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Richmond
/rich"meuhnd/, n. 1. former name of Staten Island (def. 2). 2. a port in and the capital of Virginia, in the E part on the James River: capital of the Confederacy 1861-65. ...
Richmond and Lennox, Frances Teresa Stuart, duchess of
▪ English mistress byname  La Belle Stuart, Stuart  also spelled  Stewart  born July 8, 1647 died Oct. 15, 1702       a favourite mistress of Charles II of Great ...
Richmond Great Park
a large public park in Richmond(2), south-west London, England, created in 1637 for King Charles I as a place for hunting deer. It is the largest of the royal parks, and still ...
Richmond Heights
1. a city in E Missouri, near St. Louis. 11,516. 2. a town in N Ohio. 10,095. * * *
Richmond Hill
a town in SE Ontario, in S Canada, N of Toronto. 37,778. * * *
Richmond River
▪ river, New South Wales, Australia       principal river of the North Coast district, New South Wales, Australia, rising on Mt. Lindesay, in the McPherson Range, and ...
Richmond upon Thames
▪ borough, London, United Kingdom  outer borough of London. It is drained by a 12-mile (19-km) section of the River Thames (Thames, River), which bisects the borough and ...
Richmond, Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of, 1st Duke of Lennox, Earl of March, Earl of Darnley, Baron of Settrington, Lord of Torboultoun
▪ English noble [1672-1723] born July 29, 1672, London died May 27, 1723, Goodwood, Sussex, Eng.       son of Charles II of England by his mistress Louise de ...
Richmond, Charles Lennox, 3rd duke of, 3rd duke of Lennox, duc d'Aubigny, earl of March, earl of Darnley, baron of Settrington, lord of Torboultoun
▪ British politician [1735-1806] born February 22, 1735, London, England died December 29, 1806, Goodwood, Sussex       one of the most progressive British politicians ...
Richmond, Henry Wilmot, 1st earl of
▪ English nobleman also called (1643–44)  Baron Wilmot of Adderbury , or  (1644–52)  Viscount Wilmot of Athlone  born Nov. 2, 1612? died Feb. 19, 1658, Sluis, ...
Richmond, University of
▪ university, Richmond, Virginia, United States       private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. It is affiliated with the ...
Richmondshire
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       district, administrative county of North Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, England, centred on the valleys of ...
richness
See richly. * * *
Richter
/rik"teuhr/; Ger. /rddikh"teuhrdd/; Russ. /rddyeekh"tyirdd/, n. 1. Burton, born 1931, U.S. physicist: Nobel prize 1976. 2. Conrad, 1890-1968, U.S. novelist. 3. Franz Xaver ...
Richter scale
a scale, ranging from 1 to 10, for indicating the intensity of an earthquake. [1935-40; after Charles F. Richter (1900-85), U.S. seismologist] * * * Widely used measure of the ...
Richter scale of earthquake magnitude
▪ Table Richter scale of earthquake magnitude magnitude level category effects earthquakes per year less than 1.0 to 2.9 micro generally not felt by people, though recorded ...
Richter, Burton
▪ American physicist born March 22, 1931, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.       American physicist who was jointly awarded the 1976 Nobel Prize for Physics with Samuel C.C. Ting ...
Richter, Charles F.
▪ American physicist in full  Charles Francis Richter  born , April 26, 1900, near Hamilton, Ohio, U.S. died September 30, 1985, Pasadena, California       American ...
Richter, Conrad (Michael)
born Oct. 13, 1890, Pine Grove, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 30, 1968, Pottsville, Pa. U.S. short-story writer and novelist. He began as an editor and reporter and founded a juvenile ...
Richter, Conrad Michael
▪ American author born Oct. 13, 1890, Pine Grove, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 30, 1968, Pottsville, Pa.       American short-story writer and novelist known for his lyrical ...
Richter, Curt Paul
born Feb. 20, 1894, Denver, Colo., U.S. died Dec. 21, 1988, Baltimore, Md. U.S. biologist. He received a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He introduced the concept of the ...
Richter, Gerhard
born Feb. 9, 1932, Dresden, Ger. German painter. Beginning in the early 1960s, Richter created paintings that were faithful enlargements of black-and-white photographs, often ...
Richter, Hans
▪ Hungarian conductor (German),Hungarian  János Richter   born April 4, 1843, Raab, Hung. died Dec. 5, 1916, Bayreuth, Ger.  Hungarian conductor, one of the greatest ...
Richter, Mischa
▪ 2002       Ukrainian-born American cartoonist and painter (b. 1912, Kharkov [Kharkiv], Ukraine, Russian Empire—d. March 23, 2001, Provincetown, Mass.), was a ...
Richter, Sviatoslav
▪ 1998       Russian pianist (b. March 20, 1915, Zhitomir, Ukraine, Russian Empire—d. Aug. 1, 1997, Moscow, Russia), was considered one of the preeminent pianists of ...
Richter, Sviatoslav (Teofilovich)
born March 20, 1915, Zhitomir, Ukraine, Russian Empire died Aug. 1, 1997, Moscow, Russia Ukrainian pianist of German descent. He became accompanist to the Odessa Opera at age ...
Richter,Burton
Rich·ter (rĭkʹtər), Burton. Born 1931. American physicist. He shared a 1976 Nobel Prize for the discovery of a subatomic particle. * * *
Richter,Jean Paul Friedrich
Rich·ter (rĭkʹtər, rĭKHʹ-), Jean Paul Friedrich. Pen name Jean Paul. 1763-1825. German writer whose humorous and sentimental novels include Titan (1800-1803) and Years of ...
Richter,Sviatoslav Teofilovich
Richter, Sviatoslav Teofilovich. 1915-1997. Ukranian-born Soviet pianist noted for both his technique and his poetic sensibility. His diverse repertoire ranged from the Romantic ...
richterite
▪ mineral also called  soda tremolite        amphibole mineral, a sodium silicate of calcium and magnesium or manganese. It occurs in thermally metamorphosed ...
Richterscale
Rich·ter scale (rĭkʹtər) n. A logarithmic scale used to express the total amount of energy released by an earthquake. Although the scale has no upper limit, values are ...
Richthofen
/rddikht"hoh'feuhn/, n. Baron Manfred von /mahn"frddayt feuhn/, ("Red Baron" or "Red Knight"), 1892-1918, German aviator. * * *
Richthofen, Ferdinand Paul Wilhelm, Freiherr von
▪ German geographer born May 5, 1833, Carlsruhe, Upper Silesia, Prussia [now in Poland] died October 6, 1905, Berlin, Germany  German geographer and geologist who produced a ...
Richthofen, Manfred, baron von
known as the Red Baron born May 2, 1892, Breslau, Ger. died April 21, 1918, Vaux-sur-Somme, France German World War I ace. Born to a famous and wealthy family, he began his ...
Richthofen, Manfred, Freiherr von
▪ German aviator byname  The Red Baron,  German  Der Rote Freiherr, or Der Rote Kampfflieger (“The Red Airman”)   born May 2, 1892, Breslau, Ger. [now Wrocław, ...
richweed
/rich"weed'/, n. 1. clearweed. 2. See horse balm. [1755-65, Amer.; RICH + WEED1] * * *
Ricimer
orig. Flavius Ricimer died Aug. 18, 472 Roman general. The son of a Visigothic princess and a Germanic chieftain, he rose high in the Roman army, but he was barred from the ...
ricin
/ruy"sin, ris"in/, n. Chem. a white, poisonous, protein powder from the bean of the castor-oil plant. [1895-1900; < NL Ricinus name of genus, L: castor-oil plant] * * *
ricinoleic
/ris'euh noh lee"ik, -noh"lee ik/, adj. Chem. of or derived from ricinoleic acid. [1840-50; < L ricin(us) castor-oil plant + OLEIC] * * *
ricinoleic acid
Chem. a colorless to yellow, viscous, liquid, water-insoluble, unsaturated hydroxyl acid, C18H34O3, occurring in castor oil in the form of the glyceride: used chiefly in soaps ...
ricinoleicacid
ric·in·o·le·ic acid (rĭs'ĭn-ō-lēʹĭk) n. An unsaturated fatty acid, C18H34O3, prepared from castor oil and used in making soaps and in textile finishing.   [Latin ...
ricinolein
/ris'euh noh"lee in/, n. Chem. the glyceride of ricinoleic acid, the chief constituent of castor oil. [RICINOLE(IC) + -IN2] * * *
ricinus oil
/ris"euh neuhs/, Chem. See castor oil. [1685-95; < NL, the genus name; L: lit., tick (parasite), allegedly so called in reference to the appearance of the seeds] * * *
rick
rick1 —ricker, n. /rik/, n. 1. Also, hayrick. Chiefly Midland U.S. a large, usually rectangular stack or pile of hay, straw, corn, or the like, in a field, esp. when thatched ...
Rick
/rik/, n. a male given name, form of Eric or Richard. * * *
Rick Rubin
➡ Rubin * * *
Rick Stein
➡ Stein (II) * * *
Rickard, Tex
▪ American fight promoter byname of  George Lewis Rickard   born Jan. 2, 1870/71, Kansas City, Mo., U.S. died Jan. 6, 1929, Miami Beach, Fla.       American gambler ...
rickardite
▪ mineral       copper telluride mineral with the formula Cu7Te5, the purple-red masses of which resemble tarnished bornite. It was discovered at Vulcan, Colo., where it ...
Rickenbacker
/rik"euhn bak'euhr/, n. Edward Vernon ("Eddie"), 1890-1973, U.S. aviator and aviation executive. * * *
Rickenbacker, Eddie
orig. Edward Rickenbacher born Oct. 8, 1890, Columbus, Ohio, U.S. died July 23, 1973, Zürich, Switz. U.S. World War I ace and industrialist. He developed an early interest in ...
Rickenbacker, Edward Vernon
▪ American pilot byname  Eddie Rickenbacker   born Oct. 8, 1890, Columbus, Ohio, U.S. died July 23, 1973, Zürich  pilot, industrialist, and the most celebrated U.S. air ...
Rickenbacker,Edward Vernon
Rick·en·back·er (rĭkʹĭn-băk'ər), Edward Vernon. Known as “Eddie.” 1890-1973. American aviator who was the most decorated combat pilot of World War I and later became ...
Rickert, Heinrich
▪ German philosopher born May 25, 1863, Danzig, Prussia died July 28, 1936, Heidelberg, Ger.       German philosopher who founded the Baden school of Neo-Kantian ...
ricketiness
See rickety. * * *
rickets
/rik"its/, n. Pathol. a disease of childhood, characterized by softening of the bones as a result of inadequate intake of vitamin D and insufficient exposure to sunlight, also ...
Ricketts, Howard T
▪ American pathologist born Feb. 9, 1871, Findlay, Ohio, U.S. died May 3, 1910, Mexico City, Mex.       American pathologist who discovered the causative organisms and ...
Ricketts, Howard T(aylor)
born Feb. 9, 1871, Findlay, Ohio, U.S. died May 3, 1910, Mexico City, Mex. U.S. pathologist. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University. He discovered the ...
rickettsia
—rickettsial, adj. /ri ket"see euh/, n., pl. rickettsiae /-see ee'/, rickettsias /-see euhz/. 1. any member of the genus Rickettsia, comprising rod-shaped to coccoid ...
rickettsial
See rickettsia. * * *
rickettsiosis
rick·ett·si·o·sis (rĭ-kĕt'sē-ōʹsĭs) n. pl. rick·ett·si·o·ses (-sēz) Infection with or disease caused by rickettsiae. * * *
rickety
—ricketiness, n. /rik"i tee/, adj., ricketier, ricketiest. 1. likely to fall or collapse; shaky: a rickety chair. 2. feeble in the joints; tottering; infirm: a rickety old ...
rickey
/rik"ee/, n., pl. rickeys. a drink made with lime juice, carbonated water, and gin or other liquor. [1890-95, Amer.; named after a Colonel Rickey] * * * (as used in ...
Rickey
/rik"ee/, n. (Wesley) Branch, 1881-1965, U.S. baseball executive. * * * (as used in expressions) Henderson Rickey Rickey Henley Henderson Rickey Branch Wesley * * *
Rickey, Branch
▪ American baseball executive in full  Wesley Branch Rickey  born December 20, 1881, Stockdale, Ohio, U.S. died December 9, 1965, Columbia, Missouri  American professional ...
Rickey, Branch (Wesley)
born Dec. 20, 1881, Stockdale, Ohio, U.S. died Dec. 9, 1965, Columbia, Mo. U.S. baseball executive. Rickey began playing professional baseball while a student at Ohio Wesleyan ...
Rickey, George
▪ 2003       American sculptor (b. June 6, 1907, South Bend, Ind.—d. July 17, 2002, St. Paul, Minn.), fashioned mobile geometric forms and claimed that movement was ...
Rickman
(1947–) an English actor in theatre, films and television. His film work has included leading parts in Truly, Madly, Deeply (1991) and Michael Collins (1996). He plays the part ...
Rickman, Thomas
▪ British architect born June 8, 1776, Maidenhead, Berkshire, Eng. died Jan. 4, 1841, Birmingham        Gothic Revival architect, whose book An Attempt to Discriminate ...
Rickover
/rik"oh veuhr/, n. Hyman George, 1900-86, U.S. naval officer, born in Poland: helped to develop the nuclear submarine. * * *
Rickover, Hyman G(eorge)
born Jan. 27, 1900, Makov, Russia died July 8, 1986, Arlington, Va., U.S. U.S. naval nuclear engineer. His family immigrated to the U.S. in 1906, and he grew up in Chicago. ...
Rickover, Hyman G.
▪ United States admiral in full  Hyman George Rickover   born Jan. 27, 1900, Makov, Russia died July 8, 1986, Arlington, Va., U.S.  American naval officer and engineer who ...
Rickover,Hyman George
Rick·o·ver (rĭkʹō'vər), Hyman George. 1900-1986. American admiral who advocated and greatly contributed to the development of nuclear submarines and ships. He was also an ...
rickrack
/rik"rak'/, n. a narrow, zigzag braid or ribbon used as a trimming on clothing, linens, etc. Also, ricrac. [1880-85, Amer.; gradational redupl. of RACK1] * * *
ricksha
rick·sha or rick·shaw (rĭkʹshô) n. A jinriksha.   [Short for jinriksha.] * * * ▪ vehicle also spelled  Rickshaw,  also called  Jinrikisha, or ...
rickshaw
/rik"shaw, -shah/, n. jinrikisha. Also, ricksha, rikisha, rikshaw. [1885-90; by shortening and contr.] * * *
Ricky
/rik"ee/, n. a male given name, form of Rick. Also, Rickie. * * *
Ricky Gervais
➡ Gervais * * *
Ricky Tomlinson
➡ Tomlinson * * *
ricky-tick
/rik"ee tik", -tik'/, Informal. n. 1. the mechanical, repetitive style and beat of ragtime or early swing music. adj. Also, ricky-ticky /rik"ee tik"ee, -tik'ee/. 2. of or ...
RICO
/ree"koh/, n. Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act: a U.S. law, enacted in 1970, allowing victims of organized crime to sue those responsible for punitive ...
ricochet
/rik'euh shay", rik"euh shay'/ or, esp. Brit., /rik"euh shet'/, n., v., ricocheted /-shayd", -shayd'/, ricocheting /-shay"ing, -shay'ing/ or (esp. Brit.) ricochetted /-shet'id/, ...
Ricoeur, Paul
▪ 2006       French philosopher (b. Feb. 27, 1913, Valence, France—d. May 20, 2005, Châtenay-Malabry, France), was one of the foremost exponents of hermeneutics, the ...
ricotta
/ri kot"euh, -kaw"teuh/; It. /rddee kawt"tah/, n. a soft Italian cheese that resembles cottage cheese. [1875-80; < It < L recocta, fem. of recoctus, ptp. of recoquere to re-cook. ...
ricrac
/rik"rak'/, n. rickrack. * * *
rictal
See rictus. * * *
rictal bristle
a bristlelike feather growing from the base of a bird's bill. [1815-25; rictal, equiv. to RICT(US) + -AL] * * *
rictus
—rictal, adj. /rik"teuhs/, n., pl. rictus, rictuses. 1. the gape of the mouth of a bird. 2. the gaping or opening of the mouth. [1750-60; < L: wide-open mouth, equiv. to rig-, ...
rid
rid1 —ridder, n. /rid/, v.t., rid or ridded, ridding. 1. to clear, disencumber, or free of something objectionable (usually fol. by of): I want to rid the house of mice. In my ...
Riḍā, Rashīd
▪ Islamic scholar in full  Muḥammad Rashīd Riḍā  born 1865, Syria died 1935, Syria       Syrian scholar who helped Muslims formulate an intellectual response to ...
ridable
—ridability, n. /ruy"deuh beuhl/, adj. 1. capable of being ridden, as a horse. 2. capable of being ridden over, through, etc., as a road or a stream. Also, ...
riddah
▪ Islamic history Arabic  riḍa         (“apostasy”), series of politico-religious uprisings in various parts of Arabia in about AD 632 during the caliphate of ...
riddance
/rid"ns/, n. 1. the act or fact of clearing away or out, as anything undesirable. 2. relief or deliverance from something. 3. good riddance, a welcome relief or deliverance from ...
Riddell, Walter Alexander
▪ Canadian clergyman, statesman, and labour specialist born Aug. 5, 1881, Stratford, Ont., Can. died July 27, 1963, Toronto       Canadian clergyman, statesman, and ...
ridden
/rid"n/, v. a pp. of ride. * * *
ridder
See rid. * * *
riddle
riddle1 /rid"l/, n., v., riddled, riddling. n. 1. a question or statement so framed as to exercise one's ingenuity in answering it or discovering its meaning; conundrum. 2. a ...
Riddle, Nelson
▪ American musician born June 1, 1921, Oradell, N.J., U.S. died Oct. 6, 1985, Los Angeles, Calif.       American popular-music arranger, conductor, and composer, ...
riddler
See riddle1,2. * * *
riddles
➡ nursery rhymes * * *
ride
/ruyd/, v., rode or (Archaic) rid; ridden or (Archaic) rid; riding; n. v.i. 1. to sit on and manage a horse or other animal in motion; be carried on the back of an animal. 2. to ...
Ride a Cock-horse to Banbury Cross
a traditional nursery rhyme, often said by mothers to their babies as they bounce them on their knee. A ‘cock-horse’ is a child’s toy, a horse’s head on a stick. The ...
ride cymbal
☆ ride cymbal n. Jazz a medium-sized cymbal suspended over a set of drums, used for maintaining rhythm patterns since the advent of bop * * *
Ride, Sally
▪ American astronaut in full  Sally Kristen Ride  born May 26, 1951, Encino, California, U.S.    American astronaut, the first American woman to travel into outer space. ...
Ride, Sally (Kristen)
born May 26, 1951, Encino, Calif., U.S. U.S. astronaut. She received a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University in 1977 and joined NASA the same year. In 1983 she participated ...
Ride,Sally
Ride (rīd), Sally. Born 1951. American astronaut who in 1983 became the first U.S. woman to enter outer space. * * *
rideable
/ruy"deuh beuhl/, adj. ridable. * * *
Rideau Canal
▪ canal, Ontario, Canada Introduction  inland waterway between the Canadian capital of Ottawa and Lake Ontario (Ontario, Lake) at Kingston, Ont. Completed in 1832, the ...
RideauCanal
Ri·deau Canal (rĭ-dōʹ) A waterway, about 203 km (126 mi) long, of southeast Ontario, Canada, connecting the Ottawa River at Ottawa with Lake Ontario at Kingston. It follows ...
Ridenhour, Ronald L.
▪ 1999       American journalist whose investigation of the 1968 massacre of some 500 Vietnamese civilians at My Lai by U.S. troops led to public disclosure of the ...
rident
/ruyd"nt/, adj. laughing; smiling; cheerful. [1600-10; < L rident- (s. of ridens, prp. of ridere to laugh); see -ENT] * * *
rider
—riderless, adj. /ruy"deuhr/, n. 1. a person who rides a horse or other animal, a bicycle, etc. 2. something that rides. 3. an additional clause, usually unrelated to the main ...
Rider Haggard
➡ Haggard * * *
Rider University
▪ university, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, United States       private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, U.S. It includes ...
ridered
/ruy"deuhrd/, adj. braced or reinforced with riders, as a snake fence. [1825-35; RIDER + -ED3] * * *
ridership
/ruy"deuhr ship'/, n. the passengers who use a given public transportation system, as buses or trains, or the number of such passengers. [1965-70; RIDER + -SHIP] * * *
ridesharing
/ruyd"shair'ing/, adj. 1. Also, rideshare. of or pertaining to sharing rides or transportation, esp. among commuters: The agency was set up to devise a ridesharing program. n. 2. ...
ridge
—ridgelike, adj. /rij/, n., v., ridged, ridging. n. 1. a long, narrow elevation of land; a chain of hills or mountains. 2. the long and narrow upper edge, angle, or crest of ...
Ridge and Valley
▪ region, United States       physiographic province, part of the Appalachian Highlands in the eastern United States. It is bordered on the east by the Blue Ridge and ...
Ridge, Tom
▪ 2002       In response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the U.S., Pres. George W. Bush created by executive order a new department to counter future ...
ridgeback
/rij"bak'/, n. Informal. See Rhodesian ridgeback. [1935-40; by shortening] * * *
ridgeboard
ridge·board (rĭjʹbôrd', -bōrd') n. See ridgepole. * * *
Ridgecrest
/rij"krest'/, n. a town in central California. 15,929. * * *
Ridgefield
/rij"feeld'/, n. 1. a town in SW Connecticut. 20,120. 2. a borough in NE New Jersey. 10,294. * * *
Ridgefield Park
a town in NE New Jersey. 12,738. * * *
ridgeline
ridgeline or ridge line [rij′līn΄] n. the line or surface along the top of a ridge * * * ridge·line (rĭjʹlīn') n. See ridge. * * *
ridgeling
/rij"ling/, n. Vet. Med. any male animal, esp. a colt, with undescended testicles. Also, ridgling. Also called ridgel, ridgil /rij"euhl/. [1545-55; perh. RIDGE + -LING1, from the ...
ridgepole
—ridgepoled, adj. /rij"pohl'/, n. the horizontal timber or member at the top of a roof, to which the upper ends of the rafters are fastened. Also, ridge pole. Also called ...
ridgerib
ridge rib n. A principal rib of a vault along either the longitudinal or transverse ridge. * * *
Ridgeway
an ancient path in southern England that leads from Avebury along the Berkshire Downs to the Thames at Streatley and then along the Chiltern Hills to Ivinghoe Beacon, a distance ...
Ridgewood
/rij"wood'/, n. a city in NE New Jersey. 25,208. * * * ▪ New Jersey, United States       village, Bergen county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S. It lies along the Saddle ...
ridgling
ridg·ling (rĭjʹlĭng) n. Variant of ridgeling. * * *
Ridgway
/rij"way'/, n. Matthew Bunker, born 1895, U.S. army general: chief of staff 1953-55. * * *
Ridgway ware
▪ pottery       type of Staffordshire pottery first produced by the brothers Job and George Ridgway in 1792 at the Bell Works at Shelton, Hanley, North Staffordshire, ...
Ridgway, Matthew B(unker)
born March 3, 1895, Fort Monroe, Va., U.S. died July 26, 1993, Fox Chapel, near Pittsburgh, Pa. U.S. army officer. He graduated from West Point and served in staff positions ...
Ridgway, Matthew Bunker
▪ 1994       general (ret.), U.S. Army (b. March 3, 1895, Fort Monroe, Va.—d. July 26, 1993, Fox Chapel, Pa.), was a valiant leader and brilliant strategist who ...
Ridgway,Matthew Bunker
Ridg·way (rĭjʹwā'), Matthew Bunker. 1895-1993. American army officer who commanded airborne divisions in Europe during World War II. He was supreme commander of United ...
ridgy
/rij"ee/, adj., ridgier, ridgiest. rising in a ridge or ridges. [1690-1700; RIDGE + -Y1] * * *
ridicule
—ridiculer, n. /rid"i kyoohl'/, n., v., ridiculed, ridiculing. n. 1. speech or action intended to cause contemptuous laughter at a person or thing; derision. v.t. 2. to deride; ...
ridiculer
See ridicule. * * *
ridiculous
—ridiculously, adv. —ridiculousness, ridiculosity /ri dik'yeuh los"i tee/, n. /ri dik"yeuh leuhs/, adj. causing or worthy of ridicule or derision; absurd; preposterous; ...
ridiculously
See ridiculous. * * *
ridiculousness
See ridiculously. * * *
riding
riding1 /ruy"ding/, n. 1. the act of a person or thing that rides. adj. 2. used in traveling or in riding: riding clothes. [bef. 1000; ME (n., adj.); OE ridende (adj.). See RIDE, ...
Riding
/ruy"ding/, n. Laura, 1901-91, U.S. poet, novelist, and critic. * * *
Riding (Jackson), Laura
Rid·ing (Jackson) (rīʹdĭng), Laura. 1901-1991. American poet, critic, and novelist. A member of the 1920s avant-garde, she is best known for Contemporaries and Snobs (1928) ...
riding boot
a knee-high boot of black or brown leather, without fastenings, forming part of a riding habit. [1850-55] * * *
riding breeches
calf-length trousers of whipcord or other durable fabric, flaring at the sides of the thighs and fitting snugly at and below the knees, worn with riding boots for horseback ...
riding crop
crop (def. 7). * * *
riding habit
habit (def. 11). [1660-70] * * *
riding light.
See anchor light. * * *
riding master
a person who teaches equitation. [1640-50] * * *
riding sail
Naut. a triangular sail set on the aftermost mast of a vessel, esp. a fishing vessel, to head it into the wind; trysail. * * *
riding school
a place where equitation is taught. [1670-80] * * *
Riding, Laura
▪ American poet and critic née Reichenthal, married name Jackson, pseudonyms Barbara Rich, Madeleine Vara, and Laura Riding Gottschalk born Jan. 16, 1901, New York, N.Y., ...
ridinghabit
riding habit n. The outfit typically worn by a horseback rider. * * *
ridings
➡ counties * * *
Ridler, Anne
▪ British writer née  Anne Barbara Bradby  born July 30, 1912, Rugby, Warwickshire, England died October 15, 2001, Oxford       English poet and dramatist noted for ...
Ridler, Anne Barbara Bradby
▪ 2002       British poet (b. July 30, 1912, Rugby, Warwickshire, Eng.—d. Oct. 15, 2001, Oxford, Eng.), wrote verse that was devotional and meditative, reflecting her ...
ridley
/rid"lee/, n., pl. ridleys. 1. Also called Atlantic ridley, bastard ridley, bastard turtle. a gray sea turtle, Lepidochelys kempii, of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of North ...
Ridley
/rid"lee/, n. 1. Nicholas, c1500-55, English bishop, reformer, and martyr. 2. a town in SE Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. 33,771. * * *
Ridley of Liddesdale, Nicholas Ridley
▪ 1994       BARON, British politician (b. Feb. 17, 1929, Newcastle upon Tyne, England—d. March 4, 1993, near Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England), was a staunch ...
Ridley Scott
➡ Scott (VII) * * *
Ridley, Henry Nicholas
▪ British botanist born Dec. 10, 1855, West Harling Hall, Norfolk, Eng. died Oct. 24, 1956, Kew, Surrey       English botanist who was largely responsible for ...
Ridley, Nicholas
▪ English bishop born c. 1500, /03, South Tynedale, Northumberland, Eng. died Oct. 16, 1555, Oxford, Oxfordshire  Protestant martyr, one of the finest academic minds in the ...
Ridley, Sir Harold Lloyd
▪ 2002       British ophthalmologist (b. July 10, 1906, Kibworth Harcourt, Leicestershire, Eng.—d. May 25, 2001, Salisbury, Wiltshire, Eng.), devised the first ...
Ridley,Nicholas
Rid·ley (rĭdʹlē), Nicholas. 1500?-1555. English prelate who was executed for refusing to renounce his Protestantism after the accession of the Roman Catholic Mary I. * * *
Ridolfi, Roberto
▪ Italian conspirator also called Roberto Di Ridolfo born Nov. 18, 1531, Florence [Italy] died Feb. 18, 1612, Florence       Florentine conspirator who attempted in ...
ridotto
/ri dot"oh/, n., pl. ridottos. a public ball or dance with music and often in masquerade, popular in the 18th century. [1715-25; < It: retreat, resort; see REDOUBT] * * *
Rie, Dame Lucie
▪ 1996       Austrian-born British studio potter (b. March 16, 1902, Vienna, Austria—d. April 1, 1995, London, England), created graceful, elegant domestic pottery ...
Rie, Lucie, Dame
▪ British potter née Gomperz born March 16, 1902, Vienna, Austria died April 1, 1995, London, Eng.       Austrian-born British studio potter. Her unique and complex ...
riebeckite
/ree"be kuyt'/, n. an amphibolic mineral, silicate of sodium and iron, occurring usually in feldspathoid rocks. [1885-90; named after Emil Riebeck (d. 1885), German explorer; see ...
Riebeeck, Jan van
▪ Dutch explorer in full  Jan Anthoniszoon Van Riebeeck   born April 21, 1619, Culemborg, Neth. died Jan. 18, 1677, Batavia, Dutch East Indies [now Jakarta, ...
Riecke's principle
▪ geology       in geology, statement that a mineral grain possesses a greater solubility under high stress than it does under low stress. According to this principle, ...
Ried
▪ Austria also called  Ried im Innkreis        town, northern Austria, located west of Wels. It has a museum of folklore and a parish church (1721–33) with two ...
Riedel thyroiditis
also called  struma fibrosa , or  ligneous thyroiditis        extremely rare form of chronic inflammation of the thyroid gland, in which the glandular tissues assume ...
Riedel, Claus Josef
▪ 2005       Czech-born glassmaker (b. Feb. 19, 1925, Polaun, Czech. [now in the Czech Republic]—d. March 17, 2004, Genoa, Italy), designed several lines of quality ...
Riefenstahl
/rddee"feuhn shtahl'/, n. Leni /lay"nee/, born 1902, German film director. * * *
Riefenstahl, Berta Helene Amalie
▪ 2004 “Leni”        German filmmaker (b. Aug. 22, 1902, Berlin, Ger.—d. Sept. 8, 2003, Pöcking, Ger.), was the first female director to gain international renown ...
Riefenstahl, Leni
orig. Berta Helene Amalie Riefenstahl born Aug. 22, 1902, Berlin, Ger. died Sept. 8, 2003, Pöcking German film director and photographer. In the 1920s she was a dancer and ...
Riefenstahl,Helene Bertha Amalie
Rie·fen·stahl (rēʹfən-stäl', -shtäl'), Helene Bertha Amalie. Known as “Leni.” Born 1902. German filmmaker who gained notoriety for the Nazi-sponsored documentaries ...
Rieger, František Ladislav
▪ Czech leader born Dec. 10, 1818, Semily, Bohemia, Austrian Empire died March 3, 1903, Prague  politician and leader of the more conservative Czech nationalists who was the ...
Riegger
/ree"geuhr/, n. Wallingford /wol"ing feuhrd/, 1885-1961, U.S. composer. * * *
Riegger, Wallingford
▪ American composer born April 29, 1885, Albany, Ga., U.S. died April 2, 1961, New York City       prolific U.S. composer of orchestral works, modern dance and film ...
Riegner, Gerhart Moritz
▪ 2002       German-born lawyer and human rights activist (b. Sept. 12, 1911, Berlin, Ger.—d. Dec. 3, 2001, Geneva, Switz.), was the first to warn government officials ...
Riehl, Wilhelm Heinrich
▪ German author born May 6, 1823, Biebrich, Nassau died Nov. 16, 1897, Munich       German journalist and historian whose early emphasis on social structures in ...
Rieka
/ree ek"euh/; Serbo-Croatian. /rddee ye"kah/, n. Rijeka. * * *
riel
/reel, ree el"/, n. a paper money and monetary unit of Cambodia, equal to 100 sen. * * *
Riel
/ree el"/, n. Louis, 1844-85, Canadian revolutionary. * * *
Riel, Louis
born Oct. 23, 1844, St. Boniface, Assiniboia, Can. died Nov. 16, 1885, Regina, District of Assinibois, Can. Canadian leader of the Métis people in western Canada. In 1869 Riel ...
Riel,Louis
Ri·el (rē-ĕlʹ), Louis. 1844-1885. Canadian insurrectionist who organized the métis settlers of the Red River valley in a rebellion over their land rights (1869). After ...
Riemann
—Riemannian /ree mah"nee euhn/, adj. /rddee"mahn'/; Eng. /ree"mahn, -meuhn/, n. Georg Friedrich Bernhard /gay awrddk" frddee"drddikh berddn"hahrddt/ 1826-66, German ...
Riemann integral
Math. integral (def. 8a). [1910-15; named after G. F. B. RIEMANN] * * *
Riemann sphere
Math. a sphere used for a stereographic projection. [named after G. F. B. RIEMANN] * * *
Riemann surface
Math. a geometric representation of a function of a complex variable in which a multiple-valued function is depicted as a single-valued function on several planes, the planes ...
Riemann zeta function
▪ mathematics       function useful in number theory for investigating properties of prime numbers (prime). Written as ζ(x), it was originally defined as the infinite ...
Riemann, (Georg Friedrich) Bernhard
born Sept. 17, 1826, Breselenz, Hanover died July 20, 1866, Selasca, Italy German mathematician. He studied at the Universities of Berlin and Göttingen and later taught ...
Riemann, Bernhard
▪ German mathematician in full  Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann  born September 17, 1826, Breselenz, Hanover [Germany] died July 20, 1866, Selasca, Italy  German ...
Riemann, Hugo
▪ German musicologist born July 18, 1849, near Sondershausen, Schwarzburg-Sondershausen died July 10, 1919, Leipzig       German musicologist whose works on music ...
Riemann,Georg Friedrich Bernhard
Rie·mann (rēʹmən, -män'), Georg Friedrich Bernhard. 1826-1866. German mathematician who was a pioneer of non-Euclidean geometry and complex analysis. * * *
Riemann-Stieltjes integral
/ree"mahn steel"chiz, -meuhn/, Math. the limit, as the norm of partitions of a given interval approaches zero, of the sum of the product of the first of two functions evaluated ...
Riemannian geometry
Geom. 1. Also called elliptic geometry. the branch of non-Euclidean geometry that replaces the parallel postulate of Euclidean geometry with the postulate that in a plane every ...
Riemanniangeometry
Rie·mann·ian geometry (rē-mänʹē-ən) n. A non-Euclidean system of geometry based on the postulate that within a plane every pair of lines intersects.   [After Riemann, ...
Riemenschneider, Tilman
born с 1460, Heilgenstadt or Osterode, Domain of the Teutonic Order died July 7, 1531, Würzburg German sculptor. Son of a mint master, he settled in Würzburg in 1483 and ...
rien ne va plus
/rddyaonn neuh vann plyuu"/, French. (in roulette) no further bets. * * *
Rienzi
/ree en"zee/; It. /rddyen"dzee/, n. Cola di /kaw"lah dee/, (Nicholas Gabrini), 1313?-54, Roman orator and tribune. Also, Rienzo /ree en"zoh/; It. /rddyen"dzaw/. * * *
Rienzi,Cola di
Ri·en·zi (rē-ĕnʹzē) or Ri·en·zo (-zō), Cola di. 1313?-1354. Italian revolutionary leader who installed himself as dictator of Rome (1347) but was quickly ousted at the ...
Riesener, Jean-Henri
born July 4, 1734, Gladbeck, Münster died Jan. 6, 1806, Paris, Fr. French cabinetmaker. Son of an usher in the law courts of the elector of Cologne, he joined a workshop in ...
Riesling
/reez"ling, rees"-/, n. 1. Hort. a. a variety of grape. b. the vine bearing this grape, grown in Europe and California. 2. a fragrant, white, dry or sweet wine made from this ...
Riesman
/rees"meuhn/, n. David, born 1909, U.S. sociologist. * * *
Riesman, David
born Sept. 22, 1909, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died May 10, 2002, Binghamton, N.Y. U.S. sociologist. Riesman taught at the universities of Buffalo and Chicago before returning to ...
Riesman, David, Jr.
▪ 2003       American sociologist (b. Sept. 22, 1909, Philadelphia, Pa.—d. May 10, 2002, Binghamton, N.Y.), was the author, along with Reuel Denney and Nathan Glazer, ...
Riesman, David,Jr.
Ries·man (rēsʹmən), David, Jr. Born 1909. American sociologist whose best-known work is The Lonely Crowd (1950). * * *
Riesz space
/rees/, Math. a topological space in which sets containing one point are closed. [after Frigyes Riesz (1880-1956), Hungarian mathematician] * * *
Riesz, Frigyes
▪ Hungarian mathematician born Jan. 22, 1880, Györ, Austria-Hungary [now in Hungary] died Feb. 28, 1956, Budapest, Hungary       Hungarian mathematician and pioneer of ...
Rieti
/ree et"ee/; It. /rddye"tee/, n. Vittorio /veet taw"rddyaw/, born 1898, U.S. composer, born in Italy. * * * ▪ Italy Latin  Riete,         city, Lazio (Latium) ...
Rietveld
/rddeet"felt/, n. Gerrit Thomas /kherdd"it toh"mahs/, 1888-1964, Dutch architect. * * *
Rietveld, Gerrit (Thomas)
born June 24, 1888, Utrecht, Neth. died June 25, 1964, Utrecht Dutch architect and furniture designer. He was an apprentice in his father's cabinetmaking business (1899–1906) ...
Rietveld, Gerrit Thomas
▪ Dutch architect born June 24, 1888, Utrecht, Neth. died June 25, 1964, Utrecht       Dutch architect and furniture designer notable for his application of the tenets ...
Rievaulx
▪ abbey, North Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom       ruined Cistercian abbey, Ryedale district, administrative county of North Yorkshire, historic county of ...
Rieveschl, George
▪ 2008       American chemical engineer born Jan. 9, 1916, Lockland, Ohio died Sept. 27, 2007, Cincinnati, Ohio invented the chemical compound used in the ...
rif
/rif/, v.t., riffed, riffing. Informal. to discharge (a person) from military or civil service, esp. as part of an economy program. Also, riff. [1945-50; special use of RIF] * * ...
Rif
/rif/, n. Er /er/, a mountainous coastal region in N Morocco. Also, Riff. * * * Muslim Berber people who live in El-Rif in northern Morocco. Their culture is based on ...
RIF
/rif/, n. 1. Mil. a reduction in the personnel of an armed service or unit. 2. a reduction in the number of persons employed by a business, government department, etc., esp. for ...
Rif War
▪ Spanish history also called  War of Melilla , Rif also spelled  Riff        (1919–26), war fought between the Spanish and the Moroccan Rif and Jibala ...
Rif, El-
or Rif Hilly coastal region, northern Morocco. Constituting the central and eastern parts of former Spanish Morocco, the hills extend from east of Melilla to Ceuta, both ...
Rifa'iya
/ree'fah ee"yeuh/, n. Islam. a band of dervishes who achieved ecstasy during prayer by violent body movements and self-inflicted pain: formed in the 12th century; outlawed in ...
rifacimento
/ri fah'chi men"toh/; It. /rddee fah'chee men"taw/, n., pl. rifacimenti /-tee/. a recast or adaptation, as of a literary or musical work. [1765-75; < It, deriv. of rifare to make ...
rifampin
/ri fam"pin/, n. Pharm. a semisynthetic broad-spectrum antibiotic, C43H58N4O12, used in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, asymptomatic carriers of meningococcal disease, ...
rifamycin
rif·a·my·cin (rĭf'ə-mīʹsĭn) n. Any of a group of antibiotics originally isolated from a strain of the soil microorganism Streptomyces mediterranei, used in the treatment ...
Rifāʿ, Ar-
▪ Bahrain also spelled  Rifaʿa        municipality in the state and emirate of Bahrain, on north-central Bahrain island, in the Persian Gulf. It is on the north rim ...
Rifāʿīyah
▪ Ṣūfī order       fraternity of Muslim mystics (Ṣūfīs), known in the West as howling dervishes, found primarily in Egypt and Syria and in Turkey until outlawed ...
Rifbjerg, Klaus
▪ 2003       Denmark's literary bel esprit, Klaus Rifbjerg, responded to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, in the U.S. and the pivotal Danish general election of ...
rife
—rifely, adv. —rifeness, n. /ruyf/, adj. 1. of common or frequent occurrence; prevalent; in widespread existence, activity, or use: Crime is rife in the slum areas of our ...
riff
riff1 /rif/, Jazz. n. 1. a melodic phrase, often constantly repeated, forming an accompaniment or part of an accompaniment for a soloist. v.i. 2. to perform riffs. [1930-35; ...
Riff
—Riffian, adj., n. /rif/, n., pl. Riffs, Riffi /rif"ee/, (esp. collectively) Riff. 1. a member of the Berber people living in Er Rif in northern Morocco. 2. Rif. * * *
Riffaterre, Michael
▪ 2007 Michel Camille Riffaterre        American literary critic (b. Nov. 20, 1924, Bourganeuf, France—d. May 27, 2006, New York, N.Y.), emphasized the responses of ...
Riffian
See Riff. * * *
riffle
/rif"euhl/, v., riffled, riffling, n. v.t., v.i. 1. to turn hastily; flutter and shift: to riffle a stack of letters; to riffle through a book. 2. Cards. to shuffle by dividing ...
riffler
/rif"leuhr/, n. a small curved file. [1790-1800; perh. < G riffel(n) to cut grooves into (an object) + -ER1; cf. F rifloir a kind of file (see RIFLE2)] * * *
riffraff
/rif"raf'/, n. 1. people, or a group of people, regarded as disreputable or worthless: a pack of riffraff. 2. the lowest classes; rabble: the riffraff of the city. 3. trash; ...
Rifkind, Malcolm Leslie
▪ 1996       When he reshuffled the United Kingdom's Cabinet in July 1995, Prime Minister John Major promoted Malcolm Rifkind to become his foreign secretary. Rifkind ...
Rifkind, Simon Hirsch
▪ 1996       Russian-born U.S. lawyer and judge (b. June 5, 1901, Meretz, Russia—d. Nov. 14, 1995, New York, N.Y.), in a career of more than 60 years, represented ...
rifle
rifle1 /ruy"feuhl/, n., v., rifled, rifling. n. 1. a shoulder firearm with spiral grooves cut in the inner surface of the gun barrel to give the bullet a rotatory motion and thus ...
rifle bird
any of several birds of paradise of Australia, having a long bill, dark plumage, and elaborate courtship displays. Also, riflebird. [1825-35] * * *
rifle grenade
Mil. a grenade designed to be fired from a grenade launcher attached to the muzzle of a rifle or carbine. [1910-15] * * *
rifle pit
a pit or short trench affording shelter to riflemen in firing at an enemy. [1850-55] * * *
rifle range
1. a firing range for practice with rifles. 2. the range of, or distance coverable by, a bullet fired from a rifle: The enemy was within rifle range. [1840-50] * * *
riflebird
ri·fle·bird (rīʹfəl-bûrd') n. Any of several birds of paradise of the genera Craspedophora and Ptiloris of Australia and New Guinea. * * *       any of certain ...
rifled slug
a shotgun projectile with helical grooves on its sides for imparting a spin to it when it is fired through the smooth bore of the shotgun. * * *
rifleman
—riflemanship, n. /ruy"feuhl meuhn/, n., pl. riflemen. 1. a soldier armed with a rifle. 2. a person skilled in the use of a rifle. [1765-75, Amer.; RIFLE1 + -MAN] * * ...
rifler
See rifle2. * * *
riflery
/ruy"feuhl ree/, n. the art, practice, or sport of shooting at targets with rifles. [1840-50; RIFLE1 + -RY] * * *
riflescope
/ruy"feuhl skohp'/, n. a telescopic sight mounted on top of a rifle that helps to improve one's aim by magnifying and pinpointing a target. [1960-65, Amer.; RIFLE1 + SCOPE] * * *
rifling
rifling1 /ruy"fling/, n. 1. the act or process of cutting spiral grooves in a gun barrel, pipe, etc. 2. the system of spiral grooves so cut. [1790-1800; RIFLE1 + ...
riflip
/rif"lip'/, n. See RFLP. * * *
rift
—riftless, adj. /rift/, n. 1. an opening made by splitting, cleaving, etc.; fissure; cleft; chink. 2. an open space, as in a forest or cloud mass, or a clear interval. 3. a ...
rift saw
a saw used for cutting wood radially from a log. [1905-10] * * *
rift valley
Geol. 1. graben. 2. a subsea chasm extending along the crest of a mid-ocean ridge, locus of the magma upwellings that accompany seafloor spreading. [1890-95] * * * Elongated ...
Rift Valley fever
/rift/, Pathol. a highly infectious viral disease of humans and animals, transmitted by mosquitoes and other insects, occurring in Africa and characterized in humans by headache, ...
rift zone
Geol. a system of related, narrow structural depressions between parallel faults. [1965-70] * * *
rift-sawed
/rift"sawd'/, adj. 1. (of lumber) sawed radially so that the broader sides of the boards or timbers are approximately perpendicular to the annual rings. 2. quartersawed. Also, ...
riftvalley
rift valley n. A deep fracture or break, about 25-50 km (15-30 miles) wide, in the earth's crust, creating an elongated valley bounded by two or more faults. * * *
RiftValley
Rift Valley (rĭft) See Great Rift Valley. * * *
riftzone
rift zone n. A large area of the earth in which plates of the earth's crust are moving away from each other, forming an extensive system of fractures and faults. * * *


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