPHYR(
porphyria
/pawr fear"ee euh, -fuy"ree euh/, n. Pathol. a defect of blood pigment metabolism in which porphyrins are produced in excess, are present in the blood, and are found in the ...
porphyric
See porphyria. * * *
porphyrin
/pawr"feuh rin/, n. Biochem. a dark red, photosensitive pigment consisting of four pyrrole rings linked by single carbon atoms: a component of chlorophyll, heme, and vitamin ...
porphyritic
/pawr'feuh rit"ik/, adj. Petrol. of, pertaining to, containing, or resembling porphyry, its texture, or its structure. [1375-1425; late ME porphiritike < ML porphyriticus < Gk ...
porphyrization
/pawr'feuh reuh zay"sheuhn/, n. reduction to a powder, formerly done on a slab of porphyry. [1825-35; PORPHYRIZE + -ATION] * * *
porphyrize
/pawr"feuh ruyz'/, v.t., porphyrized, porphyrizing. to subject to porphyrization. Also, esp. Brit., porphyrise. [1740-50; PORPHYR(Y) + -IZE] * * *
porphyroid
/pawr"feuh royd'/, n. 1. a rock resembling porphyry. 2. a sedimentary rock that has been metamorphosed so as to leave some original crystals in a fine-textured, layered ...
porphyropsin
porphyropsin [pôr΄fə räp′sin] n. 〚< Gr porphyra, purple + opsis, appearance (< ōps, EYE) + -IN1〛 a photosensitive, carotenoid protein pigment found in the rods of the ...
porphyry
/pawr"feuh ree/, n., pl. porphyries. 1. a very hard rock, anciently quarried in Egypt, having a dark, purplish-red groundmass containing small crystals of feldspar. 2. Petrol. ...
Porphyry
—Porphyrean /pawr fear"ee euhn/, adj. —Porphyrian, adj., n. —Porphyrianist, n. /pawr"feuh ree/, n. (Malchus) A.D. c233-c304, Greek philosopher. * * * ▪ Syrian ...
porphyry copper deposit
A large body of igneous rock, having distinct crystals in a relatively fine-grained base, that contains chalcopyrite and other sulfide minerals. These deposits contain vast ...
porpoise
—porpoiselike, adj. /pawr"peuhs/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) porpoise, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) porpoises, v., porpoised, porpoising. n. 1. any of ...
Porpora, Nicola
▪ Italian vocal teacher in full  Nicola Antonio Giacinto Porpora  born Aug. 17, 1686, Naples died March 3, 1768, Naples       leading Italian teacher of singing of ...
porrect
/peuh rekt", paw-/, adj. extending horizontally; projecting. [1810-20; < L porrectus (ptp. of porrigere to stretch out), equiv. to por- forth, forward (see PER, PRO-1) + reg-, ...
Porres, Saint Martín de
▪ Christian saint born 1579, Lima died Nov. 3, 1639, Lima; canonized 1962; feast day November 3       Peruvian national patron of social justice.       Born of a ...
porridge
—porridgelike, adj. /pawr"ij, por"-/, n. a food made of oatmeal, or some other meal or cereal, boiled to a thick consistency in water or milk. [1525-35; var. of earlier ...
porridgy
See porridge. * * *
porringer
/pawr"in jeuhr, por"-/, n. a low dish or cup, often with a handle, from which soup, porridge, or the like is eaten. [1515-25; var. of earlier poddinger, akin to late ME potinger, ...
Porritt, Arthur Espie Porritt
▪ 1995       BARON, New Zealand-born physician and statesman (b. Aug. 10, 1900, Wanganui, N.Z.—d. Jan. 1, 1994, London, England), after a long career with the British ...
Porro prism
/pawr"oh/, Optics. an isosceles, right-triangular prism in which light entering one half of the hypotenuse face is reflected at the two short sides and is reversed in orientation ...
Porsangen
▪ fjord, Norway       fjord, indenting the coast of extreme northern Norway on the Arctic Ocean. An inlet of the Barents Sea, the fjord is approximately 80 miles (130 ...
Porsche, Ferdinand
▪ Austrian engineer born Sept. 3, 1875, Maffersdorf, Austria died Jan. 30, 1951, Stuttgart, W. Ger.       Austrian automotive engineer who designed the popular ...
Porsche, Ferdinand Anton Ernst
▪ 1999       Austrian car designer and businessman who worked with his father on the design of the Volkswagen Beetle and later, after having taken over the ...
Porsena
Porsena [pôr′si nə] Lars [lärz] 6th cent. B.C.; Etruscan king who, according to legend, attacked Rome in an unsuccessful attempt to restore Tarquin to the throne: also ...
Porsgrunn
▪ Norway       town, southern Norway, at the mouth of the Skienselva (river) on Frierfjorden. Established as a customs post in 1652 with the name Porsgrund, it received ...
Porson, Richard
▪ English scholar born Dec. 25, 1759, East Ruston, Norfolk, Eng. died Sept. 25, 1808, London       British master of classical scholarship during the 18th century, the ...
port
port1 —portless, adj. /pawrt, pohrt/, n. 1. a city, town, or other place where ships load or unload. 2. a place along a coast in which ships may take refuge from storms; ...
Port Adelaide Enfield
▪ South Australia, Australia       chief port of South Australia, on an estuarine-tidal inlet of Gulf St. Vincent, just northwest of central Adelaide. The harbour, ...
Port Alberni
/al berr"nee/ a port in SW British Columbia, in SW Canada, on the E central part of Vancouver Island, on an inlet of the Pacific Ocean. 19,982. * * *
Port Angeles
/an"jeuh leuhs/ a city in NW Washington, on the Juan de Fuca Strait. 17,311. * * * ▪ Washington, United States       city, seat (1890) of Clallam county, northwestern ...
Port Antonio
▪ Jamaica  town, northeastern coast of Jamaica, 60 mi (97 km) northeast of Kingston. One of the island's largest ports, it is a shipping point for bananas, coconuts, and ...
port arms
a position in military drill in which one's rifle is held diagonally in front of the body, with the muzzle pointing upward to the left. [1795-1805] * * *
Port Arthur
1. Lüshun. 2. a seaport in SE Texas, on Sabine Lake. 61,195. 3. See under Thunder Bay. * * * ▪ Texas, United States       city, Jefferson county, southeastern Texas, ...
Port Augusta
▪ South Australia, Australia       city and former port, South Australia, at the head of Spencer Gulf. Founded in 1852 and named for the wife of Sir Henry Fox Young, an ...
port authority
a government commission that manages bridges, tunnels, airports, and other such facilities of a port or city. * * *
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
▪ United States government agency formerly  Port of New York Authority        self-supporting corporate agency formed in 1921 by agreement between the states of New ...
Port Blair
/blair/ a seaport in and the capital of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, on S Andaman. 26,212. * * * City (pop., 2001 prelim.: 100,186), capital of Andaman and Nicobar Islands ...
port captain
Naut. 1. an official in charge of the harbor activities of a seaport. 2. See marine superintendent. * * *
Port Charlotte
a town in SW Florida. 25,770. * * *
Port Chester
a city in SE New York, on Long Island Sound. 23,565. * * *
Port Colborne
/kohl"beuhrn/ a city in SE Ontario, in S Canada. 20,536. * * * ▪ Ontario, Canada       city, regional municipality of Niagara, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It lies a ...
Port Coquitlam
/koh kwit"leuhm/ a city in SW British Columbia, in SW Canada, E of Vancouver. 27,535. * * *
Port Davey
▪ Tasmania, Australia       inlet of the Indian Ocean, indenting southwestern Tasmania, Australia. It is a glacial fjord, its entrance flanked by Point St. Vincent ...
port de bras
Fr. /pawrdd deuh brddann"/, Ballet. 1. the technique of moving the arms properly. 2. the exercises for developing this technique. [1910-15; < F: carriage of arm] * * * ▪ ...
Port Dickson
▪ Malaysia       town, south-central Peninsular (West) Malaysia, on the Strait of Malacca. The port, now in decline, was used extensively during the late 19th century to ...
Port du Salut
/pawrt' deuh seuh looh", pohrt'/; Fr. /pawrdd dyuu sann lyuu"/ Port-Salut. * * *
Port Elizabeth
a seaport in the SE Cape of Good Hope province, in the S Republic of South Africa. 406,000. * * * ▪ South Africa       port city, Eastern Cape province, southern South ...
port engineer
a person who is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the machinery of the vessels of a shipping line and for the supervision of its engineering personnel. Also called ...
Port Essington
▪ inlet, Northern Territory, Australia       inlet of the Arafura Sea, indenting the north shore of the Cobourg Peninsula, at the extreme north of the Northern ...
Port Fairy
▪ Victoria, Australia       town, Victoria, Australia. It lies at the mouth of the Moyne River, on a headland east of Portland Bay (an inlet of the Indian Ocean). A ...
Port Gentil
Fr. /pawrdd zhahonn tee"/ a seaport in W Gabon. 77,111. * * *
Port Gibson
▪ Mississippi, United States       city, seat (1803) of Claiborne county, southwestern Mississippi, U.S., 28 miles (45 km) south of Vicksburg, near the Mississippi ...
Port Harcourt
/hahr"keuhrt, -kawrt, -kohrt/ a seaport in S Nigeria. 220,000. * * * ▪ Nigeria       port town and capital of Rivers state, southern Nigeria. It lies along the Bonny ...
Port Hawkesbury
▪ Nova Scotia, Canada       town, Inverness county, northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada. It lies along the Strait of Canso, at the southern end of Cape Breton Island, 36 ...
Port Hedland
▪ Western Australia, Australia       town and port, northwestern Western Australia, on the North West Coastal Highway. The port is built on a tidal island (8 miles by 1 ...
Port Hudson
a village in SE Louisiana, on the Mississippi, N of Baton Rouge: siege during the U.S. Civil War 1863. * * *
Port Hueneme
/wuy nee"mee/ a city in S California. 17,803. * * * ▪ California, United States       city and seaport terminal, Ventura county, southwestern California, U.S. Lying ...
Port Huron
a port in SE Michigan, on the St. Clair River, at the S end of Lake Huron. 33,981. * * * ▪ Michigan, United States   city, seat (1871) of St. Clair county, eastern ...
Port Jackson
an inlet of the Pacific in SE Australia: the harbor of Sydney. * * * Inlet of the South Pacific Ocean, New South Wales, southeastern Australia. It is one of the world's finest ...
Port Kelang
▪ Malaysia formerly  Port Swettenham         the leading port of Malaysia, on the Strait of Malacca midway between the major ports of Pinang and Singapore. It is the ...
Port Lavaca
/leuh vak"euh/ a town in S Texas. 10,911. * * * ▪ Texas, United States       city, seat (1886) of Calhoun county, on Lavaca Bay of the Gulf of Mexico, southern Texas, ...
Port Lincoln
▪ South Australia, Australia       city, south-central South Australia. It lies on a protected embayment of Spencer Gulf on the east shore of Eyre Peninsula, about 150 ...
Port Louis
/looh"is, looh"ee/ a seaport in and the capital of Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, E of Madagascar. 136,000. * * * City (pop., 2000: 148,506), capital, and main port of ...
Port Macquarie
▪ New South Wales, Australia       town and seaside resort of northeastern New South Wales, Australia. It lies on the Pacific Ocean coast, at the mouth of the Hastings ...
Port Maria
▪ Jamaica       town and Caribbean port, northern Jamaica, northwest of Kingston. Its harbour is well sheltered and has a small, wooded island at its centre. Bananas ...
Port Moody
a city in SW British Columbia, in SW Canada, E of Vancouver, on an inlet of the Strait of Georgia. 14,917. * * *
Port Morant
▪ Jamaica       town and Caribbean port, southeast Jamaica, 10 mi (16 km) west of Morant Point, Jamaica's eastern tip. The town is the trade centre for an area ...
Port Moresby
/mawrz"bee, mohrz"-/ a seaport in and the capital of Papua New Guinea: important Allied base in World War II. 76,507. * * * City (pop., 1997: 271,813), capital of Papua New ...
Port Neches
/nech"iz/ a town in SE Texas. 13,944. * * *
Port Nicholson
▪ inlet, New Zealand also called  Wellington Harbour,         inlet of Cook Strait indenting southern North Island, New Zealand. The almost circular bay measures 7 ...
Port Nolloth
▪ South Africa       town and Atlantic port, Northern Cape province, South Africa, in the hot, arid Namaqualand south of the Namibia border. It was founded in 1855 to ...
port of call
a port visited briefly by a ship, usually to take on or discharge passengers and cargo or to undergo repairs. [1880-85] * * *
port of entry
port1 (def. 3). [1830-40] * * *
Port of London Authority
(also the PLA) the organization that operates the port of London. It controls all business on the Thames between west London and the sea, but is mainly concerned with the docks ...
Port of Spain
City (pop., 1996 est.: 43,396), seaport, and capital of Trinidad and Tobago. Formerly the capital of the West Indies Federation, it is located in the northwestern part of the ...
Port Orange
a city in E Florida. 18,756. * * *
Port Orford
▪ Oregon, United States       city, Curry county, southwestern Oregon, U.S., on the Pacific Coast. The coastal area was sighted in 1792 by Captain George Vancouver ...
Port Orford cedar
/awr"feuhrd/ 1. a tall tree, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, of coastal Oregon, having flattened, scalelike foliage and wood highly valued as timber. 2. the fragrant wood of this tree. ...
Port Phillip Association
▪ Tasmanian settler organization       (1836–39), organization of settlers from Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) formed to purchase and develop the grazing land of the ...
Port Phillip Bay
a bay in SE Australia: the harbor of Melbourne. 31 mi. (50 km) long; 25 mi. (40 km) wide. * * * ▪ bay, Australia       inlet of Bass Strait on the south-central coast ...
Port Phillip District
▪ historical district, Victoria, Australia       (1802–51), the original name of the area of the Australian colony and present commonwealth state of Victoria. It was ...
Port Pirie
/pir"ee/ a city in S Australia. 14,695. * * * ▪ South Australia, Australia       city, second most important seaport of South Australia (after Port Adelaide Enfield), ...
Port Royal
1. a village in S South Carolina, on Port Royal island: colonized by French Huguenots 1562. 2977. 2. a historic town on SE Jamaica at the entrance to Kingston harbor: a former ...
Port Said
/sah eed"/ a seaport in NE Egypt at the Mediterranean end of the Suez Canal. 310,000. Also, Port Saïd. * * * Seaport city (pop., 1996 est.: 470,000), northeastern Egypt. It is ...
Port Salut cheese
also called  Trappist Cheese,    semisoft cow's-milk cheese first made by Trappist monks on the west coast of France in the mid-1800s. The name later became the registered ...
Port St. Lucie
/looh"see/ a town in E Florida. 14,690. * * *
Port Sudan
a seaport in the NE Sudan, on the Red Sea. 123,000. * * * ▪ port, The Sudan Arabic  Būr Sūdān,         city, principal seaport of The Sudan (Sudan, The) on the ...
Port Sunlight
a small town near Liverpool, England, built by Lord Leverhulme at the end of the 19th century for the people working in his soap factory. It was a ‘model village’, designed ...
port superintendent.
See marine superintendent. * * *
Port Talbot
▪ Wales, United Kingdom       town and port, Neath Port Talbot county borough, historic county of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), Wales, on the Bristol Channel. Margam Abbey, ...
Port Washington
a town on NW Long Island, in SE New York. 14,521. * * * ▪ unincorporated community, New York, United States       unincorporated community in the town (township) of ...
Port-au-Prince
/pawrt'oh prins", pohrt'-/; Fr. /pawrdd toh prddaonns"/, n. a seaport in and the capital of Haiti, in the S part. 550,000. * * * City (metro. area pop., 1997: 1,556,000), ...
Port-Cartier
▪ Quebec, Canada       town, Côte-Nord region, eastern Quebec province, Canada. It lies on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, at the mouth of the Rochers ...
Port-de-Paix
▪ Haiti       port, northwestern Haiti, situated on the Atlantic coast opposite Tortue Island. It was founded in 1665 by French filibusters, fomenters of insurrection ...
Port-Étienne
Fr. /pawrdd tay tyen"/, n. former name of Nouadhibou. * * *
Port-Gentil
▪ Gabon       city, western Gabon. It is located on Lopez Island (in the mouth of the navigable Ogooué River) and on a bay sheltered by Cape Lopez, which juts into the ...
Port-of-Spain
/pawrt"euhv spayn", pohrt"-/, n. a seaport on NW Trinidad, in the SE West Indies: the national capital of Trinidad and Tobago. 67,867. * * *
Port-Royal
▪ abbey, Versailles, France in full  Port-royal Des Champs,         celebrated abbey of Cistercian nuns that was the centre of Jansenism and of literary activity in ...
Port-Salut
/pawr'seuh looh", pohr'-/; Fr. /pawrdd sann lyuu"/, n. a yellow, whole-milk cheese, esp. that made at the monastery of Port du Salut near the town of Laval, France. * * *
Port-Vila
Port-Vi·la (pôrt'vēʹlə, pōrt'-, pôr-vē-läʹ) or Vi·la (vēʹlə, vē-läʹ) The capital of Vanuatu, on Efate Island in the southwest Pacific Ocean. It was a Japanese ...
port-wine stain
/pawrt"wuyn", pohrt"-/ a large birthmark of purplish color, usually on the face or neck. [1885-90] * * *
Port.
1. Portugal. 2. Portuguese. * * *
Porta, Giacomo della
▪ Italian architect born c. 1537, , Rome, Papal States [Italy] died 1602, Rome       Italian architect whose work represents the development in style from late ...
Porta, Giambattista della
▪ Italian philosopher also called  Giovanni Battista Della Porta   born 1535? died Feb. 4, 1615, Naples [Italy]       Italian natural philosopher whose experimental ...
Porta, Hugo
▪ Argentine athlete born Sept. 11, 1951, Buenos Aires, Arg.       Argentine rugby union football player who was the sport's top fly half during the 1970s and early ...
porta-
porta- [pôr′tə] combining form portable: also sp. port-a- * * *
Porta-Potti
/pawr"teuh pot'ee, pohr"-/ Trademark. a brand of portable toilet. * * *
portabella
por·ta·bel·la (pôr'tə-bĕlʹə, pōr'-) n. Variant of portobello. * * *
portability
/pawr'teuh bil"i tee, pohr'-/, n., pl. portabilities for 2. 1. the state or quality of being portable. 2. a plan or system under which employees may accumulate pension rights ...
portable
—portably, adv. /pawr"teuh beuhl, pohr"-/, adj. 1. capable of being transported or conveyed: a portable stage. 2. easily carried or conveyed by hand: a portable typewriter. 3. ...
portableness
See portability. * * *
portably
See portability. * * *
portage
/pawr"tij, pohr"-/, or, for 2, 3, 5, 6, /pawr tahzh"/, n., v., portaged, portaging. n. 1. the act of carrying; carriage. 2. the carrying of boats, goods, etc., overland from one ...
Portage
/pawr"tij, pohr"-/, n. 1. a city in SW Michigan. 38,157. 2. a town in NW Indiana. 27,409. * * * ▪ Wisconsin, United States       city, seat (1851) of Columbia county, ...
Portage la Prairie
/pawr"tij leuh prair"ee, pohr"-/ a city in S Manitoba, in S central Canada, W of Winnipeg. 13,086. * * *
portal
portal1 —portaled, portalled, adj. /pawr"tl, pohr"-/, n. 1. a door, gate, or entrance, esp. one of imposing appearance, as to a palace. 2. an iron or steel bent for bracing a ...
portal circulation
Physiol. blood flow in a portal system. [1870-75] * * *
portal system
Anat. 1. a vascular arrangement in which blood from the capillaries of one organ is transported to the capillaries of another organ by a connecting vein or veins. 2. (loosely) ...
portal vein
Anat. the large vein conveying blood to the liver from the veins of the stomach, intestine, spleen, and pancreas. [1835-45] * * * ▪ anatomy       large vein through ...
Portal, Charles Frederick Algernon Portal, 1st Viscount
▪ British air marshal born May 21, 1893, Hungerford, Berkshire, England died April 23, 1971, Chichester, Sussex       British air marshal and chief of the British Air ...
portal-to-portal
por·tal-to-por·tal (pôrʹtl-tə-pôrʹtl, pōrʹtl-tə-pōrʹtl) adj. Of or based on the time a worker spends on the employer's property, calculated from the moment of arrival ...
portal-to-portal pay
/pawr"tl teuh pawr"tl, pohr"tl teuh pohr"tl/ payment, as to a miner or factory worker, that includes compensation for time spent on the employer's premises in preparation for a ...
Portales
▪ New Mexico, United States       city, seat (1903) of Roosevelt county, eastern New Mexico, U.S., near the Texas state line. It was founded by Josh Morrison in 1898 ...
Portales, Diego
▪ Chilean politician in full  Diego José Víctor Portales  born June 26, 1793, Santiago, Viceroyalty of Peru [now in Chile] died June 6, 1837, Valparaíso, Chile  Chilean ...
Portalis, Jean-Étienne-Marie
▪ French lawyer and politician born April 1, 1746, Le Beausset, Fr. died Aug. 25, 1807, Paris  French lawyer and politician, one of the chief draftsmen of the Napoleonic ...
portalsystem
portal system n. A system of blood vessels that begins and ends in capillaries. * * *
portaltomb
portal tomb n. A Neolithic tomb consisting of two or more upright stones with a capstone, believed to have been buried in earth except for a central opening. Also called ...
portalvein
portal vein n. A vein that conducts blood from the digestive organs, spleen, pancreas, and gallbladder to the liver. * * *
portamento
/pawr'teuh men"toh, pohr'-/; It. /pawrdd'tah men"taw/, n., pl. portamenti /-tee/, portamentos. Music. a passing or gliding from one pitch or tone to another with a smooth ...
portance
/pawr"tns, pohr"-/, n. Archaic. bearing; behavior. [1580-90; < MF; see PORT5, -ANCE] * * *
PortApra
Port Apra See Apra Harbor. * * *
PortArthur
Port Arthur 1. A city of extreme southeast Texas on Sabine Lake near the Louisiana border. It is a major deep-water port connected by channel with the Gulf of Mexico. Population: ...
portative
/pawr"teuh tiv, pohr"-/, adj. 1. capable of being carried; portable. 2. having or pertaining to the power or function of carrying. n. 3. Also called portative organ. a small ...
portative organ
▪ musical instrument       small musical instrument played from the 12th through the 16th century, popular for secular music. It had one rank of flue pipes (producing a ...
PortCharlotte
Port Char·lotte (shärʹlət) An unincorporated community of southwest Florida on an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico northwest of Fort Myers. It is a planned residential ...
portcullis
/pawrt kul"is, pohrt-/, n. (esp. in medieval castles) a strong grating, as of iron, made to slide along vertical grooves at the sides of a gateway of a fortified place and let ...
portde bras
port de bras (pôr' də bräʹ) n. The technique or practice of positioning and moving the arms in ballet. * * *
Portdu Salut
Port du Sa·lut (pôrt' də să-lo͞oʹ, pōrt', pôr' dü să-lüʹ) n. Variant of Port Salut. * * *
Porte
/pawrt, pohrt/, n. the former Ottoman court or government in Turkey. Official name, Sublime Porte. [short for Sublime Porte High Gate, F trans. of the Turkish official title ...
porte cochere
(French: "coach door") Passageway through a building, or gateway in an outer wall, designed to let vehicles pass from the street to an interior courtyard. Such gateways are ...
porte-cochere
/pawrt'koh shair", -keuh-, pohrt'-/, n. 1. a covered carriage entrance leading into a courtyard. 2. a porch at the door of a building for sheltering persons entering and leaving ...
porte-monnaie
porte-monnaie [pō̂rt mō̂ ne′; ] E [ pôrt′mun΄ē] n. 〚Fr, carry-money〛 a purse or pocketbook * * *
portebouquet
porte bouquet (pôrt, pōrt) n. See bouquetier.   [French : porter, to carry, hold + bouquet, bouquet.] * * *
PortElizabeth
Port Elizabeth A city of southeast South Africa on an inlet of the Indian Ocean. It grew rapidly after the completion of the railroad to Kimberley in 1873. Population: ...
portend
/pawr tend", pohr-/, v.t. 1. to indicate in advance; to foreshadow or presage, as an omen does: The street incident may portend a general uprising. 2. to signify; mean. [1400-50; ...
portent
/pawr"tent, pohr"-/, n. 1. an indication or omen of something about to happen, esp. something momentous. 2. threatening or disquieting significance: an occurrence of dire ...
portentous
—portentously, adv. —portentousness, n. /pawr ten"teuhs, pohr-/, adj. 1. of the nature of a portent; momentous. 2. ominously significant or indicative: a portentous ...
portentously
See portentous. * * *
portentousness
See portentously. * * *
Porteous Riots
▪ Scottish history       (1736), celebrated riots that erupted in Edinburgh over the execution of a smuggler. The incident had Jacobite overtones and was used by Sir ...
porter
porter1 /pawr"teuhr, pohr"-/, n. 1. a person hired to carry burdens or baggage, as at a railroad station or a hotel. 2. a person who does cleaning and maintenance work in a ...
Porter
/pawr"teuhr, pohr"-/, n. 1. Cole, 1893-1964, U.S. composer. 2. David, 1780-1843, U.S. naval officer. 3. his son, David Dixon /dik"seuhn/, 1813-91, Union naval officer in the ...
porter chair
Eng. Furniture. a chair of the 18th century having deep wings continued to form an arch over the seat. Also called page chair. [1935-40] * * *
Porter of Luddenham, George Porter, Baron
▪ 2003       British chemist (b. Dec. 6, 1920, Stainforth, Yorkshire, Eng.—d. Aug. 31, 2002, Canterbury, Eng.), was corecipient with Ronald G.W. Norrish, his colleague ...
Porter, Cole
▪ American composer and lyricist in full  Cole Albert Porter  born June 9, 1891, Peru, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 15, 1964, Santa Monica, Calif.  American composer and lyricist ...
Porter, Cole (Albert)
born June 9, 1891, Peru, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 15, 1964, Santa Monica, Calif. U.S. composer and lyricist. Porter was born to an affluent family and studied violin and piano as a ...
Porter, David
born Feb. 1, 1780, Boston, Mass., U.S. died March 3, 1843, Pera, Tur. U.S. naval officer. He joined the navy (1798) and served in the Tripolitan War. In the War of 1812 he ...
Porter, David Dixon
born June 8, 1813, Chester, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 13, 1891, Washington, D.C. U.S. naval officer. He served under his father, David Porter, in the West Indies and in the Mexican ...
Porter, Edwin S.
▪ American director in full  Edwin Stratton Porter  born 1869/70, Scotland died April 30, 1941, New York, N.Y., U.S.  pioneer American film director who introduced the ...
Porter, Eleanor Hodgman
▪ American novelist née  Eleanor Hodgman  born Dec. 19, 1868, Littleton, N.H., U.S. died May 21, 1920, Cambridge, Mass.       American novelist, creator of the ...
Porter, Eliot
▪ American photographer in full  Eliot Furness Porter  born December 6, 1901, Winnetka, Illinois, U.S. died November 2, 1990, Santa Fe, New Mexico       American ...
Porter, Eliza Emily Chappell
▪ American educator née  Eliza Emily Chappell  born Nov. 5, 1807, Geneseo, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 1, 1888, Santa Barbara, Calif.       American educator and welfare ...
Porter, Eric Richard
▪ 1996       British classical actor who found success on television in such roles as Count Bronowsky in "The Jewel in the Crown" and, especially, Soames Forsyte in the ...
Porter, Fairfield
▪ American painter, printmaker, and writer born June 10, 1907, Winnetka, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 18, 1975, Southampton, N.Y.       American painter, printmaker, and ...
Porter, Fitz-John
born Aug. 31, 1822, Portsmouth, N.H., U.S. died May 21, 1901, Morristown, N.J. U.S. army officer. He graduated from West Point and later taught there (1849–55). In the ...
Porter, Gene Stratton
▪ American author née  Geneva Stratton  born Aug. 17, 1863, Wabash county, Ind., U.S. died Dec. 6, 1924, Los Angeles, Calif.       American novelist, remembered for ...
Porter, Hal
▪ Australian author in full  Harold Edward Porter  born Feb. 16, 1911, Albert Park, Vic., Australia died Sept. 29, 1984, Melbourne       Australian novelist, ...
Porter, Katherine Anne
born May 15, 1890, Indian Creek, Texas, U.S. died Sept. 18, 1980, Silver Spring, Md. U.S. writer. She worked as a journalist in Chicago and Denver, Colo., before leaving in ...
Porter, Keith Roberts
▪ 1998       Canadian-born American cell biologist (b. June 11, 1912, Yarmouth, N.S.—d. May 2, 1997, Bryn Mawr, Pa.), was one of the founding fathers of modern cell ...
Porter, Nyree Dawn
▪ 2002 Ngaire Dawn Porter        New Zealand-born British actress (b. Jan. 22, 1940, Napier, N.Z.—d. April 10, 2001, London, Eng.), became one of British television's ...
Porter, Peter
▪ British poet in full  Peter Neville Frederick Porter  born Feb. 16, 1929, Brisbane, Queen., Austl.       Australian-born British poet whose works are characterized ...
Porter, Rodney Robert
▪ British biochemist born Oct. 8, 1917, Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire, Eng. died Sept. 6, 1985, near Winchester, Hampshire       British biochemist who, with Gerald M. ...
Porter, Roy Sydney
▪ 2003       British historian (b. Dec. 31, 1946, Hitchin, Hertfordshire, Eng.—d. March 3, 2002, St. Leonards, East Sussex, Eng.), wrote scores of scholarly books and ...
Porter, Sarah
▪ American educator born Aug. 16, 1813, Farmington, Conn., U.S. died Feb. 17, 1900, Farmington       American educator and founder of Miss Porter's School, still one of ...
Porter, Sir George, Baron Porter of Luddenham
▪ British chemist born December 6, 1920, Stainforth, Yorkshire, England died August 31, 2002, Canterbury       English chemist, corecipient with fellow Englishman ...
Porter, Sylvia Field
▪ American economist and journalist née  Sylvia Field Feldman   born June 18, 1913, Patchogue, Long Island, N.Y., U.S. died June 5, 1991, Pound Ridge, ...
Porter, Thea
▪ 2001 Dorothea Noelle Naomi Seale Porter        British fashion designer (b. Dec. 24, 1927, Jerusalem, British Palestine—d. July 24, 2000, London, Eng.), popularized ...
Porter,Cole Albert
Por·ter (pôrʹtər, pōrʹ-), Cole Albert. 1891?-1964. American composer and lyricist remembered for his witty and sophisticated Broadway scores for musicals such as Anything ...
Porter,Edwin Stanton
Porter, Edwin Stanton. 1869-1941. American filmmaker whose works include the first edited film, The Life of an American Fireman and The Great Train Robbery (both 1903). * * *
Porter,Katherine Anne
Porter, Katherine Anne. 1890-1980. American writer known for her carefully crafted short stories as well as her novel Ship of Fools (1962). She won a Pulitzer Prize for her ...

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