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Слова на букву ramp-schw (15990)

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Ribaut, Jean
born с 1520, Dieppe, France died Oct. 12, 1565, Florida French naval officer and colonizer. He served in the French navy under Gaspard II de Coligny, who in 1562 sent him to ...
ribavirin
/ruy"beuh vuy'rin/, n. Pharm. a synthetic compound, C8H12N4O5, active against several DNA and RNA viruses. [1965-70; prob. by shortening and alter. of ribofuranosyl, a component ...
ribband
ribband1 /rib"band', rib"euhnd, -euhn/, n. 1. Also, ribbon. Shipbuilding. a strip of wood or metal running fore-and-aft along frames to keep them in the proper position until the ...
ribbed toad.
See tailed frog. * * *
ribbed vault
Archit. a vault supported by or decorated with diagonal ribs. Also called rib vault. * * *
ribbed-knit
/ribd"nit'/, n. rib-knit (def. 2). * * *
ribbedvault
ribbed vault (rĭbd) n. See rib vault. * * *
Ribbentrop
/rddib"euhn trddawp'/, n. Joachim von /yoh"ah khim feuhn/, 1893-1946, German leader in the Nazi party: minister of foreign affairs 1938-45; executed for war crimes. * * *
Ribbentrop, Joachim von
born April 30, 1893, Wesel, Ger. died Oct. 16, 1946, Nürnberg German diplomat and foreign minister under the Nazi regime. After serving in World War I, he became a wine ...
Ribbentrop,Joachim von
Rib·ben·trop (rĭbʹən-trŏp', -trôp'), Joachim von. 1893-1946. German diplomat who as minister of foreign affairs (1938-1945) helped negotiate the German-Soviet ...
ribbing
ribbing1 /rib"ing/, n. 1. ribs collectively. 2. an assemblage or arrangement of ribs, as in cloth or a ship. [1555-65; RIB1 + -ING1] ribbing2 /rib"ing/, n. an act or instance of ...
Ribble Valley
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative county of Lancashire, northwestern England, along the county's eastern border, extending ...
Ribble, River
River, northwestern England. It is 75 mi (120 km) long. It rises in North Yorkshire and flows south and west through Lancashire into the Irish Sea through an estuary extending ...
ribbon
—ribbonlike, ribbony, adj. /rib"euhn/, n. 1. a woven strip or band of fine material, as silk or rayon, varying in width and finished off at the edges, used for ornament, tying, ...
ribbon copy
the original copy of a number of typewritten copies (distinguished from carbon copy). [1965-70] * * *
ribbon development
housing or commercial buildings built along a stretch of road. [1925-30] * * *
Ribbon Fall
▪ waterfall, California, United States       cataract on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada in Yosemite National Park, east-central California, U.S. With a drop of ...
ribbon lightning
a repeated lightning discharge in which successive strokes are displaced from each other by wind, resulting in a broadened appearance. [1885-90] * * *
ribbon microphone
a microphone that utilizes a metal ribbon suspended in a magnetic field. [1930-35] * * *
ribbon plant.
See spider plant (def. 1). * * *
ribbon seal
▪ mammal  (Histriophoca fasciata), earless seal of the family Phocidae found in the North Pacific and the Bering Sea. The male, growing to about 1.7 m (5.6 feet) in length ...
ribbon snake
either of two long-tailed garter snakes, Thamnophis proximus or T. sauritus, of eastern and central North America, having a brownish body and yellow or orange stripes. [1730-40, ...
ribbon strip
Carpentry. ribbon (def. 8). * * *
ribbon window
a long window made up of a number of individual compartments set together horizontally with little or no division. * * *
ribbon worm
any of various slender, unsegmented marine worms of the phylum Nemertea, being able to contract and stretch to an extreme extent. [1850-55] * * * ▪ invertebrate also called ...
ribbon-cutting
ribbon-cutting [rib′ən kut΄iŋ] n. a ceremony marking the official opening of a site, the commencement of its construction, etc., typically involving the cutting of a ribbon ...
ribbonfish
/rib"euhn fish'/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) ribbonfish, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) ribbonfishes. 1. any of several marine fishes of the families ...
ribbongrass
ribbon grass n. A grass (Phalaris arundinacea var. picta) of the Northern Hemisphere that has leaf blades striped with white and is cultivated for ornament. * * *
Ribbonism
▪ Irish secret-society movement also called  Ribandism        Irish secret-society movement that began at the end of the 18th century in opposition to the Orange ...
ribbonsnake
ribbon snake n. A nonvenomous North American snake (Thamnophis sauritus) having yellow or reddish stripes along the body. * * *
ribbonworm
ribbon worm n. See nemertean. * * *
ribbony
See ribbon. * * *
ribby
ribby1 /rib"ee/, adj. ribbier, ribbiest. having prominent ribs: a ribby fabric. [1840-50; RIB1 + -Y1] ribby2 /rib"ee/, n., pl. ribbies. Baseball Slang. a run batted ...
ribcage
rib cage n. The enclosing structure formed by the ribs and the bones to which they are attached. * * *
Ribe
▪ Denmark       city, southwestern Jutland, Denmark, on the Ribe River, 4 miles (6 km) from the North Sea. It is one of Denmark's oldest towns: the earliest ...
Ribeauvillé
▪ France German  Rappoltsweiler        town, Haut-Rhin département, Alsace région, eastern France. It lies at the entrance of the valley of the Strengbach, under ...
Ribeira
▪ Spain Spanish  Santa Eugenia de Riveira        city, A Coruña (Coruña, A) provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Galicia, ...
Ribeirão Prêto
/rddee'bay rddowonn" prdde"too/ a city in SE Brazil. 190,897. * * * ▪ Brazil       city, northeastern São Paulo estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It is situated in ...
Ribeiro Couto, Rui
▪ Brazilian writer born March 12, 1898, Santos, Braz. died May 30, 1963, Paris       Brazilian poet, short-story writer, and diplomat, one of the leading figures of ...
Ribeiro, Aquilino
▪ Portuguese author in full  Aquilino Gomes Ribeiro  born Sept. 13, 1885, Beira Alta, Port. died May 27, 1963, Lisbon       novelist, the mainstay of Portuguese ...
Ribeiro, Bernardim
▪ Portuguese writer born c. 1482, Torrão, Port. died October 1552, Lisbon       Portuguese poet and prose writer who introduced the pastoral style to Portugal in five ...
Ribera
Ribera [ri ber′ə; ] Sp r [ē be′rä] José [hō̂ se′] 1588?-1652?; Sp. painter in Naples: called Lo Spagnoletto * * *
Ribera, José
Ri·be·ra (rē-bĕrʹə, -bĕʹrä), José or Jusepe de 1588-1652. Spanish baroque painter whose works include Martyrdom of Saint Bartholomew (1630) and The Immaculate ...
Ribera, José de
or Jusepe de Ribera (baptized Feb. 17, 1591, Játiva, Spain died Sept. 2, 1652, Naples) Spanish painter and printmaker. Though born in Spain, where he is said to have trained ...
Ribes
▪ plant genus       genus of about 150 species of shrubs of two distinct groups, the currants (currant) and the gooseberries (gooseberry), constituting the family ...
ribeye
rib eye n. A cut of meat taken from the outside of the rib. * * *
Ribeyro, Julio Ramón
▪ Peruvian writer born August 31, 1929, Lima, Peru died December 4, 1994, Lima       short-story writer, novelist, and playwright, one of the Latin American masters of ...
ribgrass
/rib"gras', -grahs'/, n. See English plantain. [1530-40; RIB1 + GRASS] * * *
Ribicoff, Abraham Alexander
▪ 1999       American politician who served as a U.S. representative, governor of Connecticut, secretary of health, education, and welfare, and U.S. senator but was best ...
ribier (grapes)
ribier (grapes) or ribier [rib′yər] n. a large, black variety of European or Californian table grape (Vitis vinifera) * * *
riblet
rib·let (rĭbʹlĭt) n. 1. A cut of meat from a rib end of veal or lamb. 2. One of a series of microscopic grooves, each a few thousandths of an inch wide, inscribed on the ...
riboflavin
/ruy'boh flay"vin, ruy"boh flay'-, -beuh-/, n. Biochem. a vitamin B complex factor appearing as an orange-yellow, crystalline compound, C17H20N4O6, derived from ribose, essential ...
ribonuclease
/ruy'boh nooh"klee ays', -ayz', -nyooh"-/, n. Biochem. any of the class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of RNA. Also called RNase, RNAase. [1940-45; RIBONUCLE(IC ACID) + ...
ribonucleic acid
/ruy"boh nooh klee"ik, -klay"-, -nyooh-, ruy'-/, Biochem. See RNA. Also, ribose nucleic acid. [1930-35; RIBO(SE) + NUCLEIC ACID] * * *
ribonucleicacid
ri·bo·nu·cle·ic acid (rī'bō-no͞o-klēʹĭk, -klāʹ-, -nyo͞o-) n. See RNA.   [ribose + nucleic acid.] * * *
ribonucleoprotein
/ruy'boh nooh'klee oh proh"teen, -tee in, -nyooh'-/, n. Biochem. a substance composed of RNA in close association with protein; a nucleoprotein containing RNA. Abbr.: ...
ribonucleoside
/ruy'boh nooh"klee euh suyd', -nyooh"-/, n. Biochem. a ribonucleotide precursor that contains ribose and a purine or pyrimidine base. [1930-35; RIBO(NUCLEIC ACID) + NUCLEOSIDE] * ...
ribonucleotide
/ruy'boh nooh"klee euh tuyd', -nyooh"-/, n. Biochem. an ester, composed of a ribonucleoside and phosphoric acid, that is a constituent of ribonucleic acid. [1925-30; RIBO(NUCLEIC ...
ribose
/ruy"bohs/, n. Biochem. a white, crystalline, water-soluble, slightly sweet solid, C5H10O5, a pentose sugar obtained by the hydrolysis of RNA. [1890-95; < G Ribose, earlier ...
riboso
/ri boh"soh/, n., pl. ribosos. rebozo. * * *
ribosomal
See ribosome. * * *
ribosomal RNA
Biochem. a type of RNA, distinguished by its length and abundance, functioning in protein synthesis as a component of ribosomes. Abbr.: rRNA [1960-65; RIBOSOME + -AL1] * * *
ribosomalRNA
ribosomal RNA n. Abbr. rRNA The RNA that is a permanent structural part of a ribosome. * * *
ribosome
—ribosomal, adj. /ruy"beuh sohm'/, n. Cell Biol. a tiny, somewhat mitten-shaped organelle occurring in great numbers in the cell cytoplasm either freely, in small clusters, or ...
Ribot, Alexandre
▪ premier of France born , Feb. 7, 1842, Saint-Omer, Fr. died Jan. 13, 1923, Paris       French statesman of the Third Republic who was four times premier of ...
Ribot, Théodule-Armand
▪ French psychologist born Dec. 18, 1839, Guingamp, Fr. died Dec. 9, 1916, Paris       French psychologist whose endeavour to account for memory (memory abnormality) ...
Riboud, Antoine-Amedee-Paul
▪ 2003       French industrialist (b. Dec. 25, 1918, Lyon, France—d. May 5, 2002, Paris, France), joined a small family-owned glass-making business, Souchon-Neuvesel, ...
ribozo
/ri boh"soh, -zoh/, n., pl. ribozos. rebozo. * * *
ribozyme
—ribozymal, adj. /ruy"beuh zuym'/, n. a segment of RNA that can act as a catalyst. [1985-90; RIBO(SOME) + (EN)ZYME] * * *
ribroast
rib roast n. A cut of red meat, such as beef or venison, containing the sizable piece located along the outside of the rib. * * *
ribvault
rib vault n. A vault in which the surface is divided into webs by a framework of diagonal arched ribs. Also called ribbed vault. * * *
ribwort
/rib"werrt', -wawrt'/, n. See English plantain. [1325-75; ME. See RIB1, WORT2] * * *
Ricard, Paul-Louis-Marius
▪ 1998       French business executive who created the fashionable Ricard pastis, an anise-flavoured liquor that became the third largest-selling alcoholic beverage in ...
Ricardian theory of rent
/ri kahr"dee euhn/. See economic rent. [after David RICARDO; see -IAN] * * *
Ricardo
/ri kahr"doh/, n. David, 1772-1823, English economist. * * * (as used in expressions) Alfonsín Foulkes Raúl Ricardo Balaguer y Ricardo Joaquín Vidella Neftalí Ricardo Reyes ...
Ricardo, Cassiano
▪ Brazilian poet, critic, and journalist born , July 26, 1895, São José dos Campos, Braz. died Jan. 14, 1974, Rio de Janeiro       poet, essayist, literary critic, ...
Ricardo, David
born , April 18/19, 1772, London, Eng. died Sept. 11, 1823, Gatcombe Park, Gloucestershire British economist. The son of a Dutch Jew, he followed his father into the London ...
Ricardo,David
Ri·car·do (rĭ-kärʹdō), David. 1772-1823. British economist whose major work, Principles of Political Economy and Taxation (1817), supported the laws of supply and demand ...
Ricca, Paul
▪ American gangster byname  The Waiter,  original name  Felice Delucia  born Nov. 14, 1897, Naples died Oct. 11, 1972, Chicago       Chicago gangster who was ...
Riccati equation
/ri kah"tee/; It. /rddeek kah"tee/, Math. a differential equation, dy/dx + fy2 + gy + h = 0, where f, g, and h are functions of x. [named after J. F. Riccati (1676-1754), Italian ...
Ricci
/rddeet"chee/, n. Sebastiano /se'bahs tyah"naw/ 1660?-1734, Italian painter. * * *
Ricci, Matteo
born Oct. 6, 1552, Macerata, Papal States died May 11, 1610, China Italian Jesuit missionary who introduced Christianity to China. From a noble family, he was educated by the ...
Ricci, Ruggiero
▪ American violinist born July 24, 1918, San Francisco       U.S. violinist known especially for his performances and recordings of Paganini's works.       Ricci ...
Ricci-Curbastro, Gregorio
▪ Italian mathematician born January 12, 1853, Lugo, Papal States [Italy] died August 6, 1925, Bologna       Italian mathematician instrumental in the development of ...
Riccia
▪ plant genus  genus of liverworts (small, creeping plants) in the order Marchantiales, widely distributed throughout the world. The most well-known species, Riccia fluitans, ...
Riccio
It. /rddeet"chaw/, n. David It. /dah"veed/. See Rizzio. * * *
Riccio, Andrea
▪ Italian sculptor original name  Andrea Briosco,  also called  Andrea Crispus  born c. 1470, Padua, Republic of Venice died 1532, Padua  Renaissance sculptor and ...
Riccio, David
orig. Davide Rizzio born с 1533, Pancalieri, near Turin, Piedmont died March 9, 1566, Edinburgh, Scot. secretary to Mary, Queen of Scots. The son of a musician, he ...
rice
/ruys/, n., v., riced, ricing. n. 1. the starchy seeds or grain of an annual marsh grass, Oryza sativa, cultivated in warm climates and used for food. 2. the grass ...
Rice
/ruys/, n. 1. Anne, born 1941, U.S. novelist. 2. Dan (Daniel McLaren), 1823-1900, U.S. circus clown, circus owner, and Union patriot. 3. Elmer, 1892-1967, U.S. playwright. 4. ...
rice bean
a twining southern Asian vine, Vigna umbellata, of the legume family, cultivated for its edible seeds. * * *
rice blast
Plant Pathol. a disease of rice caused by the fungus Pyricularia oryae, characterized by elliptical leaf spots with reddish-brown margins, brownish lesions and neck rot of the ...
rice coal
anthracite in sizes ranging from under 5/16 in. (0.79 cm) to over 3/16 in. (0.48 cm). * * *
Rice Krispies{™}
n [pl] a well-known breakfast food consisting of small pieces of crisp rice. They are usually eaten with milk and sugar. The famous advertising phrase ‘snap, crackle and pop’ ...
Rice Mother
▪ Indonesian mythology       widely distributed and variegated figure in the mythology of peoples of the Indonesian (Indonesia) culture. There are three main types of ...
rice paper
1. a thin paper made from the straw of rice, as in China. 2. a Chinese paper consisting of the pith of certain plants cut and pressed into thin sheets. [1815-25] * * *
rice pudding
n [C, U] a traditional English pudding (= cooked sweet dish) made with rice, sugar and milk. If you say that somebody ‘couldn’t knock the skin off a rice pudding’ you mean ...
rice rat
any rat of the genus Oryzomys, having an exceptionally long tail, esp. O. palustris, inhabiting rice fields and marshes of the southern U.S., Mexico, and Central ...
Rice University
Private university in Houston, Texas, U.S. It was founded in 1891 and endowed by William Marsh Rice. It has schools of humanities, social sciences, architecture, music, natural ...
rice weevil
a brown weevil, Sitophilus oryzae, that infests, breeds in, and feeds on stored grains, esp. rice. [1805-15] * * *
Rice, Alice Hegan
▪ American author born January 11, 1870, Shelbyville, Kentucky, U.S. died February 10, 1942, Louisville, Kentucky       American novelist and short-story writer most ...
Rice, Anne
▪ 2000       Vampires, witches, mummies, evil spirits, the devil—all of these macabre characters came to life in the most grisly situations in American author Anne ...
Rice, Condoleezza
▪ 2007  In 2006 U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice led an intensified diplomatic effort to promote democracy and a U.S.-friendly peace in an increasingly resistant ...
Rice, Dan
▪ American clown original name  Daniel Mclaren   born Jan. 25, 1823, New York City died Feb. 22, 1900, Long Branch, N.J., U.S.  American clown who was one of the most ...
Rice, Edmund Ignatius
▪ Irish businessman born June 1, 1762, Callan, County Kilkenny, Ire. died Aug. 29, 1844, Waterford, County Waterford       founder and first superior general of the ...
Rice, Elmer
▪ American playwright, director, and novelist original name  Elmer Reizenstein   born Sept. 28, 1892, New York City died May 8, 1967, Southampton, Hampshire, ...
Rice, Grantland
▪ American sports writer in full  Henry Grantland Rice  born Nov. 1, 1880, Murfreesboro, Tenn., U.S. died July 13, 1954, New York, N.Y.  sports columnist and author who ...
Rice, James
▪ British author born Sept. 26, 1843, Northampton, Eng. died April 26, 1882, Redhill       English novelist best known for his literary partnership with Sir Walter ...
Rice, Jerry
▪ American athlete in full  Jerry Lee Rice   born October 13, 1962, Starkville, Mississippi, U.S.    American professional gridiron football (football, gridiron) player ...
Rice, Jerry (Lee)
born Oct. 13, 1962, Starkville, Miss., U.S. U.S. football player. He won All-America honours at Mississippi Valley State University. As a wide receiver for the San Francisco ...
Rice, Susan
▪ American public official and foreign policy analyst in full  Susan Elizabeth Rice  born Nov. 17, 1964, Washington, D.C., U.S.       American public official and ...
Rice, Thomas Dartmouth
▪ American entertainer bynames  Jim Crow Rice  and  Daddy Rice  born May 20, 1808, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 19, 1860, New York City       American actor ...
Rice,Elmer Leopold
Rice (rīs), Elmer Leopold. 1892-1967. American playwright noted for his expressionist plays, including The Adding Machine (1923) and Street Scene (1929). * * *
Rice,Jerry Lee
Rice, Jerry Lee. Born 1962. American football player. A wide receiver who joined the San Francisco 49ers in 1985, he held 13 National Football League records by 1997, including ...
rice-paper plant
rice-paper plant [rīs′pā΄pər] n. a shrubby plant (Tetrapanax papyriferus) of the ginseng family: see RICE PAPER * * * ▪ plant  (species Tetrapanax papyriferum), shrub ...
rice-paper tree
/ruys"pay'peuhr/ an Asian shrub or small tree, Tetrapanax papyriferus, of the ginseng family, the pith of which is used in making rice paper. Also called rice-paper plant. * * *
rice-paperplant
rice-pa·per plant (rīsʹpā'pər) n. A Chinese shrub or small tree (Tetrapanax papyriferus) grown as a source of fiber for rice paper. Also called rice-paper tree. * * *
ricebird
/ruys"berrd'/, n. 1. Southern U.S. the bobolink. 2. See Java sparrow. 3. any of several other birds that frequent rice fields. [1695-1705; RICE + BIRD] * * *       any of ...
ricepaper
rice paper n. A thin paper made chiefly from the pith of the rice-paper plant. * * *
ricer
/ruy"seuhr/, n. an implement for ricing potatoes, squash, etc., by pressing them through small holes. [1895-1900, Amer.; RICE + -ER1] * * *
ricerat
rice rat n. A hardy agile rat of the genus Oryzomys, found in rice fields and marshy areas of Mexico and the southern United States. * * *
ricercar
/ree'cheuhr kahr"/, n. 1. Music. a chiefly polyphonic instrumental form of the 16th and 17th centuries closely resembling the vocal motet in structure and style. 2. a ...
ricercare
/ree'cheuhr kahr"ay/; It. /rddee'cherdd kah"rdde/, n., pl. ricercari /-kahr"ee/; It. /-kah"rddee/. ricercar. [ < It, n. use of ricercare to seek; see RESEARCH] * * * ▪ ...
riceweevil
rice weevil n. A small destructive insect (Sitophilus oryzae) that infests stored grain and cereal products. * * *
ricey
/ruy"see/, adj., riceyer, riceyest. pertaining to, resembling, or containing rice. [1770-80; RICE + -Y1] * * *
rich
—richly, adv. —richness, n. /rich/, adj., richer, richest, n. adj. 1. having wealth or great possessions; abundantly supplied with resources, means, or funds; wealthy: a rich ...
Rich
/rich/, n. 1. Adrienne, born 1929, U.S. poet and feminist. 2. a male given name, form of Richard. * * * (as used in expressions) Rich Adrienne Cecile Rich Buddy Bernard Rich * * ...
rich rhyme
Pros. See rime riche. [1650-60] * * *
Rich Tea{™}
n a popular British make of round, thin, sweet biscuits with a yellowish colour. They are made by McVitie’s. * * *
Rich, Adrienne
▪ American poet in full  Adrienne Cecile Rich  born May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Md., U.S.       American poet, scholar, teacher, and critic whose many volumes of poetry ...
Rich, Adrienne (Cecile)
born May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Md., U.S. U.S. poet, scholar, and critic. She was a student at Radcliffe College when her poems were chosen for publication in the Yale Younger ...
Rich, Barnabe
▪ English author and soldier born 1542 died Nov. 10, 1617       English author and soldier whose Farewell to Militarie Profession (1581) was the source for ...
Rich, Ben R.
▪ 1996       U.S. engineer (b. June 18, 1925, Manila, Phil.—d. Jan. 5, 1995, Los Angeles, Calif.), conducted top-secret research on advanced military aircraft while ...
Rich, Buddy
orig. Bernard Rich born June 30/Sept. 30, 1917, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died April 2, 1987, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. bandleader and drummer. Rich was a child-prodigy vaudeville ...
Rich, Charlie
▪ 1996       U.S. country singer (b. Dec. 14, 1932, Colt, Ark.—d. July 25, 1995, Hammond, La.), vaulted to the top of the country music charts in 1973 with the release ...
Rich, Claudius James
▪ British businessman born March 28, 1787, Dijon, Fr. died Oct. 5, 1820, Shīrāz, Iran       British business agent in Baghdad whose examination of the site of Babylon ...
Rich, Irene
▪ American actress original name  Irene Luther   born Oct. 13, 1891, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S. died April 22, 1988, Hope Ranch, Calif.  American actress who abandoned her career ...
Rich, John
▪ British theatrical manager and actor born c. 1682 died Nov. 26, 1761, London, Eng.       English theatre manager and actor, the popularizer of English pantomime and ...
Rich, Lady Penelope
▪ English noble née  Penelope Devereux  born 1562? died 1607       English noblewoman who was the “Stella” of Sir Philip Sidney's (Sidney, Sir Philip) love poems ...
Rich, Richard Rich, 1st Baron
▪ English lord chancellor in full  Richard Rich, 1st Baron Rich of Leighs  born c. 1496, London, Eng. died June 12, 1567, Rochford, Essex  powerful minister to England's ...
Rich,Adrienne
Rich (rĭch), Adrienne. Born 1929. American poet and essayist whose works, notably Diving Into the Wreck (1973), concern radical feminism, lesbianism, and political activism. * ...
Richard
/ri shahrd"/; Fr. /rddee shannrdd"/, n. Maurice /maw rees"/; Fr. /moh rddees"/, ("the Rocket"), born 1921, Canadian hockey player. /rich"euhrd/, n. a male given name. * * * (as ...
Richard and Judy
a British television show on Channel 4 which is a mixture of interviews, competitions and other features. It started in 2001 and is presented by the husband and wife, Richard ...
Richard Arkwright
➡ Arkwright * * *
Richard Attenborough
➡ Attenborough (II) * * *
Richard Austen Butler
➡ Butler (I) * * *
Richard Branson
➡ Branson * * *
Richard Brinsley Sheridan
➡ Sheridan (II) * * *
Richard Bruce Cheney
➡ Cheney * * *
Richard Burton
➡ Burton (II) * * *
Richard Cobden
➡ Cobden * * *
Richard Coeur de Lion
/kerr" deuh lee"euhn/; Fr. /kuerdd deuh lee awonn"/. See Richard I. * * *
Richard Dawkins
➡ Dawkins * * *
Richard Doll
➡ Doll * * *
Richard D’Oyly Carte
➡ D’Oyly Carte * * *
Richard E Byrd
➡ Byrd (I) * * *
Richard Evelyn Byrd
➡ Byrd (I) * * *
Richard Eyre
➡ Eyre * * *
Richard Feynman
➡ Feynman * * *
Richard Gere
➡ Gere * * *
Richard Hamilton
➡ Hamilton (III) * * *
Richard I
("Richard the Lion-Hearted," "Richard Coeur de Lion") 1157-99, king of England 1189-99. * * * known as Richard the Lionheart(ed) French Richard Coeur de Lion born Sept. 8, ...
Richard II
1. 1367-1400, king of England 1377-99 (successor to and grandson of Edward III; son of Edward, Prince of Wales). 2. (italics) a drama (1595?) by Shakespeare. * * * born Jan. 6, ...
Richard III
1. (Duke of Gloucester) 1452-85, king of England 1483-85. 2. (italics) a drama (1592-93?) by Shakespeare. * * * born Oct. 2, 1452, Fotheringhay Castle, Northamptonshire, ...
Richard J Daley
➡ Daley (II) * * *
Richard Joseph Daley
➡ Daley (II) * * *
Richard Le Grant
▪ archbishop of Canterbury also called Richard Grant, Richard Le Grand, or Richard Of Wethershed died Aug. 3, 1231, San Gemini, Duchy of Spoleto [Italy]       45th ...
Richard Loeb
➡ Leopold and Loeb * * *
Richard Lovelace
➡ Lovelace * * *
Richard M. Nixon: Resignation from the Presidency
▪ Primary Source       Following the release of the tape transcripts on August 5, 1974, many members of Congress urged the President to resign to save the country the ...
Richard Madeley
➡ Richard and Judy * * *
Richard Milhous Nixon: First Inaugural Address
▪ Primary Source       Monday, January 20, 1969       Senator Dirksen, Mr. Chief Justice, Mr. Vice President, President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, my ...
Richard Milhous Nixon: Second Inaugural Address
▪ Primary Source       Saturday, January 20, 1973       Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Chief Justice, Senator Cook, Mrs. Eisenhower, and my fellow citizens ...
Richard Nixon
➡ Nixon * * *
Richard Of Chichester, Saint
▪ English bishop original name Richard Wyche, De Wych, or De Wicio born c. 1198, Droitwich, Worcestershire, Eng. died April 3, 1253, Dover, Kent; canonized Jan. 28, 1262; ...
Richard of Saint-Victor
▪ French theologian born , Scotland/England died March 10, 1173, Paris, Fr.       Roman Catholic theologian whose treatises profoundly influenced medieval and modern ...
Richard Rodgers
➡ Rodgers (II) * * *
Richard Rodney Bennett
➡ Bennett (III) * * *
Richard Roe
/roh/ a fictitious name used in legal proceedings for a male party whose true name is not known, used esp. as the second such name when two male persons are involved whose real ...
Richard Rogers
➡ Rogers (III) * * *
Richard Steele
➡ Steele (I) * * *
Richard the Lionheart
➡ Richard I * * *
Richard Trevithick
➡ Trevithick * * *
Richard Wright
➡ Wright (II) * * *
Richard, (Joseph Henri) Maurice
born Aug. 4, 1921, Montreal, Que., Can. died May 27, 2000, Montreal Canadian ice-hockey player. He played right wing for the Montreal Canadiens (1942–60) and became the first ...
Richard, Cliff
▪ British singer original name  Harry Roger Webb  born Oct. 14, 1940, Lucknow, India       British singer whose “Move It” (1958) was the first great British ...
Richard, Coeur de Lion
➡ Richard I * * *
Richard, Maurice
▪ 2001 “the Rocket”        Canadian ice hockey player (b. Aug. 4, 1921, Montreal, Que.—d. May 27, 2000, Montreal), skated with electrifying passion, as a star of ...
Richard,Joseph Henri Maurice
Ri·chard (rē-shärdʹ), Joseph Henri Maurice. Known as “Rocket.” Born 1921. Canadian hockey player. A right wing for the Montreal Canadiens (1942-1960), he led his team to ...
RichardI
Rich·ard I (rĭchʹərd), Known as “Coeur de Lion” or “the Lion-Hearted.” 1157-1199. King of England (1189-1199). A leader of the Third Crusade (1190-1192), he was ...
RichardII
Richard II, 1367-1400. King of England (1377-1399). He quelled the Peasants' Revolt in 1381 but spent the rest of his reign at odds with the baronial opposition in Parliament. * ...
RichardIII
Richard III, 1452-1485. King of England (1483-1485) who claimed the throne after imprisoning the sons of his deceased brother Edward IV. Richard's death at the Battle of Bosworth ...
RichardRoe
Rich·ard Roe (rĭchʹərd rō) n. Used as a name in legal proceedings to designate an unknown or unidentified man or boy, especially the second of two such persons, the first ...
Richards
/rich"euhrdz/, n. 1. Dickinson Woodruff /wood"ruf/, 1895-1973, U.S. physician: Nobel prize 1956. 2. I(vor) A(rmstrong) /uy"veuhr, ee"veuhr/, 1893-1979, English literary critic in ...
Richards, (Isaac) Vivian (Alexander)
born March 7, 1952, St. John's, Antigua West Indian professional cricket player. Born into a sporting family, Richards appeared in his first Test match for the West Indies ...
Richards, Ann
▪ 2007 Dorothy Ann Willis        American politician (b. Sept.1, 1933, Lakeview, Texas—d. Sept. 13, 2006, Austin, Texas), served (1991–95) as the feisty governor of ...
Richards, Audrey I.
▪ British anthropologist in full  Audrey Isabel Richards  born July 8, 1899, London, Eng. died June 29, 1984, near Midhurst, West Sussex       English social ...
Richards, Beah
▪ 2001       American actress (b. July 12, 1926, Vicksburg, Miss.—d. Sept. 14, 2000, Vicksburg), had a more than 50-year career in film and on stage and television; ...
Richards, Bob
▪ American athlete byname of  Robert Eugene Richards   born Feb. 20, 1926, Champaign, Ill., U.S.    American athlete, the first pole-vaulter to win two Olympic gold ...
Richards, Dickinson Woodruff
▪ American physiologist born Oct. 30, 1895, Orange, N.J., U.S. died Feb. 23, 1973, Lakeville, Conn.       American physiologist who shared the Nobel Prize for ...
Richards, Ellen Swallow
▪ American chemist née  Ellen Henrietta Swallow  born Dec. 3, 1842, Dunstable, Mass., U.S. died March 30, 1911, Boston, Mass.       American chemist and founder of ...
Richards, Gordon Waugh
▪ 1999       British racehorse trainer who in 32 years was credited with some 2,000 steeplechase winners; one of his most memorable was the popular One Man, which ...
Richards, I(vor) A(rmstrong)
Rich·ards (rĭchʹərdz), I(vor) A(rmstrong). 1893-1979. British literary critic who helped to develop Basic English and was a founder of the New Criticism movement. * * ...
Richards, I.A.
▪ British critic and poet in full  Ivor Armstrong Richards  born , Feb. 26, 1893, Sandbach, Cheshire, Eng. died Sept. 7, 1979, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire       English ...
Richards, Lloyd
▪ 2007       Canadian-born American theatre director (b. June 29, 1919, Toronto, Ont.—d. June 29, 2006, New York, N.Y.), exerted a powerful influence on American ...
Richards, Sir Gordon
▪ British jockey and racehorse trainer born May 5, 1904, Oakengates, Shropshire, Eng. died Nov. 10, 1986, Kintbury, Berkshire       English jockey, the first to ride ...
Richards, Sir Viv
▪ Antiguan cricket player in full  Sir Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards  born March 7, 1952, St. John's, Antigua    West Indian cricketer, arguably the finest batsman of ...
Richards, Sir William Buell
▪ Canadian jurist born , May 2, 1815, Brockville, Upper Canada died Jan. 26, 1889, Ottawa       politician and jurist who was the first chief justice of the Supreme ...
Richards, Theodore William
▪ American chemist born Jan. 31, 1868, Germantown, Pa., U.S. died April 2, 1928, Cambridge, Mass.       American chemist whose accurate determination of the atomic ...
Richards, William
▪ American missionary born , Aug. 22, 1793, Plainfield, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 7, 1847, Hawaiian Islands       American missionary who helped to promote a liberal ...
Richards,Theodore William
Richards, Theodore William. 1868-1928. American chemist. He won a 1914 Nobel Prize for determining the atomic weight of more than 50 elements. * * *
Richardson
/rich"euhrd seuhn/, n. 1. Henry Handel (Henrietta Richardson Robertson), 1870-1946, Australian novelist. 2. Henry Hobson /hob"seuhn/, 1838-86, U.S. architect. 3. Jack (Carter), ...
Richardson ground squirrel
a ground squirrel, Citellus richardsoni, of sagebrush and grassland areas of the northwestern U.S. and adjacent regions in Canada. Also called flickertail. [1935-40; named after ...
Richardson Mountains
▪ mountains, Canada       range of the Canadian Rocky Mountains that parallels the northernmost part of the boundary of the Yukon and Northwest Territories, northwestern ...
Richardson number
▪ meteorology       parameter that can be used to predict the occurrence of fluid turbulence and, hence, the destruction of density currents in water or air. It was ...
Richardson'sground squirrel
Rich·ard·son's ground squirrel (rĭchʹərd-sənz) n. A ground squirrel (Citellus richardsoni) of the northwest United States and Canada. Also called flickertail.   [After ...
Richardson, Benjamin
▪ British glassmaker born 1802, Stourbridge, Worcestershire, Eng. died 1887       founder of one of the great English glass-manufacturing (glass) houses, who was ...
Richardson, Bill
▪ American politician byname of  William Blaine Richardson III  born Nov. 15, 1947, Pasadena, Calif., U.S.    American politician, who served as a member of the U.S. House ...
Richardson, Dorothy
▪ 1997       As a little girl, U.S. softball player Dot Richardson dreamed of standing on the highest tier of the Olympic podium, bowing her head to receive a gold ...
Richardson, Dorothy M(iller)
born May 17, 1873, Abingdon, Berkshire, Eng. died June 17, 1957, Beckenham, Kent English novelist. From age 17 she engaged in teaching, clerical work, and journalism. For much ...
Richardson, Dorothy M.
▪ British novelist in full  Dorothy Miller Richardson , married name  Dorothy Odle  born May 17, 1873, Abingdon, Berkshire, Eng. died June 17, 1957, Beckenham, ...
Richardson, Elliot Lee
▪ 2000       American government official who on Oct. 20, 1973, resigned from his newly appointed post (April 30, 1973) as U.S. attorney general during what later became ...
Richardson, Henry Handel
orig. Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson born Jan. 3, 1870, Melbourne, Austl. died March 20, 1946, Fairlight, Sussex, Eng. Australian-born English novelist. In 1888 she left ...
Richardson, Henry Hobson
born Sept. 29, 1838, Priestley Plantation, La., U.S. died April 27, 1886, Brookline, Mass. U.S. architect. He studied at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., and the École ...
Richardson, Ian William
▪ 2008  British actor born April 7, 1934 , Edinburgh, Scot. died Feb. 9, 2007 , London, Eng. was an accomplished actor and a founding member (1960–75) of the Royal ...
Richardson, Jerome
▪ 2001       American musician (b. Nov. 15, 1920, Sealy, Texas—d. June 23, 2000, Englewood, N.J.), was a versatile saxophonist and flutist who played on more than ...
Richardson, John
born Oct. 4, 1796, probably Fort George, Upper Canada died May 12, 1852, New York, N.Y., U.S. Canadian writer. His experience in the British army in the War of 1812 and later ...
Richardson, Lewis Fry
▪ British physicist born Oct. 11, 1881, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, Eng. died Sept. 30, 1953, Kilmun, Argyll, Scot.       British physicist and psychologist ...
Richardson, Robert C.
▪ American physicist in full  Robert Coleman Richardson   born June 26, 1937, Washington, D.C., U.S.       American physicist who was the corecipient, along with ...
Richardson, Samuel
(baptized Aug. 19, 1689, Mackworth, near Derby, Derbyshire, Eng. died July 4, 1761, Parson's Green, near London) English novelist. After moving with his family to London at age ...
Richardson, Sir John
▪ Scottish surgeon and explorer born Nov. 5, 1787, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scot. died June 5, 1865, Grasmere, Westmoreland, Eng.       Scottish naval surgeon and ...
Richardson, Sir Owen Willans
▪ British physicist born April 26, 1879, Dewsbury, Yorkshire, Eng. died Feb. 15, 1959, Alton, Hampshire  English physicist and recipient of the 1928 Nobel Prize for Physics ...
Richardson, Sir Ralph
▪ British actor in full  Sir Ralph David Richardson   born Dec. 19, 1902, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, Eng. died Oct. 10, 1983, London  British stage and motion-picture ...
Richardson, Sir Ralph (David)
born Dec. 19, 1902, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, Eng. died Oct. 10, 1983, London British actor. He began his acting career at age 18 and gained prominence in the 1930s and '40s ...
Richardson, Tony
orig. Cecil Antonio Richardson born June 5, 1928, Shipley, Yorkshire, Eng. died Nov. 14, 1991, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. British director. With the English Stage Co. he won ...
Richardson,Henry Hobson
Richardson, Henry Hobson. 1838-1886. American architect whose Romanesque designs include Trinity Church in Boston (1872-1877) and the Marshall Field Warehouse in Chicago ...
Richardson,Samuel
Richardson, Samuel. 1689-1761. English writer whose epistolary novels include Pamela (1740), often considered the first modern English novel, and Clarissa Harlowe (1747-1748). * ...
Richardson,Sir Ralph David
Richardson, Sir Ralph David. 1902-1983. British actor noted for his strong characterizations in classic roles as well as in contemporary works, such as Pinter's No Man's Land ...
Richborough
▪ historical site, England, United Kingdom       site of a Roman port (Rutupiae) in Dover district, administrative and historic county of Kent, England, located just ...
Richelieu
/rish"euh looh'/; Fr. /rddeesheu lyue"/, n. 1. Armand Jean du Plessis /annrdd mahonn" zhahonn dyuu ple see"/, Duc de, 1585-1642, French cardinal and statesman. 2. a river in SE ...
Richelieu River
River, southern Quebec. It is 210 mi (338 km) long and flows north from Lake Champlain to join the St. Lawrence River at Sorel. Explored in 1609 by Samuel de Champlain, it was ...
Richelieu, Armand-Emmanuel du Plessis, duke de
▪ prime minister of France born , Sept. 25, 1766, Paris, Fr. died May 17, 1822, Paris       French nobleman, soldier, and statesman who, as premier of France (1815–18 ...
Richelieu, Armand-Jean du Plessis, cardinal and duke de
born Sept. 9, 1585, Richelieu, Poitou, France died Dec. 4, 1642, Paris French statesman and chief minister to Louis XIII. Born to a minor noble family, he was ordained a priest ...
Richelieu, Armand-Jean du Plessis, cardinal et duc de
▪ French cardinal and statesman Introduction , (cardinal and duke of ),byname  The Red Eminence , French  L'éminence Rouge  born September 9, 1585, Richelieu, Poitou, ...
Richelieu, Louis-François-Armand du Plessis, Duke de
▪ French marshal born March 13, 1696, Paris, France died Aug. 8, 1788, Paris       marshal of France, and grand-nephew of Cardinal de Richelieu.       Louis was ...
Richelieu,Duc de
Ri·che·lieu (rĭshʹə-lo͞o', rē-shə-lyœʹ), Duc de Title of Armand Jean du Plessis. 1585-1642. French prelate and politician. As chief minister of Louis XIII he worked to ...
Richemont, Arthur, constable de
▪ French military officer Introduction also called  earl of Richmond , or (1457–58)  Arthur III, duke of Brittany , French  Arthur, connétable de Richemont , or ...
richen
/rich"euhn/, v.t., v.i. to make or become rich or richer. [1875-80; RICH + -EN1] * * *
Richepin, Jean
▪ French author born Feb. 4, 1849, Médéa, Algeria died Dec. 12, 1926, Paris, France  French poet, dramatist, and novelist who examined the lower levels of society in ...
Richer, Jean
▪ French astronomer born 1630 died 1696, Paris, France       French astronomer whose observations of the planet Mars from Cayenne, French Guyana, in 1671–73 ...
riches
/rich"iz/, n.pl. abundant and valuable possessions; wealth. [1175-1225; ME, pl. of ME riche wealth, power (OE rice power, rule; c. G Reich realm); confused with ME richesse ...
Richet
/ri shay"/; Fr. /rddee she"/, n. Charles Robert /shannrddl rddaw berdd"/, 1850-1935, French physician: Nobel prize 1913. * * *
Richet, Charles
▪ French physiologist in full  Charles-Robert Richet  born Aug. 26, 1850, Paris, France died Dec. 4, 1935, Paris  French physiologist who won the 1913 Nobel Prize for ...
Richey, Charles Robert
▪ 1998       American federal judge whose influential rulings during his 25 years on the bench advanced women's rights and checked presidential powers; he presided over ...
Richfield
/rich"feeld'/, n. a city in E Minnesota, near Minneapolis. 37,851. * * *
Richie
/rich"ee/, n. a male given name, form of Richard. * * *
Richier
/rddee shyay"/, n. Germaine /zherdd men"/, 1904-59, French sculptor. * * *
Richier, Germaine
▪ French sculptor born Sept. 16, 1904, Grans, near Arles, Fr. died July 31, 1959, Montpellier       French sculptor of provocative, biomorphic ...
Richland
/rich"leuhnd/, n. a city in SE Washington, on the Columbia River: residential and administrative quarters for the Hanford Works. 33,578. Cf. Hanford (def. 2). * * * ▪ ...
Richler
/rich"leuhr/, n. Mordecai, born 1931, Canadian novelist. * * *
Richler, Mordecai
born Jan. 27, 1931, Montreal, Que., Can. died July 3, 2001, Montreal Canadian novelist. He grew up in a Jewish working-class neighbourhood in which many of his novels are set. ...
Richler,Mordecai
Rich·ler (rĭchʹlər), Mordecai. Born 1931. Canadian writer whose novels, based on his working-class Jewish background, include The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959) and ...
richly
richly [rich′lē] adv. 1. in a rich manner 2. abundantly; amply; fully * * * See rich. * * *
Richmal Crompton
➡ Crompton * * *


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