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safety match
a match designed to ignite only when rubbed on a specially prepared surface. [1860-65] * * *
safety net
—safety-net, adj. 1. a large net rigged between a person, as a trapeze performer, and the ground as protection in a fall. 2. something that provides a margin of protection or ...
safety razor
a razor with a guard to prevent the blade from cutting the skin. [1875-80, Amer.] * * *
safety squeeze.
See squeeze play (def. 1b). Also called safety squeeze play. * * *
safety valve
1. a device that, when actuated by a gas or vapor pressure above a predetermined level, opens and allows the gas or vapor to escape until its pressure is reduced to a pressure ...
safety zone
☆ safety zone n. a platform or marked area in a roadway, from which vehicular traffic is diverted, for protection of pedestrians, as in boarding or leaving buses * * *
safety-deposit
/sayf"tee di poz'it/, adj. safe-deposit. [1890-95] * * *
safety-deposit box.
See safe-deposit box. [1925-30] * * *
safety-pin
/sayf"tee pin'/, v.t., safety-pinned, safety-pinning. to secure or affix with a safety pin: to safety-pin a child's mittens to his coat sleeve. [1915-20] * * *
safetybelt
safety belt n. 1. A strap or belt worn as a safety precaution by a person working at great heights. 2. See seat belt. * * *
safetycircuit
safety circuit n. An electronic circuit that prevents malfunction by either sounding an alert or activating a trip circuit on a protective device. * * *
safetyglass
safety glass n. 1. Glass that resists shattering, especially a composite of two sheets of glass with an intermediate layer of transparent plastic. Also called shatterproof ...
safetyisland
safety island n. An area marked off within a roadway from which traffic is banned, especially to provide pedestrian safety. * * *
safetylamp
safety lamp n. A miner's lamp with a protective wire gauze surrounding the flame to prevent ignition of flammable gases. * * *
safetyman
safe·ty·man (sāfʹtē-măn') n. Football A safety. * * *
safetymatch
safety match n. A match that can be lighted only by being struck against a chemically prepared friction surface. * * *
safetynet
safety net n. 1. A large net for catching one that falls or jumps, as from a circus trapeze. 2. A guarantee, as of professional, physical, or financial security: the safety net ...
safetyorange
safety orange n. See blaze orange. * * *
safetypin
safety pin n. 1. A pin in the form of a clasp, having a sheath to cover and hold the point. 2. A pin that prevents the premature or accidental detonation of an explosive device, ...
safetyrazor
safety razor n. See razor. * * *
safetyvalve
safety valve n. 1. A valve in a pressure container, as in a steam boiler, that automatically opens when pressure reaches a dangerous level. 2. An outlet for the release of ...
Safeway
any of a group of supermarkets in the US and in Britain. The Safeway supermarkets in the US and in Britain used to be part of the same US company. Safeway in Britain is now owned ...
Safeway Inc.
▪ American supermarket chain       leading U.S. supermarket chain, with stores in the United States and abroad. Its headquarters are in Pleasanton, ...
Ṣaffārid Dynasty
▪ Iranian dynasty flourished 9th century AD       Iranian dynasty of lower class origins that ruled a large area in eastern Iran. The dynasty's founder, Yaʿqūb ebn ...
saffian
/saf"ee euhn/, n. a leather made of goatskin or sheepskin, usually dyed in bright colors. [1585-95; < Russ saf'yán < Turkic (cf. Turk sahtiyan) < Pers sekhtiyan, akin to sekht ...
saffian leather
saffian leather [saf′ē ən] n. 〚Ger saffian, ult. < Pers säḫtijān, goatskin < säht, hard, firm〛 leather made of sheepskin or goatskin tanned with sumac and usually ...
Saffir, Herbert Seymour
▪ 2008       American structural engineer born March 29, 1917, New York, N.Y. died Nov. 21, 2007, Miami, Fla. was an expert on hurricane damage to buildings, and about ...
safflower
/saf"low'euhr/, n. 1. a thistlelike composite plant, Carthamus tinctorius, native to the Old World, having finely toothed leaves and large, orange-red flower heads. 2. its dried ...
safflower oil
an oil expressed or extracted fromsafflower seeds, used in cooking, as a salad oil, and as a vehicle for medicines, paints, varnishes, etc. [1855-60] * * *
Safford, Mary Jane
▪ American physician born Dec. 31, 1834, Hyde Park, Vt., U.S. died Dec. 8, 1891, Tarpon Springs, Fla.       American physician whose extensive nursing experience during ...
saffron
/saf"reuhn/, n. 1. Also called vegetable gold. a crocus, Crocus sativus, having showy purple flowers. 2. an orange-colored condiment consisting of its dried stigmas, used to ...
Saffron Walden
▪ England, United Kingdom       town (parish), Uttlesford district, in the northwest corner of the administrative and historic county of Essex, England. The settlement ...
Safi
/saf"ee/, n. a seaport in W central Morocco, on the Atlantic Ocean coast. 129,100. Also, Saffi. * * * ▪ Morocco formerly  Asfi   Atlantic port city, western Morocco. Safi ...
Safi
/saf"ee/, n. a seaport in W central Morocco, on the Atlantic Ocean coast. 129,100. Also, Saffi. * * * ▪ Morocco formerly  Asfi   Atlantic port city, western Morocco. Safi ...
Ṣafī al-Dīn
born 1253, Ardabīl, Iran died Sept. 12, 1334, Ardabīl Iranian founder of the Ṣafavid Sufi order, which in time developed into the Safavid dynasty. He was influenced by ...
Ṣafī od-Dīn
▪ Islamic mystic born 1253, Ardabīl, Iran died Sept. 12, 1334, Ardabīl       mystic and founder of the Ṣafavid (Ṣafavid Dynasty) order of ...
Safīd Mountain Range
▪ mountains, Pakistan-Afghanistan also called  Morga Range,  Pashto  Selseleh-ye Safīd Kūh, or Selseleh-ye Spīn Ghar,         mountain range forming a natural ...
Safid River
▪ river, Iran Persian  Sefīd Rūd,  also spelled  Safīd Rūd,         longest river of northern Iran, rising 920 feet (280 m) in elevation and breaking through ...
Safid Rud
/sa feed' roohd"/ a river flowing from NW Iran into the Caspian Sea. 450 mi. (725 km) long. * * *
Safire, William
born Dec. 17, 1929, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. journalist. Educated at Syracuse University, he worked as a newspaper reporter and at radio and television stations before ...
Safiye Sultan
▪ Ottoman sultana died 1605/19       the favourite consort of the Ottoman sultan Murad III (reigned 1574–95) and the mother of his son Mehmed III (reigned ...
Safra, Edmond Jacob
▪ 2000       Lebanese-born banker and philanthropist (b. Aug. 6, 1931, Aley (ʿAlayh), Lebanon—d. Dec. 3, 1999, Monte Carlo, Monaco), was one of the world's most ...
safranine
/saf"reuh neen', -nin/, n. Chem. 1. any of a class of chiefly red organic dyes, phenazine derivatives, used for dyeing wool, silk, etc. 2. Also called phenosafranine. a ...
safrole
/saf"rohl/, n. Chem. a colorless or faintly yellow liquid, C10H10O2, obtained from sassafras oil or the like: used chiefly in perfumery, for flavoring, and in the manufacture of ...
sag
/sag/, v., sagged, sagging, n. v.i. 1. to sink or bend downward by weight or pressure, esp. in the middle: The roof sags. 2. to hang down unevenly; droop: Her skirt was ...
SAG
/sag/, n. See Screen Actors Guild. * * *
Sag Harbor
a resort town on E Long Island in SE New York. 2683. * * * ▪ New York, United States       resort village, Suffolk county, southeastern New York, U.S. It is situated ...
sag rod
(in a roof) a rod for preventing the sagging of an open-web steel joist that is used as a purlin with its depth at right angles to a roof slope. * * *
sag wagon
a support vehicle accompanying a bicycle touring group that carries spare parts, luggage, etc., and sometimes also transports bicycles and cyclists. [1960-65] * * *
sāg-
To seek out. Oldest form *seə₂g-, colored to *saə₂g-, contracted to *sāg-. Derivatives include seek, ransack, and hegemony. 1. Suffixed form *sāg-yo-. seek, from Old ...
saga
/sah"geuh/, n. 1. a medieval Icelandic or Norse prose narrative of achievements and events in the history of a personage, family, etc. 2. any narrative or legend of heroic ...
sagacious
—sagaciously, adv. —sagaciousness, n. /seuh gay"sheuhs/, adj. 1. having or showing acute mental discernment and keen practical sense; shrewd: a sagacious lawyer. 2. Obs. keen ...
sagaciously
See sagacious. * * *
sagaciousness
See sagaciously. * * *
sagacity
/seuh gas"i tee/, n. acuteness of mental discernment and soundness of judgment. [1540-50; < L sagacitas wisdom, equiv. to sagaci- (s. of sagax) wise (akin to SEEK) + -tas -TY2] * ...
Sagadahoc
▪ county, Maine, United States       county, southwestern Maine, U.S. It has the smallest land area of any county in the state, consisting of a coastal region bounded ...
Sagaing
▪ Myanmar       town, central upper Myanmar (Burma), on the Irrawaddy River. It lies opposite the historical site of Ava and 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Mandalay. Once ...
Sagamihara
/sah gah"mee hah"rddann/ n. a city on E central Honshu, in Japan, SW of Tokyo. 439,257. * * * ▪ Japan       city, Kanagawa ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan, on the ...
SagamiSea
Sa·ga·mi Sea (sə-gäʹmē, sä-) A bay of the western Pacific Ocean on the east-central coast of Honshu, Japan, south-southwest of Tokyo. * * *
sagamore
/sag"euh mawr', -mohr'/, n. (among the American Indians of New England) a chief or leader. [1605-15, Amer.; < Eastern Abenaki sàkama < Proto-Algonquian *sa·kima·wa; cf. ...
Sagan
/say"geuhn/ for 1; /sann gahonn"/ for 2, n. 1. Carl (Edward), 1934-96, U.S. astronomer and writer. 2. Françoise /frddahonn swannz"/, (Françoise Quoirez), born 1935, French ...
Sagan, Carl
▪ American astronomer in full  Carl Edward Sagan   born Nov. 9, 1934, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 20, 1996, Seattle, Wash.  American astronomer and science ...
Sagan, Carl (Edward)
born Nov. 9, 1934, Brooklyn, N.Y., N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 20, 1996, Seattle, Wash. U.S. astronomer and science writer. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. At ...
Sagan, Carl Edward
▪ 1997       U.S. astronomer and exobiologist (b. Nov. 9, 1934, New York, N.Y.—d. Dec. 20, 1996, Seattle, Wash.), studied such diverse aspects of the solar system as ...
Sagan, Françoise
orig. Françoise Quoirez born June 21, 1935, Carjac, France died Sept. 24, 2004, Honfleur French novelist and dramatist. While attending the Sorbonne, she published her ...
Sagan,Carl
Sa·gan (sāʹgən), Carl. 1934-1996. American astronomer noted for research on the possibility of extraterrestrial life and for speculation on the severity of a nuclear winter. ...
saganovel
saga novel n. See roman-fleuve. * * *
Sagar
▪ India Hindi“Lake”also called  Saugor        city, central Madhya Pradesh state, central India, situated around a lake. Sagar was founded by Udan Singh in 1660 ...
Sagar Island
▪ island, India       westernmost island of the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta, West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies at the mouth of the Hugli (Hooghly) River ...
Sagar, Ramanand
▪ 2006       Indian filmmaker (b. Dec. 29, 1917, near Lahore, Punjab, British India [now in Pakistan]—d. Dec. 12, 2005, Mumbai [Bombay], India), as the head of the ...
Sagasta, Práxedes Mateo
▪ prime minister of Spain born July 21, 1825, Torrecilla en Cameros, Spain died Jan. 5, 1903, Madrid       seven-time prime minister of Spain (1871–72, 1874, ...
sage
sage1 —sagely, adv. —sageness, n. /sayj/, n., adj., sager, sagest. n. 1. a profoundly wise person; a person famed for wisdom. 2. someone venerated for the possession of ...
Sage
/sayj/, n. Russell, 1816-1906, U.S. financier. * * * I Aromatic perennial herb (Salvia officinalis) of the mint family, native to the Mediterranean. Its leaves are used fresh ...
sage cock
the male sage grouse. [1830-40, Amer.] * * *
sage green
—sage-green, adj. grayish to yellowish green. [1800-10] * * *
sage grouse
a large grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, of the sagebrush regions of western North America, having plumage of gray, buff, and black. [1870-75] * * *
sage hen
the sage grouse, esp. the female. [1835-45, Amer.] * * *
sage sparrow
a small gray finch, Amphispiza belli, of dry, brushy areas of western North America. [1880-85, Amer.] * * *
sage thrasher
a grayish-brown thrasher, Oreoscoptes montanus, of sagebrush regions of the western U.S. [1880-85] * * *
Sage, Margaret Olivia Slocum
▪ American philanthropist née  Margaret Olivia Slocum   born Sept. 8, 1828, Syracuse, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 4, 1918, New York, N.Y.       American philanthropist ...
Sage, Russell
born Aug. 4, 1816, Shenandoah, N.Y., U.S. died July 22, 1906, Lawrence Beach, N.Y. U.S. financier. He worked as an errand boy, studying arithmetic and bookkeeping in his spare ...
sagebrush
/sayj"brush'/, n. any of several sagelike, bushy composite plants of the genus Artemisia, esp. A. tridentata, having silvery, wedge-shaped leaves, with three teeth at the tip, ...
sagecock
sage cock n. The male sage grouse. * * *
sagegrouse
sage grouse n. A chickenlike bird (Centrocercus urophasianus) of western North America, having long pointed tail feathers that can be spread like a fan. * * *
sagehen
sage hen n. The sage grouse, especially the female. * * *
sagely
See sage1. * * *
sageness
See sagely. * * *
sagenite
/saj"euh nuyt'/, n. a variety of rutile occurring as needlelike crystals embedded in quartz. Cf. Venus hairstone. [1795-1805; < F sagénite < Gk sagén(e) net (cf. SEINE) + F ...
Sager, Ruth
born Feb. 7, 1918, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died March 29, 1997, Brookline, Mass. U.S. geneticist. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia and later taught at Hunter College and ...
sagesparrow
sage sparrow n. A small brownish-gray sparrow (Amphispiza belli) found in dry or desert regions of the southwest United States. * * *
sagethrasher
sage thrasher n. A light grayish-brown thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus) that nests in low sage and cactus bushes in dry or desert regions of the western United States. * * *
sagger
/sag"euhr/, n. 1. a box or case made of refractory baked clay in which the finer ceramic wares are enclosed and protected while baking. 2. a hard unlayered clay underlying many ...
saggy
—sagginess, n. /sag"ee/, adj., saggier, saggiest. sagging or tending to sag: a saggy roof. [1850-55; SAG + -Y1] * * *
SagHarbor
Sag Harbor (săg) A village of southeast New York on the eastern end of Long Island on an inlet of Long Island Sound. A major whaling port in the early 19th century, it is ...
Saginaw
/sag"euh naw'/, n. a port in E Michigan, on the Saginaw River. 77,508. * * * ▪ Michigan, United States       city, seat (1835) of Saginaw county, east-central ...
Saginaw Bay
n. an arm of Lake Huron, off the E coast of Michigan. 60 mi. (97 km) long. * * * ▪ bay, Michigan, United States       southwestern arm of Lake Huron (Huron, Lake) in ...
Sagitta
/seuh jit"euh/, n., gen. Sagittae /-jit"ee/. Astron. the Arrow, a northern constellation between Aquila and Cygnus. [1695-1705; < L: arrow] * * *
sagittal
—sagittally, adv. /saj"i tl/, adj. 1. Anat. a. of or pertaining to the suture between the parietal bones at the roof of the skull or to a venous canal within the skull and ...
sagittally
See sagittal. * * *
sagittalplane
sagittal plane n. A longitudinal plane that divides the body of a bilaterally symmetrical animal into right and left sections. * * *
Sagittarian
/saj'i tair"ee euhn/, n. Astrol. a person born under Sagittarius, the ninth sign of the zodiac; a Sagittarius. [1910-15; SAGITTARI(US) + -AN] * * *
Sagittarius
/saj'i tair"ee euhs/, n., gen. Sagittarii /-tair"ee uy'/ for 1. 1. Astron. the Archer, a zodiacal constellation between Scorpius and Capricorn. 2. Astrol. a. the ninth sign of ...
Sagittarius A
Strongest source of cosmic radio waves, lying in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. Discovered by Karl Jansky in 1932, it has been identified as the nucleus of the ...
sagittary
/saj"i ter'ee/, n., pl. sagittaries. a centaur with a bow, as Chiron. [1425-75; late ME < L: see SAGITTARIUS] * * *
sagittate
/saj"i tayt'/, adj. shaped like an arrowhead. Also, sagittiform /seuh jit"euh fawrm', saj"i teuh-/. [1750-60; < NL sagittatus. See SAGITTA, -ATE1] * * *
sago
/say"goh/, n. a starchy foodstuff derived from the soft interior of the trunk of various palms and cycads, used in making puddings. [1545-55; earlier sagu < Malay] * * * Food ...
sago palm
1. any of several tropical Old World palms, as of the genera Metroxylon and Caryota, that yield sago. 2. a cycad, Cycas revoluta, of Japan, having a crown of glossy, fernlike ...
sagopalm
sago palm n. 1. Any of various palms of the genera Metroxylon, Arenga, and Caryota of tropical Asia. 2. Either of two palmlike cycads (Cycas circinalis or C. revoluta) of eastern ...
Sagua la Grande
▪ Cuba       city and port, north-central Cuba. Lying on the Sagua la Grande River 15 miles (24 km) from its mouth, the city is a major port and regional manufacturing ...
Saguache
/seuh wach"/, n. Sawatch. * * *
saguaro
/seuh gwahr"oh, -wahr"oh/, n., pl. saguaros. a tall, horizontally branched cactus, Carnegiea (or Cereus) gigantea, of Arizona and neighboring regions, yielding a useful wood and ...
Saguaro National Monument
Mountain and desert region, southeastern Arizona, U.S. Established in 1933, it comprises an area of 124 sq mi (321 sq km) east of Tucson and contains forests of saguaro ...
Saguaro National Park
➡ saguaro * * * ▪ region, Arizona, United States  mountain and desert region in southern Arizona, U.S. The park—consisting of two districts, Saguaro West and Saguaro ...
Saguenay
/sag'euh nay"/, n. a river in SE Canada, in Quebec, flowing SE from Lake St. John to the St. Lawrence. 125 mi. (200 km) long. * * * ▪ Canada formerly ...
Saguenay River
River, southern central Quebec, Canada. It drains Lac-Saint-Jean into the Saint Lawrence River at Tadoussac, northeast of Quebec city. Flowing east, it descends about 300 ft (90 ...
Saguia el Hamra
/sah"gee euh el ham"reuh/; Sp. /sah"gyah el ahm"rddah/ the N part of Western Sahara. * * * ▪ region, Western Sahara, Africa       northern region of the Western Sahara, ...
Saguia el-Hamra
▪ region, Western Sahara, Africa       northern geographic region of Western Sahara, northwest Africa. Stretching between Cape Bojador (Bojador, Cape) and the de jure ...
Sagunto
/seuh goohn"toh/; Sp. /sah goohn"taw/, n. a city in E Spain, N of Valencia: besieged by Hannibal 219-218 B.C. 47,026. Ancient, Saguntum /seuh gun"teuhm/. * * * ▪ ...
Saha equation
▪ astronomy       mathematical relationship between the observed spectra (spectrum) of stars (star) and their temperatures. The equation was stated first in 1920 by the ...
Saha, Meghnad N.
▪ Indian astrophysicist born Oct. 6, 1893, Seoratali, near Dacca, India died Feb. 16, 1956, New Delhi       Indian astrophysicist noted for his development in 1920 of ...
Sahaptian
Sahaptian [sä hap′tē ən] n. a family of North American Indian languages consisting of Sahaptin and Nez Percé * * * Sa·hap·ti·an (sä-hăpʹtē-ən) also ...
Sahaptin
/sah hap"teuhn/, n., pl. Sahaptins, (esp. collectively) Sahaptin for 1, adj. n. 1. a member of an American Indian people of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. 2. a language used by ...
Sahara
—Saharan, Saharian, adj. /seuh har"euh, -hair"euh, -hahr"euh/, n. 1. a desert in N Africa, extending from the Atlantic to the Nile valley. ab. 3,500,000 sq. mi. (9,065,000 sq. ...
Saharan
See Sahara. * * *
Saharan Arab Democratic Republic
Disputed territory of Western Sahara occupied by Morocco. It was a Spanish colony from с 1884 to 1976. After Spain left, native Saharawi guerrillas (see Polisario) based in ...
Saharan Atlas
▪ mountains, Africa French  Atlas Saharien,         part of the chain of Atlas Mountains, extending across northern Africa from Algeria into Tunisia. The principal ...
Saharan languages
      group of languages that constitutes one of the major divisions of Nilo-Saharan languages. Saharan languages are spoken mainly around Lake Chad (Chad, Lake)—which ...
Saharanpur
/seuh hahr"euhn poor'/, n. a city in NW Uttar Pradesh, in N India. 225,698. * * * ▪ India       city, northwestern Uttar Pradesh state, northern India, situated at ...
Saharsa
▪ India       city, northeastern Bihar state, northeastern India. The city is a major rail and road hub and has an electric power station. It was constituted a ...
Sahel
—Sahelian, adj., n. /seuh hayl", -heel"/, n. the arid area on the S flank of the Sahara desert that stretches across six countries from Senegal to Chad. * * * Arabic ...
Sahelian
See Sahel. * * *
Sahgal, Nayantara
▪ Indian journalist and author in full  Nayantara Pandit Sahgal  born May 10, 1927, Allahābād, India       Indian journalist and novelist whose fiction presents the ...
sahib
/sah"ib, -eeb/, n. 1. (in India) sir; master: a term of respect used, esp. during the colonial period, when addressing or referring to a European. 2. (cap.) sing. of ...
Sahibdin
flourished 17th century, India Indian miniature painter. His work dominated the Mewar school of Rajasthani painting. Though he was a Muslim, Sahibdin was fully at ease with ...
Sāḥil, Al-
▪ plain, Tunisia also spelled  Sahel , Latin  Byzacium        coastal plain in the eastern Mediterranean littoral of Tunisia that includes a sandy coast with large ...
Sahiwal
▪ Pakistan formerly  Montgomery         city, east-central Punjab province, east-central Pakistan. The city was founded in 1865 and named for Sir Robert Montgomery, ...
Sahle Selassie
▪ king of Ethiopia born 1795 or 1801 died 1847       ruler (1813–47) of the kingdom of Shewa (Shoa), Ethiopia. He was the grandfather of Emperor Menilek II ...
Saho
▪ people       people of the coastal plains of southern Eritrea. Traditional Saho culture involved considerable mobility, because people needed to move their herds of ...
Saho-Afar languages
      related but distinct languages spoken by several peoples, most of whom inhabit the coastal plains of southern Eritrea and Djibouti. Saho and Afar are generally ...
sahuaro
sa·hua·ro (sə-wärʹō) n. Variant of saguaro. * * *
Sahuayo
▪ Mexico in full  Sahuayo de José María Morelos         city, northwestern Michoacán estado (state), west-central Mexico. It lies on the central plateau, at 5,085 ...
Sahul Shelf
▪ continental shelf, Pacific Ocean       stable structural shelf or platform of the ocean floor, extending from the northern coast of Australia to the island of New ...
Sai Ong Hue
▪ king of Lan Xang also called  Setthathirat Ii, or Ong Lo   died 1735       ruler (1700?–35) of the Lao kingdom of Lan Xang which, during his reign, was divided ...
saice
/suys/, n. syce. * * *
Saichō
or Dengyō Daishi born 767, Ōmi province, Japan died 822, Hiei-zan Monk who established the Tendai (Chinese Tiantai) sect of Buddhism in Japan. Ordained at age 13, he studied ...
said
said1 /sed/, v. 1. pt. and pp. of say. adj. 2. Chiefly Law. named or mentioned before; aforesaid; aforementioned: said witness; said sum. said2 /sah"id/, n. Islam. sayyid. * * ...
Said, Edward
▪ American critic in full  Edward Wadie Said , sometimes  Edward William Said  born November 1, 1935, Jerusalem died September 25, 2003, New York, New York, ...
Said, Edward W(adie)
born Nov. 1, 1935, Jerusalem died Sept. 25, 2003, New York, N.Y., U.S. Palestinian-born U.S. literary critic. Said was educated in Western schools in Jerusalem and Cairo before ...
Said, Edward Wadie
▪ 2004       Palestinian American literary critic (b. Nov. 1, 1935, Jerusalem—d. Sept. 24, 2003, New York, N.Y.), reshaped scholarship in the humanities with his ...
Saida
/sah"ee dah'/, n. a seaport in SW Lebanon: the site of ancient Sidon. 24,740. * * * ▪ Algeria       city, northwestern Algeria, on the southern slopes of the Tell Atlas ...
Saidpur
▪ Bangladesh       city, northwestern Bangladesh. A jute-processing and export centre, it is a major railway terminus containing large railway workshops. Crops grown in ...
saiga
/suy"geuh/, n. a goatlike antelope, Saiga tatarica, of western Asia and eastern Russia, having a greatly enlarged muzzle. [1795-1805; ( < NL) < Russ saigá(k) < Turkic; cf. ...
Saigō Takamori
born Dec. 7, 1827, Kagoshima, Kyushu, Japan died Sept. 24, 1877, Kagoshima Japanese military and political leader of the late Tokugawa and early Meiji periods. A samurai from ...
Saigon
/suy gon"/, n. former name of Ho Chi Minh City: capital of former South Vietnam 1954-76. * * *
Saigon cinnamon.
See under cinnamon (def. 1). * * *
Saigon River
▪ river, Vietnam Vietnamese  Song Sai Gon        river in southern Vietnam that rises near Phum Daung, southeastern Cambodia, and flows south and south-southeast for ...
Saigon, Treaty of
▪ French-Vietnamese history       (June 1862), agreement by which France achieved its initial foothold on the Indochinese Peninsula. The treaty was signed by the last ...
Saigyō
▪ Japanese poet also called  Sato Norikiyo   born 1118, Japan died March 23, 1190, Ōsaka       Japanese Buddhist priest-poet, one of the greatest masters of the ...
Saijō
▪ Japan       city, Ehime ken (prefecture), Shikoku, Japan, in the Kamo River delta. A castle town in the 17th century, it served later as a local administrative and ...
Saiki
▪ Japan also spelled  Saeki         city, Ōita ken (prefecture), Kyushu, Japan, facing Saiki Bay. It developed as a castle town on the small delta of the Banjō ...
sail
—sailable, adj. —sailless, adj. /sayl/, n. 1. an area of canvas or other fabric extended to the wind in such a way as to transmit the force of the wind to an assemblage of ...
sail plan
Naval Archit. a side elevation of a sailing vessel showing all sails and spars and some or all of the standing rigging, as if set directly fore-and-aft so that the true ...
sail-over
/sayl"oh'veuhr/, n. a repetition of an indecisive or interrupted run of a racing yacht. * * *
sailboard
/sayl"bawrd', -bohrd'/, n. 1. a long board, usually of Plexiglas, used for windsurfing, having a mount for a sail, a daggerboard, and a small skeg. 2. a small, flat, ...
sailboarder
See sailboard. * * *
sailboarding
—sailboarder, n. /sayl"bawr'ding, -bohr'-/, n. windsurfing. [1975-80; SAILBOARD + -ING1] * * *
sailboat
—sailboater, n. —sailboating, n. /sayl"boht'/, n. a boat having sails as its principal means of propulsion. [1790-1800; SAIL + BOAT] * * *
sailcloth
/sayl"klawth', -kloth'/, n. 1. any of various fabrics, as of cotton, nylon, or Dacron, for boat sails or tents. 2. a lightweight canvas or canvaslike fabric used esp. for ...
sailer
/say"leuhr/, n. 1. a vessel propelled by a sail or sails. 2. a vessel with reference to its powers or manner of sailing: The schooner was judged a good sailer. [1350-1400; ME; ...
Sailer
/say"leuhr/; Ger. /zuy"leuhr/, n. Anton /ahn"tohn/, ("Toni"), born 1935, Austrian skier. * * *
Sailer, Anton
▪ Austrian skier byname  Toni Sailer   born Nov. 17, 1935, Kitzbühel, Austria       Austrian Alpine skier who, in the 1956 Olympic Winter Games held in Cortina ...
sailfish
/sayl"fish'/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) sailfish, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) sailfishes. 1. a large tropical and subtropical marine fish, Istiophorus ...
sailing
/say"ling/, n. 1. the activity of a person or thing that sails. 2. the departure of a ship from port: The cruise line offers sailings every other day. 3. Navig. any of various ...
Sailing (Yachting)
▪ 2009       The Olympic Regatta was held in the Chinese port city of Qingdao during the 2008 Olympic Games. The sailing venue, with its strong currents and light air, ...
sailing boat
Brit. sailboat. [1715-25] * * *
sailing length
a measurement of a yacht, comprising its length on the water line as well as certain measurements taken from the overhangs at bow and stern. * * *
sailing ship
a large ship equipped with sails. [1880-85] * * *
sailmaker
/sayl"may'keuhr/, n. 1. a person who makes or repairs sails. 2. a former rank of warrant officer in the U.S. Navy. [1590-1600; SAIL + MAKER] * * *
sailmaker's palm
palm1 (def. 4). * * *
sailor
—sailorlike, adj. —sailorly, adj. /say"leuhr/, n. 1. a person whose occupation is sailing or navigation; mariner. 2. a seaman below the rank of officer. 3. a naval ...
sailor's breastplate.
See prolonge knot. * * *
sailor's-choice
/say"leuhrz choys"/, n., pl. sailor's-choice. any of several fishes living in waters along the Atlantic coast of the U.S., esp. a pinfish, Lagodon rhomboides, ranging from ...
sailoring
/say"leuhr ing/, n. the occupation or duties of a sailor. [1860-65; SAILOR + -ING1] * * *
sailplane
—sailplaner, n. /sayl"playn'/, n., v., sailplaned, sailplaning. n. 1. a very light glider that can be lifted by an upward current of air. v.i. 2. to soar in a ...
sailplaner
See sailplane. * * *
sailyard
/sayl"yahrd'/, n. a yard for a sail. [bef. 900; ME seylyarde, OE seglgyrd. See SAIL, YARD1] * * *
Saimaa
/suy"mah/, n. Lake, a lake in SE Finland. ab. 500 sq. mi. (1295 sq. km). * * *
Saimaa, Lake
Lake, southeastern Finland. Located northeast of Helsinki, Lake Saimaa has an area of 443 sq mi (1,147 sq km) and is the primary lake in the Great Saimaa lake system, the ...
Saimaa,Lake
Sai·maa (sīʹmä'), Lake A lake of southeast Finland. It is the largest of the Saimaa Lakes, a group of more than 120 interconnected lakes in the south-central and southeast ...
saimin
saimin [sī′min′] n. 〚prob. ult. < Chin sai, thin + min, noodle〛 1. long, thin noodles used in preparing various Japanese dishes 2. a soup made of broth and vegetables ...
sain
/sayn/, v.t. Archaic. 1. to make the sign of the cross on, as for protection against evil influences. 2. to bless. [bef. 900; ME; OE segnian (c. G segnen to bless) < LL signare ...
sainfoin
/sayn"foyn/, n. a Eurasian plant, Onobrychis viciifolia, of the legume family, having pinnate leaves and clusters of pink flowers, used for forage. [1620-30; < F, equiv. to MF ...
Sainsbury of Drury Lane, Alan John Sainsbury, Baron
▪ 1999       British grocer who changed British food-shopping habits when he built the grocery business begun by his grandparents into a chain of supermarkets modeled on ...
Sainsbury, Sir Robert James
▪ 2001       British grocer and arts patron (b. Oct. 24, 1906, London, Eng.—d. April 2, 2000, London), was joint manager of Sainsbury's grocery business with his older ...
Sainsbury’s
a large group of British supermarkets. The first Sainsbury’s was a small shop in London, opened in 1869 by John James Sainsbury (1844–1928) and Mary Ann Sainsbury ...
Saint
1347-80, Italian ascetic and mystic. died A.D. 731, pope 715-731. died A.D. 741, pope 731-741. died A.D. 352, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 337-352. died A.D. 683, Sicilian ...
saint
—saintless, adj. /saynt/, n. 1. any of certain persons of exceptional holiness of life, formally recognized as such by the Christian Church, esp. by canonization. 2. a person ...
Saint Abb's Head
▪ promontory, Scotland, United Kingdom       promontory on the North Sea in the Scottish Borders council area, historic county of Berwickshire, southeastern Scotland. ...
Saint Agnes's Eve
/ag"ni siz/ the night of January 20, superstitiously regarded as a time when a young woman who performs certain rites is likely to dream of her future husband. * * *
Saint Albans
▪ England, United Kingdom       town and city (district), administrative and historic county of Hertfordshire, England, in the valley of the River Ver about 20 miles ...
Saint Albans Raid
(Oct. 19, 1864) Raid by Confederates in the American Civil War. About 25 Confederate soldiers based in Canada raided the Union town of St. Albans, Vt., where they killed one man ...
Saint Albans, battles of
▪ English history       (May 22, 1455, and Feb. 17, 1461), battles during the English Wars of the Roses. The town of St. Albans, situated on the old Roman Watling Street ...
Saint Albans, Charles Beauclerk, 1st duke of, Baron Heddington, earl of Burford
▪ son of Charles II born May 8, 1670, London, England died May 10, 1726, Bath, Somerset       illegitimate son of Charles II, the elder of two illegitimate sons born ...
Saint Albans, Henry Jermyn, Earl of, 1st Baron Jermyn of Saint Edmundsbury
▪ English courtier born c. 1604 died Jan. 2, 1684, London       courtier, favourite of Henrietta Maria, queen of Charles I of England. It was rumoured, falsely, that ...
Saint Albert
▪ Alberta, Canada       city, central Alberta, Canada, immediately northwest of Edmonton, on the Sturgeon River, in a mixed-farming district. The settlement developed ...
Saint Andrew's Cross
an X-shaped cross. See illus. under cross. * * *
Saint Andrews
City (pop., 1995 est.: 15,000) and seaport, Fife council area, eastern Scotland. It was formerly the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland; its religious traditions began in the ...
Saint Andrews, University of
Oldest university in Scotland, founded in 1411 on the outskirts of St. Andrews. The university buildings include St. Salvator's College (1450), St. Leonard's College (1512; ...
Saint Anns Bay
▪ Jamaica       town and Caribbean port, northern Jamaica, northwest of Kingston. Christopher Columbus anchored there in 1494 and named the spot Santa Gloria. He ...
Saint Anthony
▪ Newfoundland, Canada       town, north of the entrance to Hare Bay, on the northern peninsula of Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, 306 miles (492 km) ...
Saint Anthony's Cross
a T-shaped cross. See illus. under cross. * * *
Saint Anthony's fire
Pathol. (formerly) any of certain skin conditions that are of an inflammatory or gangrenous nature, as erysipelas, hospital gangrene, or ergotism. [1570-80] * * *
Saint Asaph
▪ Wales, United Kingdom Welsh  Llanelwy        cathedral village, Denbighshire (Sir Ddinbych) county, historic county of Flintshire (Sir Fflint), Wales. It stands ...
Saint Augustine
City (pop., 2000: 11,592), northeastern Florida, U.S. It is the oldest continuously settled U.S. city. In 1513 Juan Ponce de León landed there in search of the Fountain of ...
Saint Augustine grass
      (Stenotaphrum secundatum), low, mat-forming perennial grass of the family Poaceae, native to central and southeastern North America and Central America and ...
Saint Austell
▪ England, United Kingdom       town, Restormel borough, administrative and historic county of Cornwall, southwestern England. St. Austell was originally called ...
Saint Bartholomew's Day Massacre
Fr. Hist. a massacre of over 3000 Huguenots, instigated by Catherine de Médicis and begun in Paris on St. Bartholomew's Day, August 24, 1572. * * *
Saint Bartholomew's Day, Massacre of
(Aug. 24–25, 1572) Murder of French Huguenots in Paris by Catholics. As part of the ongoing Wars of Religion, Catherine de Médicis agreed to a plot by the Guise family (see ...
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
▪ hospital, London, United Kingdom byname  Bart's  or  Saint Bart's,         oldest hospital in London. It lies just southeast of the Central Markets in the ...
Saint Basil the Blessed
or Pokrovsky Cathedral Church constructed at the southern end of Red Square in Moscow (1554–60) by Ivan IV as a votive offering for his military victories over the ...
Saint Bernard
Saint Bernard [bər närd′] n. any of a breed of very large, reddish-brown and white dog once kept by the monks of the hospice of the Great St. Bernard Pass in the Swiss Alps, ...
Saint Bernard.
See St. Bernard (def. 3). * * *
Saint Boniface
a city in SE Manitoba, in S central Canada: suburb of Winnipeg. 46,714. * * * ▪ district, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada       historical district of Winnipeg, Manitoba, ...
Saint Catharines
▪ Ontario, Canada  city, regional municipality of Niagara, southeastern Ontario, Canada, on the south shore of Lake Ontario, at the entrance to the Welland Ship Canal ...
Saint Catherine's
▪ monastery, Egypt       Greek Orthodox monastery situated on Mount Sinai more than 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level in a narrow valley north of Mount Mūsā in the ...
Saint Catherine: Letter
▪ Primary Source        St. Catherine of Siena, a Dominican tertiary and mystic, was one of the most influential figures of 14th-century Italy. She was widely celebrated ...
Saint Charles
▪ Missouri, United States       city, seat of St. Charles county, eastern Missouri, U.S., on bluffs overlooking the Missouri River, there bridged to St. Louis, 22 miles ...
Saint Clair River
▪ river, North America  outlet for Lake Huron, forming part of the boundary between Michigan, U.S. (west), and Ontario, Can. (east). Flowing southward into Lake Saint Clair, ...
Saint Clair's Defeat
▪ United States history       (November 4, 1791), one of the worst defeats ever suffered by U.S. forces in Indian warfare, precipitated by British-Indian confrontation ...
Saint Clair, Lake
I Lake, forming part of the boundary between Michigan, U.S., and Ontario, Canada. Roughly circular, with an area of 467 sq mi (1,210 sq km), it connects with the St. Clair River ...
Saint Clair,Lake
Saint Clair, Lake A lake between southwest Ontario, Canada, and southeast Michigan. It is connected with Lake Huron by the Saint Clair River, about 64 km (40 mi) long. * * *
Saint Clements Island
▪ island, Maryland, United States also called  Blakiston Island  or  Blackistone Island         islet (40 acres [16 hectares]) in the Potomac River, St. Mary's ...
Saint Cloud
▪ Minnesota, United States  city, seat of Stearns county, central Minnesota, U.S. Located at the junction of the Mississippi (Mississippi River) and Sauk rivers, in a ...
Saint Cloud State University
▪ university, Saint Cloud, Minnesota, United States       coeducational institution of higher learning in St. Cloud (Saint Cloud), central Minnesota, U.S. It is part of ...
Saint Croix
Largest island (pop., 1990: 50,000) of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Located south of Saint Thomas, it has an area of 84 sq mi (218 sq km). Its capital is Christiansted; the town of ...
Saint Croix River
▪ river, North America       river that rises as an outlet of the Chiputneticook Lakes, Maine, U.S., and flows south-southeast into Passamaquoddy Bay, an inlet of the ...
Saint CRU
       Saintas a title with a personal name, see under personal name (e.g., Cyprian, Saint). As a part of a place-name or other proper name, see under Saint as below or ...
Saint Cyr, Henri
▪ Swedish athlete born March 15, 1902, Stockholm, Sweden died July 27, 1979       Swedish equestrian in dressage who was one of only two people to win two Olympic gold ...
Saint David's
▪ Wales, United Kingdom Welsh  Tyddewi        cathedral city, historic and present county of Pembrokeshire, Wales, in the Alun river valley. Situated in an area ...
Saint David, Fort
▪ fort, Cuddalore, India       British stronghold near the town of Cuddalore, about 100 miles (160 km) south of Madras on the southeastern coast of India. The fort was ...
Saint Denis,Ruth
Saint Den·is (dĕnʹĭs), Ruth. 1878-1968. American choreographer and pioneer of modern dance. With her husband Ted Shawn she founded (1915) the influential Denishawn Dance ...
Saint Edmundsbury
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative and historic county of Suffolk, England, with its headquarters at Bury Saint Edmunds. Its ...
Saint Edward's Crown
      coronation crown of the kings and queens of England that consists of a gold- and jewel-encrusted base surmounted by a cross. The crown's appellation was first used ...
Saint Edward's sapphire
▪ gem       rose-cut gem with a fine blue colour set in the finial cross of the imperial state crown of England. Reported to date from Edward the Confessor's coronet in ...
Saint Elias Mountains
Segment of the Pacific Coast Ranges in the southwestern Yukon Territory of Canada and eastern Alaska, U.S. The mountains extend southeast about 250 mi (400 km) from the Wrangell ...
Saint Elias, Mount
▪ mountain, North America       second highest peak (18,008 feet [5,489 m]) of the St. Elias Mountains, on the Canada–United States (Alaska) border, 70 miles (110 km) ...
Saint Elias,Mount
Saint E·li·as (sānt ĭ-līʹəs), Mount A peak, 5,492.4 m (18,008 ft) high, in the Saint Elias Mountains, a section of the Coast Ranges on the border between eastern Alaska ...
Saint Elmo's fire
/el"mohz/. See St. Elmo's fire. * * * Glow accompanying the brushlike discharges of atmospheric electricity that usually appears as a tip of light on the extremities of such ...
Saint Fergus
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       village and gas pipeline terminal, in the council area and historic county of Aberdeenshire, on the northeastern coast of Scotland 5 ...
Saint Francis College
▪ college, Loretto, Pennsylvania, United States       private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Loretto, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is sponsored by the ...
Saint Francis River
River, southeastern Missouri and eastern Arkansas, U.S. Rising in southeastern Missouri and flowing south, it enters the Mississippi River just above Helena, Ark. , after a ...
Saint François
Saint Fran·çois or Saint-Fran·çois (sānt' frăn-swäʹ, săɴ fräɴ-swäʹ) A river, about 265 km (165 mi) long, of southern Quebec, Canada, flowing southwest and ...
Saint George
▪ Bermuda       town and parish, southern coast of St. George's Island, northern Bermuda. One of the oldest English settlements in the Western Hemisphere, St. George was ...
Saint George's
Town (pop., 1991 est.: 5,000), capital of Grenada, in the West Indies. It lies on the island's southwestern coast, on a small peninsula. Founded by the French in 1650, it became ...
Saint George's Cay
▪ island, Caribbean Sea       islet in the Caribbean Sea, 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Belize City, Belize, of which it is considered a part. Offshore, in 1798, the ...
Saint George's Channel
Wide passage between the Irish Sea and the northern Atlantic Ocean. It extends for 100 mi (160 km) and has a minimum width of 47 mi (76 km) between Carnsore Point, Ireland, and ...
Saint George's Chapel
▪ chapel, Windsor, England, United Kingdom       part of Windsor Castle in the district of Windsor and Maidenhead, Berkshire, Eng. This chapel was designed for the ...
Saint George's Cross
the Greek cross as used in the flag of Great Britain. * * *
Saint George's Day
April 23, celebrated in parts of the British Commonwealth in honor of the patron saint of Britain and esp. in New Zealand as a bank holiday. * * *
Saint George, Fort
▪ fort, Madras, India       citadel built by the English East India Company in Madras, India, later becoming the British capital in South India. The fort, named in ...
Saint Gotthard Pass
Mountain pass, Lepontine Alps, southern Switzerland. An important motor and railway route between central Europe and Italy, the pass lies at an elevation of 6,916 ft (2,108 m) ...
Saint Helena
Saint Helena Introduction Saint Helena - Background: Uninhabited when first discovered by the Portuguese in 1502, Saint Helena was garrisoned ...
Saint Helens
▪ Merseyside, England, United Kingdom       urban area and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Merseyside, historic county of Lancashire, England. It lies in ...
Saint Helens, Mount
Volcanic peak in the Cascade Range, southwestern Washington, U.S. Dormant since 1857, it erupted in May 1980 in one of the greatest volcanic explosions ever recorded in North ...


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